liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
12 1 - 50 of 91
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Eriksson, H
    Hall, C
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    B-type natriuretic peptides as markers of left ventricular function in the elderly2001In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 22, p. 304-304Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Eriksson, H
    Nylander, E
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Overtreatment as well as undertreatment of heart failure is common in elderly patients in primary health care. Objective diagnostics tools are needed2001In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 22, p. 143-143Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Lindbäck, Johan
    Uppsala University.
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala University.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Similar outcome with an invasive strategy in men and women with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndromes From the Swedish Web-System for Enhancement and Development of Evidence-Based Care in Heart Disease Evaluated According to Recommended Therapies (SWEDEHEART)2011In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 32, no 24, p. 3128-3136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims To assess gender differences in outcome with an early invasive or non-invasive strategy in patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE ACS). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods and results We included 46 455 patients [14 819 women (32%) and 31 636 men (68%)] from the SWEDEHEART register, with NSTE ACS, between 2000 and 2006, and followed them for 1 year. In the non-invasive strategy arm, the relative risk (RR) of death was (women vs. men) 1.02 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.94-1.11] and in the invasive strategy arm 1.12 (95% CI, 0.96-1.29). After adjustment for baseline differences between the genders, with propensity score and discharge medication, there was a similar trend towards better outcome among women in both the early non-invasive cohort [RR 0.90 (95% CI, 0.82-0.99)] and the early invasive cohort [RR 0.90 (95% CI, 0.76-1.06)], although it did not reach statistical significance in the early invasive cohort. Results were similar with the combined endpoint death/myocardial infarction. An early invasive treatment was associated with a marked, and similar, mortality reduction in women [RR 0.46 (95% CI, 0.38-0.55)] and men [RR 0.45 (95% CI, 0.40-0.52)], without interaction with gender. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion In this large cohort of patients with NSTE ACS, reflecting real-life management, women and men had similar and better outcome associated with an invasive strategy.

  • 4. Bjorklund, E
    et al.
    Dellborg, M
    Lindahl, B
    Pehrsson, K
    Stenestrand, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Van de Werf, F
    Wallentin, L
    Outcome of myocardial infarction in the unselected population is vastly different from samples of eligible patients in large-scale clinical trials2002In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 23, p. 625-625Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5. Björklund, Erik
    et al.
    Stenestrand, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Lindbäck, Johan
    Svensson, Leif
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Pre-hospital thrombolysis delivered by paramedics is associated with reduced time delay and mortality in ambulance-transported real-life patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction2006In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 27, no 10, p. 1146-1152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: There are sparse data on the impact of pre-hospital thrombolysis (PHT) in real-life patients. We therefore evaluated treatment delays and outcome in a large cohort of ambulance-transported real-life patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) according to PHT delivered by paramedics or in-hospital thrombolysis. Methods and results: Prospective cohort study used data from the Swedish Register of Cardiac intensive care on patients admitted to the coronary care units of 75 Swedish hospitals in 2001-2004. Ambulance-transported thrombolytic-treated patients younger than age 80 with a diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction were included. Patients with PHT (n = 1690) were younger, had a lower prevalence of co-morbid conditions, fewer complications, and a higher ejection fraction (EF) than in-hospital-treated patients (n = 3685). Median time from symptom onset to treatment was 113 min for PHT and 165 min for in-hospital thrombolysis. One-year mortality was 7.2 vs. 11.8% for PHT and in-hospital thrombolysis, respectively. In a multivariable analysis, after adjusting for baseline characteristics and rescue angioplasty, PHT was associated with lower 1-year mortality (odds ratio 0.71, 0.55-0.92, P = 0.008). Conclusion: When compared with regular in-hospital thrombolysis, pre-hospital diagnosis and thrombolysis with trained paramedics in the ambulances are associated with reduced time to thrombolysis by almost 1 h and reduced adjusted 1-year mortality by 30% in real-life STEMI patients. © The European Society of Cardiology 2006. All rights reserved.

  • 6. Cowie, MR
    et al.
    Jourdain, P
    Maisel, A
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Follath, F
    Isnard, R
    Luchner, A
    McDonagh, T
    Mair, J
    Nieminen, M
    Francis, G
    Clinical applications of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) testing2003In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 24, no 19, p. 1710-1718Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many claims have been made in recent years regarding the utility of plasma B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) concentration measurements in the diagnosis, risk stratification and monitoring of patients with heart failure. This paper summarizes the current evidence and provides guidance for practising clinicians. Overall, plasma BNP testing appears to be of most value in the diagnostic arena, where it is likely to improve the performance of non-specialist physicians in diagnosing heart failure. In clinical practice, BNP testing is best used as a 'rule out' test for suspected cases of new heart failure in breathless patients presenting to either the outpatient or emergency care settings, it is not a replacement for echocardiography and full cardiological assessment, which will be required for patients with an elevated BNP concentration. Although work is ongoing in establishing the 'normal' values of BNP, heart failure appears to be highly unlikely below a plasma concentration of 100 pg/ml. However, as BNP levels rise with age and are affected by gender, comorbidity and drug therapy, the plasma BNP measurement should not be used in isolation from the clinical context.

  • 7.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Filippatos, Gerasimos
    University of Athens.
    Maggioni, Aldo
    ANMCO Research Centre.
    Tavazzi, Luigi
    GVM Care and Research.
    Zannad, Faiez
    Nancy University.
    Heart Failure Pilot protocol2010In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 31, no 18, p. 2184-2186Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Davidson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Husberg, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Oldgren, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cost-effectiveness of dabigatran compared with warfarin for patients with atrial fibrillation in Sweden2013In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 177-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients with atrial fibrillation have a significantly increased risk of thromboembolic events such as ischaemic stroke, and patients are therefore recommended to be treated with anticoagulation treatment. The most commonly used anticoagulant consists of vitamin K antagonist such as warfarin. A new oral anticoagulation treatment, dabigatran, has recently been approved for stroke prevention among patients with atrial fibrillation. The purpose of this study was to estimate the cost-effectiveness of dabigatran as preventive treatment of stroke and thromboembolic events compared with warfarin in 65-year-old patients with atrial fibrillation in Sweden. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanA decision analytic simulation model was used to estimate the long-term (20-year) costs and effects of the different treatments. The outcome measures are the number of strokes prevented, life years gained, and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) gained. Costs and effect data are adjusted to a Swedish setting. Patients below 80 years of age are assumed to start with dabigatran 150 mg twice a day and switch to 110 mg twice a day at the age of 80 years due to higher bleeding risk. The price of dabigatran in Sweden is Euro2.82 (Swedish kronor 25.39) per day for both doses. The cost per QALY gained for dabigatran compared with warfarin is estimated at Euro7742, increasing to Euro12 449 if dabigatran is compared with only well-controlled warfarin treatment. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanDabigatran is a cost-effective treatment in Sweden, as its incremental cost-effectiveness ratio is below the normally accepted willingness to pay limit.

  • 9.
    Dickstein, Kenneth
    et al.
    Norge.
    Cohen-Solal, Alain
    Frankrike.
    Filippatos, Gerasimos
    Grekland.
    McMurray, John J.V.
    Storbritannien.
    Ponikowski, Piotr
    Polen.
    Poole-Wilson, Philip Alexander
    Storbrittanien.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    van Veldhuisen, Dirk J
    Nederländerna.
    Atar, Dan
    Norge.
    Hoes, Arno W.
    Nederländerna.
    Keren, Andre
    Israel.
    Mebazaa, Alexandre
    Frankrike.
    Nieminen, Markku
    Finland.
    Priori, Silvia Giuliana
    Italien.
    Swedberg, Karl
    Sverige.
    ESC Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic heart failure 20082008In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 29, p. 2388-2442Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

       

  • 10.
    Edner, Magnus
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Benson, Lina
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Lund, Lars H.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Association between renin-angiotensin system antagonist use and mortality in heart failure with severe renal insufficiency: a prospective propensity score-matched cohort study2015In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 36, no 34, p. 2318-2326Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims In heart failure (HF) with reduced ejection fraction (EF), renin-angiotensin receptor (RAS) antagonists reduce mortality. However, severe renal insufficiency was an exclusion criterion in trials. We tested the hypothesis that RAS antagonists are associated with reduced mortality also in HF with severe renal insufficiency. Methods and results We studied patients with EF less than= 39% registered in the prospective Swedish Heart Failure Registry. In patients with creatinine greater than221 mu mol/L or creatinine clearance less than30 mL/min, propensity scores for RAS-antagonist use were derived from 36 variables. The association between RAS antagonist use and all-cause mortality was assessed with Cox regression in a cohort matched 1:1 based on age and propensity score. To assess consistency, we performed the same analysis as a positive control in patients without severe renal insufficiency. Between 2000 and 2013, there were 24 283 patients of which 2410 [age, mean (SD), 82 (9), 45% women] had creatinine greater than221 mu mol/L or creatinine clearance less than30 mL/min and were treated (n = 1602) or not treated (n = 808) with RAS antagonists. In the matched cohort of 602 vs. 602 patients [age 83 (8), 42% women], RAS antagonist use was associated with 55% [95% confidence interval (CI) 51-59] vs. 45% (41-49) 1-year survival, P less than 0.001, with a hazard ratio (HR) for mortality of 0.76 (95% CI 0.67-0.86, P less than 0.001). In positive control patients without severe renal insufficiency [n = 21 873; age 71 (12), 27% women], the matched HR was 0.79 (95% CI 0.72-0.86, P less than 0.001). Conclusion In HF with severe renal insufficiency, the use of RAS antagonists was associated with lower all-cause mortality. Prospective randomized trials are needed before these findings can be applied to clinical practice.

  • 11.
    Fransson, Sven-Göran
    et al.
    Department of Thoracic Radiology, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Nylander, Eva
    epartment of Clinical Physiology, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Vascular injury following cardiac catheterization, coronary angiography, and coronary angioplasty1994In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 232-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    All vascular injuries occurring at this hospital department over a 5-year period (1987-91) as a result of cardiac catheterization, coronary angiography, or coronary angioplasty (PTCA) and requiring transfusion, surgical consultation, or repair, are reviewed. Such complications may occur late and, to detect cases not apparent from the protocol accompanying every examination, a questionnaire was sent to all surgical clinics in the region asking for details of vascular surgical intervention after angiography. The present review of 4879 examinations disclosed 18 patients with 19 vascular injuries (0.39%); four of them were detected by the questionnaire. The types of injury were: pseudoaneurysm (12), thrombembolic episode (4), and excessive bleeding (3). Of the patients with a vascular complication 11 (61%) were receiving anticoagulation treatment, compared to 10% in the whole series; two others suffered from a coagulopathic state. Catheterization was difficult or severe atherosclerosis was present in three, inadvertent mobilization occurred in one, and unintentional puncture distal to the common femoral artery occurred in two patients. With the increasing use of invasive diagnostic and interventional procedures in cardiovascular diseases, knowledge of the type and frequency of possible complications is important, especially of those that may occur late. In the present study anticoagulation, coagulation disorders, and cardiac catheterization combined with brachial puncture and angiography all predisposed to a vascular complication.

  • 12.
    Hansson, Emma C
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jidéus, Lena
    University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Åberg, Bengt
    Blekinge Hospital, Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Bjursten, Henrik
    Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Dreifaldt, Mats
    University Hospital and University Health Care Research Centre, Örebro, Sweden.
    Holmgren, Anders
    University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden..
    Ivert, Torbjörn
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nozohoor, Shahab
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Barbu, Mikael
    Blekinge Hospital, Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Svedjeholm, Rolf
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jeppsson, Anders
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Coronary artery bypass grafting-related bleeding complications in patients treated with ticagrelor or clopidogrel: a nationwide study2016In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 189-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: Excessive bleeding impairs outcome after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Current guidelines recommend withdrawal of clopidogrel and ticagrelor 5 days (120 h) before elective surgery. Shorter discontinuation would reduce the risk of thrombotic events and save hospital resources, but may increase the risk of bleeding. We investigated whether a shorter discontinuation time before surgery increased the incidence of CABG-related major bleeding complications and compared ticagrelor- and clopidogrel-treated patients.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: All acute coronary syndrome patients in Sweden on dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and ticagrelor (n = 1266) or clopidogrel (n = 978) who underwent CABG during 2012-13 were included in a retrospective observational study. The incidence of major bleeding complications according to the Bleeding Academic Research Consortium-CABG definition was 38 and 31%, respectively, when ticagrelor/clopidogrel was discontinued <24 h before surgery. Within the ticagrelor group, there was no significant difference between discontinuation 72-120 or >120 h before surgery [odds ratio (OR) 0.93 (95% confidence interval, CI, 0.53-1.64), P = 0.80]. In contrast, clopidogrel-treated patients had a higher incidence when discontinued 72-120 vs. >120 h before surgery (OR 1.71 (95% CI 1.04-2.79), P = 0.033). The overall incidence of major bleeding complications was lower with ticagrelor [12.9 vs. 17.6%, adjusted OR 0.72 (95% CI 0.56-0.92), P = 0.012].

    CONCLUSION: The incidence of CABG-related major bleeding was high when ticagrelor/clopidogrel was discontinued <24 h before surgery. Discontinuation 3 days before surgery, as opposed to 5 days, did not increase the incidence of major bleeding complications with ticagrelor, but increased the risk with clopidogrel. The overall risk of major CABG-related bleeding complications was lower with ticagrelor than with clopidogrel.

  • 13.
    Hare, David L.
    et al.
    University of Melbourne, Heidelberg, Australia; Austin Heatlh, Heidelberg, Australia .
    Toukhsati, Samia R.
    Austin Heatlh, Heidelberg, Australia .
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Depression and cardiovascular disease: a clinical review2014In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 35, no 21, p. 1365-1372Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and depression are common. Patients with CVD have more depression than the general population. Persons with depression are more likely to eventually develop CVD and also have a higher mortality rate than the general population. Patients with CVD, who are also depressed, have a worse outcome than those patients who are not depressed. There is a graded relationship: the more severe the depression, the higher the subsequent risk of mortality and other cardiovascular events. It is possible that depression is only a marker for more severe CVD which so far cannot be detected using our currently available investigations. However, given the increased prevalence of depression in patients with CVD, a causal relationship with either CVD causing more depression or depression causing more CVD and a worse prognosis for CVD is probable. There are many possible pathogenetic mechanisms that have been described, which are plausible and that might well be important. However, whether or not there is a causal relationship, depression is the main driver of quality of life and requires prevention, detection, and management in its own right. Depression after an acute cardiac event is commonly an adjustment disorder than can improve spontaneously with comprehensive cardiac management. Additional management strategies for depressed cardiac patients include cardiac rehabilitation and exercise programmes, general support, cognitive behavioural therapy, antidepressant medication, combined approaches, and probably disease management programmes.

  • 14.
    Hatle, L.
    et al.
    University Hospital, Linkøping, Sweden.
    Sutherland, G.R.
    University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven, Belgium.
    Regional myocardial function - A new approach2000In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 21, no 16, p. 1337-1357Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    [No abstract available]

  • 15.
    Held, C
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Tornvall, P
    Stenestrand, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Effects of revascularization within 14 days of hospital admission due to acute coronary syndrome on 1-year mortality in patients with previous coronary artery bypass graft surgery2007In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 316-325Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To determine whether revascularization within 14 days reduces 1-year mortality in patients with a previous CABG admitted for non-ST-elevation ACS. Current guidelines for patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) include early revascularization. The evidence is derived from studies, in which patients with previous coronary artery by-pass graft (CABG) surgery often were excluded and thus insufficient to support a similar strategy in these high-risk patients in whom coronary interventions are associated with lower success and higher complication rates. Methods and results: A cohort of 10 469 patients < 80 years old from a national registry, admitted to coronary care units in Sweden, was studied. We obtained 1-year mortality data from the Swedish National Cause of Death Registry. Relative risk (RR) in patients undergoing revascularization within 14 days (n = 4269) of admission compared to those who did not (n = 6200) was calculated by using multivariable logistic regression analyses and propensity scores for the likelihood of early revascularization. At 1-year, unadjusted mortality was 5.4% in the revascularized group and 13.1% in the conservatively treated group. In multiple regression analyses, revascularization was associated with a reduction of 1-year mortality (RR 0.67, 95% CI, 0.56-0.81, P < 0.001). Conclusion: In patients with a previous CABG admitted for ACS, revascularization within 14 days of hospital admission was associated with a marked reduction in 1-year mortality, supporting an early invasive approach also in this subset of patients. © The European Society of Cardiology 2007. All rights reserved.

  • 16.
    Husted, S E
    et al.
    Dep. of medicine and cardioloy Aarhus, Danmark.
    Wallentin, L
    Uppsala.
    Lagerqvist, B
    Uppsala.
    Kontny, F
    Ullevål, Norge.
    Ståhle, E
    Uppsala.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Benefits of extended treatment with dalteparin in patients with unstable coronary artery disease eligible for revascularization2002In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 23, no 15, p. 1213-1218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims The FRISC II trial demonstrated that, for patients with unstable coronary artery disease, an early invasive strategy following acute treatment with dalteparin and aspirin, was superior to a more conservative approach. We evaluated whether it is beneficial to extend treatment with dalteparin to patients eligible for revascularization but for whom these procedures are performed after the initial hospital stay. Methods and Results As a subanalysis of FRISC II, the efficacy and clinical safety of extended dalteparin treatment (5000 or 7500 IU. 12 h-1 to day 90) compared with placebo was assessed in 1601 patients randomized to a non-invasive group who underwent revascularization only when necessary because of recurring symptoms, (re)infarction, or severe ischaemia. By day 90, 440 patients had undergone revascularization: 267 of these procedures occurred during the double-blind period. All patients initially received acute treatment (5-7 days from day 1) with dalteparin (120 IU / kg-1 12 h-1). The incidence of death and/or myocardial infarction was monitored until revascularization or day 45 and until revascularization or day 90. There was a significant difference in the estimated probability of death and/or myocardial infarction until revascularization or day 90 in favour of dalteparin (log-rank test, P=0╖0415) and there was a significant reduction in death and/or myocardial infarction in favour of extended dalteparin treatment at day 45, with a 57% relative risk reduction (P=0╖0004). At day 90 the relative risk reduction was 29%. The safety profile of extended dalteparin treatment was similar to that of acute usage. Conclusion Extended dalteparin treatment for up to 45 days is effective and safe as a bridging therapy for patients with unstable coronary artery disease awaiting revascularization. ⌐ 2002 The European Society of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 17.
    Jaarsma, T
    et al.
    Univ Maastricht, Maastricht, Netherlands Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden Cty Hosp Ryhov, Dept Cardiol, Jonkoping, Sweden Univ Calif Los Angeles, Sch Nursing, Los Angeles, CA 90024 USA.
    Stromberg, A
    Martensson, J
    Univ Maastricht, Maastricht, Netherlands Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden Cty Hosp Ryhov, Dept Cardiol, Jonkoping, Sweden Univ Calif Los Angeles, Sch Nursing, Los Angeles, CA 90024 USA.
    Dracup, K
    Univ Maastricht, Maastricht, Netherlands Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden Cty Hosp Ryhov, Dept Cardiol, Jonkoping, Sweden Univ Calif Los Angeles, Sch Nursing, Los Angeles, CA 90024 USA.
    The European heart failure self-care behaviour scale: development and revision2000In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 21, p. P1248-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    The Netherlands Heart Foundation, The Hague.
    Broadening the real world of health care: what we can do for heart failure patients2002In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 425; author reply 425-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 19.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    et al.
    University of Maastricht.
    Halfens, R
    University of Maastricht.
    Huijer Abu-Saad, H
    University of Maastricht.
    Dracup, K
    University of California at Los Angeles.
    Gorgels, T
    University Hospital Maastricht.
    van Ree, J
    University of Maastricht.
    Stappers, J
    University Hospital Maastricht.
    Effects of education and support on self-care and resource utilization in patients with heart failure1999In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 20, no 9, p. 673-682Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: To test the effect of education and support by a nurse on self-care and resource utilization in patients with heart failure. METHODS: A total of 179 patients (mean age 73, 58% male, NYHA III-IV) hospitalized with heart failure were evaluated prospectively. Patients were randomized to the study intervention or to 'care as usual'. The supportive educative intervention consisted of intensive, systematic and planned education by a study nurse about the consequences of heart failure in daily life, using a standard nursing care plan developed by the researchers for older patients with heart failure. Education and support took place during the hospital stay and at a home visit within a week of discharge. Data were collected on self-care abilities, self-care behaviour, readmissions, visits to the emergency heart centre and use of other health care resources. RESULTS: Education and support from a nurse in a hospital setting and at home significantly increases self-care behaviour in patients with heart failure. Patients from both the intervention and the control group increased their self-care behaviour within 1 month of discharge, but the increase in the intervention group was significantly more after 1 month. Although self-care behaviour in both groups decreased during the following 8 months, the increase from baseline remained statistically significant in the intervention group, but not in the control group. No significant effects on resource utilization were found. CONCLUSIONS: Intensive, systematic, tailored and planned education and support by a nurse results in an increase in patients' self-care behaviour. No significant effects were found on use of health care resources. Additional organisational changes, such as longer follow-up and the availability of a heart failure specialist would probably enhance the effects of education and support.

  • 20. Jaarsma, Tiny
    et al.
    Lesman, Ivonne
    van Veldhuisen, Dirk J
    Psychology and cardiology: do not forget the heart failure patient.2008In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 29, no 9, p. 1208; author reply 1208-9Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    et al.
    University Hospital Groningen.
    Moser, D K
    University of Kentucky, College of Nursing, USA.
    beta-Blockers and sexual problems2004In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 25, no 7, p. 617; author reply 617-8Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    et al.
    University Hospital Groningen, The Netherlands
.
    van Veldhuisen, D J
    University Hospital Groningen.
    Heart failure management: how much COACH-ing is needed?2005In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 314; author reply 314-5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We were glad to find two interesting articles and an editorial in the September 2004 issue of the European Heart Journal on management of patients with heart failure (HF) in specialized programmes, e.g. HF clinics or home-based HF programmes.1–3 HF management programmes are increasingly implemented and considered as a promising method of improving the quality of HF care.1 Both papers and the editorial note that HF management programmes can be effective in improving patient outcomes with regard to readmission.1–3 The authors also point out that there still is a lack of clarity on the necessary components of an HF management programme. Most interventions described in the meta-analysis, and in the review, are heterogeneous and report on combined interventions as one treatment modality comparing this with a ‘care as usual group’. The authors of both papers conclude that ‘clinical trials in future should be conducted to compare different interventions directly’2 and that effectiveness remains to be proved in a clinical trial comparing usual HF clinic care with the combination of HF clinic with home care.3

    We are happy to inform the authors that at this moment such information is gathered in a large multi-centre study conducted in the Netherlands evaluating Outcomes of Advising and Counselling in Heart Failure (COACH), financed by the Netherlands Heart Foundation.4 Patients included in COACH are randomized in (i) care as usual (regular follow-up without HF nurse); (ii) an HF clinic (scheduled visits at the HF clinic with an HF nurse added to follow-up by a cardiologist); or (iii) an HF clinic + home care (care at the HF clinic, a multidisciplinary approach, and scheduled home visits).4 Patients are recruited from 17 centres in the Netherlands and patients are followed up for 18 months after discharge. Endpoints of the study are time to first event, readmission, mortality, costs, and quality of life. At this moment (October 2004), more then 900 patients are included in the study and final results are expected at the end of 2006. With this large-scale trial we hope to contribute further to the unanswered questions noted by the groups of Gustafsson3 and Gonseth2 regarding the dose of the intervention, and thereby contribute to the development of an optimal approach for chronic HF patients.

  • 23.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    et al.
    University Hospital Groningen.
    van Veldhuisen, D J
    University Hospital Groningen.
    Searching for dose-response in HF clinics2004In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 182; author reply 182-3Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Jacobsen, M.D.
    et al.
    Department of Medicine B, H:S Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Blegdamsvej 9, DK-2100, Copenhagen, Denmark, Department of Medicine B, Hilleroed Hospital, DK-3400 Hilleroed, Denmark.
    Wagner, G.S.
    Duke Clinical Research Institute, Durham, NC, United States.
    Holmvang, L.
    Department of Medicine B, H:S Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Blegdamsvej 9, DK-2100, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Kontny, F.
    Heart and Lung Center, Ulleval University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
    Wallentin, L.
    Department of Cardiology, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Husted, S.
    Dept. of Medicine and Cardiology A, Århus University Hospital, Århus, Denmark.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Stahle, E.
    Ståhle, E., Dept. Thorac. and Cardiovasc. Surg., University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Steffensen, R.
    Department of Medicine B, Hilleroed Hospital, DK-3400 Hilleroed, Denmark.
    Clemmensen, P.
    Department of Medicine B, H:S Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Blegdamsvej 9, DK-2100, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Quantitative T-wave analysis predicts 1 year prognosis and benefit from early invasive treatment in the FRISC II study population2005In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 112-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To investigate the prognostic value of T-wave abnormalities in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE-ACS), and whether such ECG changes may predict benefit from an early coronary angiography. Although ST-segment changes are considered the most important ECG feature in NSTE-ACS, T-wave abnormalities are the most common ECG finding. We hypothesize that a new quantitative approach to T-wave analysis could improve the prognostic value of this ECG abnormality. Methods and results: Quantitative T-wave analysis was performed on the admission ECG in 1609 patients with NSTE-ACS. Nine different categories of T-wave abnormality were analysed for their prognostic value concerning clinical outcome in patients not randomized to early coronary angiography. Also, the presence of one category (i.e. T-wave abnormality in >6 leads) was analysed for its predictive value concerning benefit from early coronary angiography. The combined study endpoint was death or myocardial infarction at 1 year follow-up. Patients with >6 leads with abnormal T-waves and concomitant ST-segment depression had a higher risk when not receiving early coronary angiography (24 vs. 12%, respectively, P = 0.003), but could be brought to the same level of risk as the remaining patients with this treatment. For non-invasively treated patients five different categories of T-wave abnormality were significantly associated with an adverse outcome. Conclusion: New quantitative T-wave analysis of the admission ECG gives additional predictive information concerning clinical outcome and identifies patients who benefit from early coronary angiography.

  • 25.
    Janzon, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Henriksson, Martin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Quality of life in unstable angina - Individual and public preferences differ in levels but are similar when measuring changes over time2002In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 23, p. 730-730Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Janzon, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Comment concerning 'Cost-effectiveness of an invasive strategy in unstable coronary artery disease' - Reply2002In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 23, no 20, p. 1634-1635Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Janzon, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Center for Medical Technology Assessment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cost-effectiveness of an invasive strategy in unstable coronary artery disease: results from the FRISC II invasive trial2002In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 31-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims The utilization and timing of revascularization in unstable coronary artery disease varies, which could have important consequences for patients and for treatment costs. The FRISC II invasive trial compared an early invasive strategy vs a non-invasive strategy with respect to the composite end-point of death and myocardial infarction as well as costs.

    Methods and Results A total of 2457 patients, median age 66 years, comprising 70% men, were randomized. We prospectively recorded the patients' use of the health service. The results were analysed in a societal perspective. There was a significant 1·7% absolute reduction in deaths and a 3·7% absolute reduction in deaths and myocardial infarctions in the invasive compared to the non-invasive group after 12 months. During the initial hospitalization a patient in the invasive group spent on average 3·9 more days in hospital than a patient in the non-invasive group. Opposite results were found for rehospitalizations. The difference in mean total costs is SEK 23 876 (P<0·001). The incermental cost-effective ratio for choosing the invasive instead of the non-invasive strategy is SEK 1 404 000 per avoided death and SEK 645 000 per avoided death or myocardial infarction

    Conclusion The high cost at the beginning of the invasive strategy is substantial. The clinical results of the FRISC II study provided evidence that the invasive strategy reduces the rate of death and myocardial infarction in patients with unstable coronary artery disease. For policy discussions concerning whether or not to implement the invasive strategy, these positive results should be balanced against the cost-consequences of the strategy.

  • 28.
    Jernberg, Tomas
    et al.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, S-14186 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hasvold, Pål
    AstraZeneca NordicBalt, Sodertalje, Sweden.
    Henriksson, Martin
    AstraZeneca NordicBalt, Sodertalje, Sweden.
    Hjelm, Hans
    Nykoping Hosp, Nykoping, Sweden.
    Thuresson, Marcus
    Statisticon AB, S-75322 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Cardiovascular risk in post-myocardial infarction patients: nationwide real world data demonstrate the importance of a long-term perspective.2015In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 36, no 19, p. 1163-1170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: Long-term disease progression following myocardial infarction (MI) is not well understood. We examined the risk of subsequent cardiovascular events in patients discharged after MI in Sweden.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: This was a retrospective, cohort study linking morbidity, mortality, and medication data from Swedish national registries. Of 108 315 patients admitted to hospital with a primary MI between 1 July 2006 and 30 June 2011 (index MI), 97 254 (89.8%) were alive 1 week after discharge and included in this study. The primary composite endpoint of risk for non-fatal MI, non-fatal stroke, or cardiovascular death was estimated for the first 365 days post-index MI and Day 366 to study completion. Risk and risk factors were assessed by Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards modelling, respectively. Composite endpoint risk was 18.3% during the first 365 days post-index MI. Age [60-69 vs. <60 years: HR (95% CI): 1.37 (1.30-1.45); 70-79 vs. <60 years: 2.13 (2.03-2.24); >80 vs. <60 years: 3.96 (3.78-4.15)], prior MI [1.44 (1.40-1.49)], stroke [1.49 (1.44-1.54)], diabetes [1.37 (1.34-1.40)], heart failure [1.57 (1.53-1.62)] and no index MI revascularisation [1.88 (1.83-1.93)] were each independently associated with a higher risk of ischaemic events or death. For patients without a combined endpoint event during the first 365 days, composite endpoint risk was 20.0% in the following 36 months.

    CONCLUSIONS: Risk of cardiovascular events appeared high beyond the first year post-MI, indicating a need for prolonged surveillance, particularly in patients with additional risk factors.

  • 29.
    Johansson, Ingela
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Why patients with myocardial infarction don't choose ambulance2002In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 23, p. 350-350Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Klingstedt, Therése
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Organic Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kostareva, A
    Almazov Federal Centre of Heart, Blood and Endocrinology, St. Petersburg, Russian Federation.
    Sjöberg, G.
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gudkova, A
    Almazov Federal Centre of Heart, Blood and Endocrinology, St. Petersburg, Russian Federation.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Organic Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biochemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sejersen, T
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Desmin L345P transgenic mice exhibit morphological and biochemical features of amyloidosis of two distinct types2010In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 31, no Suppl. 1, p. 924-925Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Being a chief intermediate filament of the muscle tissue, desmin isimplicated in the sarcomeric organization, organelle positioning and mitochondrialfunction. Various desmin mutations have been reported as a possible cause forcardiomyopathies. Several reports on transgenic mice expressing mutant desminshowed deleterious effects of mutant desmin incorporated into filaments on cardiomyocyte function, but most importantly that accumulation of unfolded proteinaggregates plays an important pathogenic role in development of desminassociatedcardiomyopathies. Thus, in desmin transgenic mice with the L345Pmutation, which interferes in a dominant-negative manner with desmin polymerization,the accumulation of intracellular and extracellular amyloidogenic proteinaggregates was shown to be the key feature along with alteration of mitochondrialstructure and function. Therefore, the aim of this study was to characterizethe nature of amyloidogenic protein aggregates in L345P desmin transgenic miceon molecular and protein level.

    Material and methods: L345P desmin transgenic mice (DM) and WT mice 40weeks old were analyzed. Myocardial cryostat 10 micron sections were stainedwith conventional techniques (hematoxilin-eosin, Congo Red). A detailed amyloidcharacterization was carried out using novel optical probes called luminescentconjugated oligothiophenes and polythiophenes (LCOs and LCPs) that specificallystain various protein aggregates and give rise to conformation dependentemission spectra.

    Results: The most prominent feature of DM mice myocardium was misfoldedprotein depositions in perivascular space and between muscle fibers. Analysisof samples from DM mouse stained with LCO or LCP revealed the presence ofaggregates emitting light with two different emission spectra. Since the spectralproperties of the LCOs or LCPs are dependent on their conformation, the appearanceof two dissimilar emission spectra indicates that the probes might bindto two different types of amyloid aggregates within the tissue. Interestingly, aggregateswith emission spectra similar to one of the two types found in the DMmouse could also be found in WT mice, but in a much lower extent, suggesting asporadic cardiac amyloid pathology in C57 Bl/6 mice at 40 weeks, probably, as anative aging attribute.

    Conclusions: The L345P desmin mutation causes focal amyloid protein depositionin heart muscle of two distinct types. White first one can be a natural attributeof C57 Bl/6 mice detected with age, another one can be specifically responsiblefor the development of desmin-related cardiomyopathy.

  • 31.
    Komajda, Michel
    et al.
    Presidential Office, European Society of Cardiology, The European Heart House, Sophia Antipolis, France.
    Ferarri, Roberto
    Presidential Office, European Society of Cardiology, The European Heart House, Sophia Antipolis, France.
    Vandas, Panagiotis
    Presidential Office, European Society of Cardiology, The European Heart House, Sophia Antipolis, France.
    Pinto, Fausto
    Presidential Office, European Society of Cardiology, The European Heart House, Sophia Antipolis, France.
    Swahn, Eva
    Presidential Office, European Society of Cardiology, The European Heart House, Sophia Antipolis, France.
    Torbicki, Adam
    Presidential Office, European Society of Cardiology, The European Heart House, Sophia Antipolis, France.
    Wood, David Allan
    Presidential Office, European Society of Cardiology, The European Heart House, Sophia Antipolis, France.
    Bugiardini, Raffaele
    Presidential Office, European Society of Cardiology, The European Heart House, Sophia Antipolis, France.
    Derumeaux, Genevieve Anne
    Presidential Office, European Society of Cardiology, The European Heart House, Sophia Antipolis, France.
    Kautzner, Josef
    Presidential Office, European Society of Cardiology, The European Heart House, Sophia Antipolis, France.
    Pierard, Luc
    Presidential Office, European Society of Cardiology, The European Heart House, Sophia Antipolis, France.
    Borggrefe, Martin
    Presidential Office, European Society of Cardiology, The European Heart House, Sophia Antipolis, France.
    Degertekin, Muzaffer
    Presidential Office, European Society of Cardiology, The European Heart House, Sophia Antipolis, France.
    Boehm, Michael
    Presidential Office, European Society of Cardiology, The European Heart House, Sophia Antipolis, France.
    Smiseth, Otto
    Presidential Office, European Society of Cardiology, The European Heart House, Sophia Antipolis, France.
    Bax, Jeroen
    Presidential Office, European Society of Cardiology, The European Heart House, Sophia Antipolis, France.
    Luescher, Thomas Felix
    Presidential Office, European Society of Cardiology, The European Heart House, Sophia Antipolis, France.
    Van de Werf, Frans
    Presidential Office, European Society of Cardiology, The European Heart House, Sophia Antipolis, France.
    Deaton, Christi
    Presidential Office, European Society of Cardiology, The European Heart House, Sophia Antipolis, France.
    Tavazzi, Luigi
    Presidential Office, European Society of Cardiology, The European Heart House, Sophia Antipolis, France.
    Huber, Kurt
    Presidential Office, European Society of Cardiology, The European Heart House, Sophia Antipolis, France.
    Ponikowski, Piotr
    Presidential Office, European Society of Cardiology, The European Heart House, Sophia Antipolis, France.
    Badano, Luigi Paolo
    Presidential Office, European Society of Cardiology, The European Heart House, Sophia Antipolis, France.
    Fajadet, Jean
    Presidential Office, European Society of Cardiology, The European Heart House, Sophia Antipolis, France.
    Giannuzzi, Pantaleo
    Presidential Office, European Society of Cardiology, The European Heart House, Sophia Antipolis, France.
    Auricchio, Angelo
    Presidential Office, European Society of Cardiology, The European Heart House, Sophia Antipolis, France.
    Bardinet, Isabel
    Presidential Office, European Society of Cardiology, The European Heart House, Sophia Antipolis, France.
    Fraser, Alan G.
    Presidential Office, European Society of Cardiology, The European Heart House, Sophia Antipolis, France.
    Relations between professional medical associations and the health-care industry, concerning scientific communication and continuing medical education: a Policy Statement from the European Society of Cardiology.2012In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 33, no 5, p. 666-674Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Physicians have an ethical duty to keep up-to-date with current knowledge. Professional medical associations such as the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) support these obligations. In Europe, the costs of continuing medical education (CME) are insufficiently supported from governments and employers; however, medical associations have been criticized for accepting alternative financial support from industry. Medical education and training in research include learning how to assess the quality and reliability of any information. There is some risk of bias in any form of scientific communication including intellectual, professional, and financial and it is essential that in particular, the latter must be acknowledged by full disclosure. It is essential that there is strong collaboration between basic and clinical researchers from academic institutions on the one hand, with engineers and scientists from the research divisions of device and pharmaceutical companies on the other. This is vital so that new diagnostic methods and treatments are developed. Promotion of advances by industry may accelerate their implementation into clinical practice. Universities now frequently exhort their academic staff to protect their intellectual property or commercialize their research. Thus, it is not commercial activity or links per se that have become the target for criticism but the perceived influence of commercial enterprises on clinical decision-making or on messages conveyed by professional medical organizations. This document offers the perspective of the ESC on the current debate, and it recommends how to minimize bias in scientific communications and CME and how to ensure proper ethical standards and transparency in relations between the medical profession and industry.

  • 32.
    Kylhammar, David
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Cardiology, Lund University, The Section for Heart Failure and Valvular Disease, Heart and Lung Medicine, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Kjellström, Barbro
    Cardiology Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden..
    Hjalmarsson, Clara
    University of Gothenburg, and Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Jansson, Kjell
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Nisell, Magnus
    Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institute, and The Department of Respiratory Medicine and Allergy, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Söderberg, Stefan
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Heart Centre, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Wikström, Gerhard
    Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology, Uppsala University, and Uppsala Academic Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Rådegran, Göran
    Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Cardiology, Lund University, and The Section for Heart Failure and Valvular Disease, VO Heart and Lung Medicine, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    A comprehensive risk stratification at early follow-up determines prognosis in pulmonary arterial hypertension.2017In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Guidelines recommend a goal-oriented treatment approach in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). The aim is to reach a low-risk profile, as determined by a risk assessment instrument. This strategy is incompletely validated. We aimed to investigate the bearing of such risk assessment and the benefit of reaching a low-risk profile.

    Methods and results: Five hundred and thirty PAH patients were included. Follow-up assessments performed after a median of 4 (interquartile range 3-5) months were available for 383 subjects. Patients were classified as 'Low', 'Intermediate', or 'High risk' and the benefit of reaching the 'Low risk' group was estimated. Survival differed (P < 0.001) between the risk groups at baseline and at follow-up. Survival was similar for patients who remained in or improved to the 'Low risk' group. Survival was similar for patients who remained in or worsened to the 'Intermediate risk' or 'High risk' groups. Irrespective of follow-up risk group, survival was better (P < 0.001) for patients with a higher proportion of variables at low risk. Results were unchanged after excluding patients with idiopathic PAH >65 years at diagnosis, and when patients with idiopathic or connective tissue disease-associated PAH were analysed separately. Patients in the 'Low risk' group at follow-up exhibited a reduced mortality risk (hazard ratio 0.2, 95% confidence interval 0.1-0.4 in multivariable analysis adjusted for age, sex and PAH subset), as compared to patients in the 'Intermediate risk' or 'High risk' groups.

    Conclusion: These findings suggest that comprehensive risk assessments and the aim of reaching a low-risk profile are valid in PAH.

  • 33.
    Lagerqvist, B
    et al.
    Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Uppsala, Sweden Aarhus Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Aarhus, Denmark Aker Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Oslo, Norway Univ Hosp, Dept Thorac Surg, Uppsala, Sweden Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden Univ Hosp, Dept Chem, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Diderholm, E
    Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Uppsala, Sweden Aarhus Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Aarhus, Denmark Aker Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Oslo, Norway Univ Hosp, Dept Thorac Surg, Uppsala, Sweden Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden Univ Hosp, Dept Chem, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lindahl, B
    Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Uppsala, Sweden Aarhus Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Aarhus, Denmark Aker Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Oslo, Norway Univ Hosp, Dept Thorac Surg, Uppsala, Sweden Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden Univ Hosp, Dept Chem, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Husted, S
    Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Uppsala, Sweden Aarhus Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Aarhus, Denmark Aker Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Oslo, Norway Univ Hosp, Dept Thorac Surg, Uppsala, Sweden Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden Univ Hosp, Dept Chem, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Kontny, F
    Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Uppsala, Sweden Aarhus Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Aarhus, Denmark Aker Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Oslo, Norway Univ Hosp, Dept Thorac Surg, Uppsala, Sweden Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden Univ Hosp, Dept Chem, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Stahle, E
    Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Uppsala, Sweden Aarhus Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Aarhus, Denmark Aker Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Oslo, Norway Univ Hosp, Dept Thorac Surg, Uppsala, Sweden Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden Univ Hosp, Dept Chem, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Venge, P
    Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Uppsala, Sweden Aarhus Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Aarhus, Denmark Aker Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Oslo, Norway Univ Hosp, Dept Thorac Surg, Uppsala, Sweden Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden Univ Hosp, Dept Chem, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wallentin, L
    Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Uppsala, Sweden Aarhus Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Aarhus, Denmark Aker Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Oslo, Norway Univ Hosp, Dept Thorac Surg, Uppsala, Sweden Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden Univ Hosp, Dept Chem, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Coronary angiography in relation to troponin T level in patients with unstable coronary artery disease (UCAD) - a FRISC-2 substudy2000In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 21, p. 2530-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Lagerqvist, B
    et al.
    Univ Uppsala Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Uppsala, Sweden Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Univ Uppsala Hosp, Dept Thorac & Cardiovasc Surg, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Inst Med & Care, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Säfström, Kåge
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Stahle, E
    Univ Uppsala Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Uppsala, Sweden Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Univ Uppsala Hosp, Dept Thorac & Cardiovasc Surg, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Inst Med & Care, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Wallentin, L
    Univ Uppsala Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Uppsala, Sweden Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Univ Uppsala Hosp, Dept Thorac & Cardiovasc Surg, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Inst Med & Care, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Invasive treatment in women in the acute stage of unstable coronary artery disease (FRISCII)2000In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 21, p. 1918-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Lau, Dennis H.
    et al.
    University of Adelaide, Australia; Royal Adelaide Hospital, Australia.
    Schotten, Ulrich
    Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Mahajan, Rajiv
    University of Adelaide, Australia; Royal Adelaide Hospital, Australia.
    Antic, Nicholas A.
    Repatriat Gen Hospital, Australia; Flinders University of S Australia, Australia.
    Hatem, Stephane N.
    Hop La Pitie Salpetriere, France; University of Paris 04, France.
    Pathak, Rajeev K.
    University of Adelaide, Australia; Royal Adelaide Hospital, Australia.
    Hendriks, Jeroen
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Adelaide, Australia; Royal Adelaide Hospital, Australia.
    Kalman, Jonathan M.
    Royal Melbourne Hospital, Australia; University of Melbourne, Australia.
    Sanders, Prashanthan
    University of Adelaide, Australia; Royal Adelaide Hospital, Australia.
    Novel mechanisms in the pathogenesis of atrial fibrillation: practical applications2016In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 37, no 20, p. 1573-+Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intensive research over the last few decades has seen significant advances in our understanding of the complex mechanisms underlying atrial fibrillation (AF). The epidemic of AF and related hospitalizations has been described as a rising tide with estimates of the global AF burden showing no sign of retreat. There is urgency for effective translational programs in this field to facilitate more individualized and targeted therapy to modify the abnormal atrial substrate responsible for the perpetuation of this arrhythmia. In this review, we chose to focus on several novel aspects of AF pathogenesis whereby practical applications in clinical practice are currently available or potentially not too far away. Specifically, we explored the contribution of atrial fibrosis, epicardial adipose tissue, autonomic nervous system, hyper-coagulability, and focal drivers to adverse atrial remodelling and AF persistence. We also highlighted the potential practical means of monitoring and targeting these factors to achieve better outcomes in patients suffering from this debilitating illness. Emerging data also support a new paradigm for targeting AF substrate with aggressive risk factor management. Finally, multi-disciplinary integrated care approach has shown great promise in improving cardiovascular outcomes of patients with AF along with potential cost savings.

  • 36. Lesman-Leegte, I
    et al.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    van Veldhuisen, D J
    Quality of life in patients with preserved and depressed left ventricular function.2005In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 26, no 5, p. 525-6; author reply 526Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Lesman-Leegte, Ivonne
    et al.
    University of Groningen.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    University of Groningen.
    van Veldhuisen, Dirk Jan
    University of Groningen.
    Psychological distress and cardiovascular disease2006In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 27, no 9, p. 1123-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Lindgren, Peter
    et al.
    Stockholm.
    Graff, Jennifer
    Nw York.
    Olsson, Anders
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Pedersen, Terje J
    Ullevål, Oslo.
    Jönsson, Bengt
    Stockholm.
    Cost-effectiveness of high-dose atorvastatin compared with regular dose simvastatin2007In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 28, no 12, p. 1448-1453Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: The aim of the study was to evaluate the long-term cost-effectiveness of high-dose atorvastatin when compared with generic simvastatin for secondary prevention in Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden based on the recently completed IDEAL trial. Methods and results: The IDEAL trial showed that high-dose treatment with atorvastatin was associated with fewer non-fatal myocardial infarctions (MI) or coronary heart disease death (RR 0.89, 95% CI 0.78-1.01) and major cardiovascular events by (RR 0.87, 95% CI 0.77-0.98) or any coronary event (RR 0.84, 95% CI 0.76-0.91) than simvastatin with no significant difference in the number of serious adverse events. Costs during the trial period was estimated based on the trial data and a Markov model was constructed where the risk of MIs and revascularization procedures and the long-term costs, quality of life, and mortality associated with these events was simulated. Costs were based on resource consumptions recorded in the trial multiplied with recent unit costs from each country. Both direct health care costs and indirect costs (costs from lost production due to work absence) were included. Intervention lasted for the duration of the trial (4.8 years) while health-effects and costs are predicted for the lifespan of the patient. The main outcome was quality adjusted life-years (QALY) gained. High-dose treatment was predicted to lead to a mean increase in survival of 0.049 years per patient and 0.033 QALYs gained. The cost to gain one QALY was predicted to 47 197€ (Denmark), 62 639€ (Finland), 35 210€ (Norway), and 43 667€ (Sweden), with cost-effectiveness ratio decreasing with higher risk. Conclusion: In the prevention of cardiovascular events among patients with a previous MI, high-dose atorvastatin appears to be a cost-effective strategy when compared with generic simvastatin 20-40 mg in Denmark, Norway, and Sweden. In Finland, it is cost-effective in high-risk patients. The key driver of the cost-effectiveness is the price-difference between 80 mg atorvastatin and generic simvastatin. © The European Society of Cardiology 2007. All rights reserved.

  • 39.
    Lund, Larrs H.
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Jurga, Juliane
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Edner, Magnus
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Benson, Lina
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Linde, Cecilia
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Prevalence, correlates, and prognostic significance of QRS prolongation in heart failure with reduced and preserved ejection fraction2013In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 34, no 7, p. 529-539Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims

    The independent clinical correlates and prognostic impact of QRS prolongation in heart failure (HF) with reduced and preserved ejection fraction (EF) are poorly understood. The rationale for cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) in preserved EF is unknown. The aim was to determine the prevalence of, correlates with, and prognostic impact of QRS prolongation in HF with reduced and preserved EF.

    Methods and results

    We studied 25 171 patients (age 74.6 ± 12.0 years, 39.9% women) in the Swedish Heart Failure Registry. We assessed QRS width and 40 other clinically relevant variables. Correlates with QRS width were assessed with multivariable logistic regression, and the association between QRS width and all-cause mortality with multivariable Cox regression. Pre-specified subgroup analyses by EF were performed. Thirty-one per cent had QRS ≥120 ms. Strong predictors of QRS ≥120 ms were higher age, male gender, dilated cardiomyopathy, longer duration of HF, and lower EF. One-year survival was 77% in QRS ≥120 vs. 82% in QRS <120 ms, and 5-year survival was 42 vs. 51%, respectively (P < 0.001). The adjusted hazard ratio for all-cause mortality was 1.11 (95% confidence interval 1.04-1.18, P = 0.001) for QRS ≥120 vs. <120 ms. There was no interaction between QRS width and EF.

    Conclusion

    QRS prolongation is associated with other markers of severity in HF but is also an independent risk factor for all-cause mortality. The risk associated with QRS prolongation may be similar regardless of EF. This provides a rationale for trials of CRT in HF with preserved EF.

  • 40.
    Maas, Angela H E M
    et al.
    Isala Klin.
    van der Schouw, Yvonne T
    University Medical Centre Utrecht.
    Regitz-Zagrosek, Vera
    Centre Gender Medical and Cardiovasc Disease Women, Berlin, Germany Cardiovasc Research Centre Berlin, Berlin, Germany .
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Appelman, Yolande E
    Vrije University of Amsterdam Medical Centre.
    Pasterkamp, Gerard
    University Medical Centre Utrecht.
    ten Cate, Hugo
    University of Maastricht.
    Nilsson, Peter M
    University of Lund Hospital.
    Huisman, Menno V
    Leiden University.
    Stam, Hans C G
    Netherlands Heart Foundation.
    Eizema, Karin
    Netherlands Heart Foundation.
    Stramba-Badiale, Marco
    IRCCS Ist Auxol Italiano.
    Red alert for womens heart: the urgent need for more research and knowledge on cardiovascular disease in women2011In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 32, no 11, p. 1362-1368Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A recent report of the EuroHeart project has shown that women are still underrepresented in many cardiovascular clinical trials, while important gender differences are present within most areas of heart disease. As the burden of cardiovascular disease is increasing in middle-aged women relative to men, a more profound understanding is needed of the fundamental biological differences that exist between men and women. In the current review, we aim to address the need for more explanatory sex-specific cardiovascular research to be able to adapt existing guidelines for a better heart health in women.

  • 41.
    Madler, CF
    et al.
    Univ Wales Coll Med, Heart Res Inst, Cardiff CF4 4XN, S Glam, Wales Huddinge Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, S-14186 Huddinge, Sweden Linkoping Univ, Dept Cardiol, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden CHU Sart Tilman, Dept Cardiol, B-4000 Liege, Belgium Hop St Antoine, Dept Cardiol, F-75571 Paris, France Hop Charles Nicolle, Dept Cardiol, Rouen, France.
    Payne, N
    Univ Wales Coll Med, Heart Res Inst, Cardiff CF4 4XN, S Glam, Wales Huddinge Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, S-14186 Huddinge, Sweden Linkoping Univ, Dept Cardiol, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden CHU Sart Tilman, Dept Cardiol, B-4000 Liege, Belgium Hop St Antoine, Dept Cardiol, F-75571 Paris, France Hop Charles Nicolle, Dept Cardiol, Rouen, France.
    Fraser, AG
    Univ Wales Coll Med, Heart Res Inst, Cardiff CF4 4XN, S Glam, Wales Huddinge Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, S-14186 Huddinge, Sweden Linkoping Univ, Dept Cardiol, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden CHU Sart Tilman, Dept Cardiol, B-4000 Liege, Belgium Hop St Antoine, Dept Cardiol, F-75571 Paris, France Hop Charles Nicolle, Dept Cardiol, Rouen, France.
    Brodin, LA
    Engvall, J
    Lancellotti, P
    Univ Wales Coll Med, Heart Res Inst, Cardiff CF4 4XN, S Glam, Wales Huddinge Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, S-14186 Huddinge, Sweden Linkoping Univ, Dept Cardiol, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden CHU Sart Tilman, Dept Cardiol, B-4000 Liege, Belgium Hop St Antoine, Dept Cardiol, F-75571 Paris, France Hop Charles Nicolle, Dept Cardiol, Rouen, France.
    Cohen, A
    Univ Wales Coll Med, Heart Res Inst, Cardiff CF4 4XN, S Glam, Wales Huddinge Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, S-14186 Huddinge, Sweden Linkoping Univ, Dept Cardiol, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden CHU Sart Tilman, Dept Cardiol, B-4000 Liege, Belgium Hop St Antoine, Dept Cardiol, F-75571 Paris, France Hop Charles Nicolle, Dept Cardiol, Rouen, France.
    Derumeaux, G
    Univ Wales Coll Med, Heart Res Inst, Cardiff CF4 4XN, S Glam, Wales Huddinge Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, S-14186 Huddinge, Sweden Linkoping Univ, Dept Cardiol, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden CHU Sart Tilman, Dept Cardiol, B-4000 Liege, Belgium Hop St Antoine, Dept Cardiol, F-75571 Paris, France Hop Charles Nicolle, Dept Cardiol, Rouen, France.
    Sutherland, GR
    Univ Wales Coll Med, Heart Res Inst, Cardiff CF4 4XN, S Glam, Wales Huddinge Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, S-14186 Huddinge, Sweden Linkoping Univ, Dept Cardiol, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden CHU Sart Tilman, Dept Cardiol, B-4000 Liege, Belgium Hop St Antoine, Dept Cardiol, F-75571 Paris, France Hop Charles Nicolle, Dept Cardiol, Rouen, France.
    Quantitative stress echocardiography using tissue Doppler can estimate the severity of coronary artery disease2001In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 22, p. 357-357Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Madler, CF
    et al.
    Univ Wales Coll Med, Wales Heart Res Inst, Cardiff CF4 4XN, S Glam, Wales Linkoping Univ, Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden Hop St Antoine, Dept Cardiol, F-75571 Paris, France Univ Hosp Benjamin Franklin, Dept Cardiol, Berlin, Germany Univ Vienna, Sch Med, Dept Cardiol, Vienna, Austria Huddinge Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Payne, N
    Univ Wales Coll Med, Wales Heart Res Inst, Cardiff CF4 4XN, S Glam, Wales Linkoping Univ, Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden Hop St Antoine, Dept Cardiol, F-75571 Paris, France Univ Hosp Benjamin Franklin, Dept Cardiol, Berlin, Germany Univ Vienna, Sch Med, Dept Cardiol, Vienna, Austria Huddinge Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fraser, AG
    Univ Wales Coll Med, Wales Heart Res Inst, Cardiff CF4 4XN, S Glam, Wales Linkoping Univ, Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden Hop St Antoine, Dept Cardiol, F-75571 Paris, France Univ Hosp Benjamin Franklin, Dept Cardiol, Berlin, Germany Univ Vienna, Sch Med, Dept Cardiol, Vienna, Austria Huddinge Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Janerot-Sjoberg, B
    Univ Wales Coll Med, Wales Heart Res Inst, Cardiff CF4 4XN, S Glam, Wales Linkoping Univ, Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden Hop St Antoine, Dept Cardiol, F-75571 Paris, France Univ Hosp Benjamin Franklin, Dept Cardiol, Berlin, Germany Univ Vienna, Sch Med, Dept Cardiol, Vienna, Austria Huddinge Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cohen, A
    Univ Wales Coll Med, Wales Heart Res Inst, Cardiff CF4 4XN, S Glam, Wales Linkoping Univ, Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden Hop St Antoine, Dept Cardiol, F-75571 Paris, France Univ Hosp Benjamin Franklin, Dept Cardiol, Berlin, Germany Univ Vienna, Sch Med, Dept Cardiol, Vienna, Austria Huddinge Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kuersten, B
    Univ Wales Coll Med, Wales Heart Res Inst, Cardiff CF4 4XN, S Glam, Wales Linkoping Univ, Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden Hop St Antoine, Dept Cardiol, F-75571 Paris, France Univ Hosp Benjamin Franklin, Dept Cardiol, Berlin, Germany Univ Vienna, Sch Med, Dept Cardiol, Vienna, Austria Huddinge Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wutte, M
    Univ Wales Coll Med, Wales Heart Res Inst, Cardiff CF4 4XN, S Glam, Wales Linkoping Univ, Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden Hop St Antoine, Dept Cardiol, F-75571 Paris, France Univ Hosp Benjamin Franklin, Dept Cardiol, Berlin, Germany Univ Vienna, Sch Med, Dept Cardiol, Vienna, Austria Huddinge Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Brodin, LA
    Lind, B
    Univ Wales Coll Med, Wales Heart Res Inst, Cardiff CF4 4XN, S Glam, Wales Linkoping Univ, Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden Hop St Antoine, Dept Cardiol, F-75571 Paris, France Univ Hosp Benjamin Franklin, Dept Cardiol, Berlin, Germany Univ Vienna, Sch Med, Dept Cardiol, Vienna, Austria Huddinge Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The tissue Doppler response to dobutamine is reduced in women compared with men: implications of the MYDISE study for quantitative stress echocardiography2001In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 22, p. 117-117Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Madler, CF
    et al.
    Univ Wales Coll Med, Wales Heart Res Inst, Cardiff, S Glam, Wales Huddinge Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Stockholm, Sweden Linkoping Univ, Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden Hop St Antoine, Dept Cardiol, Paris, France Univ Hosp Benjamin Franklin, Dept Cardiol, Berlin, Germany Univ Vienna, Sch Med, Dept Cardiol, Vienna, Austria Hop Charles Nicolle, Dept Cardiol, Rouen, France Univ Hosp Sart Tilman, Dept Cardiol, Liege, Belgium.
    Payne, N
    Univ Wales Coll Med, Wales Heart Res Inst, Cardiff, S Glam, Wales Huddinge Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Stockholm, Sweden Linkoping Univ, Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden Hop St Antoine, Dept Cardiol, Paris, France Univ Hosp Benjamin Franklin, Dept Cardiol, Berlin, Germany Univ Vienna, Sch Med, Dept Cardiol, Vienna, Austria Hop Charles Nicolle, Dept Cardiol, Rouen, France Univ Hosp Sart Tilman, Dept Cardiol, Liege, Belgium.
    Fraser, AG
    Univ Wales Coll Med, Wales Heart Res Inst, Cardiff, S Glam, Wales Huddinge Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Stockholm, Sweden Linkoping Univ, Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden Hop St Antoine, Dept Cardiol, Paris, France Univ Hosp Benjamin Franklin, Dept Cardiol, Berlin, Germany Univ Vienna, Sch Med, Dept Cardiol, Vienna, Austria Hop Charles Nicolle, Dept Cardiol, Rouen, France Univ Hosp Sart Tilman, Dept Cardiol, Liege, Belgium.
    Lind, B
    Univ Wales Coll Med, Wales Heart Res Inst, Cardiff, S Glam, Wales Huddinge Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Stockholm, Sweden Linkoping Univ, Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden Hop St Antoine, Dept Cardiol, Paris, France Univ Hosp Benjamin Franklin, Dept Cardiol, Berlin, Germany Univ Vienna, Sch Med, Dept Cardiol, Vienna, Austria Hop Charles Nicolle, Dept Cardiol, Rouen, France Univ Hosp Sart Tilman, Dept Cardiol, Liege, Belgium.
    Engvall, J
    Cohen, A
    Univ Wales Coll Med, Wales Heart Res Inst, Cardiff, S Glam, Wales Huddinge Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Stockholm, Sweden Linkoping Univ, Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden Hop St Antoine, Dept Cardiol, Paris, France Univ Hosp Benjamin Franklin, Dept Cardiol, Berlin, Germany Univ Vienna, Sch Med, Dept Cardiol, Vienna, Austria Hop Charles Nicolle, Dept Cardiol, Rouen, France Univ Hosp Sart Tilman, Dept Cardiol, Liege, Belgium.
    Wilkenshoff, U
    Univ Wales Coll Med, Wales Heart Res Inst, Cardiff, S Glam, Wales Huddinge Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Stockholm, Sweden Linkoping Univ, Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden Hop St Antoine, Dept Cardiol, Paris, France Univ Hosp Benjamin Franklin, Dept Cardiol, Berlin, Germany Univ Vienna, Sch Med, Dept Cardiol, Vienna, Austria Hop Charles Nicolle, Dept Cardiol, Rouen, France Univ Hosp Sart Tilman, Dept Cardiol, Liege, Belgium.
    Rosenhek, R
    Univ Wales Coll Med, Wales Heart Res Inst, Cardiff, S Glam, Wales Huddinge Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Stockholm, Sweden Linkoping Univ, Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden Hop St Antoine, Dept Cardiol, Paris, France Univ Hosp Benjamin Franklin, Dept Cardiol, Berlin, Germany Univ Vienna, Sch Med, Dept Cardiol, Vienna, Austria Hop Charles Nicolle, Dept Cardiol, Rouen, France Univ Hosp Sart Tilman, Dept Cardiol, Liege, Belgium.
    Derumeaux, G
    Univ Wales Coll Med, Wales Heart Res Inst, Cardiff, S Glam, Wales Huddinge Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Stockholm, Sweden Linkoping Univ, Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden Hop St Antoine, Dept Cardiol, Paris, France Univ Hosp Benjamin Franklin, Dept Cardiol, Berlin, Germany Univ Vienna, Sch Med, Dept Cardiol, Vienna, Austria Hop Charles Nicolle, Dept Cardiol, Rouen, France Univ Hosp Sart Tilman, Dept Cardiol, Liege, Belgium.
    Lancellotti, P
    Univ Wales Coll Med, Wales Heart Res Inst, Cardiff, S Glam, Wales Huddinge Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Stockholm, Sweden Linkoping Univ, Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden Hop St Antoine, Dept Cardiol, Paris, France Univ Hosp Benjamin Franklin, Dept Cardiol, Berlin, Germany Univ Vienna, Sch Med, Dept Cardiol, Vienna, Austria Hop Charles Nicolle, Dept Cardiol, Rouen, France Univ Hosp Sart Tilman, Dept Cardiol, Liege, Belgium.
    Quantitative stress echocardiography by tissue Doppler should be implemented using simple diagnostic models rather than velocity out-offs: final results of the MYDISE study2001In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 22, p. 358-358Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Madler, CF
    et al.
    Univ Wales Coll Med, Wales Heart Res Inst, Cardiff CF4 4XN, S Glam, Wales Linkoping Univ, Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden Huddinge Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, S-14186 Huddinge, Sweden Univ Vienna, Sch Med, Dept Cardiol, Vienna, Austria Univ Hosp Benjamin Franklin, Dept Cardiol, Berlin, Germany Hop St Antoine, Dept Cardiol, F-75571 Paris, France Univ Hosp Gasthuisberg, Dept Cardiol, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium.
    Payne, N
    Univ Wales Coll Med, Wales Heart Res Inst, Cardiff CF4 4XN, S Glam, Wales Linkoping Univ, Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden Huddinge Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, S-14186 Huddinge, Sweden Univ Vienna, Sch Med, Dept Cardiol, Vienna, Austria Univ Hosp Benjamin Franklin, Dept Cardiol, Berlin, Germany Hop St Antoine, Dept Cardiol, F-75571 Paris, France Univ Hosp Gasthuisberg, Dept Cardiol, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium.
    Janerot-Sjoberg, B
    Univ Wales Coll Med, Wales Heart Res Inst, Cardiff CF4 4XN, S Glam, Wales Linkoping Univ, Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden Huddinge Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, S-14186 Huddinge, Sweden Univ Vienna, Sch Med, Dept Cardiol, Vienna, Austria Univ Hosp Benjamin Franklin, Dept Cardiol, Berlin, Germany Hop St Antoine, Dept Cardiol, F-75571 Paris, France Univ Hosp Gasthuisberg, Dept Cardiol, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium.
    Lind, B
    Univ Wales Coll Med, Wales Heart Res Inst, Cardiff CF4 4XN, S Glam, Wales Linkoping Univ, Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden Huddinge Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, S-14186 Huddinge, Sweden Univ Vienna, Sch Med, Dept Cardiol, Vienna, Austria Univ Hosp Benjamin Franklin, Dept Cardiol, Berlin, Germany Hop St Antoine, Dept Cardiol, F-75571 Paris, France Univ Hosp Gasthuisberg, Dept Cardiol, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium.
    Rosenhek, R
    Univ Wales Coll Med, Wales Heart Res Inst, Cardiff CF4 4XN, S Glam, Wales Linkoping Univ, Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden Huddinge Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, S-14186 Huddinge, Sweden Univ Vienna, Sch Med, Dept Cardiol, Vienna, Austria Univ Hosp Benjamin Franklin, Dept Cardiol, Berlin, Germany Hop St Antoine, Dept Cardiol, F-75571 Paris, France Univ Hosp Gasthuisberg, Dept Cardiol, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium.
    Wilkenshoff, U
    Univ Wales Coll Med, Wales Heart Res Inst, Cardiff CF4 4XN, S Glam, Wales Linkoping Univ, Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden Huddinge Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, S-14186 Huddinge, Sweden Univ Vienna, Sch Med, Dept Cardiol, Vienna, Austria Univ Hosp Benjamin Franklin, Dept Cardiol, Berlin, Germany Hop St Antoine, Dept Cardiol, F-75571 Paris, France Univ Hosp Gasthuisberg, Dept Cardiol, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium.
    Grocott-Mason, R
    Univ Wales Coll Med, Wales Heart Res Inst, Cardiff CF4 4XN, S Glam, Wales Linkoping Univ, Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden Huddinge Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, S-14186 Huddinge, Sweden Univ Vienna, Sch Med, Dept Cardiol, Vienna, Austria Univ Hosp Benjamin Franklin, Dept Cardiol, Berlin, Germany Hop St Antoine, Dept Cardiol, F-75571 Paris, France Univ Hosp Gasthuisberg, Dept Cardiol, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium.
    Cohen, A
    Univ Wales Coll Med, Wales Heart Res Inst, Cardiff CF4 4XN, S Glam, Wales Linkoping Univ, Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden Huddinge Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, S-14186 Huddinge, Sweden Univ Vienna, Sch Med, Dept Cardiol, Vienna, Austria Univ Hosp Benjamin Franklin, Dept Cardiol, Berlin, Germany Hop St Antoine, Dept Cardiol, F-75571 Paris, France Univ Hosp Gasthuisberg, Dept Cardiol, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium.
    Sutherland, GR
    Univ Wales Coll Med, Wales Heart Res Inst, Cardiff CF4 4XN, S Glam, Wales Linkoping Univ, Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden Huddinge Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, S-14186 Huddinge, Sweden Univ Vienna, Sch Med, Dept Cardiol, Vienna, Austria Univ Hosp Benjamin Franklin, Dept Cardiol, Berlin, Germany Hop St Antoine, Dept Cardiol, F-75571 Paris, France Univ Hosp Gasthuisberg, Dept Cardiol, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium.
    Fraser, AG
    Univ Wales Coll Med, Wales Heart Res Inst, Cardiff CF4 4XN, S Glam, Wales Linkoping Univ, Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden Huddinge Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, S-14186 Huddinge, Sweden Univ Vienna, Sch Med, Dept Cardiol, Vienna, Austria Univ Hosp Benjamin Franklin, Dept Cardiol, Berlin, Germany Hop St Antoine, Dept Cardiol, F-75571 Paris, France Univ Hosp Gasthuisberg, Dept Cardiol, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium.
    Normal myocardial velocity responses to dobutamine: the basis for quantitative stress echocardiography with off-line analysis2000In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 21, p. P3041-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Madler, C.F.
    et al.
    Mädler, C.F., Univ. of Wales College of Medicine, Cardiff, United Kingdom.
    Payne, N.
    Univ. of Wales College of Medicine, Cardiff, United Kingdom.
    Wilkenshoff, U.
    Univ. Hospital Benjamin Franklin, Berlin, Germany.
    Cohen, A.
    Hôpital Saint Antoine, Paris, France.
    Derumeaux, G.A.
    Hôpital Charles Nicolle, Rouen, France.
    Pierard, L.A.
    Piérard, L.A., University Hospital Sart Tilman, Liège, Belgium.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Brodin, L.-A.
    Brodin, L.-Å., Huddinge University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sutherland, G.R.
    Fraser, A.G.
    Univ. of Wales College of Medicine, Cardiff, United Kingdom, Wales Heart Research Institute, Univ. of Wales College of Medicine, Heath Park, Cardiff CF14 4XN, United Kingdom.
    Non-invasive diagnosis of coronary artery disease by quantitative stress echocardiography: Optimal diagnostic models using off-line tissue Doppler in the MYDISE study2003In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 24, no 17, p. 1584-1594Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To develop optimal methods for the objective non-invasive diagnosis of coronary artery disease, using myocardial Doppler velocities during dobutamine stress echocardiography. Methods and results: We acquired tissue Doppler digital data during dobutamine stress in 289 subjects, and measured myocardial responses by off-line analysis of 11 left ventricular segments. Diagnostic criteria developed by comparing 92 normal subjects with 48 patients with coronary disease were refined in a prospective series of 149 patients referred with chest pain. Optimal diagnostic accuracy was achieved by logistic regression models, using systolic velocities at maximal stress in 7 myocardial segments, adjusting for independent correlations directly with heart rate and inversely with age and female gender (all p<0.001). Best cut-points from receiveroperator curves diagnosed left anterior descending, circumflex and right coronary disease with sensitivities and specificities of 80% and 80%, 91% and 80%, and 93% and 82%, respectively. All models performed better than velocity cut-offs alone (p<0.001). Conclusion: Non-invasive diagnosis of coronary artery disease by quantitative stress echocardiography is best performed using diagnostic models based on segmental velocities at peak stress and adjusting for heart rate, and gender or age. © 2003 Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of The European Society of Cardiology.

  • 46.
    Mancia, Giuseppe
    et al.
    University of Milano Bicocca, Italy .
    Fagard, Robert
    University of Gdansk, Poland .
    Narkiewicz, Krzysztof
    University of Gdansk, Poland .
    Redon, Josep
    University of Valencia, Spain .
    Zanchetti, Alberto
    University of Milan, Italy .
    Boehm, Michael
    University of Saarlandes Kliniken, Germany .
    Christiaens, Thierry
    University of Ghent, Belgium .
    Cifkova, Renata
    Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic .
    De Backer, Guy
    University Hospital, Belgium .
    Dominiczak, Anna
    University of Glasgow, Scotland .
    Galderisi, Maurizio
    Federico II University Hospital, Italy .
    Grobbee, Diederick E.
    University of Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands .
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kirchhof, Paulus
    University of Birmingham, England .
    Kjeldsen, Sverre E.
    University of Oslo, Norway .
    Laurent, Stephane
    Hop Europeen Georges Pompidou, France .
    Manolis, Athanasios J.
    Asklepe Gen Hospital, Greece .
    Nilsson, Peter M.
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Ruilope, Luis Miguel
    Hospital 12 Octubre, Spain .
    Schmieder, Roland E.
    University Hospital, Germany .
    Sirnes, Per Anton
    Ostlandske Hjertesenter, Norway .
    Sleight, Peter
    John Radcliffe Hospital, England .
    Viigimaa, Margus
    Tallinn University of Technology, Estonia .
    Waeber, Bernard
    CHU Vaudois, Switzerland .
    Zannad, Faiez
    University of Lorraine, France .
    2013 ESH/ESC Guidelines for the management of arterial hypertension2013In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 34, no 28, p. -+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 47.
    McMurray, John J. V.
    et al.
    UK.
    Adamopoulos, Stamatis
    Greece.
    Anker, Stefan D.
    Germany.
    Auricchio, Angelo
    Switzerland.
    Böhm, Michael
    Germany.
    Dickstein, Kenneth
    Norway.
    Falk, Volkmar
    Switzerland.
    Filippatos, Gerasimos
    Greece.
    Fonseca, Cândida
    Portugal.
    Gomez-Sanchez, Miguel Angel
    Spain.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Køber, Lars
    Denmark.
    Lip, Gregory Y. H.
    UK.
    Maggioni, Aldo Pietro
    Italy.
    Parkhomenko, Alexander
    Ukraine.
    Pieske, Burkert M.
    Austria.
    Popescu, Bogdan A.
    Romania.
    Rønnevik, Per K.
    Norway.
    Rutten, Frans H.
    The Netherlands.
    Schwitter, Juerg
    Switzerland.
    Seferovic, Petar
    Serbia.
    Stepinska, Janina
    Poland.
    Trindade, Pedro T.
    Switzerland.
    Voors, Adriaan A.
    The Netherlands.
    Zannad, Faiez
    France.
    Zeiher, Andreas
    Germany.
    ESC Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic heart failure 2012: The Task Force for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Acute and Chronic Heart Failure 2012 of the European Society of Cardiology. Developed in collaboration with the Heart Failure Association (HFA) of the ESC2012In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 33, no 14, p. 1787-1847Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Meyer, Sven
    et al.
    University of Groningen, Netherlands .
    van der Meer, Peter
    University of Groningen, Netherlands .
    van Deursen, Vincent M.
    University of Groningen, Netherlands .
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.
    University of Groningen, Netherlands .
    van der Wal, Martje H. L.
    University of Groningen, Netherlands .
    Hillege, Hans L.
    University of Groningen, Netherlands .
    Voors, Adriaan A.
    University of Groningen, Netherlands .
    Neurohormonal and clinical sex differences in heart failure2013In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 34, no 32, p. 2538-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite disparities in pathophysiology and disease manifestation between male and female patients with heart failure, studies focusing on sex differences in biomarkers are scarce. The purpose of this study was to assess sex-specific variation in clinical characteristics and biomarker levels to gain more understanding of the potential pathophysiological mechanisms underlying sex differences in heart failure. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanBaseline demographic and clinical characteristics, multiple biomarkers, and outcomes were compared between men and women in 567 patients. The mean age of the study group was 71 11 years and 38 were female. Women were older, had a higher body mass index and left ventricular ejection fraction, more hypertension, and received more diuretic and antidepressant therapy, but less ACE-inhibitor therapy compared with men. After 3 years, all-cause mortality was lower in women than men (37.0 vs. 43.9, multivariable hazard ratio 0.64; 95 confidence interval 0.450.92, P 0.016). Levels of biomarkers related to inflammation [C-reactive protein, pentraxin 3, growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF-15), and interleukin 6] and extracellular matrix remodelling (syndecan-1 and periostin) were significantly lower in women compared with men. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide, TNF-R1a, and GDF-15 showed the strongest interaction between sex and mortality. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanFemale heart failure patients have a distinct clinical presentation and better outcomes compared with male patients. The lower mortality was independent of differences in clinical characteristics, but differential sex associations between several biomarkers and mortality might partly explain the survival difference.

  • 49.
    Nikolic, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Hauch, Ole
    AstraZeneca LP, DE USA .
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Henriksson, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cost-effectiveness of treating acute coronary syndrome patients with ticagrelor for 12 months: results from the PLATO study2013In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 220-228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The efficacy and safety of ticagrelor vs. clopidogrel in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) are well documented in the PLATelet inhibition and patient Outcomes trial (PLATO). The aim of this study was to assess the long-term cost-effectiveness of treating ACS patients for 12 months with ticagrelor compared with generic clopidogrel.less thanbrgreater thanless thanbrgreater thanEvent rates, health-care costs, and health-related quality of life during 12 months of therapy with either ticagrelor or generic clopidogrel were estimated from PLATO. Beyond 12 months, quality-adjusted survival and costs were estimated conditional on whether a non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI), a non-fatal stroke, or no MI or stroke occurred during the 12 months of therapy. Lifetime costs, life expectancy, and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) were estimated for both treatment strategies. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were presented from a health-care perspective in 2010 Euros (Euro) applying unit costs and life tables from a Swedish setting in the base-case analysis. Treatment with ticagrelor was associated with increased health-care costs of Euro362 and a QALY gain of 0.13 compared with generic clopidogrel, yielding a cost per QALY gained with ticagrelor of Euro2753. The cost per life year gained was Euro2372. The results were consistent in major subgroups. Sensitivity analyses showed a cost per QALY gained with ticagrelor of approximate to Euro7300 under certain scenarios.less thanbrgreater thanless thanbrgreater thanBased on clinical and health-economic evidence from the PLATO study, treating ACS patients with ticagrelor for 12 months is associated with a cost per QALY below generally accepted thresholds for cost-effectiveness.less thanbrgreater thanless thanbrgreater thanClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00391872.

  • 50. Norhammar, Anna
    et al.
    Malmberg, Klas
    Rydén, Lars
    Tornvall, Per
    Stenestrand, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Wallentin, Lars
    Under utilisation of evidence-based treatment partially explains for the unfavourable prognosis in diabetic patients with acute myocardial infarction2003In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 24, no 9, p. 838-844Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: The prognosis after an acute myocardial infarction is worse for patients with diabetes mellitus than for those without. We investigated whether differences in the use of evidence-based treatment may contribute to the differences in 1-year survival in a large cohort of consecutive acute myocardial infarction patients with and without diabetes mellitus. Methods: We included patients below the age of 80 years from the Register of Information and Knowledge about Swedish Heart Intensive care Admissions (RIKS-HIA), which included all patients admitted to coronary care units at 58 hospitals during 1995-1998. In all 5193 patients had the combination of acute myocardial infarction and diabetes mellitus while 20 440 had myocardial infarction but no diabetes diagnosed. Multivariate logistical regression analyses were performed to evaluate the influence of diabetes mellitus on the use of evidence-based treatment and its association with survival during the first year after the index hospitalisation. Results: The prevalence of diabetes mellitus was 20.3% (males 18.5%, females 24.4%). The 1-year mortality was substantially higher among diabetic patients compared with those without diabetes mellitus (13.0 vs. 22.3% for males and 14.4 vs. 26.1% for female patients, respectively) with an odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence interval (CI)) in three different age groups: <65 years 2.65 (2.23-3.16), 65-74 years 1.81 (1.61-2.04) and >75 years 1.71 (1.50-1.93). During hospital stay patients with diabetes mellitus received significantly less treatment with heparins (37 vs. 43%, p<0.001), intravenous beta blockade (29 vs. 33%, p<0.001), thrombolysis (31 vs. 41%, p<0.001) and acute revascularisation (4 vs. 5%, p<0.003). A similar pattern was apparent at hospital discharge. After multiple adjustments for dissimilarities in baseline characteristics between the two groups, patients with diabetes were significantly less likely to be treated with reperfusion therapy (OR 0.83), heparins (OR 0.88), statins (OR 0.88) or to be revascularised within 14 days from hospital discharge procedures (OR 0.86) while the use of ACE-inhibitors was more prevalent among diabetic patients compared to non-diabetic patients (OR 1.45). The mortality reducing effects of evidence-based treatment like reperfusion, heparins, aspirin, beta-blockers, lipid-lowering treatment and revascularisation were, in multivariate analyses, of equal benefit in diabetic and non-diabetic patients. Interpretation: Diabetes mellitus continues to be a major independent predictor of 1-year mortality following an acute myocardial infarction, especially in younger age groups. This may partly be explained by less use of evidence-based treatment although treatment benefits are similar in both patients with and without diabetes mellitus. Thus a more extensive use of established treatment has a potential to improve the poor prognosis among patients with acute myocardial infarction and diabetes mellitus.

12 1 - 50 of 91
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf