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  • 1.
    Hammarstrom, Gunhild
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Torres, Sandra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Being, feeling and acting. A qualitative study of Swedish home-help care recipients understandings of dependence and independence2010In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 75-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article contributes to the debate on dependence and independence through a study of how a group of 29 cognitively healthy Swedish home-help care recipients between the ages of 77 and 93 perceive their situation. Two overall themes with regards to how the constructs of dependence and independence are understood were found. One of them concerns how being in need of help can be justified (i.e. the why of receiving help) and the other how the very situation of being in need of help and care can be regarded (i.e. the how of receiving help). The study reveals a clear distinction between receiving help and care and feeling dependent, as well as between receiving help and care and being able to remain an active agent. On the basis of these findings we argue for the fruitfulness of distinguishing between being, feeling and acting as aspects of dependence and independence.

  • 2.
    Hedman, Ragnhild
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden Ersta Skondal University of Coll, Sweden Ersta Skondal University of Coll, Sweden .
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden Ersta Skondal University of Coll, Sweden .
    Hansebo, Gorel
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden Ersta Skondal University of Coll, Sweden .
    Norberg, Astrid
    Ersta Skondal University of Coll, Sweden Umeå University, Sweden .
    Social positioning by people with Alzheimers disease in a support group2014In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 28, p. 11-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    People with Alzheimers disease (AD) are often negatively positioned by others, resulting in difficulties upholding a positive sense of self. This might cause them to withdraw socially and apparently lose their minds. Conversely, the sense of self can be strengthened with the support from others. This study aimed to describe, in accordance with positioning theory, how people with moderate AD positioned themselves and each other in a support group for people with AD. We describe five first-order positions; the project manager, the storyteller, the moral agent, the person burdened with AD, and the coping person. In the interactions that followed among the support group participants, those positions were mainly affirmed. This enabled participants to construct strong and agentic personae, and to have the severity of their illness acknowledged. Despite their language impairment participants managed to position and reposition themselves and others by assistance of the trained facilitator.

  • 3.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cutting Brussels sprouts: Collaboration involving persons with dementia2014In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 29, p. 115-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How people with dementia collaborate with other people is an area in need of more research and conceptualizations. Collaboration introduces a number of new possibilities and demands concerning cognitive and linguistic abilities and it is suggested that a theoretical framework that emphasize that cognitive resources are not exclusively individual, but are part of cognitive and communicative context. In this article focus is on joint activities and their collaborative organization is analyzed using an example involving persons with dementia working together with staff preparing a meal. The analysis shows that persons with dementia are able to collaborate in fairly advanced activities if they are supported in such a way that they can make use of the cognitive and linguistic resources of others, in particular cognitive functions having to do with planning and execution of actions. The organization of artifacts like kitchen tools can function as an external memory support. The results support a theoretical framework that help to understand what people can do together rather than focus on individual abilities. The results also indicate that is possible to learn how to organize collaboration involving persons with dementia by understanding how other persons abilities as well as artifacts can be used as external resources for support of cognitive and linguistic abilities. 

  • 4.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Narrative collaboration and scaffolding in dementia2011In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 339-347Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Narrative Collaboration and Scaffolding in Dementia2011In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 339-347Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 6.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Örulv, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Narrative and identity in Alzheimer’s disease: a case study2009In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 205-214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this case study, focus is on how persons with AD use their remaining linguistic and cognitive resources, together with non-verbal aspects of the storytelling event, as resources in communicating and negotiating their identities in everyday encounters. The results of the analysis, focusing on the telling of the stories, indicate that other aspects than the temporal and referential organization of the narratives has become important resources for the teller in establishing and negotiating identity. The telling of temporally discontinuous narratives does not appear to affect or disrupt the teller's experience of some sort of a continuous sense of self and identity but are probably more a problem to persons without this kind of diagnosis. Being afflicted by AD most likely leads persons to try to invent and use alternative communicative recourses in order to sustain factors like their senses of self and identities. For researchers this makes it important to try to base their analysis on the actual organization of the talk and to focus on the functions of various responses and utterances in the interaction.

  • 7.
    Jönson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies.
    Social democratic aging in the People's Home of Sweden2005In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 291-308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article describes collective action frames and ideologically informed identities provided by the senior rights movement in Sweden, with special focus on the optimistic and future-oriented descriptions produced by the National Organization of Pensioners (PRO) between 1941 and 1976. These images are related to concepts from social movement theory and compared with competing action frames. It is concluded that the success of the PRO perspective should be understood in relation to the development and political culture of the Swedish welfare state during the 20th century. By presenting a history about the development from poor-law society to welfare state, PRO representatives mobilized members in resistance to enemies and injustices that were identified as forces of the past. The rhetoric of welfare progress helped members of PRO to frame improvements that would only benefit future pensioners, as part of a struggle against the stigma of poverty in old age. © 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 8.
    Jönson, Håkan
    et al.
    Socialhögskolan, Lunds Universitet.
    Siverskog, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Turning vinegar into wine: Humorous self-presentations among older GLBTQ online daters2012In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 55-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates humorous and self-mocking comments about age and age-related appearance among older gay, lesbian, bisexual, transsexual and queer advertisers in two Swedish Internet dating forums. Using a perspective where age is regarded as an accomplishment, humor was investigated as a way of relating to restrictive norms concerning age and sexuality. It was concluded that self-mocking comments, although sometimes subverting norms of age-appropriate behavior, contributed to allocating ambiguous problematic status to old age. According to this analysis, humor appeared as a form of age-salient maneuvering. If we change analytical focus and regard self-presentations as performances of marketability, the study illustrated that self-mocking comments on old age, being overweight, impotence and other age-related changes were in fact part of a repertoire that displayed marketable characteristics such as humor, self-distance and honesty among advertisers. The last part of the paper discusses these findings in terms of a need to focus on aspects that are relevant to the local context where the enactment is taking place, and the need to take care not to construct age and aging as the only objects of knowledge within aging research.

  • 9.
    Jönson, Håkan
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Taghizadeh Larsson, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The exclusion of older people in disability activism and policies - A case of inadvertent ageism?2009In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 69-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using Sweden as a case, the article discusses the tendency within disability activism and policies to overlook elderly people. From an analysis of a major Swedish government investigation on disability it is clear that disability policies in Sweden have come to rest upon stereotyped age norms that divide the life course into set stages, and there has been a tendency to define elderly disabled people as elderly rather than disabled. It is argued that this exclusion is partly the result of a successful endeavor to provide disabled people of younger ages with rights that are typical of non-disabled citizens. justice and equality have been defined in comparison to citizens of similar ages: children, youth and adults of "active age". Based on the analysis of the paper it is argued that activities of movements struggling to liberate oppressed Populations may contribute to ageism, and that anti-ageist research must go beyond the idea that ageism is a simple matter of attitudes towards older people.

  • 10.
    Larsson Ranada, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hagberg, Jan-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    All the things I have - handling one’s material room in old age2014In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 31, p. 110-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article explores how old people who live in their ordinary home, reason and act regarding their ‘material room’ (technical objects, such as household appliances, communication tools and things, such as furniture, personal belongings, gadgets, books, paintings, and memorabilia). The interest is in how they, as a consequence of their aging, look at acquiring new objects and phasing out older objects from the home. This is a broader approach than in most other studies of how old people relate to materiality in which attention is mostly paid either to adjustments to the physical environment or to the importance of personal possessions. In the latter cases, the focus is on downsizing processes (e.g. household disbandment or casser maison) in connection with a move to smaller accommodation or to a nursing home. The article is based on a study in which thirteen older people (median age 87), living in a Swedish town of medium size were interviewed (2012) for a third time. The questions concerned the need and desire for new objects, replacement of broken objects, sorting out the home or elsewhere, most cherished possessions, and the role of family members such as children and grandchildren. The results reveal the complexity of how one handles the material room. Most evident is the participants' reluctance to acquire new objects or even to replace broken things. Nearly all of them had considered, but few had started, a process of sorting out objects. These standpoints in combination resulted in a relatively intact material room, which was motivated by an ambition to simplify daily life or to facilitate the approaching dissolution of the home. Some objects of special value and other cherished objects materialized the connections between generations within a family. Some participants wanted to spare their children the burden of having to decide on what to do with their possessions. Others (mostly men), on the contrary, relied on their children to do the sorting out after they had died.

  • 11.
    Majlesi, Ali Reza
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Department of Education, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Ekström, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Baking together-the coordination of actions in activities involving people with dementia2016In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 38, p. 37-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores interaction and collaboration between people with dementia and their spouses in relation to the performance of household chores with the focus on instruction as an interactional context to engage the person with dementia in collaboration to accomplish joint activities. Dementia is generally associated with pathological changes in peoples cognitive functions such as diminishing memory functions, communicative abilities and also diminishing abilities to take initiative as well as to plan and execute tasks. Using video recordings of everyday naturally occurring activities, we analyze the sequential organization of actions (see Schegloff, 2007) oriented toward the accomplishment of a joint multi-task activity of baking. The analysis shows the specific ways of collaboration through instructional activities in which the person with dementia exhibits his competence and skills in accomplishing the given tasks through negotiating the instructions with his partner and carrying out instructed actions. Although the driving force of the collaboration seems to be a series of directive sequences only initiated by the partner throughout the baking activity, our analyses highlight how the person with dementia can actively use the material environment including collaborating partners to compensate for challenges and difficulties encountered in achieving everyday, tasks. The sequential organization of instructions and instructed actions are in this sense argued to provide an interactional environment wherein the person with dementia can make contributions to the joint activity in an efficient way. While a collaborator has been described as necessary for a person with dementia to be able to partake in activities, this study shows that people with dementia are not only guided by their collaborators in joint activities but they can also actively use their collaborators in intricate compensatory ways. (C) 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 12.
    Michailakis, Dimitris
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Schirmer, Werner
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The lost Gemeinschaft: How people working with the elderly explain loneliness2015In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, no 33, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We conducted a qualitative interview study with people of different professions working with lonely elderly people. The rationale of the study was to examine how these respondents explain loneliness among the elderly. The present article focuses on the social explanations, i.e. explanations that identify causes of loneliness in the structure of modern society. We found that many of the social explanations given are aspects of a more encompassing and general pattern underlying all the reasoning about loneliness among the elderly. This pattern is the expression of two contrasting images of society which the classical sociologist Ferdinand Tönnies termed Gemeinschaft (community) and Gesellschaft (society). The former refers to traditional or small-size rural communities characterized by high degrees of social cohesion, integration, solidarity, proximity and familiarity, whereas the latter refers to functional differentiation, distance, individualization, exchanged-based social relations and anonymity. Loneliness among the elderly is explained by the lack of Gemeinschaft and its characteristics in contemporary society. This explanatory pattern goes hand in hand with a critical view of contemporary society and a nostalgic yearning for the lost communities of past societies, where inhabitants find their staked-out place and sense of belonging, and thus loneliness hardly seems to occur. We summarized this view under the label the "lost Gemeinschaft".

  • 13.
    Nedlund, Ann-Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nordh, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Crafting citizen(ship) for people with dementia: How policy narratives at national level in Sweden informed politics of time from 1975 to 20132015In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 34, p. 123-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores how policy narratives in national policy documents in Sweden inform associated politics on people with dementia. This is disentangled in terms of how people with dementia have been defined, what the problems and their imminent solutions have been, and if and how these have differed overtime. Based on a textual analysis of policy documents at national level in Sweden, covering nearly 40 years the study shows how divergent policy narratives shape the construction of citizens with dementia as policy target groups. This study shows the temporal character of people with dementia as a political problem, the implications of policy narratives on people with dementia as a citizen group, and policy narratives as something being crafted rather than shaped by fixed pre-existing "facts". Dementia, and further citizens living with dementia, does not have a once and for all stabilised meaning. Instead, the meanings behind the categories continue to evolve and to be crafted, which affects the construction of citizens living with dementia, the space in which to exercise their citizenship and further belonging to the society.

  • 14.
    Nord, Catharina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    A day to be lived. Elderly peoples' possessions for everyday life in assisted living2013In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 135-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is a qualitative interview study about the household possessions that elderly women and men brought with them when moving into assisted living. The move implied a substantial reduction of their possessions since, in all cases, they had left a larger dwelling than the one they moved to. The study gives a glimpse into the everyday life of the oldest old in assisted living. The things the elderly participants brought were of three types; cherished objects, representations of who they were, and mundane objects. The most important objects indicated by the elderly often belonged to the third type, and were preferred for the significance they had for the everyday life of the individual. These objects revealed a circumscribed but dignified life in their private bed-sitting room, often in solitude, where the elderly individuals pursued various interests and small-scale activities. However, this life was organized and preferred by the individuals themselves, in accordance with the principles of resident autonomy and individual choice that are promoted in assisted living. The author suggests that these self-engaged pursuits can contribute to bridging the gap between disengagement and activity theories. The study results also contribute to making visible the private life of the oldest old in assisted living.

  • 15.
    Nord, Catharina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Free choice in residential care for older people– a philosophical reflection2016In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 37, no April, p. 59-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Free choice in elderly care services is a debated issue. Using the theoretical support of philosophers of free will, this paper explores free choice in relocation to residential care. The three dominant perspectives within this field of philosophy, libertarianism, determinism and compatibilism, are applied from the perspective of the older individual to the process of moving. Empirical data were collected through qualitative interviews with 13 older individuals who had recently moved into residential care. These individuals had made the choice to move following either a health emergency or incremental health problems. In a deterministic perspective they had no alternative to moving, which was the inevitable solution to their various personal problems. A network of people important to them assisted in the move, making the choice possible. However, post-move the interviewees’ perspective had changed to a libertarian or compatibilist interpretation, whereby although the circumstances had conferred little freedom regarding the move, the interviewees reported a high degree of self-determination in the process. It appeared that in order to restore self-respect and personal agency, the older individuals had transformed their restricted choice into a choice made of free will or freer will.

  • 16.
    Olaison, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cedersund, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Assessment for home care: Negotiating solutions for individual needs2006In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 367-380 Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores care management as an activity that regulates the distribution of society's resources for home care. It focuses on interaction in assessment meetings, which are part of the planning of services and care for old people in Sweden. The aim was to acquire an understanding of how old people, as applicants, account for their needs for care, and how these accounts are negotiated and positioned in talk. Twenty home care assessments were audio-taped and the data were analyzed using discursive analysis. It was found that the assessment meetings had an institutional structure within, which old people, as applicants and with individual needs for care, were assessed within fixed institutional categories. Furthermore, analysis showed how interaction during assessment meetings functioned as formal problem-solving, in which applicants' accounts of their health issues were negotiated, contributing to the construction of their identity as home care receivers.

  • 17.
    Róin, Ása
    Department of Health Science, University of the Faroe Islands, Faroe Islands.
    Embodied ageing and categorisation work amongst retirees in the Faroe Islands2014In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 31, p. 83-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract This paper addresses ageing and embodiment and explores how age is negotiated in interaction using Membership Categorisation Work. Data were derived from group and individual interviews with home-dwelling retirees in the Faroe Islands. The analysis showed that the interviewees negotiated age by drawing on two contrasting categories, placing themselves and others in the categories of ‘old’ or ‘not old’. Good health was the main predicate tied to the category ‘not old’ and keeping busy and taking care of oneself were the main activities that the interviewees ascribed to the category ‘not old’. The analysis also demonstrated how health as a moral discourse was actualised during the interviews. Staying active and in good health were not just talked about as ways to achieve personal well-being. The interviewees talked about having a responsibility to stay ‘fit’ for as long as possible to avoid being a burden to the society or to their families.

  • 18.
    Wilińska, Monika
    et al.
    Department of Behavioural Science and Social Work, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Cedersund, Elisabet
    Department of Behavioural Science and Social Work, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    "Classic ageism" or "brutal economy"?- Old age and older people in the Polish media2010In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 335-343Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores media discourse of ageing, taking the example of Poland and relating it to a broader discussion of ageing policy. The discourse in news magazines appears both to reflect and create attitudes towards older people, which in turn has implications for ageing policy. To reveal the nature of these attitudes, we use a method of attitudinal positioning. The study analyzes articles that appeared in the four largest Polish weekly opinion news magazines, in the 2004–2007 period. Various domains in the discourse of ageing are identified, yet only the family and market domains seem to be described in exclusively positive terms: the authors discuss the implications of this for ageing policy.

  • 19.
    Ågren, Axel
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    What are we talking about?: Constructions of loneliness among older people in the Swedish news-press2017In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 41, p. 18-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Loneliness among older people is an issue that engages the general public and various professions and organizations in contemporary Swedish society. One public arena where this engagement is particularly evident is within the Swedish news-press, where articles on loneliness among older people are frequently published. Loneliness is commonly perceived as significantly related to ageing and older people. In addition, the mass media is considered to have a crucial influence in shaping general perceptions of older people. The aim of this study is to examine how loneliness among older people is constructed in the Swedish news-press and whether there is a prevailing “loneliness discourse” within this context. The empirical material consists of 94 articles from the Swedish news-press from the years 2013–2014. Two dominating discourses was found. Loneliness — within the discourse of eldercare, politics and the welfare society, is primarily written about in news articles and debate articles by a variety of authors, such as politicians and representatives from organizations. Within this discourse, loneliness is utilized as a concept to motivate the need for political change and the allocations of resources and to amplify deficiencies within eldercare, politics and the welfare society. The second discourse, Loneliness — within the discourse of volunteer work, is addressed in reportage articles written by journalists. In this discourse focus was on depicting volunteers and enhancing the importance of volunteer work. Here, loneliness serves as a motive for performing volunteer work. In addition, the discourse of Research reports on older people's health was found, although less significant compared to the two major discourses. Within this discourse ageing is presented as a risk, where loneliness is one of these risk factors. Despite some minor differences, loneliness, within all three discourses, is given the meaning of being a problem that needs to be solved. A central finding in this study is that focus in the articles, from Swedish news-press, is not mainly on loneliness but rather on eldercare, politics and the welfare state, volunteer work and health among older people. Loneliness is, consequently, used as a concept to motivate the need for political change and the allocation of resources for older people, to enhance the values of volunteer work and to emphasize the risks associated with ageing.

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