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  • 1.
    Backteman, K
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Ledent, E
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Transfusion Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Berlin, Gösta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Transfusion Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    A rapid and reliable flow cytometric routine method for counting leucocytes in leucocyte-depleted platelet concentrates2002In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 83, no 1, p. 29-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Objectives: To ensure a proper quality control it is important to use a reliable method to count low numbers of leucocytes in leucocyte-reduced platelet concentrates (PCs). Materials and Methods: A modified flow cytometric method for counting low numbers of leucocytes, based on a reference population contained in tubes with an exact number of fluorescent beads and staining with propidium iodide was used. To increase the number of events, the original sample volume was increased. Results: There was a good correlation in the number of leucocytes (r = 0.99) between the modified flow cytometric method and microscopy of samples from unfiltered and expected numbers from serially diluted PCs. Samples from leucocyte-reduced PCs obtained by apheresis or filtered buffy coats showed no correlation between results from the modified flow cytometric method and microscopy (Nageotte). Conclusion: Counting by microscopy gave a lower number of leucocytes than the modified flow cytometric method when counting a low number of cells. However, analysis of the serially diluted PCs proved that the modified flow cytometric method was reliable and rapid, making it suitable for clinical routine use.

  • 2.
    Banch Clausen, Frederik
    et al.
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Denmark; Natl Univ Singapore, Singapore.
    Barrett, Angela Natalie
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Denmark; Natl Univ Singapore, Singapore.
    Akkok, Cigdem Akalin
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Armstrong-Fisher, Sylvia
    Scottish Natl Blood Transfus Serv, Scotland.
    Danielsson Bergstrom, Karolina
    Orebro Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Trucco Boggione, Carolina
    Univ Nacl Rosario, Argentina.
    Sillhagen Baevre, Mette
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Choolani, Mahesh
    Natl Univ Singapore City, Singapore.
    Christiansen, Mette
    Aarhus Univ, Denmark.
    Cotorruelo, Carlos
    Univ Nacl Rosario, Argentina.
    Drnovsek, Tadeja Dovc
    Blood Transfus Ctr Slovenia, Slovenia.
    Finning, Kirstin
    NHS Blood and Transplant, England.
    Guz, Katarzyna
    Inst Hematol and Transfus Med, Poland.
    de Haas, Masja
    Sanquin Blood Supply Fdn, Netherlands.
    Haimila, Katri
    Finnish Red Cross Blood Serv, Finland.
    Halldorsdottir, Anna Margret
    Landspitali Univ Hosp, Iceland.
    Hellberg, Asa
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Henny, Christine
    Interreg Blood Transfus SRC, Switzerland.
    Holmertz, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Al Houghton, Jayne
    Royal Devon and Exeter NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Hyland, Catherine
    Australian Red Cross Blood Serv, Australia.
    Jakobsen, Marianne Antonius
    Odense Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Kvitland, Mona Andersen
    St Olavs Hosp, Norway.
    Lambert, Mark
    Natl Blood Ctr, Ireland.
    Legler, Tobias J.
    Georg August Univ, Germany.
    Liew, Yew-Wah
    Australian Red Cross Blood Serv, Australia.
    Muniz-Diaz, Eduardo
    Banc Sang and Teixits, Spain.
    Mortberg, Anette
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Niederhauser, Christoph
    Interreg Blood Transfus SRC, Switzerland.
    Nogues, Nuria
    Banc Sang and Teixits, Spain.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Hematopoiesis and Developmental Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Olsson, Martin L.
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Orzinska, Agnieszka
    Inst Hematol and Transfus Med, Poland.
    Parks, Michael
    Nonacus Ltd, England.
    Rietkotter, Eva
    LADR GmbH MVZ Dr Kramer and Kollegen, Germany.
    Ryan, Helen
    Natl Blood Ctr, Ireland.
    Sachs, Ulrich J.
    Justus Liebig Univ, Germany.
    van der Schoot, Ellen
    Sanquin Res CLB, Netherlands.
    Silcock, Lee
    Nonacus Ltd, England.
    Steffensen, Rudi
    Aalborg Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Sulin, Kati
    Finnish Red Cross Blood Serv, Finland.
    Sorensen, Anne Solling
    Naestved Hosp, Denmark.
    Tarrant, Sarah
    NHS Blood and Transplant, England.
    Thorlacius, Steinunn
    Landspitali Univ Hosp, Iceland.
    Wienzek-Lischka, Sandra
    Justus Liebig Univ, Germany.
    Wikman, Agneta
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Wulf-Johansson, Helle
    Naestved Hosp, Denmark.
    Zupan, Mojca
    Blood Transfus Ctr Slovenia, Slovenia.
    Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Denmark; Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Noninvasive fetal RHD genotyping to guide targeted anti-D prophylaxis-an external quality assessment workshop2019In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 114, no 4, p. 386-393Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Objectives Fetal RHD genotyping of cell-free fetal DNA from RhD-negative pregnant women can be used to guide targeted antenatal and postnatal anti-D prophylaxis for the prevention of RhD immunization. To assure the quality of clinical testing, we conducted an external quality assessment workshop with the participation of 28 laboratories. Materials and Methods Aliquots of pooled maternal plasma were sent to each laboratory. One sample was positive, and the second sample was negative for fetal RHD, verified by pre-workshop testing using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) analysis of RHD exons 4, 5, 7 and 10. Plasma samples were shipped at room temperature. A reporting scheme was supplied for data collection, including questions regarding the methodological setup, results and clinical recommendations. Different methodological approaches were used, all employing qPCR with a total of eight different combinations of RHD exon targets. The samples were tested blindly. Results Fetal RHD genotyping was performed with no false-negative and no false-positive results. One inconclusive result was reported for the RHD-positive sample, and four inconclusive results were reported for the RHD-negative sample. All clinical conclusions were satisfactory. Conclusion This external quality assessment workshop demonstrates that despite the different approaches taken to perform the clinical assays, fetal RHD genotyping is a reliable laboratory assay to guide targeted use of Rh prophylaxis in a clinical setting.

  • 3.
    Benjamin, R J
    et al.
    American Red Cross.
    Bianco, C
    Canadian Blood Service.
    Seed, C R
    Australian Red Cross Blood Service.
    Yang, H
    Australian Red Cross Blood Service.
    Lee, J
    Australian Red Cross Blood Service.
    Keller, A J
    Australian Red Cross Blood Service.
    Wendel, S
    Hospital Sirio Libanes.
    Biagini, S
    Hospital Sirio Libanes.
    Murray, J
    Shanghai Blood Centre.
    Turek, P
    Thomayer Teaching Hospital.
    Moftah, F M
    National Blood Transfus Service.
    Kullaste, R
    North Estonia Medical Centre.
    Pillonel, J
    French Institute Public Health Surveillance.
    Danic, B
    Etab Francais Sang.
    Bigey, F
    Etab Francais Sang.
    Follea, G
    Etab Francais Sang.
    Seifried, E
    Goethe University of Frankfurt.
    M Mueller, M
    Goethe University of Frankfurt.
    Lin, C K
    Hong Kong Red Cross Blood Transfus Service.
    Makroo, R N
    Indraprastha Apollo Hospital.
    Grazzini, G
    Italian National Blood Centre.
    Pupella, S
    Italian National Blood Centre.
    Velati, C
    Italian National Blood Centre.
    Tadokoro, K
    Japanese Red Cross Society.
    Bravo Lindoro, A
    Institute Nacl Pediat.
    DArtote Gonzalez, A
    Banco Central Sangre Siglo XXI.
    Giner, V T
    Centre Nacl Transfus Sanguinea.
    Flanagan, P
    New Zealand Blood Service.
    Olaussen, R W
    Oslo University of Hospital.
    Letowska, M
    Institute Hematol and Transfus Med, Warsaw.
    Rosiek, A
    Institute Hematol and Transfus Med, Warsaw.
    Poglod, R
    Institute Hematol and Transfus Med, Warsaw.
    Zhiburt, E
    Pirogov Russian National Medical Surg Centre.
    Mali, P
    Blood Transfus Centre Slovenia.
    Rozman, P
    Blood Transfus Centre Slovenia.
    Gulube, S
    S African National Blood Service.
    Castro Izaguirre, E
    Centre Transfus Cruz Roja Espanola Madrid.
    Ekermo, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Transfusion Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Barnes, S M
    NHS Blood and Transplant.
    McLaughlin, L
    University of Vienna.
    Reesink, H W
    University of Amsterdam.
    Deferral of males who had sex with other males2011In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 101, no 4, p. 339-367Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 4.
    Chew, Michelle
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    A comprehensive ovine model of blood transfusion2014In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 106, p. 153-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The growing awareness of transfusion-associated morbidity and mortality necessitates investigations into the underlying mechanisms. Small animals have been the dominant transfusion model but have associated limitations. This study aimed to develop a comprehensive large animal (ovine) model of transfusion encompassing: blood collection, processing and storage, compatibility testing right through to post-transfusion outcomes.

    Materials and methods

    Two units of blood were collected from each of 12 adult male Merino sheep and processed into 24 ovine-packed red blood cell (PRBC) units. Baseline haematological parameters of ovine blood and PRBC cells were analysed. Biochemical changes in ovine PRBCs were characterized during the 42-day storage period. Immunological compatibility of the blood was confirmed with sera from potential recipient sheep, using a saline and albumin agglutination cross-match. Following confirmation of compatibility, each recipient sheep (n = 12) was transfused with two units of ovine PRBC.

    Results

    Procedures for collecting, processing, cross-matching and transfusing ovine blood were established. Although ovine red blood cells are smaller and higher in number, their mean cell haemoglobin concentration is similar to human red blood cells. Ovine PRBC showed improved storage properties in saline–adenine–glucose–mannitol (SAG-M) compared with previous human PRBC studies. Seventy-six compatibility tests were performed and 17·1% were incompatible. Only cross-match compatible ovine PRBC were transfused and no adverse reactions were observed.

    Conclusion

    These findings demonstrate the utility of the ovine model for future blood transfusion studies and highlight the importance of compatibility testing in animal models involving homologous transfusions.

  • 5. Coste, J
    et al.
    Reesink, HW
    Engelfriet, CP
    Laperche, S
    Brown, S
    Busch, MP
    Cuijpers, HT
    Elgin, R
    Ekermo, B
    Epstein, JS
    Flesland, O
    Heier, HE
    Henn, G
    Hernandez, JM
    Hewlett, IK
    Hyland, C
    Keller, AJ
    Krusius, T
    Levicnik-Stezina, S
    Levy, G
    Lin, CK
    Margaritis, AR
    Muylle, L
    Neiderhauser, C
    Pastila, S
    Pillonel, J
    Pineau, J
    van der Poel, CL
    Politis, C
    Roth, WK
    Sauleda, S
    Seed, CR
    Sondag-Thull, D
    Stramer, SL
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Strong, M
    Vamvakas, EC
    Velati, C
    Vesga, MA
    Zanetti, A
    Implementation of donor screening for infectious agents transmitted by blood by nucleic acid technology: update to 20032005In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 88, no 4, p. 289-298Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 6.
    Ekermo, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Transfusion Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Implementation of donor screening for infectious agents transmitted by blood by nucleic acid technology2002In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 82, no 2, p. 87-111Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Ledent, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Transfusion Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Semple, John W.
    Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Canada.
    Berlin, Gösta
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Transfusion Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    White Blood Cell Subsets in Buffy Coat-Derived Platelet Concentrates: The Effect of Pre- and Poststorage Filtration2000In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 79, no 4, p. 235-241Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Objectives: Our objective was to study the effect of storage time on the filtration of platelet concentrates (PCs). We compared the total number of white blood cells (WBC), as well as the distribution of WBC subsets, in units filtered before and after storage.

    Materials and Methods: Buffy coat-derived PCs were filtered either fresh or after 5 days of storage, and total WBC were enumerated by flow cytometry. WBC subsets were analyzed by flow cytometry with three-color fluorescence.

    Results: The total number of white cells before filtration was significantly higher in fresh units compared with stored units, whereas in postfiltration samples the number of white cells was significantly lower in the fresh compared with the stored units. Although absolute numbers were significantly reduced, filtration also induced significant changes in the proportions of subsets in both fresh and stored units; the percentage of T cells was decreased, whereas the percentage of B cells and monocytes was increased after filtration.

    Conclusion: Our results suggest that prestorage WBC filtration of platelet concentrates is superior in reducing the absolute numbers of WBC. However, both pre- and poststorage WBC filtration significantly affect the proportions of WBC in the final product, decreasing the number of T cells while apparently increasing the proportion of MHC class II-positive cell populations.

  • 8.
    Ledent, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Transfusion Medicine and Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wasteson, Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Berlin, Gösta
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Transfusion Medicine and Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Growth Factor Release during Preparation and Storage of Platelet Concentrates1995In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 68, no 4, p. 205-209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The platelet content of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), a mitogen stored in the alpha-granules, was studied during preparation and storage of platelet concentrates (PC) and compared to the growth-promoting activity of platelets, β-thromboglobulin (β-TG) and lactate dehydrogenase (LD). We compared PC prepared from platelet-rich plasma (PRP-PC; n= 10) and from buffy coat. Two different pre-preparation storage periods of the buffy coat were used: 4h (BC-PC:4h; n = 10) and 24 h (BC-PC: 24h; n = 5). The platelet content of PDGF and β-TG was measured by a RIA technique and the growth-promoting activity by incorporation of 3H-thymidine in stimulated fibroblasts. The platelet content of PDGF, β-TG and the growth-promoting activity of the platelets decreased in a similar way during preparation and storage of PRP-PC (31 ±2, 35±2 and 33±7%, respectively, at day 5 of storage; mean ± SEM). The release of LD was minor (3.9 ±0.5% at day 5). At day 1 of storage the platelet content of PDGF was significantly better preserved in BC-PC:4h than in BD-PC:24h (88±2 and 81 ±3%, respectively; p = 0.03). Comparing BC-PC:4h and PRP-PC we found a significantly better preservation of PDGF in BC-PC:4h until day 3 of storage (80±2 and 75±1%, respectively at day 3; p = 0.046). In conclusion the preparation of PC according to the PRP method initially induces a higher loss of PDGF, and hence of the growth-promoting activity, than the BC method.

  • 9.
    Lieberman, L.
    et al.
    University of Health Network, Canada.
    Devine, D. V.
    Canadian Blood Serv, Canada; University of British Columbia, Canada,.
    Reesink, H. W.
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Panzer, S.
    Medical University of Vienna, Austria.
    Wong, J.
    Australian Red Cross Blood Serv, Australia.
    Raison, T.
    Australian Red Cross Blood Serv, Australia.
    Benson, S.
    Australian Red Cross Blood Serv, Australia.
    Pink, J.
    Australian Red Cross Blood Serv, Australia.
    Leitner, G. C.
    University of Vienna, Austria.
    Horvath, M.
    University of Vienna, Austria.
    Compernolle, V.
    Belgian Red Cross Flanders, Belgium.
    Prado Scuracchio, P. S.
    Blood Bank Hospital Sirio Libanes, Brazil.
    Wendel, S.
    Blood Bank Hospital Sirio Libanes, Brazil.
    Delage, G.
    Hema Quebec, Canada.
    Nahirniak, S.
    Alberta Health Serv, Canada.
    Dongfu, X.
    Shanghai Blood Centre, Peoples R China.
    Krusius, T.
    Finnish Red Cross Blood Serv, Finland.
    Juvonen, E.
    Finnish Red Cross Blood Serv, Finland.
    Sainio, S.
    Finnish Red Cross Blood Serv, Finland.
    Cazenave, J. -P.
    Etab Francais Sang EFS Alsace, France.
    Guntz, P.
    Etab Francais Sang EFS Alsace, France.
    Kientz, D.
    Etab Francais Sang EFS Alsace, France.
    Andreu, G.
    Institute National Transfus Sanguine INTS, France.
    Morel, P.
    EFS Bourgogne Franche Comte, France.
    Seifried, E.
    German Red Cross, Germany.
    Hourfar, K.
    German Red Cross, Germany.
    Lin, C. K.
    Hong Kong.
    O'Riordan, J.
    National Blood Centre, Ireland.
    Raspollini, E.
    Fdn Ca Granda Osped Maggiore Policlin, Italy.
    Villa, S.
    Fdn Ca Granda Osped Maggiore Policlin, Italy.
    Rebulla, P.
    Fdn Ca Granda Osped Maggiore Policlin, Italy; Fdn Ca Granda Osped Maggiore Policlin, Italy.
    Flanagan, P.
    New Zealand Blood Serv, New Zealand.
    Teo, D.
    Health Science Author, Singapore.
    Lam, S.
    Health Science Author, Singapore.
    Ang, A. L.
    Health Science Author, Singapore.
    Lozano, M.
    University of Clin Hospital, Spain.
    Sauleda, S.
    Blood and Tissue Bank Catalonia, Spain.
    Cid, J.
    University of Clin Hospital, Spain.
    Pereira, A.
    University of Clin Hospital, Spain.
    Ekermo, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Niederhauser, C.
    Blood Transfus Serv SRC Berne, Switzerland.
    Waldvogel, S.
    Blood Transfus Serv SRC, Switzerland.
    Fontana, S.
    Blood Transfus Serv SRC Berne, Switzerland.
    Desborough, M. J.
    John Radcliffe Hospital, England.
    Pawson, R.
    John Radcliffe Hospital, England.
    Li, M.
    Blood Syst Inc, AZ, USA.
    Kamel, H.
    Blood Syst Inc, AZ, USA.
    Busch, M.
    Blood Syst Inc, AZ, USA.
    Qu, L.
    University of Pittsburgh, PA, USA; Institute Transfus Med, PA, USA.
    Triulzi, D.
    University of Pittsburgh, PA, USA; Institute Transfus Med, PA, USA.
    Prevention of transfusion-transmitted cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection: Standards of care2014In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 107, no 3, p. 276-311Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 10.
    Meunier, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Petersson, A.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Good, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Berlin, Gösta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Validation of a haemoglobin dilution method for estimation of blood loss2008In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 95, no 2, p. 120-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Objectives: Analysis of haemoglobin (Hb) dilution after bleeding is a simple, inexpensive and non-invasive method to estimate blood loss. Blood volume is estimated, taking sex, weight and height into account. The Hb concentration before and after blood loss is analysed and, from the difference, the blood loss volume can be calculated assuming a normovolemic subject. Although widely used this method has never been validated.

    Material and Methods: The Hb concentration of 21 blood donors was analysed before and up to 4 days after a standard blood donation and in another 18 blood donors the Hb concentration was analysed before and on day 4, 6, 8, 11 and 14 after blood donation. The blood volume of each donor was calculated and the donated blood volume was estimated by weighing. We calculated the blood loss by the Hb dilution method and compared the calculated value with the donated blood volume.

    Results: The mean donated blood volume was 442 ± 10 ml, whereas the mean calculated blood loss was 152 ± 214 ml using the Hb concentration of the first day after donation and 301 ± 145 ml with the Hb concentration of day 6 after blood donation after which no further Hb decrease was observed. The directly measured Hb concentration was always higher than the calculated/expected Hb concentration based on the blood donation volume.

    Conclusions: The Hb dilution method underestimates the true blood loss by more than 30% after a moderate blood loss of approximately 10% of the total blood volume.

  • 11.
    Panzer, S
    et al.
    Medical University of Vienna, Austria .
    Engelbrecht, S
    Alfred Hospital, Australia .
    Cole-Sinclair, M F
    St Vincents Hospital, Australia .
    Wood, E M
    Monash University, Australia .
    Wendel, S
    Hospital Sirio Libanes, Brazil .
    Biagini, S
    Hospital Sirio Libanes, Brazil .
    Zhu, Z
    Institute National Transfus Sanguine, France .
    Lefrere, J-J
    Institute National Transfus Sanguine, France .
    Andreu, G
    Institute National Transfus Sanguine, France .
    Zunino, T
    Institute National Transfus Sanguine, France .
    Cabaud, J-J
    Institute National Transfus Sanguine, France .
    Rouger, P
    Institute National Transfus Sanguine, France .
    Garraud, O
    University of Lyon, France .
    Janetzko, K
    Heidelberg University, Germany .
    Mueller-Steinhardt, M
    Heidelberg University, Germany .
    van der Burg, P
    Sanquin Bloedvoorziening, Netherlands .
    Brand, A
    Leiden University, Netherlands .
    Agarwal, P
    SGPGIMS, India .
    Triyono, T
    University of Gadjah Mada, Indonesia .
    Gharehbaghian, A
    Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Science, Iran .
    Manny, N
    Hadassah Hebrew University of Medical Centre, Israel .
    Zelig, O
    Hadassah Hebrew University of Medical Centre, Israel .
    Takeshita, A
    Hamamatsu University of School Med, Japan .
    Yonemura, Y
    Kumamoto University Hospital, Japan .
    Fujihara, H
    Hamamatsu University, Japan .
    Nollet, K E
    Fukushima Medical University, Japan .
    Ohto, H
    Fukushima Medical University, Japan .
    Han, K-S
    Seoul National University, South Korea .
    Nadarajan, V S
    University of Malaya, Malaysia .
    Berlin, Gösta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine.
    Sandler, S G.
    Georgetown University, DC USA .
    Strauss, R G
    University of Iowa Hospital and Clin, IA USA .
    Reesink, H W
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    Education in transfusion medicine for medical students and doctors2013In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 104, no 3, p. 250-272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 12.
    Reesink, H W
    et al.
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    Lee, J
    Australian Red Cross Blood Serv, Australia .
    Keller, A
    Australian Red Cross Blood Serv, Australia .
    Dennington, P
    Australian Red Cross Blood Serv, Australia .
    Pink, J
    Australian Red Cross Blood Serv, Australia .
    Holdsworth, R
    Australian Red Cross Blood Serv, Australia .
    Schennach, H
    TILAK University of Clin Regional Hospital, Austria .
    Goldman, M
    Canadian Blood Serv, Canada .
    Petraszko, T
    Canadian Blood Serv, Canada .
    Sun, J
    Shanghai Blood Centre, Peoples R China .
    Meng, Y
    Shanghai Blood Centre, Peoples R China .
    Qian, K
    Shanghai Blood Centre, Peoples R China .
    Rehacek, V
    University Hospital, Czech Republic .
    Turek, P
    Thomayer Hospital, Czech Republic .
    Krusius, T
    Finnish Red Cross Blood Serv, Finland .
    Juvonen, E
    Finnish Red Cross Blood Serv, Finland .
    Tiberghien, P
    Etab Francais Sang, France .
    Legrand, D
    Etab Francais Sang, France .
    Semana, G
    Etab Francais Sang Bretagne, France .
    Muller, J Y
    Etab Francais Sang, France .
    Bux, J
    German Red Cross Blood Serv W, Germany .
    Reil, A
    German Red Cross Blood Serv W, Germany .
    Lin, C K
    Hong Kong Red Cross Blood Transfus Serv, Peoples R China .
    Daly, H
    National Blood Centre, Ireland .
    McSweeney, E
    National Blood Centre, Ireland .
    Porretti, L
    Fdn Ca Granda Osped Maggiore Policlin, Italy .
    Greppi, N
    Fdn Ca Granda Osped Maggiore Policlin, Italy .
    Rebulla, P
    Fdn Ca Granda Osped Maggiore Policlin, Italy .
    Okazaki, H
    Blood Serv Headquarters, Japan .
    Sanchez-Guerrero, S A
    National Institute Cancerol, Mexico .
    Baptista-Gonzalez, H A
    Medical Hospital, Mexico .
    Martinez-Murillo, C
    Siglo XXI National Medical Centre Mexican Social Secur, Mexico .
    Guerra-Marquez, A
    La Raza National Medical Centre Mexican Social Secur, Mexico .
    Rodriguez-Moyado, H
    Consejo Mexicano Hematol, Mexico .
    Middelburg, R A
    Sanquin JJ van Rood Centre, Netherlands TRIP, Netherlands .
    Wiersum-Osselton, J C
    Sanquin JJ van Rood Centre, Netherlands TRIP, Netherlands .
    Brand, A
    Sanquin JJ van Rood Centre, Netherlands TRIP, Netherlands .
    van Tilburg, C
    New Zealand Blood Serv, New Zealand .
    Dinesh, D
    New Zealand Blood Serv, New Zealand .
    Dagger, J
    New Zealand Blood Serv, New Zealand .
    Dunn, P
    New Zealand Blood Serv, New Zealand .
    Brojer, E
    Institute Hematol and Transfus Med, Poland .
    Letowska, M
    Institute Hematol and Transfus Med, Poland .
    Maslanka, K
    Institute Hematol and Transfus Med, Poland .
    Lachert, E
    Institute Hematol and Transfus Med, Poland .
    Uhrynowska, M
    Institute Hematol and Transfus Med, Poland .
    Zhiburt, E
    Russian Transfusionist Assoc, Russia .
    Palfi, Miodrag
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Transfusion Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Berlin, Gösta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Transfusion Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Frey, B M
    Blood Transfus Serv SRC, Switzerland .
    Puig Rovira, L
    Banc Sang and Teixits Catalonia, Spain .
    Muniz-Diaz, E
    Crus Roja Espanola, Spain .
    Chapman, C
    NHSBT Newcastle Centre, England .
    Green, A
    NHSBT, England .
    Massey, E
    NHSBT, England .
    Win, N
    NHSBT Tooting Centre, England .
    Williamson, L
    NHSBT, England .
    Silliman, C C
    Bonfils Blood Centre, CO 80230 USA .
    Chaffin, D J
    University of Rochester, NY 14642 USA .
    Tomasulo, P
    Blood Syst, AZ USA .
    Land, K J
    Blood Syst, TX USA Blood Syst, CA USA .
    Norris, P J
    Blood Syst, TX USA Blood Syst, CA USA .
    Illoh, O C
    US FDA, MD 20852 USA .
    Davey, R J
    US FDA, MD 20852 USA .
    Benjamin, R J
    Amer Red Cross, MD 20855 USA .
    Eder, A F
    Amer Red Cross, MD 20855 USA .
    McLaughlin, L
    Amer Red Cross, MD 20855 USA .
    Kleinman, S
    University of Vienna, Austria .
    Measures to prevent transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI)2012In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 103, no 3, p. 231-259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 13.
    Roth, W K
    et al.
    Germany.
    Busch, M P
    USA.
    Schuller, A
    Germany.
    Ismay, S
    Australia.
    Cheng, A
    Australia.
    Seed, C R
    Australia.
    Jungbauer, C
    Austria.
    Minsk, P M
    Belarus.
    Sondag-Thull, D
    Belgium.
    Wendel, S
    Brazil.
    Levi, J E
    Brazil.
    Fearon, M
    Canada.
    Delage, G
    Canada.
    Xie, Y
    China.
    Jukic, I
    Croatia.
    Turek, P
    Czech Republic.
    Ullum, H
    Denmark.
    Tefanova, V
    Estonia.
    Tilk, M
    Estonia.
    Reimal, R
    Estonia.
    Castren, J
    Finland.
    Naukkarinen, M
    Finland.
    Assal, A
    France.
    Jork, C
    Germany.
    Hourfar, M K
    Germany.
    Michel, P
    Germany.
    Offergeld, R
    Germany.
    Pichl, L
    Germany.
    Schmidt, M
    Germany.
    Schottstedt, V
    Germany.
    Seifried, E
    Germany.
    Wagner, F
    Germany.
    Weber-Schehl, M
    Germany.
    Politis, C
    Greece.
    Lin, C K
    Hong Kong.
    Tsoi, W C
    Hong Kong.
    O'Riordan, J
    Ireland.
    Gottreich, A
    Israel.
    Shinar, E
    Israel.
    Yahalom, V
    Israel.
    Velati, C
    Italy.
    Satake, M
    Japan.
    Sanad, N
    Kuwait.
    Sisene, I
    Latvia.
    Bon, A H
    Malaysia.
    Koppelmann, M
    the Netherlands.
    Flanagan, P
    New Zealand.
    Flesland, O
    Norway.
    Brojer, E
    Poland.
    Lętowska, M
    Poland.
    Nascimento, F
    Portugal.
    Zhiburt, E
    Russia.
    Chua, S S
    Singapore.
    Teo, D
    Singapore.
    Levicnik Stezinar, S
    Slovenia.
    Vermeulen, M
    South Africa.
    Reddy, R
    South Africa.
    Park, Q
    South Korea.
    Castro, E
    Spain.
    Eiras, A
    Spain.
    Gonzales Fraile, I
    Spain.
    Torres, P
    Spain.
    Ekermo, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Transfusion Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Niederhauser, C
    Switzerland.
    Chen, H
    Taiwan.
    Oota, S
    Tailand.
    Brant, L J
    United Kingdom.
    Eglin, R
    United Kingdom.
    Jarvis, L
    United Kingdom.
    Mohabir, L
    United Kingdom.
    Brodsky, J
    USA.
    Foster, G
    USA.
    Jennings, C
    USA.
    Notari, E
    USA.
    Stramer, S
    USA.
    Kessler, D
    USA.
    Hillyer, C
    USA.
    Kamel, H
    USA.
    Katz, L
    USA.
    Taylor, C
    USA.
    Panzer, S
    Austria.
    Reesink, H W
    the Netherlands.
    International survey on NAT testing of blood donations: expanding implementation and yield from 1999 to 2009.2012In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 102, no 1, p. 82-90Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Södergren, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tynngård, Nahreen
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Berlin, Gösta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Ramström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Responsiveness of platelets during storage studied with flow cytometry - formation of platelet subpopulations and LAMP-1 as new markers for the platelet storage lesion2016In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 110, no 2, p. 116-125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and ObjectivesStorage lesions may prevent transfused platelets to respond to agonists and arrest bleeding. The aim of this study was to evaluate and quantify the capacity of platelet activation during storage using flow cytometry and new markers of platelet activation. Materials and MethodsActivation responses of platelets prepared by apheresis were measured on days 1, 5, 7 and 12. In addition, comparisons were made for platelet concentrates stored until swirling was affected. Lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1), P-selectin and phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure were assessed by flow cytometry on platelets in different subpopulations in resting state or following stimulation with platelet agonists (cross-linked collagen-related peptide (CRP-XL), PAR1- and PAR4-activating peptides). ResultsThe ability to form subpopulations upon activation was significantly decreased already at day 5 for some agonist combinations. The agonist-induced exposure of PS and LAMP-1 also gradually decreased with time. Spontaneous exposure of P-selectin and PS increased with time, while spontaneous LAMP-1 exposure was unchanged. In addition, agonist-induced LAMP-1 expression clearly discriminated platelet concentrates with reduced swirling from those with retained swirling. This suggests that LAMP-1 could be a good marker to capture changes in activation capacity in stored platelets. ConclusionThe platelet activation potential seen as LAMP-1 exposure and fragmentation into platelet subpopulations is potential sensitive markers for the platelet storage lesion.

  • 15.
    Toss, Fredrik
    et al.
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Edgren, Gustaf
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Soder Sjukhuset, Sweden.
    Berlin, Gösta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Stegmayr, Bernd
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Witt, Volker
    UKKJ Med Univ Vienna, Austria.
    Does prophylactic calcium in apheresis cause more harm than good? - Centre heterogeneity within the World Apheresis Association Register prevents firm conclusions2018In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 113, no 7, p. 632-638Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and objectivesMaterials and methodsSymptomatic hypocalcaemia is common during apheresis procedures based on citrate-based anticoagulants. As a consequence, patients often receive prophylactic calcium treatment. However, a recent publication based on the World Apheresis Association (WAA) register suggested harmful effects of such prophylactic calcium use. Recognizing possible limitations in the previous WAA register analyses, we critically re-evaluate the data, to test whether a change in prophylactic calcium usage may be warranted. Using the WAA register, we reanalysed previous data by means of centre and treatment type stratification, to explore the role of prophylactic calcium as a risk factor for adverse events. ResultsConclusionThere was large variability in adverse event rates dependent on the centre performing the apheresis procedure and dependent on the type of procedure. When this variability was accounted for, there was no clear effect of calcium administration on risk of adverse effects. Shortcomings in the previous WAA register analyses may have failed to account for important confounding factors resulting in a substantial overestimation of the risk attributable to calcium usage. Overall our findings do not support a negative effect of prophylactic calcium administration in the apheresis setting.

  • 16.
    Tynngård, Nahreen
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Transfusion Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Trinks, M.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Transfusion Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Berlin, Gösta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    In vitro quality of platelets during prolonged storage after washing with three platelet additive solutions2012In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 102, no 1, p. 32-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Objectives Patients with anaphylactic transfusion reactions require washed platelet concentrates (PCs) for subsequent platelet (PLT) transfusions. New PLT additive solutions (PASs) contain substances that might be beneficial for the preservation of PLT function during storage. This study compares the quality of PLTs washed and stored with T-Sol, Composol or SSP+. Study Design and Methods Fifteen buffy coats were pooled and divided into three parts. PCs with 30% plasma and 70% PAS (T-Sol, Composol or SSP+) were prepared. Washing was performed on day 5 of storage. Ten PCs were prepared and washed with each PAS. In vitro variables including haemostatic function (clotting time and clot retraction) were analysed on day 5 before, directly after and up to 2days after washing. Results Swirling was well preserved, and pH was within acceptable limits (6·4-7·4) during storage for all PASs. The PLT number was reduced by washing for all PASs, and T-Sol PCs had a further decrease during storage. PLTs in T-Sol were spontaneously more activated and had lower capacity to respond to an agonist than Composol or SSP+ PLTs. The haemostatic function was only slightly changed by washing and during postwashing storage. Conclusion PLTs washed with T-Sol, Composol or SSP+ had good in vitro quality for two days after washing despite absence of glucose. PLTs in T-Sol were more affected by the washing procedure and subsequent storage than Composol or SSP+ PLTs as judged by higher spontaneous activation. © 2011 The Author(s). Vox Sanguinis © 2011 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

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