liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Bäckryd, Emmanuel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Larsson, Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Do low levels of Beta-endorphin in the cerebrospinal fluid indicate defective top-down inhibition in patients with chronic neuropathic pain? A cross-sectional, comparative study2014In: Pain medicine (Malden, Mass.), ISSN 1526-2375, E-ISSN 1526-4637, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 111-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    Pain medicine still lacks mechanism-specific biomarkers to guide diagnosis and treatment, and defective top-down modulation is an important factor in the pathophysiology of chronic pain conditions. Using modern analytical tools and advanced multivariate statistical analysis, the aim of this study was to revisit two classical potential biomarkers of pro- and anti-nociception in humans (substance P and beta-endorphin), focusing particularly on the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF).

    Design

    Cross-sectional, comparative, observational study.

    Subjects

    Patients with chronic, post-traumatic and/or post-surgical, neuropathic pain refractory to conventional treatment (N = 15) and healthy controls (N = 19) were included.

    Methods

    Samples were taken from CSF and blood, and levels of substance P and beta-endorphin were investigated using a Luminex technology kit.

    Results

    We found low levels of beta-endorphin in the CSF of neuropathic pain patients (66 ± 11 pcg/mL) compared with healthy controls (115 ± 14 pcg/mL) (P = 0.017). Substance P levels in the CSF did not differ (20 ± 2 pcg/mL, 26 ± 2, P = 0.08). However, our multivariate data analysis showed that belonging to the patient group was associated with low levels of both substances in the CSF. A higher correlation between the levels of beta-endorphin and substance P in CSF was found in healthy controls than in patients (rs = 0.725, P < 0.001 vs rs = 0.574, P = 0.032).

    Conclusions

    Patients with chronic neuropathic pain due to trauma or surgery had low levels of beta-endorphin in the CSF. We speculate that this could indicate a defective top-down modulation of pain in chronic neuropathic pain. Our results also illustrate the importance of taking a system-wide, multivariate approach when searching for biomarkers.

  • 2.
    Ghafouri, Nazdar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Fowler, Christopher J.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Larsson, Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Turkina, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Linn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Effects of Two Different Specific Neck Exercise Interventions on Palmitoylethanolamide and Stearoylethanolamide Concentrations in the Interstitium of the Trapezius Muscle in Women with Chronic Neck Shoulder Pain2014In: Pain medicine (Malden, Mass.), ISSN 1526-2375, E-ISSN 1526-4637, Vol. 15, no 8, p. 1379-1389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose. Chronic neck/shoulder pain (CNSP) is one of the most common pain conditions. The understanding of mechanisms, including the peripheral balance between nociceptive and antinociceptive processes, is incomplete. N-acylethanolamines (NAEs) are a class of endogenous compounds that regulate inflammation and pain. The aim of this study was to investigate the levels of two NAEs: the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor type-a ligand palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) and stearoylethanolamide (SEA) in the muscle interstitium of the trapezius muscle in women with CNSP randomized to two different neck specific training programs and in a healthy pain-free control group (CON). Materials and Methods. Fifty-seven women with CNSP were randomized to strength + stretch or stretch alone exercise programs. Twenty-nine subjects underwent microdialysis procedure before and after 4-6 months of exercise. Twenty-four CON subjects underwent microdialysis procedure before and after 4-6 months without any intervention in between. Microdialysate samples were collected from the trapezius muscle and analyzed by mass spectrometry for PEA and SEA levels. Results. PEA and SEA levels were significantly higher in CNSP patients compared with CON. PEA was significantly higher in CNSP than in CON after both training programs. SEA was significantly higher in CNSP than in CON after stretch alone but not after strength + stretch training. A significant positive correlation was found between changes in pain intensity and in SEA levels in the strength + stretch group, but not in the stretch alone group. Conclusion. Our results indicate that exercise interventions differentially affect the levels of the bioactive lipids PEA and SEA in the interstitium of the trapezius muscle in women with CNSP.

  • 3.
    Grimby-Ekman, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Health Metrics, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Sandén, H
    Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Larsson, Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Different DHEA-S Levels and Response Patterns in Individuals with Chronic Neck Pain, Compared with a Pain Free Group-a Pilot Study.2017In: Pain medicine (Malden, Mass.), ISSN 1526-2375, E-ISSN 1526-4637, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 846-855Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To test, in this pilot study, whether DHEA-S (Dehydroepiandrosterone, sulfated form) plasma levels are lower among persons with chronic neck pain, compared to control persons, and to investigate the DHEA-S response after a physical exercise.

    SUBJECTS: Included were 12 persons with chronic neck pain and eight controls without present pain, all 18 and 65 years of age. Exclusion criteria for both groups were articular diseases or tendinosis, fibromyalgia, systemic inflammatory and neuromuscular diseases, pain conditions due to trauma, or severe psychiatric diseases.

    DESIGN AND METHODS: The participants arm-cycled on an ergometer for 30 minutes. Blood samples were taken before, 60 minutes, and 150 minutes after this standardized physical exercise.

    RESULTS: The estimated plasma DHEA-S levels at baseline were 2.0 µmol/L (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.00; 4.01) in the pain group and 4.1 µmol/L (95% CI2.0; 8.6) in the control group, adjusted for sex, age, body mass index (BMI), and Shirom-Melamed Burnout Questionnaire (SMBQ), with a ratio of 0.48 (P = 0.094).The total DHEA-S (AUCG) in the pain group were 183 min*µmol/L lower than in the control group (P = 0.068). For the response to the exercise (AUCI), the difference between the pain group and the control group was 148 min*µmol/L (P = 0.011).

    CONCLUSIONS: In this pilot study, the plasma DHEA-S levels appeared to be lower among the persons with chronic neck pain, compared with the control group. It was indicated that DHEA-S decreased during the physical exercise in the control group, and either increased or was unaffected in the chronic pain group.

  • 4.
    Lemming, Dag
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Börsbo, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjörs, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lind, Eva-Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Arendt-Nielsen, Lars
    Laboratory for Experimental Pain Research and Center for Neuroplasticity and Pain, Center for Sensory-Motor Interaction, Department of Health Science and Technology, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark.
    Graven-Nielsen, Thomas
    Center for Neuroplasticity and Pain, Center for Sensory-Motor Interaction, Department of Health Science and Technology, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Cuff Pressure Pain Detection Is Associated with Both Sex and Physical Activity Level in Nonathletic Healthy Subjects2017In: Pain medicine (Malden, Mass.), ISSN 1526-2375, E-ISSN 1526-4637, Vol. 18, no 8, p. 1573-1581Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to evaluate pressure pain sensitivity on leg and arm in 98 healthy persons (50 women) using cuff algometry. Furthermore, associations with sex and physical activity level were investigated.

    Method. Normal physical activity level was defined as Godin Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire (GLTEQ) score ≤ 45 and high activity level as GLTEQ > 45. A pneumatic double-chamber cuff was placed around the arm or leg where a single chamber was inflated. The cuff inflation rate (1 kPa/s) was constant, and pain intensity was registered continuously on a 10 cm electronic visual analogue scale (VAS). The pain detection threshold (PDT) was defined as when the pressure was perceived as painful, and pain tolerance (PTT) was when the subject terminated the cuff inflation. For PTT, the corresponding VAS score was recorded (VAS-PTT). The protocol was repeated with two chambers inflated.

    Result. Only single cuff results are given. For women compared with men, the PDT was lower when assessed in the arm (P = 0.002), PTTs were lower in the arm and leg (P < 0.001), and the VAS-PTT was higher in the arm and leg (P < 0.033). Highly active participants compared with less active had higher PDT (P = 0.027) in the leg. Women showed facilitated spatial summation (P < 0.014) in the arm and leg and a steeper VAS slope (i.e., the slope of the VAS pressure curve between PDT and PPT) in the arm and leg (P < 0.003).

    Conclusion. This study indicates that reduced pressure pain sensitivity is associated both with male sex and physical activity level.

  • 5.
    Persson, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Clinical Department of Operation and Intensive Care, Pain Unit, County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping.
    Sörensen, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Chronic Whiplash Associated Disorders (WAD): Responses to Nerve Blocks of Cervical Zygapophyseal Joints.2016In: Pain medicine (Malden, Mass.), ISSN 1526-2375, E-ISSN 1526-4637, Vol. 17, no 12, p. 2162-2175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: This study explores the prevalence of facet joint pain in chronic Whiplash Associated Disorder (WAD).

    DESIGN: Forty-seven patients with chronic WAD were scheduled for medial branch blocks of the cervical spine.

    METHODS: The patient's localization of the pain together with established pain maps guided to the first level of zygapophyseal joint to be tested. The joint was anesthetized by injecting bupivacaine (0.5 ml; 5 mg/ml) to the medial branches of the cervical dorsal rami above and below the joint. If a positive response was noted, the schedule continued with a double-blinded sequence with a placebo (saline) and bupivacaine. If a negative response was noted, other joint levels were anesthetized until all joints from C2 to C7 were tested. The responses were assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS) in a predefined protocol.The study was carried through with a definition of a positive response to a diagnostic block as a VAS decrease ≥50% compared with baseline during a minimum of 3 hours after the block. All other responses were regarded as negative. The data were also analyzed using a definition of a positive response as a VAS decrease ≥80%, and figures from this analysis are presented as the main result of the study.

    RESULTS: The study yielded 29% true positive responders, 60% non-responders, and 11% placebo responders.

    CONCLUSIONS: A substantial amount of patients with chronic WAD have their persistent pain emanating from cervical zygapophyseal joints.

1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf