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  • 1.
    Flegel, Willy A
    et al.
    University Hospital, Ulm.
    von Zabern, Inge
    Doescher, Andrea
    Wagner, Franz F
    Strathmann, Klaus P
    Geisen, Christof
    Plafi, Miodrag
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Transfusionsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Laboratoriemedicinskt centrum, Klinisk immunologi och transfusionsmedicin.
    Pisacka, Martin
    Poole, Joyce
    Polin, Helene
    Gabriel, Christian
    Avent, Neil D
    D variants at the RhD vestibule in the weak D type 4 and Eurasian D clusters2009Inngår i: Transfusion, ISSN 0041-1132, E-ISSN 1537-2995, Vol. 49, nr 6, s. 1059-1069Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: One branch of the RHD phylogenetic tree is represented by the weak D type 4 cluster of alleles with F223V as the primordial amino acid substitution. F223V as well as a large number of further substitutions causing D variants are located at the extracellular RhD protein vestibule, which represents the entrance to the transmembraneous channel of the RhD protein.

    STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: RHD and RHCE nucleotide sequences were determined from genomic DNA and cDNA. D epitope patterns were established with commercial monoclonal anti-D panels.

    RESULTS: The RHD alleles DOL-1 and DOL-2 had the two amino acid substitutions M170T (509T>C) and F223V (667T>G) in common. DOL-2 harbored the additional substitution L378V (1132C>G). Both alleles were observed in Africans and are probably evolutionary related. DMI carried M170I (510G>A), which differed from the DOL-typical substitution. DFW and DFL harbored the substitutions H166P (497A>C) and Y165C (494A>G). The antigen densities of DOL-1, DFL, and DFW were only moderately reduced.

    CONCLUSION: DOL-1 and DOL-2 belong to the weak D type 4 cluster of RHD alleles. Together with DMI, DFL, and DFW they represent D variants with amino acid substitutions located at extracellular loops 3 or 4 lining the RhD protein vestibule. These substitutions were of minor influence on antigen density while adjacent substitutions in the transmembraneous section caused weak D antigen expression. All these D variants were partial D and alloanti-D immunizations have been observed in DOL-1, DMI, and DFL carriers. The substitution at position 170 causes partial D although located deep in the vestibule.

  • 2.
    Ledent, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Laboratoriemedicinskt centrum, Transfusionsmedicin och klinisk immunologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Berlin, Gösta
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Laboratoriemedicinskt centrum, Transfusionsmedicin och klinisk immunologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Factors influencing white cell removal from red cell concentrates by filtration1996Inngår i: Transfusion, ISSN 0041-1132, E-ISSN 1537-2995, Vol. 36, nr 8, s. 714-718Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The preparation of blood components by hard centrifugation results in red cell concentrates with a small amount of plasma. The influence of various plasma factors, temperature, and storage time on white cell reduction by filtration was studied. STUDY

    DESIGN AND METHODS: Red cell concentrates were suspended in 100 mL of saline- adenine-glucose-mannitol (SAGMAN) solution or in SAGMAN solution in which 5 or 10 mL had been replaced with an equal amount of fresh plasma, albumin (4%), or heat-inactivated plasma. After overnight storage at 4 degrees C, filtration at a slow flow rate (2 hours) was performed. The effect of temperature was studied by filtration at 4 degrees C and 37 degrees C. To study the influence of storage time, red cell concentrates were stored for 4 to 8 hours or 14 to 20 hours at 4 degrees C and filtered through another model of filter. The number of white cells was counted microscopically or by flow cytometry.

    RESULTS: When 5 or 10 mL of plasma was added, a significantly smaller number of white cells were found after filtration than were found in the SAGMAN control (the median difference between pairs: 23.6 × 10(6) for 5 mL [p = 0.006] and 14.9 × 10(6) for 10 mL [p = 0.003]). The number of white cells was significantly higher with 10 mL of albumin than with 10 mL of plasma (difference, 15.0 × 10(6); p = 0.006). When heat-inactivated plasma was used, the number of white cells was significantly lower than when fresh plasma was used (difference, 0.3 × 10(6); p = 0.009). Filtration at 37 degrees C resulted in a 64-percent reduction in white cells and that at 4 degrees C led to a 99.7-percent reduction (p = 0.006). When the second filter was used, a slight but significantly lower number of white cells was found in the red cell concentrate stored for 14 to 20 hours than in that stored for 4 to 8 hours (difference, 0.03 × 10(6); p < 0.001).

    CONCLUSION: The amount of plasma in the red cell concentrate and the storage time and temperature are important factors in the outcome of white cell reduction by filtration. The effect of plasma does not seem to be due to a general influence of protein or to the activity of complement or fibrinogen.

  • 3.
    Ledent, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Laboratoriemedicinskt centrum, Transfusionsmedicin och klinisk immunologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Berlin, Gösta
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Laboratoriemedicinskt centrum, Transfusionsmedicin och klinisk immunologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Inadequate white cell reduction by bedside filtration of red cell concentrates1994Inngår i: Transfusion, ISSN 0041-1132, E-ISSN 1537-2995, Vol. 34, nr 9, s. 765-768Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: White cell filtration of red cell concentrates is often performed at the bedside, in the ward, with the filter inserted in the blood administration line. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of this filtration method and compare it to filtration in the blood bank.

    Study Design and Methods: One-day-old, buffy coat-reduced, hard-packed red cell concentrates in saline-adenine-glucose-mannitol solution were filtered through different filters designed for bedside or laboratory use. With filters designed for bedside use, filtration of red cells was performed under laboratory conditions at fast flow (10 min) or under bedside conditions at slow flow (2 hours). The remaining white cells were counted microscopically. Filters designed for laboratory use were evaluated at fast flow, and the number of contaminating white cells was counted by flow cytometry.

    Results: With bedside fllters, a significantly higher contamination of white cells was found In the units filtered at slow flow than at fast flow, regardless of the filter used. The number of units with >5 x 106 white cells was 52 (78%) of 67 filtered at slow flow compared to 11 (23%) of 47 at fast flow, all filters taken together. This difference in white cell contamination was mainly due to an increase of polymorphonuclear cells in the red cell concentrates filtered at slow flow. With filters designed for laboratory use, 0 to 2 percent of units (n = 1448) were contaminated with >5 x 106 white cells.

    Conclusion: Bedside filtration for white cell reduction at slow flow is inefficient for 1-day-old, buffy coat-reduced red cell concentrates.

  • 4.
    Palfi, Miodrag
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för molekylär och klinisk medicin, Transfusionsmedicin. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Laboratoriemedicinskt centrum, Klinisk immunologi och transfusionsmedicin.
    Berg, Sören
    Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och vård, Anestesiologi. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Hjärtcentrum, Thorax-kärlkliniken.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för molekylär och klinisk medicin, Klinisk immunologi. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Laboratoriemedicinskt centrum, Klinisk immunologi och transfusionsmedicin.
    Berlin, Gösta
    Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för molekylär och klinisk medicin, Transfusionsmedicin. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Laboratoriemedicinskt centrum, Klinisk immunologi och transfusionsmedicin.
    A randomized controlled trial of transfusion-related acute lung injury: Is plasma from multiparous blood donors dangerous?2001Inngår i: Transfusion, ISSN 0041-1132, E-ISSN 1537-2995, Vol. 41, nr 3, s. 317-322Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) and other posttransfusion reactions may be caused by granulocyte and/or HLA antibodies, which are often present in blood from multiparous donors. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of plasma from multiparous donors with those of plasma from donors with no history of transfusion or pregnancy (control plasma) in a prospective, randomized, double-blind, crossover study. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Intensive care patients, judged to need at least 2 units of plasma, were randomly assigned to receive a unit of control plasma and, 4 hours later, a plasma unit from a multiparous donor (=3 live births) or to receive the plasma units in opposite order. The patients were closely monitored, and body temperature, blood pressure, and heart rate were recorded. Blood samples for analysis of blood gases, TNFa, IL-1 receptor antagonist, soluble E selectin, and C3d complement factor were collected at least on four occasions (before and after the transfusion of each unit). RESULTS: Transfusion of plasma from multiparous donors was associated with significantly lower oxygen saturation and higher TNFa concentrations than transfusion of control plasma. The mean arterial pressure increased significantly after the transfusion of control plasma, whereas plasma from multiparous donors had no effect on it. Five posttransfusion reactions were observed in 100 patients, in four cases after the transfusion of plasma from multiparous donors. CONCLUSION: Plasma from multiparous blood donors may impair pulmonary function in intensive care unit patients.

  • 5.
    Sandgren, Per
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Berlin, Gösta
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Diagnostikcentrum, Klinisk immunologi och transfusionsmedicin.
    Tynngård, Nahreen
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för mikrobiologi och molekylär medicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Diagnostikcentrum, Klinisk kemi. Region Östergötland, Diagnostikcentrum, Klinisk immunologi och transfusionsmedicin.
    Treatment of platelet concentrates with ultraviolet C light for pathogen reduction increases cytokine accumulation2016Inngår i: Transfusion, ISSN 0041-1132, E-ISSN 1537-2995, Vol. 56, nr 6, s. 1377-1383Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUNDPathogen reduction technologies use photoactive substances in combination with ultraviolet (UV) light to inactivate pathogens. A new method uses only UVC light for pathogen reduction. This study assesses the effects of UVC light treatment on cytokine release in platelet (PLT) concentrates (PCs). STUDY DESIGN AND METHODSA PC with 35% plasma and 65% PLT additive solution (SSP+) was prepared from five buffy coats. Three such PCs were pooled and divided into 3 units. One unit was used as a nonirradiated control, the second was a gamma-irradiated control, and the third unit was treated with UVC light technology. Ten units of each type were investigated. Cytokine release was analyzed on Days 1, 5, and 7 of storage. Correlation between cytokines, PLT surface markers, and hemostatic properties was investigated. RESULTSSwirling was well preserved and pH was above the reference limit of 6.4 during storage of PLTs in all groups. Cytokine levels increased during storage in all groups but to a larger degree in PCs treated with UVC light. Only weak correlation was found between cytokines and PLT surface markers (ramp;lt;0.5). However, several cytokines showed strong correlation (ramp;gt;0.6) with the PLTs ability to promote clot retraction. CONCLUSIONUVC treatment resulted in increased release from PLT alpha granules as evident by a higher cytokine release compared to nonirradiated and gamma-irradiated PCs. The clinical relevance of these findings needs to be further evaluated.

  • 6.
    Smolowicz, AG
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för molekylär och klinisk medicin, Transfusionsmedicin.
    Villman, K
    Berlin, Gösta
    Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för molekylär och klinisk medicin, Transfusionsmedicin. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Laboratoriemedicinskt centrum, Klinisk immunologi och transfusionsmedicin.
    Tidefelt, U
    Kinetics of peripheral blood stem cell harvests during a single apheresis. 1999Inngår i: Transfusion, ISSN 0041-1132, E-ISSN 1537-2995, Vol. 39, s. 403-409Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 7. Tynell, Elsa
    et al.
    Norda, Rut
    Ekermo, Bengt
    Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för molekylär och klinisk medicin, Transfusionsmedicin. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Laboratoriemedicinskt centrum, Klinisk immunologi och transfusionsmedicin.
    Sanner, Margareta
    Andersson, Soren
    Bjorkman, Anders
    False-reactive microbiologic screening test results in Swedish blood donors - how big is the problem? A survey among blood centers and deferred donors2007Inngår i: Transfusion, ISSN 0041-1132, E-ISSN 1537-2995, Vol. 47, nr 1, s. 80-89Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Screening of blood donors for markers of transfusion-transmissible infectious agents leads to a varying number of false-reactive test results and sometimes thereby temporary or permanent deferral of donors and also to loss of collected units. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Data on false-reactive screening test results in 2002 and 2003 were collected from 19 blood centers in Sweden. A questionnaire was sent to donors deferred because of false-reactive screening test results to investigate their perception of the information and their reaction to the deferral. RESULTS: Testing of 21,189 samples from new donors and 423,543 donations from regular and/or repeat donors produced 1,059 false-reactive test results, mostly from hepatitis C virus antibody testing, and 299 deferrals. Six different human immunodeficiency virus tests led to between 0.02 and 0.2 percent false-reactive results. The deferral rate varied considerably between different counties. Of 204 deferred donors contacted, 180 (88%) answered the questionnaire. More than 80 percent were worried about their test results and worry was more common among those who did not feel sufficiently informed. CONCLUSION: The results imply that there is a need for a more standardized approach to the screening of blood donors and donations with the aim of minimizing the number of false-reactive screening test results. They also emphasize the importance of appropriate information and support to deferred donors.

  • 8.
    Tynngård, Nahreen
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Regionstyrelsen, Enheten för forskningsstöd Ledningsstaben.
    Boknäs, Niklas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för mikrobiologi och molekylär medicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Centrum för kirurgi, ortopedi och cancervård, Hematologiska kliniken US.
    Trinks, Marie
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Diagnostikcentrum, Klinisk immunologi och transfusionsmedicin.
    Dreimane, Arta
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Centrum för kirurgi, ortopedi och cancervård, Hematologiska kliniken US.
    Berlin, Gösta
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Diagnostikcentrum, Klinisk immunologi och transfusionsmedicin.
    Storage-induced change in platelet transfusion response evaluated by serial transfusions from one donor to one patient2019Inngår i: Transfusion, ISSN 0041-1132, E-ISSN 1537-2995, Vol. 59, nr 2, s. 723-728Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND

    Storage of platelet concentrates (PCs) results in storage lesions with possible detrimental effects on platelet recovery after transfusion, which might affect their ability to prevent or arrest bleeding. The aim of this study was to compare the quality of PCs stored for 1 to 3 or 5 to 7 days by assessing the corrected count increment (CCI) after transfusion. To isolate the effects of storage time, we studied serial transfusions of PCs obtained from one donor and one donation, and transfused to one single recipient after storage for 1 to 3 days and 5 to 7 days.

    STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS

    Platelets were obtained from one donor by apheresis, divided into two units (>240 × 109platelets/unit) and stored for 1 to 3 and 5 to 7 days, respectively, before transfusion. The PCs were transfused on normal indications to patients undergoing treatment at the hematology ward. Platelet count was measured before and after transfusion.

    RESULTS

    Thirty patients concluded the study according to the protocol. The mean storage time was 2.4 ± 0.7 and 5.7 ± 0.8 days for platelets transfused on Days 1 to 3 and 5 to 7, respectively. Storage for 5 to 7 days decreased the 1‐hour transfusion response as compared to platelets stored 1 to 3 days, from a CCI of 17 ± 7 to 13 ± 5. Despite this decrease, 86% of the 5 to 7 days stored PCs resulted in a CCI above the cutoff value for a successful transfusion of 7.5, which was not significantly different to PCs stored for 1 to 3 days.

    CONCLUSION

    Storage of PCs for 5 to 7 days only slightly altered the transfusion response.

  • 9.
    Tynngård, Nahreen
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Transfussionsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Laboratoriemedicinskt centrum, Klinisk immunologi och transfusionsmedicin.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Klinisk kemi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Laboratoriemedicinskt centrum, Klinisk kemi.
    Trinks, Marie
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Studer, Monika
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Berlin, Gösta
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Laboratoriemedicinskt centrum, Klinisk immunologi och transfusionsmedicin.
    The quality of platelet concentrates produced by COBE Spectra and Trima Accel during storage for 7 days as assessed by in vitro methods2008Inngår i: Transfusion, ISSN 0041-1132, E-ISSN 1537-2995, Vol. 48, nr 4, s. 715-722Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The quality of PLT concentrates (PCs) can be evaluated using various in vitro methods. A new technique, free oscillation rheometry (FOR), can be used to monitor coagulation properties of PCs and gives information on clotting time and coagulum elasticity. This study compared the quality of apheresis PCs produced by COBE Spectra and Trima Accel during storage for 7 days using in vitro tests including FOR.

    Study design and methods: Apheresis PCs were collected with the COBE Spectra (n=10) and Trima Accel (n=10) cell separators. Swirling, blood gases and metabolic parameters were analyzed on day 0. Samples taken on day 1, 5 and 7 were also analyzed for hypotonic shock response (HSR), P-selectin and GPIb expression and evaluation of coagulation by FOR.

    Results: Swirling, HSR and percent GPIb expressing PLTs were well maintained for 7 days whereas glucose decreased and lactate increased significantly during storage for both Spectra and Trima PCs. Percent P-selectin expressing cells increased to the same extent in both types of PCs during storage. pH increased between day 0 and 1 but then decreased. The clotting time remained constant throughout the storage period whereas the development of elasticity was reduced on day 5 and 7 compared to day 1 (p<0.05) for both types of PCs.

    Conclusion: The results indicate that the PLT quality after storage for 7 days is well preserved although activation of PLTs occurs during storage as assessed by in vitro tests. No difference in platelet quality was observed between Spectra and Trima produced PCs.

  • 10.
    Tynngård, Nahreen
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Transfussionsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Studer, Monika
    Lindahl, Tomas L
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Klinisk kemi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Trinks, Marie
    Berlin, Gösta
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    The effect of gamma irradiation on the quality of apheresis platelets during storage for 7 days2008Inngår i: Transfusion, ISSN 0041-1132, E-ISSN 1537-2995, Transfusion, Vol. 48, nr 8, s. 1669-1675Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:This study compares the quality of gamma-irradiated versus nonirradiated platelet (PLT) concentrates (PCs) during storage for 7 days as assessed by various in vitro methods. A new technique, free oscillation rheometry (FOR), which measures clotting time and coagulum elasticity, was also used to evaluate the PLT function.

    Study design and methods: Single-donor PLTs were collected by apheresis technique (n = 20). The PLTs from each donor were divided into two PCs, one gamma-irradiated with 25 Gy and the other used as a nonirradiated control. Blood gases, metabolic variables, and swirling were analyzed from Day 0. Samples taken on Days 1, 5, and 7 were also analyzed for hypotonic shock response (HSR), P-selectin, and glycoprotein (GP)Ib expression by flow cytometry and coagulation by FOR.

    Results: Swirling, HSR, and the percentage of GPIb-expressing cells were well maintained for 7 days of storage. pH was always within accepted range (6.4-7.4). Glucose decreased and lactate increased during the storage period (p < 0.05). P-selectin expression increased during storage (p < 0.05). The FOR clotting time remained constant, whereas the build-up of elasticity was slower after storage (p < 0.05). No difference was found between irradiated and nonirradiated PCs.

    Conclusion: The results indicate a well-preserved quality of gamma-irradiated apheresis PLTs during storage for 7 days as assessed by in vitro methods, with no difference compared to nonirradiated PLTs.

  • 11.
    Tynngård, Nahreen
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för mikrobiologi och molekylär medicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Diagnostikcentrum, Klinisk immunologi och transfusionsmedicin. Region Östergötland, Diagnostikcentrum, Klinisk kemi.
    Trinks, Marie
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Diagnostikcentrum, Klinisk immunologi och transfusionsmedicin.
    Berlin, Gösta
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Diagnostikcentrum, Klinisk immunologi och transfusionsmedicin.
    In vitro function of platelets treated with ultraviolet C light for pathogen inactivation: a comparative study with nonirradiated and gamma-irradiated platelets2015Inngår i: Transfusion, ISSN 0041-1132, E-ISSN 1537-2995, Vol. 55, nr 6, s. 1169-1177Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundDuring storage of platelet concentrates (PCs) replication of contaminating pathogens might occur, which can be prevented by various pathogen inactivation (PI) methods using photoactive substances in combination with ultraviolet (UV) light. A new method uses only UVC light for PI without photoactive substances. This study evaluates the in vitro function, including hemostatic properties (clot formation and elasticity), of platelets (PLTs) treated with UVC light. Study Design and MethodsA PC with 35% plasma and 65% PLT additive solution (SSP+) was prepared from five buffy coats. Three PCs were pooled and divided into 3units. One unit was used as a nonirradiated control, the second was a gamma-irradiated control, and the third unit was treated with UVC light. In vitro variables including analysis of coagulation by free oscillation rheometry were analyzed on Days 1, 5, and 7 of storage. Ten units in each group were investigated. ResultsSwirling was well preserved, and the pH level was higher than the reference limit (6.4) during storage of PLTs in all groups. Glycolysis and PLT activation were higher for UVC-treated PLTs but the clot-forming capacity was unaffected. However, immediately after UVC treatment, the clot elastic properties were slightly affected. Hypotonic shock response decreased immediately after UVC treatment but recovered partly during the storage period. ConclusionUVC treatment affected the in vitro properties, but PLT quality and storage stability were well preserved for up to 7 days, and the in vitro hemostatic capacity of UVC-treated PLTs was only minimally altered. The clinical relevance of these changes needs to be evaluated in controlled trials.

  • 12.
    Tynngård, Nahreen
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för inflammationsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Diagnostikcentrum, Klinisk immunologi och transfusionsmedicin. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Diagnostikcentrum, Klinisk kemi.
    Trinks, Marie
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för inflammationsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Diagnostikcentrum, Klinisk immunologi och transfusionsmedicin.
    Berlin, Gösta
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för inflammationsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Diagnostikcentrum, Klinisk immunologi och transfusionsmedicin.
    In vitro properties of platelets stored in a small container for pediatric transfusion2014Inngår i: Transfusion, ISSN 0041-1132, E-ISSN 1537-2995, Vol. 54, nr 6, s. 1562-1568Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    The quality of a platelet (PLT) concentrate (PC) is affected by the number of PLTs in relation to the size and gas permeability of the container. This study evaluates the in vitro function, including hemostatic properties (clot formation and elasticity), of PLTs stored in a container of standard or small size.

    STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS:

    PCs with 30% plasma and 70% PLT additive solution were prepared from buffy coats. Two PCs were pooled and divided into the following containers: 1 unit and ½ a unit into a 1.8-L container (reference container) and ½ a unit into a 0.45-L container (test container). In a second set of experiments ¼ of a unit was stored in the reference and test containers. Swirling, PLT count, blood gases, metabolic variables, PLT activation markers, hypotonic shock response (HSR), and coagulation by free oscillation rheometry were analyzed during 7 days of storage.

    RESULTS:

    Swirling was well preserved and pH was acceptable (6.4-7.4) during storage of PLTs in both containers. Glycolysis and PLT activation were higher when storing ½ and ¼ of a unit in the reference container and storage of ¼ of a unit in the reference container resulted in the largest decrease in HSR. The clotting time was similar whereas the clot elasticity was slightly lower for PLTs when stored as ½ and ¼ of a unit in the reference container.

    CONCLUSION:

    Storage of a low number of PLTs benefits by storage in a small container in terms of better maintained in vitro properties.

  • 13.
    Tynngård, Nahreen
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Transfusionsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Diagnostikcentrum, Klinisk immunologi och transfusionsmedicin.
    Trinks, Marie
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Transfusionsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Diagnostikcentrum, Klinisk immunologi och transfusionsmedicin.
    Berlin, Gösta
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Transfusionsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Diagnostikcentrum, Klinisk immunologi och transfusionsmedicin.
    In vitro properties of platelets stored in three different additive solutions2012Inngår i: Transfusion, ISSN 0041-1132, E-ISSN 1537-2995, Vol. 52, nr 5, s. 1003-1009Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: New platelet (PLT) additive solutions (PASs) contain compounds that might improve the storage conditions for PLTs. This study compares the in vitro function, including hemostatic properties (clot formation and elasticity), of PLTs in T-Sol, Composol, or SSP+ during storage for 5 days. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Fifteen buffy coats were pooled and divided into three parts. PLT concentrates (PCs) with 30% plasma and 70% PAS (T-Sol, Composol, or SSP+) were prepared (n = 10). Swirling, PLT count, blood gases, metabolic variables, PLT activation markers, and coagulation by free oscillation rheometry (FOR) were analyzed on Days 1 and 5. RESULTS: Swirling was well preserved and pH acceptable (6.4-7.4) during storage for all PASs. Storage of PLTs in T-Sol led to a decrease in PLT count whereas the number of PLTs was unchanged in Composol or SSP+ PCs. PLTs in T-Sol showed higher glucose metabolism than PLTs in Composol or in SSP+. At the end of storage PLTs in T-Sol had higher spontaneous activation and lower ability to respond to an agonist than PLTs in Composol or SSP+. PLTs in all the PASs had a similar ability to promote clot formation and clot elasticity. CONCLUSION: Storage of PLTs in Composol or in SSP+ improved the quality of PCs in terms of better maintained PLT count, lower glucose metabolism, lower spontaneous activation, and improved response to a PLT agonist compared to PLTs in T-Sol. PLTs stored in the various PASs had similar hemostatic properties. These findings make Composol and SSP+ interesting alternatives as PASs.

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