liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Andre, M.
    et al.
    André, M., Centre for Clinical Research, Dalarna, Nissers väg 3, 791 82 Falun, Sweden.
    Hedin, K.
    Unit of RandD, Kronoberg County Council, Växjö, Sweden, Department of Clinical Science in Malmö - General Practice/Family Medicine, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Hakansson, A.
    Håkansson, A., Department of Clinical Science in Malmö - General Practice/Family Medicine, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Mölstad, Sigvard
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, General Practice.
    Rodhe, N.
    Centre for Clinical Research, Dalarna, Nissers väg 3, 791 82 Falun, Sweden.
    Petersson, C.
    Unit of RandD, Kronoberg County Council, Växjö, Sweden.
    More physician consultations and antibiotic prescriptions in families with high concern about infectious illness - Adequate response to infection-prone child or self-fulfilling prophecy?2007In: Family Practice, ISSN 0263-2136, E-ISSN 1460-2229, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 302-307Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Respiratory tract infections (RTI) in children is the most common cause of prescription of antibiotics. It is important to describe and analyse non-medical factors in order to develop more rational use of antibiotics. Objectives. To compare families with high and low concern about infectious illness with regard to social variables, perception of infection proneness and beliefs in antibiotics and to relate the concern for infectious illness to reported morbidity, physician consultations and antibiotic prescriptions for the 18-month-old child in the family. Methods. A prospective, population-based survey was performed. During 1 month, all infectious symptoms, physician consultations and antibiotic treatments for 18-month-old children were noted. The 818 families also answered questions about their socio-economic situation, illness perception and concern about infectious illness. Results. High concern about infectious illness was associated with more frequent physicians consultations and more prescriptions of antibiotics. There was no significant difference in reported days with symptoms of RTI, but the parents more often experienced their children with RTI without fever as being ill. The variables of infection proneness in the child, inadequate beliefs in antibiotics and the factor of being the only child were important explanatory factors for concern about infectious illness. Conclusions. High concern about infectious illness is an important determining factor for physician consultations and antibiotic prescription for small children. An adequate consultation, where the doctor deals with the parents' worries and gives appropriate information about symptoms and disease, might contribute to less antibiotic prescribing with preserved parental satisfaction. © Published by Oxford University Press.

  • 2. Arrelöv, Britt
    et al.
    Borgquist, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, General Practice.
    Ljungberg, Britt
    Svärdsudd, Kurt
    Do GPs sick-list people to a lesser extent than other physician categories? A population-based study2001In: Family Practice, ISSN 0263-2136, E-ISSN 1460-2229, Vol. 18, p. 293-398Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Chtziarsenis, M
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, General Practice.
    Miyakis, S
    Faresjö, Tomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, General Practice.
    Fioretos, M
    Trell, Erik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, General Practice.
    Lionis, C
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, General Practice.
    Is there room for General Practice in Penitentiary Instituions? Screening and vaccinating high risk groups against hepatitis.1999In: Family Practice, ISSN 0263-2136, E-ISSN 1460-2229, Vol. 16, p. 366-368Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Johansson, Kajsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bergström, Anna
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Schröder, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Foldevi, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Primary Health Care Centres.
    Subacromial corticosteroid injection or acupuncture with home exercises when treating patients with subacromial impingement in primary care-a randomized clinical trial2011In: Family Practice, ISSN 0263-2136, E-ISSN 1460-2229, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 355-365Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    bjective. To compare the efficacy of subacromial corticosteroids injected by a GP with physiotherapy combining acupuncture and home exercises as treatments for SIS. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods. A randomized clinical trial was performed in primary health care. Patients diagnosed with SIS were randomized to either subacromial corticosteroid injection (s) or 10 acupuncture treatments combined with home- exercises. The main outcomes were pain and shoulder function (Adolfsson-Lysholm shoulder assessment score). Secondary outcomes were health-related quality of life (HRQL) (EuroQol-five dimension self-report questionnaire) and the patients global assessment of change. All patients were assessed at baseline and after 6 weeks and 3, 6 and 12 months. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults. One hundred and seventeen patients with SIS were included, of which 91 complied with the study protocol. There were no significant differences between treatments with regard to pain, shoulder function and HRQL in change over time. However, both treatment groups improved significantly from baseline over time. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions. Both subacromial corticosteroid injection and a series of acupuncture treatments combined with home exercises significantly decreased pain and improved shoulder function in patients with SIS, but neither treatment was significantly superior to the other.

  • 5.
    Lundkvist, j
    et al.
    Uppsala.
    Åkerlind, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, National Centre for Work and Rehabilitation.
    Borgquist, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, General Practice.
    Mölstad, S
    Jönköping.
    The more time spent on listening, the less time spent on prescribing antibiotics in general practice2002In: Family Practice, ISSN 0263-2136, E-ISSN 1460-2229, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 638-640Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To analyse the variation between primary care centres (PCCs) with regard to prescribing antibiotics and to investigate whether the variation can be explained by factors related to patient satisfaction and to socio-demographic characteristics of the populations in the catchment areas of the PCCs. Methods. The frequency of prescription of antibiotics by GPs at the PCCs was used as the dependent variable in a multivariate regression analysis. Questionnaire data for patient satisfaction and register data for socio-demographic characteristics were used as explanatory variables. The study was set in a county in south-east Sweden, and 6734 patients consulting GPs at 39 out of the 41 PCCs in the county participated. Variables correlating with the frequency of antibiotics prescription at PCC level and with patient satisfaction were the main outcome measures. Results. A seven-fold variation in the extent of the prescription of antibiotics between the PCCs was observed. In the multivariate analysis, a high antibiotic prescription rate relates to high overall patient satisfaction with GP consultation as well as to the share of males in the listed population but to low satisfaction with the time spent by the GP on listening to the patient. Conclusion. A high frequency of prescription of antibiotics at a PCC may reflect a general disposition among GPs to give priority to maintaining good relations with the patients. However, a low level of prescription may be consistent with patient satisfaction if more time is spent on listening to and informing the patients. Thus more time spent on listening to the patients may reduce the prescription of antibiotics without reducing patient satisfaction.

  • 6.
    Ockander, Marlene
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, FHVC - Folkhälsovetenskapligt centrum.
    Nyce, J.M.
    School of Library and Information Management, Emporia, KS 66801, United States, Department of Radiology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202, United States.
    How to avoid long-term sickness absence: The advice from women with personal experience2005In: Family Practice, ISSN 0263-2136, E-ISSN 1460-2229, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 394-398Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. The aim of this study was to describe women's perceptions of what can be done to avoid extended sickness absence with following suffering and passivity. Methods. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 82 women who had been on sickness absence (60 days or more) or were receiving disability pensions. The data were analysed using phenomenological methods. Results. To be able to get back to work was found to be equivalent to breaking away from the prospect of isolation and loneliness. To support this, four parties were identified along with suggestions for their actions: the healthcare professionals, the woman who is on sick leave herself, the employer, and the social insurance official. Most interestingly, the family and close relatives were almost not mentioned at all. The results are connected to a theoretical model of distress in terms of enduring and suffering. Conclusions. It is necessary to look more carefully at how women on sickness absence use the resources in the world (like their families) to get well. More generally, the task is to understand why society deals insufficiently with women who need time off and cannot keep up with their duties because of illness. © The Author (2005). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  • 7.
    Ringsberg, KC
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lepp, M
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Finnstrom, B
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Experiences by patients with asthma-like symptoms of a problem-based learning health education programme2002In: Family Practice, ISSN 0263-2136, E-ISSN 1460-2229, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 290-293Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Eighteen patients with asthma-like symptoms but negative asthma tests, randomly selected, participated in a problem-based learning health education programme. The programme had a multidisciplinary approach and included exercises inspired by cognitive behavioural therapy. Objective. The aim of this study was to describe how the patients experienced the programme. Methods. After termination of the programme, semi-structured interviews with a phenomenographic approach were conducted with 15 of the participants. Results. Two categories emerged, with three sub-categories each. In these, the informants described how they felt solidarity with the group, received confirmation from the other participants and had increased their self-confidence. They had started to look upon themselves and the disorder from a different perspective, they could describe the disorder in words and they had started to use new, conscious coping strategies. Conclusions. Patients with asthma-like symptoms benefit from taking part in a problem-based learning health education programme. It helps them to reflect upon themselves and the disorder and to use new strategies to cope with it.

  • 8.
    Wilhelmsson, Susan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Faresjö, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Foldevi, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Åkerlind, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of health and environment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The personal doctor reform in Sweden: perceived changes in working conditions1998In: Family Practice, ISSN 0263-2136, E-ISSN 1460-2229, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 192-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: In primary care in Sweden, several organizational changes have been implemented during the last decades in order to facilitate a shift from a high proportion of hospital care to a more primary-health-based care. The personal doctor reform has been one of the most important during recent years, for both personnel and patients.

    OBJECTIVES: We aimed to compare perceived changes in psychosocial working conditions for GP and district nurses in regions with traditional primary care and regions that have implemented a personal doctor system.

    METHODS: A questionnaire was mailed to 566 GPs and 554 district nurses in four selected county councils, two with traditional primary care and two with a personal doctor system. The overall response rate was 83%. A factor analysis of data concerning the experience of the organizational change revealed the following factors: fellowship at work, demands on the individual, influence and control, competence development and stimulation at work.

    RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: In the group as a whole, there was a general experience of deterioration of working conditions in all aspects except stimulation at work. This tendency was mostly marked in the regions with a personal doctor system. In these regions, GPs and district nurses reported significantly more impairments concerning demands on the individual and competence development. In addition, the district nurses also found themselves less able to exercise influence and control. These changes are neither desirable nor necessary consequences of an organizational development. It is important to follow continuously the personnel's experience in a changing primary health care system.

1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf