liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 20 of 20
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Connolly, Eamonn
    et al.
    Dept of Research, BioGaia, Stockholm.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Björkstén, Bengt
    Centrum för Allergiforskning KI, Stockholm.
    Safety of D(-)-lactic acid producing bacteria in the human infant2005In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - JPGN, ISSN 0277-2116, E-ISSN 1536-4801, Vol. 41, no 4, p. 489-492Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Grodzinsky, Ewa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Andersson, C
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of health and environment. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Comparative evaluation of serological tests for celiac disease: A European initiative toward standardization.2000In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - JPGN, ISSN 0277-2116, E-ISSN 1536-4801, Vol. 31, p. 513-519Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Högberg, L
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics.
    Stenhammar, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics.
    Is spelt wheat toxic to those with celiac disease.2000In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - JPGN, ISSN 0277-2116, E-ISSN 1536-4801, Vol. 31, p. 321-321Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Högberg, Lotta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics.
    Stenhammar, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Barn.
    Björkengren-Johansson, Lars
    Barnkliniken Borås.
    Jansson, Gunnar
    Barnkliniken Motala.
    Can braces provoke oral lesions in Crohn Disease?2002In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - JPGN, ISSN 0277-2116, E-ISSN 1536-4801, Vol. 35, p. 708-709Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Laurin, Pia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wolving, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fälth-Magnusson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Even small amounts of gluten cause relapse in children with celiac disease2002In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - JPGN, ISSN 0277-2116, E-ISSN 1536-4801, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 26-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Previously, a gluten challenge was customary to establish the diagnosis of celiac disease in children. There are no clear recommendations on how to perform this challenge or what markers to rely on for timing the biopsy after the challenge. The authors' aim was to monitor gluten intake, clinical symptoms, and antibody kinetics to evaluate the influence of gluten exposure during the challenge.

    Methods: Twenty-five children under investigation for suspected celiac disease were challenged. One child was excluded because blood samples, food records, or biopsy was lacking. Median age at the postchallenge biopsy was 3.8 (2.7-8.8) years. The families kept daily records of the children's gluten intake and of symptoms that occurred. Blood samples were taken monthly for analysis of antigliadin and endomysium antibodies and total immunoglobulin A (IgA). A third biopsy was performed when clinical symptoms suggested a relapse.

    Results: All 24 children showed deterioration of the mucosa or elevated antibodies during gluten challenge. Median duration of the challenge was 13 (5-51) weeks, and mean gluten intake was 1.7 (0.2-4.3) g/d and 0.1 (0.02-0.26) g/kg daily.

    Conclusions: Gluten intake during the challenge varied widely, and the parents were unable to give their children the recommended amount. Despite the small amounts given, all children showed signs of relapse at a clinical, laboratory, or histologic level. Much smaller amounts of gluten than previously suggested seem sufficient to cause relapse during gluten challenge in children.

  • 6. Logan, BK
    et al.
    Jones, A Wayne
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry.
    Endogenous ethanol production in a child with short-gut syndrome2003In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - JPGN, ISSN 0277-2116, E-ISSN 1536-4801, Vol. 36, p. 419-420Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7. Ludvigsson, JF
    Book review: SPSS 10.0 for use in Windows 95,98,2000; Windows ME; Mac OS 9.04 or later (Power Macintosh G3, including iMacs, 233 MHz, 64 MB ram)2001In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - JPGN, ISSN 0277-2116, E-ISSN 1536-4801, Vol. 33, p. 355-356Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8.
    Ludvigsson, JF
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine.
    Book Review: Studying a Study and Testing a Test by RK Riegelman, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins 2000.2001In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - JPGN, ISSN 0277-2116, E-ISSN 1536-4801, Vol. 33, p. 226-227Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 9.
    Ludvigsson, Jonas
    et al.
    Barnkliniken Örebro.
    Ansved, Pär
    Barnkliniken, Kalmar .
    Fälth-Magnusson, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Hammersjö, Jan-Åke
    Barnkliniken, Västervik .
    Johansson, Calle
    Barnkliniken, Jönköping .
    Edvardsson, Stig
    Barnkliniken, Växjö .
    Ljungkrantz, Magnus
    Barnkliniken, Karlskrona .
    Stenhammar, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Symptoms and signs have changed in Swedish children with coeliac disease.2004In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - JPGN, ISSN 0277-2116, E-ISSN 1536-4801, Vol. 38, p. 181-186Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Norstrom, Fredrik
    et al.
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    van der Pals, Maria
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Myleus, Anna
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Hammarroth, Solveig
    Praktikertjanst, Sweden.
    Högberg, Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Isaksson, Anders
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Ivarsson, Anneli
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Annelie
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Impact of Thyroid Autoimmunity on Thyroid Function in 12-year-old Children With Celiac Disease2018In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - JPGN, ISSN 0277-2116, E-ISSN 1536-4801, Vol. 67, no 1, p. 64-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Celiac disease (CD) is associated with thyroid autoimmunity and other autoimmune diseases. Data are, however, lacking regarding the relationship between thyroid autoimmunity and thyroid function, especially in regard to CD. Our aim was to investigate the impact of thyroid autoimmunity on thyroid function in 12-year-old children with CD compared to their healthy peers. Methods: A case-referent study was conducted as part of a CD screening of 12-year-olds. Our study included 335 children with CD and 1695 randomly selected referents. Thyroid autoimmunity was assessed with antibodies against thyroid peroxidase (TPOAb). Thyroid function was assessed with thyroid-stimulating hormone and free thyroxine. Results: TPOAb positivity significantly increased the risk of developing hypothyroidism in all children. The odds ratios (with 95% confidence intervals) were 5.3 (2.7-11) in healthy 12-year-olds, 10 (3.2-32) in screening-detected CD cases, 19 (2.6-135) in previously diagnosed CD cases, and 12 (4.4-32) in all CD cases together. Among children with TPOAb positivity, hypothyroidism was significantly more common (odds ratio 3.1; 95% CI 1.03-9.6) in children with CD (10/19) than in children without CD (12/46). Conclusions: The risk of thyroid dysfunction due to thyroid autoimmunity is larger for those with CD than their healthy peers. Our study indicates that a gluten-free diet does not reduce the risk of thyroid dysfunction. Further studies are required for improved understanding of the role of the gluten-free diet for the risk of autoimmune diseases in children with CD.

  • 11. Paajanen, L
    et al.
    Kokkonen, J
    Karttunen, TJ
    Tuure, T
    Korpela, R
    Vaarala, Outi
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Intestinal cytokine mRNA expression in delayed-type cow's milk allergy2006In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - JPGN, ISSN 0277-2116, E-ISSN 1536-4801, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 470-476Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to investigate the characteristics of intestinal immune activation (ie, a chemokine receptor and cytokine expression profile) in delayed-type cow's milk allergy (CMA) appearing in the form of gastrointestinal symptoms. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In all biopsy samples taken from the duodenum and/or the terminal ileum, 30 were studied for the expression of interferon-gamma, transforming growth factor-beta, chemokine receptor (CCR)-4, CCR-5, IL-2, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12p35, IL-12p40 and IL-18 specific mRNA by real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction in 26 children ages 3 to 15 years: 10 with untreated delayed-type CMA, 6 with celiac disease (CD) and 10 controls. RESULTS: The children with delayed-type CMA showed lower IL-2 and IL-18 mRNA expression in the duodenum (both P = 0.055) and higher CCR-4 and IL-6 mRNA expression in the terminal ileum (P = 0.055, P = 0.016) compared with the controls. The children with CD exhibited slightly higher expression of interferon-gamma and CCR-4 mRNA (P = 0.054, P = 0.053) and lower expression of IL-18 mRNA (P = 0.004) in the duodenal samples compared with the controls. The mRNA expression levels of regulatory cytokines, transforming growth factor-beta and IL-10 remained similar in all 3 groups. CONCLUSIONS: The children with delayed-type gastrointestinal CMA showed a unique pattern of local intestinal hypersensitivity with Th2 response-related characteristics, a profile differing clearly from the children with CD. © 2006 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

  • 12.
    Stenberg, Reidun
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden .
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Magnuson, Anders
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden .
    Hellberg, Dan
    Clin Research Centre, Sweden .
    Tysk, Curt
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden .
    Increased Prevalence of Antibodies Against Dietary Proteins in Children and Young Adults With Cerebral Palsy2013In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - JPGN, ISSN 0277-2116, E-ISSN 1536-4801, Vol. 56, no 2, p. 233-238Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Undernourishment is common in children with cerebral palsy (CP), but the reasons are unknown. We previously reported elevated levels of immunoglobulin (Ig) A and IgG antibodies against gliadin (AGA) and tissue transglutaminase (tTG) in 99 children and young adults with CP without characteristic findings of gluten enteropathy in small bowel biopsies. Our aim was to perform a case-control study of IgG antibodies against other dietary antigens, AGA, anti-tTG, and IgE antibodies against wheat and gluten. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods: Sera from 99 cases with CP and 99 healthy, age-and sex-matched controls were analysed with fluorescence enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of IgG antibodies against beta-lactoglobulin, casein, egg white, IgG-and IgA-AGA, IgA-anti-tTG, and IgE antibodies against gluten and wheat. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: Compared with controls, the odds ratio in cases with CP for having elevated levels of IgG antibodies against beta-lactoglobulin was 17.0 (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.3-128), against casein 11.0 (95% CI 2.6-46.8), and against egg white 7.0 (95% CI 1.6-30.8). The IgE responses for wheat/gluten were generally low. The tetraplegic and dyskinetic CP subtypes had significantly higher frequencies of elevated levels for all of the tested antibodies except IgG against egg white, and IgA-anti-tTG. A significantly lower weight was seen in cases with CP with positive versus negative serology. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions: Elevated levels of IgG against dietary antigens were more frequent in the CP group compared with controls, and particularly in the tetraplegic and dyskinetic CP subtypes with the most severe neurologic handicap and undernourishment. Hypothetically, malnourishment may cause increased intestinal permeability and thus immunization against dietary antigens.

  • 13.
    Stenberg, Reidun
    et al.
    Department of Paediatrics, Örebro University Hospital,.
    Kaukinen, Katri
    Department of Gastroenterology and Alimentary Tract Surgery, Tampere University Hospital, University of Tampere.
    Bengtsson, Mats
    Department of Clinical Immunology, University Hospital, Uppsala University.
    Lindberg, Eva
    Department of Paediatrics, Örebro University Hospital,.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Early developing celiac disease in children with cerebral palsy2011In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - JPGN, ISSN 0277-2116, E-ISSN 1536-4801, Vol. 53, no 6, p. 674-678Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: We have reported on increased levels of antibodies against gliadin and/or transglutaminase 2 (TG2) in children with cerebral palsy (CP) but without having increased prevalence of celiac disease (CD). The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether these children have mucosal signs of early developing CD, human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DQ2/DQ8, and antibodies against deamidated gliadin peptides (DGP).

    PATIENTS AND METHODS: Stored blood samples from 16 children with CP were analyzed regarding HLA-DQ2/DQ8 and anti-DGP antibodies. HLA-DQ2/DQ8 were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes. Anti-DGP antibodies were analyzed with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Small-bowel biopsies from 15 of these children were available for immunohistochemistry regarding IgA colocalized with TG2, densities of α/β+ and γ/δ+ intraepithelial lymphocytes.

    RESULTS: Mucosal immunoglobulin A (IgA) deposits colocalized with TG2 were found in the small-bowel biopsy from 1 patient with serum IgA-class anti-TG2 antibodies, HLA-DQ2, and gastrointestinal complaints. Another 2 children had slightly increased numbers of mucosal α/β+ and/or γ/δ+ intraepithelial lymphocytes. In total, 10 of 16 children were HLA-DQ2 and/or DQ8-positive. Anti-DGP antibodies were detected in sera from 4 of 16 children.

    CONCLUSIONS: In the present study, 1 child with CP had IgA colocalizing with TG2 in the small-bowel mucosa, suggesting CD at an early stage. Although the majority of children with CP and elevated levels of CD-related seromarkers are HLA-DQ2 and/or DQ8-positive, they have neither classical nor early developing CD.

  • 14.
    Sundqvist, Tommy
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Laurin, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fälth-Magnusson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Magnusson, Karl-Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stenhammar, Lars
    Department of Pediatrics, Central Hospital, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Significantly increased levels of nitric oxide products in urine of children with celiac disease1998In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - JPGN, ISSN 0277-2116, E-ISSN 1536-4801, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 196-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Celiac disease is characterized by morphologic and functional aberrations of the small intestinal mucosa, i.e. crypt hyperplasia, villous atrophy, infiltration of intraepithelial lymphocytes, and alteration of permeability. Nitric oxide has been shown to affect mucosal permeability after ischemia-reperfusion, but little is known about the regulatory role of nitric oxide in celiac disease. The purpose of this study was to assess nitric oxide production in children with celiac disease and in control subjects.

    Methods: The sum of nitrite and nitrate in the urine was measured with a colorimetric method in 137 children with a median age of 3 years, 84 patients and 53 reference children, all of whom underwent a small intestinal biopsy to confirm or overrule suspicion of celiac disease.

    Results: Median urinary nitrite-nitrate concentration in celiac children was 3323µM (4147 ± 1102; mean ± SEM) at first clinical examination and 2501 µM (2939 ± 386) after gluten challenge, which was significantly higher than concentrations in reference children(1029 µM; 1174 ± 116) and in children with celiac disease on a gluten-free diet (882 µM; 1369 ± 360) (p< 0.0001).

    Conclusions: A gluten-containing diet is associated with an increased nitrite-nitrate secretion in the urine in children with celiac disease, presumably as a result of nitric oxide synthase activation and nitric oxide production in the diseased small intestinal mucosa.

  • 15.
    Tjellström, Bo
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Stenhammar, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Magnusson, Karl-Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Midtvedt, Tore
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Norin, Elisabeth
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Sundqvist, Tommy
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Högberg, Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Letter: Exclusive Enteral Nutrition Does Not Normalize Gut Microflora Function in Pediatric Perianal Crohn Disease in JOURNAL OF PEDIATRIC GASTROENTEROLOGY AND NUTRITION, vol 61, issue 1, pp E4-E42015In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - JPGN, ISSN 0277-2116, E-ISSN 1536-4801, Vol. 61, no 1, p. E4-E4Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 16.
    Vaarala, Outi
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics .
    Intestinal immunity and type 1 diabetes2004In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - JPGN, ISSN 0277-2116, E-ISSN 1536-4801, Vol. 39, p. S732-S733Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Webb, Charlotta
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Myleus, Anna
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Norstrom, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Hammarroth, Solveig
    Norrtalje Hospital, Sweden.
    Högberg, Lotta
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lagerqvist, Carina
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Rosen, Anna
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Sandstrom, Olof
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Stenhammar, Lars
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ivarsson, Anneli
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Annelie
    Lund University, Sweden.
    High Adherence to a Gluten-Free Diet in Adolescents With Screening-Detected Celiac Disease2015In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - JPGN, ISSN 0277-2116, E-ISSN 1536-4801, Vol. 60, no 1, p. 54-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives:The aim of the study was to evaluate the gluten-free diet (GFD) adherence after 1 year of follow-up in children with screening-detected celiac disease (CD) in a general population.Methods:A total of 18,325 twelve-year-olds were invited to participate in a population-based CD screening (Exploring the Iceberg of Celiacs in Sweden), of whom 13,279 participated. In 240 children, CD was detected through elevated anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies 2 (TG2-IgA) and verified by a small-intestinal biopsy. This substudy included 210 children with TG2-IgA, evaluated both at the initial biopsy occasion and at 1-year follow-up. GFD adherence was evaluated by a combination of TG2-IgA measurements and self-reported adherence (n=193).Results:After 1 year, 85% (179/210) had normalized TG2-IgA levels (less than5 U/mL). Among those who had greater than50 U/mL at diagnosis, 25% (16/63) still had elevated TG2-IgA, but for the majority their initial values were more than halved. Most reported a high level of GFD adherence (always 82% [158/193] and often 16% [30/193]), and 75% [145/193] reported always adhering combined with normalized TG2-IgA. Although reporting that they were always adherent, 13 (6.7%) had not yet normalized their TG2-IgA levels completely; however, a majority of these initially had the highest TG2-IgA levels.Conclusions:GFD adherence is high in adolescents with CD detected by screening of the general population of Swedish 12-year-olds. Almost all of them had normalized serology and reported GFD adherence at the 1-year follow-up. A few adolescents who reported GFD adherence, however, had elevated TG2-IgA levels, suggesting more severe disease and/or nonadherence.

  • 18.
    Webb, Charlotta
    et al.
    Department of Pediatrics, Clinical Sciences, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Lund.
    Norstrom, Fredrik
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health, Umeå University, Umeå.
    Myleus, Tanna
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health, Umeå University, Umeå.
    Ivarsson, Anneli
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health, Umeå University, Umeå.
    Halvarsson, Britta
    Department of Pathology and Cytology, Aleris Medilab, Täby.
    Högberg, Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Lagerqvist, Carina
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Pediatrics, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden..
    Rosen, Anna
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health, Umeå University, Umeå.
    Sandström, Olof
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health, Umeå University, Umeå.
    Stenhammar, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Carlsson, Annelie
    Department of Pediatrics, Clinical Sciences, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Lund.
    Celiac Disease Can Be Predicted by High Levels of Anti-Tissue Transglutaminase Antibodies in Population-Based Screening2015In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - JPGN, ISSN 0277-2116, E-ISSN 1536-4801, Vol. 60, no 6, p. 787-791Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim of the present study was to evaluate any potential correlation between anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies of type immunoglobulin A (tTG-IgA) and the degree of gluten-induced enteropathy in children participating in a screening study for celiac disease (CD) and to assess to what extent the revised European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) guidelines cover this group of patients. Methods: The present study is a substudy of a cross-sectional CD screening study, Exploring the Iceberg of Celiacs in Sweden, a2-phased study performed during 2005 to 2006 and 2009 to 2010. The 13,279 participating children had a blood test obtained, and those with positive tTG-IgA were recommended a small intestinal biopsy. The tTG-IgA levels at the time of biopsy were compared with those at the assessment of the biopsy. Results: There were 267 children included, of whom 230 were diagnosed as having CD. Of all of the children, 67 children had low tTG-IgA levels (<5 U/mL), of whom 55% had Marsh 3 lesions. All of the children with tTG-IgA levels exceeding 10 times the upper limit of normal values of 5 U/mL, that is, 50 U/mL, were diagnosed as having CD. Lowering the cutoff to 3 U/mL, all but 1 child with 30 U/mL got CD diagnosis. Conclusions: By adopting the revised ESPGHAN criteria, biopsies could have been omitted in one-fourth of all of the patients. Our results indicate that the criteria may be useful even in screened children. Further studies are needed to confirm whether the 2012 ESPGHAN guidelines should be revised to also apply to the populations being screened.

  • 19.
    Welander, Adina
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Montgomery, Scott
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden .
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Ludvigsson, Jonas F.
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden .
    Breast-feeding Duration and Gluten Introduction Among Mothers With Celiac Disease2014In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - JPGN, ISSN 0277-2116, E-ISSN 1536-4801, Vol. 59, no 1, p. 89-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES::

    Both breastfeeding duration and age at gluten introduction have been implicated in the pathogenesis of celiac disease (CD). We hypothesized that parental CD affects the feeding pattern of the offspring, mediated by parental health awareness increasing adherence to infant feeding guidelines.

    METHODS::

    Prospectively collected infant feeding data were obtained through the All Babies in Southeast Sweden (ABIS) study. Information regarding infant feeding was available in 9,414 children. Twenty-two mothers had a history of biopsy-verified CD before delivery of a child in the study, 9,392 mothers had no diagnosis of CD prior to birth and thus constituted the unexposed or control population. Cox regression was used to compare the risk of early weaning and gluten introduction according to parental CD status, and logistic regression to assess if mothers with CD were more likely to breastfeed their children at gluten introduction.

    RESULTS::

    Some 63% of children were breastfeed for at least 9 months. We found no association between maternal CD and early weaning (adjusted hazard ratio (HR), 1.0; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.6-1.7), nor between paternal CD and early weaning (HR 0.5; 95% CI, 0.1-1.9). Sixty percent of children were introduced to gluten in months 5-6. Maternal CD was not associated with age at gluten introduction (adjusted HR, 0.8; 95% CI, 0.6-1.3) There was no statistically significant association between maternal CD and breastfeeding at time of gluten introduction (OR, 1.4; 95% CI, 0.4-4.7).

    CONCLUSIONS::

    Feeding patterns do not seem to vary between offspring to mothers with CD and those without.

  • 20.
    West, Christina E.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Editorial Material: Transfer of Probiotic Bacteria From Mother to Child: A Matter of Strain Specificity? in JOURNAL OF PEDIATRIC GASTROENTEROLOGY AND NUTRITION, vol 61, issue 2, pp 157-1582015In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - JPGN, ISSN 0277-2116, E-ISSN 1536-4801, Vol. 61, no 2, p. 157-158Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

1 - 20 of 20
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf