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  • 1.
    Andersson, Eva K
    et al.
    Department of Human Geography, Stockholm University.
    Abramsson, Marianne
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Changing residential mobility rates of older people in Sweden2012In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 32, no 6, p. 963-982Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The lifestyle of the baby boomers as retirees has been assumed to differ from older cohorts due to them being financially more stable and having grown up during the welfare state expansion. Many baby boomers live in large houses with gardens that require maintenance and labour. Recent studies have indicated that a growing share of those born in the 1940s in Sweden express a wish to change residence at retirment or in old age. A need to verify such results statistically was identified to confirm whether there has been an increase in residential mobility among older people. As a r esult, moves that took place during 2001-06 of the total cohort born in the 1940s were copared to similar moves by those born in teh 1930s, ten years earlier during 1991-96, i.e. those aged 57–66 in 1996 and 2006. The study used a register database, Geoswede, containing the entire Swedish population. The study shoed increased residential mobility rates among the 1940s cohort compared to the cohort born in the 1930s. However, explanations for the differences between the cohorts were not evident.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Eva K.
    et al.
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Abramsson, Marianne
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Malmberg, Bo
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Patterns of changing residential preferences during late adulthood2019In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 39, no 8, p. 1752-1781, article id PII S0144686X18000259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Earlier research on residential mobility has demonstrated a tendency for the young old of the 55+ population to prefer peripheral locations, whereas older age groups choose central locations. Here, we present survey results indicating that such late-adulthood differences in preferences are supported by age-related shifts corresponding to differences in housing preferences expressed by individuals in peripheral as well as central locations in Sweden. A sample of 2,400 individuals aged 55 years and over was asked to select the seven most important characteristics of a dwelling from a list of 21 alternatives (Survey of Housing Intentions among the ELDerly in Sweden (SHIELD), 2013). The preferences expressed were used as dependent variables in logistic regressions to determine to what extent the housing preferences of older people are linked to age, gender, socio-economic status and type of geographical area. The results demonstrated a close link between neighbourhood characteristics and housing preferences. Owning the dwelling, having a garden and access to nature were stressed as important by individuals living in non-metropolitan middle-class areas and in suburban elite areas. The youngest cohort expressed similar preferences. Older age groups instead stressed the importance of an elevator, single-storey housing and a good design for independent living; preferences that have similarities to those expressed by individuals living in large cities and smaller urban centres where such housing is more readily available.

  • 3.
    Forssell, Emilia
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal Högskola.
    Torres, Sandra
    Sociologiska institutionen, Uppsala universitet.
    Olaison, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Care managers' experiences of cross-cultural needs assessment meetings: the case of late-in-life immigrants2015In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 576-601Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on care managers' experiences of the needs assessment process is scarce even though the literature on needs assessment practice is relatively extensive. One of the research areas that has not received attention yet is the way in which care managers experience the challenges that are presumably posed by increased ethnic, cultural, linguistic and religious diversity among prospective elder care recipients. This article addresses this research gap. It is based on a project that aims to shed light on care managers' experiences of the needs assessment process in general and cross-cultural needs assessment meetings in particular. The data are constituted of focus group interviews with care managers in Sweden (N=60). In this article we focus on care managers' experiences of needs assessment with older people who have immigrated late-in-life, who come from cultures considered different from the Swedish one and who have not mastered the Swedish language. This was the group of older people that the care managers mostly thought of when asked to describe their experiences of cross-cultural needs assessment meetings. The interviewed care managers discussed the challenges that these meetings present, which were related to communication due to language barriers, different demands and expectations, insecurity regarding what is customary in such meetings, as well as perceived passivity among late-in-life immigrants. The article discusses the contributions of the findings to research on care management practices in general, as well as to needs assessment practice in particular.

  • 4.
    Hjalmarsson Österholm, Johannes
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Orally positioning persons with dementia in assessment meetings2015In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 367-388Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper the authors study if and how persons with dementia are orally positioned by others, and how they position themselves while participating in assessment meetings held in order to discuss access to supportive services. We analysed five assessment meetings where two older persons (one diagnosed with dementia and one without a dementia diagnosis) participated to investigate whether the person with dementia is positioned differently than the other old person. Interactional phenomena used to position the person with dementia were identified by interactional analysis.

    The paperidentifies six phenomena that positioned the person with dementia as an individual with less interactional competence than the other participants: ignoring the person with dementia; voicing the feelings, capacity or opinion of the person with dementia; posing questions implying lack of competence; others' use of diagnosis; self-(re)positioning; and elderspeak. Persons with dementia are often orally positioned as less competent, indicating that they suffer further from discrimination than other older persons. We suggest that this has an impact on the participation of people with dementia in negotiations regarding their future care. The results indicate that social workers should be made aware that negative positioning exists and how it may affect the ability of people with dementia to contribute to discussions about their everyday life. Social workers should be encouraged to find strategies to reduce negative positioning in interaction.

  • 5.
    Kåhlin, Ida
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kjellberg, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nord, Catharina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hagberg, Jan-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lived experiences of ageing and later life in older people with intellectual disabilities2015In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 602-628Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to explore how older people with intellectual disability (ID), who live in group accommodation, describe their lived experience in relation to ageing and later life. The study adopted a phenomenological approach, based on the concept of life-world. Individual, qualitative interviews were conducted with twelve people with ID (five men, seven women), between the ages of 48 and 71 (m=64), who lived in four different group accommodation units in southern Sweden. A descriptive phenomenological analysis method was used, which disclosed a structure consisting of themes and subthemes. The findings of the study reveal the informants’ lived experience of ageing and later life as a multifaceted phenomenon, expressed through the two themes, “age as a process of change” and “existential aspects of ageing”, each with three sub themes. along with six substantialising[SK1]  subthemes. The body is an essential element in their experience of ageing and growing old, and in how this experience is expressed. The study also finds social, cultural and historical dimensions of the life-world to be important in the informants’ experience of ageing and later life. This supports understanding of  the existence of a collective life-world for older people with ID, the unique experiences the informants share because of their disability and its consequences for their life course.

     

  • 6.
    Motel-Klingebiel, Andreas
    et al.
    Deutsches Zentrum fuer Altersfragen [German Centre of Gerontology], Berlin.
    Tesch-Römer, Clemens
    Deutsches Zentrum fuer Altersfragen [German Centre of Gerontology], Berlin.
    von Kondratowitz, Hans-Joachim
    Deutsches Zentrum fuer Altersfragen [German Centre of Gerontology], Berlin.
    Welfare states do not crowd out the family: Evidence for mixed responsibility from comparative analyses2005In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 863-882Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses the informal and formal provision of help and support to older people from a comparative welfare state perspective, with particular reference to the relationships between inter-generational family help and welfare state support. While the ‘substitution’ hypothesis states that the generous provision of welfare state services in support of older people ‘crowds out’ family help, the ‘encouragement’ hypothesis predicts a stimulation of family help, and the ‘mixed responsibility’ hypothesis predicts a combination of family and formal help and support. The paper reports findings from the Old Age and Autonomy: The Role of Service Systems and Inter-generational Family Solidarity (OASIS) research project. This created a unique age-stratified sample of 6,106 people aged 25–102 years from the urban populations of Norway, England, Germany, Spain and Israel. The analyses show that the total quantity of help received by older people is greater in welfare states with a strong infrastructure of formal services. Moreover, when measures of the social structure, support preferences and familial opportunity structures were controlled, no evidence of a substantial ‘crowding out’ of family help was found. The results support the hypothesis of ‘mixed responsibility’, and suggest that in societies with well-developed service infrastructures, help from families and welfare state services act accumulatively, but that in familistic welfare regimes, similar combinations do not occur.

  • 7.
    Nord, Catharina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Architecturalspace as a moulding factor of care practices and resident privacy in assisted living2011In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 934-952Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thisarticle presents an analysis of privacy, care practices and architectural spacein assisted living in Sweden. The presented research is a qualitative casestudy. Observations and personal interviews with staff as well as residentswere the major data collection methods. The analysis revealed the elusivenessof the private/public dichotomy; how privacy appeared in public spaces and howprivate spaces became public under certain conditions. Over the day, theresident followed a trajectory of privacy structured by caring activities invarious spaces from which distance and closeness to the staff emerged. Thestudy showed how individualised care practices improved privacy for theresident. Although the architectural conditions constrained the staff in thestudy, they used a number of spatial strategies in order to improve residentprivacy, for instance, in the dining room at meal times or when residents weresubject to intimate care in their private rooms. Access and control aredimensions of privacy that are of relevance to assisted living. Residents’control of access to their private rooms was more successful than their controlof access to the public areas in the unit. Individual care strengthenedresident agency. Staff supported the residents to lead a private life in theassisted living facility.

  • 8.
    Odzakovic, Elzana
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology in Linköping.
    Kullberg, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland.
    Andrew, Clark
    School of Health and Society, University of Salford, Salford, UK.
    Sarah, Campbell
    Division of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.
    Kainde, Manji
    Faculty of Social Science, University of Stirling, Stirling, UK.
    Kirstein, Rummery
    Faculty of Social Science, University of Stirling, Stirling, UK.
    John, Keady
    Division of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.
    Richard, Ward
    Faculty of Social Science, University of Stirling, Stirling, UK.
    ‘It's our pleasure, we count cars here’: an exploration of the ‘neighbourhood-based connections’ for people living alone with dementia2019In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 9, p. 1-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The extent of social isolation experienced by people living with dementia who reside in the community has been well acknowledged, yet little is known about how people living alone with dementia maintain neighbourhood-based connections. The purpose of this study is to examine the experiences of people with dementia who live alone, focusing upon how they establish social networks and relationships in a neighbourhood context, and how they are supported to maintain this social context within everyday life. Multiple data collection methods were used including, semi-structured interviews, walking interviews, guided home tours and social network mapping, which were conducted with 14 community-dwelling people living alone with dementia (11 women and three men) situated across the three international study sites in England, Scotland and Sweden. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. The analysis revealed four main themes: (a) making the effort to stay connected; (b) befriending by organisations and facilitated friendships; (c) the quiet neighbourhood atmosphere; and (d) changing social connections. The analysis suggests that people with dementia who live alone were active agents who took control to find and maintain relationships and social networks in the neighbourhood. Our findings indicate the need to raise awareness about this specific group in both policy and practice, and to find creative ways to help people connect through everyday activities and by spontaneous encounters in the neighbourhood.

  • 9.
    Principi, Andrea
    et al.
    National Institute Health and Science Aging INRCA, Italy .
    Lamura, Giovanni
    National Institute Health and Science Aging INRCA, Italy .
    Sirolla, Cristina
    National Institute Health and Science Aging INRCA, Italy .
    Mestheneos, Liz
    Sextant Grp 50 Hellas, Greece .
    Bien, Barbara
    Medical University of Bialystok, Poland .
    Brown, Jayne
    Scottish Centre Evidence Based Care Older People, Scotland .
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gabriella Melchiorre, Maria
    National Institute Health and Science Aging INRCA, Italy .
    Doehner, Hanneli
    University of Medical Centre Hamburg Eppendorf, Germany .
    Work restrictions experienced by midlife family care-givers of older people: evidence from six European countries2014In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 209-231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines differences in work restrictions of midlife family carers of older people in terms of prevalence, gender and explanatory variables, in six European countries: Germany, Greece, Italy, Poland, Sweden and the United Kingdom. A sample of 2,897 carers aged 45-64 was extracted from the EUROFAMCARE (Services for Supporting Family Carers of Older People in Europe: Characteristics, Coverage and Usage) European project database, in order to analyse four possible work restrictions experienced in connection with the activity of care-giving: the reduction of working hours; giving up working; difficulties in career developments and forced occasional work. The results show that work restrictions are experienced differently between countries especially by women: they are reported to a higher degree in the United Kingdom, Germany and Greece, less so in Italy, and seldom in Poland and Sweden. Gender differences within countries are not so marked. Country differences are explained in the light of the different welfare regimes characterising the countries under investigation, in order to elucidate how policy makers may act to improve working carers conditions through appropriate policies.

  • 10.
    Schirmer, Werner
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Michailakis, Dimitris
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Loneliness among older people as a social problem: the perspectives of medicine, religion and economy2016In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 36, no 8, p. 1559-1579Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article offers a theoretical framework for studying loneliness among older people from a social problems perspective. The framework combines the constructionist approach to social problems (Spector and Kitsuse) and systems theory (Luhmann). Based on the first approach, we understand the social problem of loneliness among older people to be the result of claims-making activities by different key actors. These activities are guided by underlying moralities, causalities and solutions. With the second approach, we can explain how social problems are framed differently within different social systems. The proposed framework is primarily aimed at researchers studying social (in contrast to bio-medical or psychological) aspects of loneliness among older people. It helps not only to guide research designs in order to address conflicting perspectives, rationalities and interests but also to enable researchers to grasp fully how loneliness among older people is attributed (potentially shifting) meanings through communicative acts by influential stakeholders in the social problems industry. Combining constructionism and Luhmanns theory also helps to interpret and explain concrete claims-making concerning loneliness as a social problem. The argument in this article is illustrated via three different social systems: medicine, religion and economy. Loneliness among older people appears to be something different from each of these perspectives: as a matter of health and illness, of spirituality, and of incentives and commodities, respectively.

  • 11.
    Törnvall, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Marcusson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Wressle, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Health-related quality in life in relation to mobility and fall risk in 85-year-old people: a population study in Sweden2016In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 36, no 9, p. 1982-1997Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Optimal mobility is fundamental for healthy ageing and quality of life. This study is part of a cross-sectional population-based study of 85-year-old people residing in Linköping municipality, Sweden. The purpose was to describe 85-year-old peoples' health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in relation to mobility and fall risk while adjusting for gender and body mass index. Data collection included a postal questionnaire, a home visit and a reception visit. HRQoL was assessed with EQ-5D-3L, mobility with the Timed Up and Go test (TUG) and fall risk with the Downton Fall Risk Index (DFRI). All those who completed the DFRI, TUG and EQ-5D-3L were included in the present study (N = 327). Lower HRQoL was associated with longer time taken to complete TUG and higher fall risk in both genders but not with body mass index. Women had higher risk of falling, took a longer time to complete TUG and reported less physical activity compared with men. Health-care professionals should address mobility capacity and fall risk in order to maintain quality of life in elderly people. This is of utmost importance, especially for elderly women because impaired mobility, high risk of falling and occurrence of pain are common among women, and related to lower HRQoL.

  • 12.
    Ågren, Axel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cedersund, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Reducing loneliness among older people – who is responsible?2020In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 584-603Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the Swedish news-press, loneliness among older people is presented as a severe problem that needs to be solved. The issue of who is responsible for reducing loneliness and how this responsibility is designated is, however, rarely discussed. In this study, we have analysed how responsibility is designated and constructed in articles from the Swedish news-press. Focus has been on identifying responsibility in discourses proceeding from the concept of subject positions. This concept has enabled analysis on how responsibility is negotiated and who is positioned as a responsible actor with the ability to perform actions that reduce loneliness. Three dominating discourses were found. In the discourse of responsibility within politics and the welfare state, the responsibility is both self-taken and designated to other institutions held responsible for not initiating sufficient measures to reduce loneliness. In the discourse of responsibility within societal and evolutionary perspectives on loneliness, developments beyond the individual's control are considered to contribute to loneliness. At the same time ‘we’ in ‘society’ are considered capable of reducing loneliness, thereby constructing individuals as responsible actors. Within the discourses of responsibility within senior organisations, both senior organisations and people who participate in activities are constructed as responsible actors. In conclusion, the responsibility for reducing loneliness is, apart from the discourse on senior organisations, designated to those working with older people.

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