liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 30 of 30
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Annema, Coby
    et al.
    Luttik, Marie-Louise
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Reasons for readmission in heart failure: Perspectives of patients, caregivers, cardiologists, and heart failure nurses.2009In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 38, no 5, p. 427-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Despite efforts to improve outcomes in heart failure (HF), readmission rates remain relatively high. Reasons for readmission from different perspectives (patient, caregiver, health care providers) may help to optimize the future management of patients with HF. The aims of this study are to 1) gain insight into reasons for HF readmission from the perspective of patients, caregivers, cardiologists, and HF nurses; 2) examine similarities and differences in perspectives on the reason for an HF readmission, and 3) describe possibilities to prevent an HF readmission from different perspectives. METHODS AND RESULTS: Data on reasons for readmission were collected on 173 readmissions. Perspectives of patients, caregivers, cardiologists, and HF nurses were collected by interview and questionnaire. Worsening HF as the sole reason for readmission was reported most often; however, 36% of caregivers, 56% of patients, and 63% to 65% of health care providers indicated that other factors, such as comorbidity, nonadherence, and nonoptimal medication, were important contributing factors. In only 34% of readmissions, patients and their caregivers agreed with health care providers on the underlying reason. Respondents reported that 23% to 31% of the readmissions could probably have been prevented if adherence were higher, patients requested help earlier, and adequate multidisciplinary professional help were available. CONCLUSION: To prevent future readmissions of patients with HF, it is important to fully understand the reasons for readmission by gaining insight on the reason for readmission from different perspectives. Also, we may need another approach to prevent adverse outcomes in which other medical problems and new strategies to improve adherence have to be considered.

  • 2.
    Bergman, Eva
    et al.
    City Hospital Ryhov.
    Malm, Dan
    City Hospital Ryhov.
    Karlsson, Jan-Erik
    City Hospital Ryhov.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Longitudinal study of patients after myocardial infarction: Sense of coherence, quality of life, and symptoms2009In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 129-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Myocardial infarction has pronounced effects on an individual that demand changes in lifestyle. Health is influenced by whether the individual experiences the world as comprehensible, meaningful, and manageable, that is, has a sense of coherence (SOC). High SOC scores indicate that the individual probably manages the situation by understanding the context and connections: action and effect.

    OBJECTIVE: The study objective was to identify the SOC, assess the quality of life (Short Form-12 Health Survey Questionnaire), assess the symptoms using the Seattle Angina Questionnaire, and create health curves from a baseline for patients with a first myocardial infarction.

    METHODS: A longitudinal and predictive Study of 100 participants in the heart care unit of a county hospital in southern Sweden was performed.

    RESULTS: Women score lower on SOC than men. Persons with high SOC scores have fewer angina attacks, are more physically active, drink more alcohol, are more satisfied with their treatments, and have better disease perception.

    CONCLUSION: By following SOC scores, a trend emerges that Suggests it may be a useful tool for identifying those who will need extra support.

  • 3.
    Chiala, Oronzo
    et al.
    Univ Roma Tor Vergata, Italy.
    Vellone, Ercole
    Univ Roma Tor Vergata, Italy.
    Klompstra, Leonie
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ortali, Giorgio Alberto
    Cardiopulm Rehabil Casa Cura Villa Querce Nemi, Italy.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Univ Calif Irvine, CA USA.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Australian Catholic Univ, Australia.
    Relationships between exercise capacity and anxiety, depression, and cognition in patients with heart failure2018In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 47, no 5, p. 465-470Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Symptoms of anxiety, depression, and cognitive impairment are common in heart failure (HF) patients, but there are inconsistencies in the literature regarding their relationship and effects on exercise capacity. Objectives: The aim of this study was to explore the relationships between exercise capacity and anxiety, depression, and cognition in HF patients. Methods: This was a secondary analysis on the baseline data of the Italian subsample (n = 96) of HF patients enrolled in the HF-Wii study. Data was collected with the 6-minute walk test (6MWT), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Montreal Cognitive Assessment. Results: The HF patients walked an average of 222 (SD 114) meters on the 6MWT. Patients exhibited clinically elevated anxiety (48%), depression (49%), and severe cognitive impairment (48%). Depression was independently associated with the distance walked on the 6MWT. Conclusions: The results of this study reinforced the role of depression in relation to exercise capacity and call for considering strategies to reduce depressive symptoms to improve outcomes of HF patients. (C) 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 4. Dieperink, Willem
    et al.
    Nijsten, Maarten W N
    van de Stadt, Mark
    van der Horst, Iwan C C
    Aarts, Leon P H J
    Zijlstra, Felix
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Implementation of Boussignac continuous positive airway pressure in the coronary care unit: experiences and attitudes.2008In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 37, no 6, p. 449-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Boussignac continuous positive airway pressure (BCPAP) delivered by face mask is useful for patients with acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (ACPE). Although BCPAP is medically effective, we observed that not all suitable patients received it. In this descriptive, prospective, cohort study, we explored the experiences and attitudes of both patients and staff with BCPAP. METHODS: Patients were interviewed 12 to 48 hours after treatment with BCPAP. Nurses on the coronary care unit were interviewed on their knowledge, skills, experiences, and opinions concerning BCPAP. RESULTS: Of 117 patients with ACPE, 87 patients (74%) received BCPAP treatment. It was decided not to administer BCPAP in 30 patients with ACPE (26%). Patients who received BCPAP found that the reduction of dyspnea outweighed any discomfort. Barriers for the use of BCPAP were not related to nurses' skills but to the following: the nurses' belief that BCPAP created major discomfort, the lack of guidelines, the ultimate improvement of oxygenation without BCPAP, and the more labor-intensive treatment. CONCLUSION: Overestimation of patient discomfort by nurses and system-related factors impeded the use of BCPAP for all patients with ACPE.

  • 5.
    Eckerblad, Jeanette
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tödt, Kristina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Respiratory Medicine.
    Jakobsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Respiratory Medicine.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Skargren, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kentsson, M.
    Ryhov Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Theander, K.
    Karlstad University, Sweden; Värmland County Council, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Symptom burden in stable COPD patients with moderate or severe airflow limitation2014In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 351-357Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES:

    To describe a multidimensional symptom profile in patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and determine whether symptom experience differed between patients with moderate or severe airflow limitations.

    BACKGROUND:

    Patients with severe airflow limitation experience numerous symptoms, but little is known regarding patients with moderate airflow limitation.

    METHODS:

    A multidimensional symptom profile (Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale) was assessed in 42 outpatients with moderate and 49 with severe airflow limitations.

    RESULTS:

    The mean number of symptoms in the total sample was 7.9 (±4.3) with no difference between patients with moderate and severe airflow limitations. The most prevalent symptoms with the highest MSAS symptom burden scores were shortness of breath, dry mouth, cough, sleep problems, and lack of energy in both groups.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Patients with moderate or severe airflow limitations experience multiple symptoms with high severity and distress. An assessment of their multidimensional symptom profile might contribute to better symptom management.

  • 6.
    Edell-Gustafsson, Ulla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Svanborg, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Clinical Neurophysiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurophysiology UHL.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    A gender perspective on sleeplessness behavior, effects of sleep loss, and coping resources in patients with stable coronary artery disease2006In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 75-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The primary aim of this study was to systematically compare perceived sleep quality, sleeplessness behavior, sense of mastery, self-esteem, depression, subjective health, and effects of sleep loss in men and women with stable coronary artery disease (CAD). Further aims were to determine possible predictors of poor sleep quality and sense of mastery, as well as the consequences of too little sleep. METHODS: Comparative-correlation and predictive design were used. Patients with a history of stable angina pectoris scheduled to undergo coronary angiography at Linköping University Hospital in Sweden were included. There were 47 women and 88 men (mean age 62.4 years) with CAD. Structured interviews using validated questionnaires covered sleep quality and sleep habits, effects of sleep loss, psychologic resources, and depression. RESULTS: Multiple stepwise regression analysis showed that sleeplessness behavior, depressed mood, female gender, and pharmacologic treatments with inflammation inhibitors significantly (P < .0001) accounted for the variance of poorer sleep quality. The analysis also showed that the following factors in descending order significantly accounted (P < .0001) for the outcome of sleep quality: inability to feel refreshed by sleep, difficulty in maintaining sleep, gastrointestinal problems, too little sleep, final morning awakening time, sleep onset latency, lying down because of daytime tiredness, and daytime physical tiredness. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with men, women with stable CAD may be especially at risk of experiencing poor sleep quality, even when sleeplessness behavior and pharmacologic treatments with inflammation inhibitors are controlled. It is also possible that they may be more at risk of depressed mood. Copyright © 2006 by Mosby, Inc.

  • 7.
    Flemme, Inger
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Edvardsson, Nils
    Division of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Hinic, Hansi
    School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Jinhage, Britt-Marie
    Division of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Dalman, Margareta
    Division of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden;Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Long-term quality of life and uncertainty in patients living with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator2005In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 34, no 6, p. 386-392Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: This study describes the quality of life (QOL) and uncertainty in patients who have an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) and predicts QOL at long-term follow-up.

    METHODS: Long-term follow-up was defined as 6.9 years +/- 1 year (range 4.11-8.7 years). QOL was measured with the Quality of Life Index, and uncertainty was measured with the Mishel Uncertainty in Illness Scale.

    RESULTS: The overall QOL and health/functioning were unchanged over time. QOL in the socioeconomic (P = .002) and psychologic/spiritual domains (P = .012) decreased in the first year. From baseline to long-term follow-up, the QOL in the family domain (P = .011) and uncertainty (P = .002) decreased. Uncertainty was a predictor of low QOL.

    CONCLUSION: QOL was reasonably good 6.9 years post-ICD implantation. Patients felt less uncertain once they had passed the first year of their illness.

  • 8.
    Flemme, Inger
    et al.
    Halmstad University.
    Hallberg, Ulrika
    Nordic School of Public Health, Gothenburg.
    Johansson, Ingela
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Uncertainty is a major concern for patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators2011In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 420-428Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The study objective was to explore the main concern of individuals living with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) and how they handle this in daily life. For improved management and follow-up, it is important to understand how the ICD affects the recipients daily life. METHODS: A grounded theory method was used. Sixteen Swedish recipients (9 men) living with an ICD for 6 to 24 months were interviewed. RESULTS: The core category labeled, "Incorporating uncertainty in daily life," illuminates the main concern. To handle uncertainty, recipients used the following strategies: restricting activities, distracting oneself, accepting being an ICD recipient, and reevaluating life. CONCLUSION: Recipients were not paralyzed by uncertainty. Instead, they incorporated uncertainty in life by using strategies to handle their daily life. Questions, comments, and plans for supportive communication were provided, which can be used by healthcare professionals in cardiac rehabilitation.

  • 9.
    Fluur, Christina
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Bolse, Kärstin
    Halmstad University, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Thylén, Ingela
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Patients' experiences of the implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD); with a focus on battery replacement and end-of-life issues2013In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 202-207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    ICD deactivation at end-of-life is technically uncomplicated. However, it may present a psychological challenge to healthcare professionals, patients, and next-of-kin.

    OBJECTIVE:

    This study explored patients' experiences of complex issues of battery replacement and deactivation of the ICD.

    METHODS:

    Semistructured interviews were administered to 37 medically stable ICD-recipients.

    RESULTS:

    The ICD-recipients lived with an uncertain illness trajectory, but the majority had not reflected on battery replacement or elective ICD deactivation. Healthcare professionals had rarely discussed these issues with patients. However, this was consistent with the ICD-recipients' wishes. Many patients had misconceptions about the lifesaving capacity of the ICD and the majority stated that they would not choose to deactivate the ICD, even if they knew they were terminally ill, and it meant they would receive multiple shocks.

    CONCLUSION:

    The ICD-recipients tended not to think about end-of-life issues, which imply that many patients reach the final stages of life unaware of the option of ICD deactivation.

  • 10.
    Hjelm, Carina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Broström, Anders
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Riegel, Barbara
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    The association between cognitive function and self-care in patients with chronic heart failure2015In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 113-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To test the relationship between cognitive function and self-care in patients with heart failure after adjusting for the contribution of age, education, functional status, myocardial stress, sleep and depression. Further, the relationship between cognitive function and self-care was explored with depression and sleep as moderators.

    Background: Self-care can significantly impact functional capacity, well-being, morbidity, and prognosis in patients with heart failure (HF). However, self-care requires the cognitive ability to learn, perceive, interpret and respond. The influence of demographics and clinical symptoms on the relationship between cognition and self-care needs to be further understood.

    Design: Descriptive, cross-sectional study.

    Methods: The study included 142 patients with chronic HF (68% male, median age 72 years, 61% in NYHA II). Self-care was measured with the European Heart Failure Self-Care Behavior Scale. Cognitive function was evaluated with neuropsychological tests measuring global cognitive dysfunction, psychomotor speed, executive function, visual-spatial perception/construct, spatial performance, semantic and episodic memory.

    Findings: Psychomotor function (speed and attention) measured with the Trail Making A was the only dimension of cognitive function significantly associated with self-care. Neither depressive symptoms, nor sleep disturbances  moderated the relation between cognitive function and selfcare.

    Conclusion: Deficits in psychomotor speed have implications for how patients should be educated and supported to perform self-care. A decrease in sustained attention and ability to carry out more than one task at a same time could lead to difficulties in self-care. Screening for psychomotor speed is therefore advocated for patients with HF.

  • 11.
    Hoekstra, Tialda
    et al.
    University of Groningen, Netherlands .
    Lesman-Leegte, Ivonne
    University of Groningen, Netherlands University of Groningen, Netherlands .
    Couperus, Margriet F
    University of Groningen, Netherlands .
    Sanderman, Robbert
    University of Groningen, Netherlands .
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    What keeps nurses from the sexual counseling of patients with heart failure?2012In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 41, no 5, p. 492-499Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: We sought to examine the current practice of discussing sexual health by heart failure (HF) nurses, and to explore which barriers prevent nurses from discussing sexuality. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMETHODS: The Nurses Survey of Sexual Counseling of Myocardial Infarction Patients and a list of barriers were used to form a questionnaire, which was sent to all HF clinics (n = 122) in the Netherlands. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanRESULTS: The majority (75%) of nurses (n = 146) felt a certain responsibility to discuss patients sexual health. However, in practice, 61% of the nurses rarely or never addressed sexuality. Barriers that prevented nurses from addressing sexuality and that differed between nurses who do (n = 58) and do not (n = 88) discuss sexuality include a lack of organizational policy (49% vs. 79%, respectively; P andlt; .001) and lack of training (43% vs. 80%, respectively; P andlt; .001), and not knowing how to initiate the subject (24% vs. 72%, respectively; P andlt; .001). Nurses preferred to address sexuality during a follow-up visit or when discussing medication. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanCONCLUSIONS: Although HF nurses feel responsible for discussing sexuality, this topic is rarely addressed in clinics. Several barriers were identified, relating to personal, patient, and organizational factors.

  • 12.
    Israelsson, Johan
    et al.
    Kalmar County Hospital, Sweden; Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Persson, Carina
    Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Årested, Kristofer Franzén
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Is there a difference in survival between men and women suffering in-hospital cardiac arrest?2014In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 43, no 6, p. 510-515Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To describe in-hospital cardiac arrest (CA) events with regard to sex and to investigate if sex is associated with survival. Background: Previous studies exploring differences between sexes are incongruent with regard to clinical outcomes. In order to provide equality and improve care, further investigations into these aspects are warranted. Methods: This registry study included 286 CAs. To investigate if sex was associated with survival, logistic regression analyses were performed. Results: The proportion of CA with a resuscitation attempt compared to CA without resuscitation was higher among men. There were no associations between sex and survival when controlling for previously known predictors and interaction effects. Conclusions: Sex does not appear to be a predictor for survival among patients suffering CA where resuscitation is attempted. The difference regarding proportion of resuscitation attempts requires more attention. It is important to consider possible interaction effects when studying the sex perspective.

  • 13.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    et al.
    University of Limburg, Maastricht.
    Dracup, K
    University of Limburg, Maastricht.
    Walden, J
    University of Limburg, Maastricht.
    Stevenson, L W
    University of Limburg, Maastricht.
    Sexual function in patients with advanced heart failure1996In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 262-270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the effect of low ejection fraction on sexual function and the relation between alterations in sexual function and pertinent clinical, demographic, and psychosocial variables in patients with advanced heart failure. DESIGN: This study was descriptive and correlational in design. SETTING: The setting was an outpatient clinic of a university-affiliated hospital. SUBJECTS: Sixty-two male (82%) and female (18%) patients with advanced heart failure (New York Heart Association [NYHA] class III or IV) were studied. MEASURES: Exercise tolerance and symptom severity were assessed by the 6-minute walk and NYHA classification. Ejection fraction was measured by echocardiography. Alterations in the patients' emotional, social, and sexual function were assessed with the self-report version of the Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness Scale. RESULTS: Approximately three quarters of the patients reported a marked decrease in sexual interest and in the frequency of sexual relations caused by illness, with one quarter having ceased all sexual activity. Half the patients described having experienced marked reductions, after heart failure developed, in the pleasure or satisfaction they normally experienced from sex. Few patients had arguments with their spouses about sex or reported significant marital problems as a result of their illness. A significant relation was documented between patients' sexual function and the results of the 6-minute walk (r = 0.32, p < 0.005), as well as between sexual function and NYHA functional class (r = 0.21, p < 0.05). Sexual function was also related to the patient's social environment (r = 0.59, p < 0.001), psychologic distress (r = 0.38, p < 0.001), and domestic environment (r = 0.29, p < 0.05). No significant differences in sexual function were noted when patients were compared on the basis of differences in ejection fraction, medications, gender, or age. CONCLUSION: Advanced heart failure results in marked changes in libido and in the ability to perform sexually. These changes do not affect the marital relationship negatively, at least in the view of the patient. As patients' symptoms of heart failure become increasingly more severe, physicians and nurses need to counsel patients and their spouses about the changes they may experience in their sexual relationships. Attention needs to focus on ways to cope with the decreasing physical status that accompanies advanced heart failure to minimize negative changes in sexual functioning.

  • 14.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    et al.
    University of Maastricht .
    Halfens, R
    University of Maastricht .
    Tan, F
    University of Maastricht .
    Abu-Saad, H H
    University of Maastricht .
    Dracup, K
    University of California, Los Angeles.
    Diederiks, J
    University of California, Los Angeles.
    Self-care and quality of life in patients with advanced heart failure: the effect of a supportive educational intervention2000In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 319-330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to determine the effects of a supportive educational nursing intervention on self-care abilities, self-care behavior, and quality of life of patients with advanced heart failure. DESIGN: The study design was an experimental, random assignment. SETTING: The study was located at the University Hospital in Maastricht, The Netherlands. PATIENTS: The study included 179 patients (mean age 73 years, 58% men, New York Heart Association classification III and IV) admitted to a university hospital with symptoms of heart failure. OUTCOME MEASURES: Outcome measures included self-care abilities (Appraisal of Self-care Agency Scale), self-care behavior (Heart Failure Self-care Behavior Scale), 3 dimensions of quality of life (functional capabilities, symptoms, and psychosocial adjustment to illness), and overall well-being (Cantril's ladder of life). INTERVENTION: The intervention patients received systematic education and support by a nurse in the hospital and at home. Control patients received routine care. RESULTS: Self-care abilities did not change as a result of the intervention, but the self-care behavior in the intervention group was higher than the self-care behavior in the control group during follow-up. The effect of the supportive educational intervention on quality of life was limited. The 3 dimensions of quality of life improved after hospitalization in both groups, with no differences between intervention and control group as measured at each follow-up measurement. However, there was a trend indicating differences between the 2 groups in decrease in symptom frequency and symptom distress during the 9 months of follow-up. CONCLUSION: A supportive educational nursing intervention is effective in improving self-care behavior in patients with advanced (New York Heart Association class III-IV) heart failure; however, a more intensive intervention is needed to show effectiveness in improving quality of life.

  • 15.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nikolova-Simons, Mariana
    Philips Research Briarcliff, NY USA .
    H L van der Wal, Martje
    University of Medical Centre Groningen, Netherlands .
    Nurses strategies to address self-care aspects related to medication adherence and symptom recognition in heart failure patients: An in-depth look2012In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 41, no 6, p. 583-593Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Despite an increasing body of knowledge on self-care in heart failure patients, the need for effective interventions remains. We sought to deepen the understanding of interventions that heart failure nurses use in clinical practice to improve patient adherence to medication and symptom monitoring. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMETHODS: A qualitative study with a directed content analysis was performed, using data from a selected sample of Dutch-speaking heart failure nurses who completed booklets with two vignettes involving medication adherence and symptom recognition. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanRESULTS: Nurses regularly assess and reassess patients before they decide on an intervention. They evaluate basic/factual information and barriers in a patients behavior, and try to find room for improvement in a patients behavior. Interventions that heart failure nurses use to improve adherence to medication and symptom monitoring were grouped into the themes of increasing knowledge, increasing motivation, and providing patients with practical tools. Nurses also described using technology-based tools, increased social support, alternative communication, partnership approaches, and coordination of care to improve adherence to medications and symptom monitoring. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanCONCLUSION: Despite a strong focus on educational strategies, nurses also reported other strategies to increase patient adherence. Nurses use several strategies to improve patient adherence that are not incorporated into guidelines. These interventions need to be evaluated for further applications in improving heart failure management

  • 16.
    Klompstra, Leonie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Van der Wal, Martje H. L.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Univ Groningen, Netherlands.
    Letter: Response to letter to the editor: Seasonal variation in physical activity in patients with heart failure in HEART and LUNG, vol 49, issue 6, pp 576-5762019In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 49, no 6, p. 576-576Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 17.
    Klompstra, Leonie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    van der Wal, Martje H. L.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Univ Groningen, Netherlands.
    Seasonal variation in physical activity in patients with heart failure2019In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 48, no 5, p. 381-385Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and objectives: Physical activity is important for all heart failure (HF) patients to improve quality of life and physical function. Since adherence to physical activity is low and could differ between seasons, it is essential to explore factors related to change that may depend on seasonal changes. The purpose of this study was to describe the seasonal differences in physical activity and assess factors that influence these differences in a country with markedly different winter-to-summer weather conditions (in temperature, hours of daylight and snow fall). Methods: The study had a cross-sectional survey design. Outpatients with HF completed a questionnaire on physical activity, motivation and self-efficacy to exercise and I-IF symptom severity in the summer and the winter in a northern hemisphere country. We used analysis of variance to evaluate seasonal differences in physical activity, motivation, self-efficacy and HF symptom severity. Results: Eighty-seven patients with HF (29% women, mean age 70 +/- 9 years) were included and 35% performed less physical activity (METs) in the winter, compared to the summer. Increased symptom severity during the winter was associated with lower activity levels. Conclusion: One-third of the patients performed less physical activity during the winter compared to the summer, and this was associated with symptom severity. Decreased physical activity was not related with motivation and self-efficacy. This study emphasises the need for personalised physical activity programmes that also assess symptom severity and change in symptom severity depending between seasons. (C) 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  • 18.
    Lee, Christopher S.
    et al.
    Oregon Health and Science University, OR 97201 USA.
    Bidwell, Julie T.
    Emory University, GA 30322 USA.
    Paturzo, Marco
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy.
    Alvaro, Rosaria
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy.
    Cocchieri, Antonello
    Catholic University, Italy.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Riegel, Barbara
    University of Penn, PA 19104 USA.
    Vellone, Ercole
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy.
    Patterns of self-care and clinical events in a cohort of adults with heart failure: 1 year follow-up2018In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 47, no 1, p. 40-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Heart failure (HF) self-care is important in reducing clinical events (all-cause mortality, emergency room visits and hospitalizations). HF self-care behaviors are multidimensional and include maintenance (i.e. daily adherence behaviors), management (i.e. symptom response behaviors) and consulting behaviors (i.e. contacting a provider when appropriate). Across these dimensions, patterns of successful patient engagement in self-care have been observed (e.g. successful in one dimension but not in others), but no previous studies have linked patterns of HF self care to clinical events. Objectives: To identify patterns of self-care behaviors in HF patients and their association with clinical events. Methods: This was a prospective, non-experimental, cohort study. Community-dwelling HF patients (n = 459) were enrolled across Italy, and clinical events were collected one year after enrollment. We measured dimensions of self-care behavior with the Self-Care of HF Index (maintenance, management, and confidence) and the European HF Self-care Behavior Scale (consulting behaviors). We used latent class mixture modeling to identify patterns of HF self-care across dimensions, and Cox proportional hazards modeling to quantify event-free survival over 12 months of follow-up. Results: Patients (mean age 71.8 +/- 12.1 years) were mostly males (54.9%). Three patterns of self-care behavior were identified; we labeled each by their most prominent dimensional characteristic: poor symptom response, good symptom response, and maintenance-focused behaviors. Patients with good symptom response behaviors had fewer clinical events compared with those who had poor symptom response behaviors (adjusted hazard ratio = 0.66 10.46-0.96], p = 0.03). Patients with poor symptom response behaviors had the most frequent clinical events. Patients with poor symptom response and those with maintenance-focused behaviors had a similar frequency of clinical events. Conclusions: Self-care is significantly associated with clinical events. Routine assessment, mitigation of barriers, and interventions targeting self-care are needed to reduce clinical events in HF patients. (C) 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 19.
    Luttik, Marie Louise
    et al.
    University Medical Centre Groningen.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    University Medical Centre Groningen.
    Veeger, Nic
    University Medical Centre Groningen.
    van Veldhuisen, Dirk J
    University Medical Centre Groningen.
    Marital status, quality of life, and clinical outcome in patients with heart failure2006In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 3-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: This study investigated the impact of having a partner on quality of life (QoL), the number of hospital readmissions, and 9-month survival in patients with heart failure (HF). METHODS: The study population consisted of hospitalized patients with HF. QoL was measured by the Cantril Ladder of Life (0-10) during hospital admission. Clinical data, readmission rate, and number of deaths were registered by patient interview and chart review. RESULTS: Of the 179 patients, 96 (54%) were married or were living with a partner. Differences in QoL between married patients and those living alone were most pronounced with regard to future expectations of QoL (6.5 vs 5.0, P=.00). However, in a multivariate model QoL was primarily associated with socioeconomic status, age, and gender. Married patients had 12% less events in the 9-month follow-up period compared with patients living alone (P=not significant). CONCLUSION: This study indicates that most patients with HF who are living alone are mostly elderly women with a low socioeconomic status, who are at risk for recurrent events and a worse QoL.

  • 20.
    Martensson, J.
    et al.
    Mårtensson, J., Department of Cardiology, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden, School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden, Department of Primary Health Care, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Dracup, K.
    School of Nursing, University of California, San Francisco, CA, United States.
    Fridlund, B.
    Decisive situations influencing spouses' support of patients with heart failure: A critical incident technique analysis2001In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 341-350Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to describe decisive situations experienced by spouses of patients with heart failure that could potentially affect their ability to provide social support to the patient. METHODS: A qualitative descriptive design with a critical incident technique was used. Twenty-three informants, 15 women and 8 men, who were spouses of patients with severe heart failure were strategically chosen to ensure maximal variation in sociodemographic data and experiences as a spouse. RESULTS: Decisive situations influenced the experience of spouses of patients with heart failure in a manner that was either positive (involvement with others) or negative (feeling like an outsider). When spouses were given attention and treated like persons of value, they experienced involvement with others. In these cases, spouses had someone to turn to and were included in the physical care. In contrast, when spouses were kept at a distance by the patient, were socially isolated, and received insufficient support from children, friends, and health care professionals, they experienced feeling like an outsider. CONCLUSIONS: By identifying spouses' experiences, health care professionals can assess which kind of specific interventions should be used to improve the life situation of the patient with heart failure and his or her spouse.

  • 21.
    Miller, Jennifer L.
    et al.
    Univ Kentucky, KY USA.
    Chung, Misook L.
    Univ Kentucky, KY USA.
    Etaee, Farshid
    Univ Kentucky, KY USA.
    Hammash, Muna
    Univ Louisville, KY 40292 USA.
    Thylén, Ingela
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Biddle, Martha J.
    Univ Kentucky, KY USA.
    Elayi, Samy C.
    Univ Florida, FL USA.
    Czarapata, Mary M.
    Univ Kentucky, KY USA.
    McEvedy, Samantha
    La Trobe Univ, Australia.
    Cameron, Jan
    Monash Univ, Australia.
    Haedtke, Christine A.
    Indianapolis Sch Nursing, IN USA.
    Ski, Chantal F.
    Queens Univ Belfast, North Ireland.
    Thompson, David R.
    Queens Univ Belfast, North Ireland.
    Moser, Debra K.
    Univ Kentucky, KY USA.
    Missed opportunities! End of life decision making and discussions in implantable cardioverter defibrillator recipients2019In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 313-319Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Recent guidelines highlight the need for clinician-patient discussions regarding end-of-life (EOL) choices prior to implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implantation. Health literacy could affect the quality and quantity of such discussions. Objective: Our objective was to determine the association of health literacy with experiences, attitudes, and knowledge of the ICD at EOL. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, we used validated instruments to measure health literacy and patient experiences, attitudes, and knowledge of the ICD at EOL. Results: Of the 240 ICD recipients, 76% of participants reported never having discussed the implications of a future withdrawal of defibrillation therapy with their healthcare provider. Increased odds of choosing to maintain defibrillation therapy were associated with female gender and lower ICD knowledge. Conclusions: From patients perspectives, EOL discussions with providers were minimal. Most patients hold misperceptions about ICD function that could interfere with optimal EOL care, particularly for those with inadequate health literacy. (C) 2019 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 22.
    Mourad, Ghassan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hallert, Claes
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the East of Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine VHN.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Depressive symptoms and healthcare utilization in patients with noncardiac chest pain compared to patients with ischemic heart disease2012In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 41, no 5, p. 446-455Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: We compared depressive symptoms and healthcare utilization in patients admitted for noncardiac chest pain, acute myocardial infarction, and angina pectoris after hospitalization and at 1-year follow-up. METHODS: One hundred and thirty-one patients with noncardiac chest pain, 66 with acute myocardial infarction, and 70 with angina pectoris completed a depression screening questionnaire and the Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating Scale. Healthcare utilization data were collected from a population-based, diagnosis-related database. RESULTS: More than 25% of respondents reported depressive symptoms, regardless of diagnosis. At follow-up, 9% had recovered, 19% were still experiencing depressive symptoms, and 13% had developed depressive symptoms. Noncardiac patients with chest pain had similar primary care contacts, but fewer hospital admissions, than patients with an acute myocardial infarction. Patients with angina pectoris and depressive symptoms used the most healthcare services. CONCLUSIONS: Depressive symptoms were common. Patients with noncardiac chest pain used as much primary care as did patients with an acute myocardial infarction. Interventions should focus on identifying and treating depressive symptoms.

  • 23.
    Perkiö Kato, Naoko
    et al.
    Department of Adult Nursing/Palliative Care Nursing, Division of Health Sciences and Nursing, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan / Research Fellow of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
    Kinugawa, Koichiro
    Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
    Ito, Naomi
    Department of Adult Nursing/Palliative Care Nursing, Division of Health Sciences and Nursing, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
    Yao, Atsushi
    Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
    Watanabe, Masafumi
    Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
    Imai, Yasushi
    Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
    Takeda, Norihiko
    Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
    Hatano, Masaru
    Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
    Kazuma, Keiko
    Department of Adult Nursing/Palliative Care Nursing, Division of Health Sciences and Nursing, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
    Adherence to self-care behavior and factors related to this behavior among patients with heart failure in Japan2009In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 38, no 5, p. 398-409Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Adherence to self-care behavior is important for patients with heart failure (HF) to prevent exacerbation of HF. The aim of this study was to evaluate adherence, identify associated factors, and clarify the impact of previous HF hospitalizations on adherence in outpatients with HF.

    METHODS: A total of 116 outpatients completed a questionnaire, including the Japanese version of the European Heart Failure Self-Care Behavior Scale, to assess adherence.

    RESULTS: Regardless of previous hospitalizations, adherence to seek help if HF worsened was poor. Multivariate analysis adjusted for age and brain natriuretic peptide showed that diabetes mellitus and being employed were independent predictors of poorer adherence to self-care behavior (P = .03, P = .02, respectively), but the experience of previous HF hospitalizations was not a predictor.

    CONCLUSIONS: Self-care strategies for HF should target patients with diabetes mellitus and employed patients. Further study is necessary to develop effective programs for such patients.

  • 24.
    Poole, Jennifer
    et al.
    School of Social Work, Faculty of Community Services, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
    Ward, Jennifer
    School of Social Work, Faculty of Community Services, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
    DeLuca, Enza
    Division of Cardiology and Transplant, University Health Network, 585 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Abbey, Susan
    Department of Psychiatry, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
    Mauthner, Oliver
    Institute of Nursing Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
    Ross, Heather
    Division of Cardiology and Transplant, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
    Grief and loss for patients before and after heart transplant2016In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 45, no 3, p. 193-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    The purpose of the study was to examine the loss and grief experiences of patients waiting for and living with new hearts.

    Background

    There is much scholarship on loss and grief. Less attention has been paid to these issues in clinical transplantation, and even less on the patient experience.

    Methods

    Part of a qualitative inquiry oriented to the work of Merleau-Ponty, a secondary analysis was carried out on audiovisual data from interviews with thirty participants.

    Results

    Patients experience loss and three forms of grief. Pre-transplant patients waiting for transplant experience loss and anticipatory grief related to their own death and the future death of their donor. Transplanted patients experience long-lasting complicated grief with respect to the donor and disenfranchised grief which may not be sanctioned.

    Conclusions

    Loss as well as anticipatory, complicated and disenfranchised grief may have been inadvertently disregarded or downplayed. More research and attention is needed.

  • 25.
    Stamp, Kelly D.
    et al.
    Univ North Carolina Greensboro, NC 27420 USA.
    Prasun, Marilyn
    Mem Med Ctr, IL USA; Univ Illinois, IL USA.
    Lee, Christopher S.
    Boston Coll, MA 02167 USA.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Piano, Mariann R.
    Vanderbilt Univ, TN 37240 USA.
    Albert, Nancy M.
    Cleveland Clin Hlth Syst, OH USA.
    Nursing research in heart failure care: a position statement of the american association of heart failure nurses (AAHFN)2018In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 169-175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Heart Failure (HF) is a public health problem globally affecting approximately 6 million in the United States. Objectives: A tailored position statement was developed by the American Association of Heart Failure Nurses (AAHFN) and their Research Consortium to assist researchers, funding institutions and policymakers with improving HF clinical advancements and outcomes. Methods: A comprehensive review was conducted using multiple search terms in various combinations to describe gaps in HF nursing science. Based on gaps described in the literature, the AAHFN made recommendations for future areas of research in HF. Results: Nursing has made positive contributions through disease management interventions, however, quality, rigorous research is needed to improve the lives of patients and families while advancing nursing science. Conclusions: Advancing HF science is critical to managing and improving patient outcomes while promoting the nursing profession. Based on this review, the AAHFN is putting forth a call to action for research designs that promote validity, sustainability, and funding of future nursing research. (C) 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 26.
    Strömberg, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Broström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Centre for Health Promotion Research, Halmstad University and the Department of Primary Health Care, Göteborg University.
    Factors influencing patient compliance with therapeutic regimens in chronic heart failure: A critical incident technique analysis1999In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 28, no 5, p. 334-341Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to identify factors influencing compliance with prescribed treatment in patients with chronic heart failure.

    Methods: A qualitative design with a critical incident technique was used. Incidents were collected through interviews with 25 patients with heart failure strategically selected from a primary health care clinic, a medical ward, and a specialist clinic.

    Results: Two hundred sixty critical incidents were identified in the interviews and 2 main areas emerged in the analysis: inward factors and outward factors. The inward factors described how compliance was influenced by the personality of the patient, the disease, and the treatment. The outward factors described how compliance was influenced by social activities, social relationships, and health care professionals.

    Conclusions: By identifying the inward and outward factors influencing patients with chronic heart failure, health care professionals can assess whether intervention is needed to increase compliance.

  • 27. van der Wal, Martje H L
    et al.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Moser, Debra K
    van Gilst, Wiek H
    van Veldhuisen, Dirk J
    Qualitative examination of compliance in heart failure patients in The Netherlands.2010In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 121-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Noncompliance with pharmacological and nonpharmacological recommendations is a problem in many heart failure (HF) patients, leading to worse symptoms and readmission. Although knowledge is available regarding factors related to compliance with HF regimens, little is known about patients' perspectives. We investigated patients' reasons and motivations for compliance with HF regimens from their perspective, and we studied how patients manage these recommendations in daily life. The health belief model was used as a framework for this study. METHODS: A qualitative descriptive study was used, and 15 HF patients were interviewed about reasons for compliance, barriers to compliance, interventions that helped them comply with medications, sodium restriction, fluid restriction, and daily weighing. RESULTS: The most commonly reported reasons for compliance included fear of hospitalization and HF symptoms. Barriers to compliance were mainly related to the negative aspects of a regimen, e.g., taste of the food and thirst. Most patients tried to make their lifestyle changes part of the daily routine. Several problems and misunderstandings with the regimen were evident. Patients themselves offered many tips that helped them comply with the regimen. CONCLUSIONS: To improve compliance in HF patients, patient-tailored interventions must be targeted at specific problems and patients' beliefs regarding the regimen, and aim at implementing the regimen into daily life. Healthcare providers need to emphasize the benefits of compliance, motivate patients to comply, and focus on individual barriers to compliance, knowledge deficits, and misunderstandings regarding the regimen. More specific advice about medications and diet is needed. Group interventions, including tips patients themselves provide, might also be useful in helping patients implement the HF regimen in their daily lives.

  • 28. van der Wal, Martje H L
    et al.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Moser, Debra K
    van Gilst, Wiek H
    van Veldhuisen, Dirk J
    Unraveling the mechanisms for heart failure patients' beliefs about compliance.2007In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 253-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Compliance with medication, diet, and monitoring symptoms is a problem in heart failure (HF) patients. Noncompliance can lead to worsening symptoms and is associated with personal beliefs about compliance. To intervene effectively, knowledge of factors related to patients' beliefs about compliance is needed. OBJECTIVES: The aims of this study are to: (1) gain insight into patients' beliefs about compliance; (2) examine the association of demographic variables and depressive symptoms to beliefs; (3) assess compliance with medication, diet, and daily weighing; and (4) examine the association of compliance to patients' beliefs. METHODS: Nine hundred fifty-four HF patients completed questionnaires on beliefs about medication and diet; 297 patients also completed a questionnaire on beliefs about symptom monitoring. Most important barriers and benefits were assessed as well as differences in beliefs between subgroups and the association between compliance and beliefs. RESULTS: The most important barriers were diuresis during the night (57%), the taste of food (51%), and limited ability to go out (33%). A barrier related to failure to weigh daily was forgetfulness (26%). Patients with depressive symptoms and patients with a low level of HF knowledge experienced more barriers to compliance with the HF regimen. Self-reported compliance with medication was almost 99%, compliance with diet 77%, and with daily weighing 33%. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: In order to improve compliance, it is important that interventions should be directed to those patients who experience more barriers to compliance, such as patients with depressive symptoms and patients with a low level of knowledge on the HF regimen. Improvement of knowledge, therefore, will remain an important issue in HF management programs.

  • 29.
    Walfridsson, Ulla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Walfridsson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Impact of radiofrequency ablation on health-related quality of life in patients with paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia compared with a norm population one year after treatment2010In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 405-411Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the impact of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients with paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT).

    METHODS: HRQOL was assessed with the Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36) and EuroQol (EQ)-5D at baseline and 3 and 12 months after RFA. At 12 months, the patients were compared with an age- and gender-matched reference group.

    RESULTS: Patients showed a marked improvement in all the SF-36's scales at 3 months after treatment compared with baseline. Patients scored higher in all scales in the SF-36 but not in the EQ-5D's index at 12 months compared with baseline. No further improvements were detected from 3 to 12 months follow-up. Twelve months after treatment, patients scored equal to the reference group in the SF-36 and EQ-5D index, indicating a complete restoration of the HRQOL after RFA.

    CONCLUSION: PSVT is a condition with a pronounced impact on HRQOL. At 12 months follow-up after RFA, patients' HRQOL scores were similar to those of the age- and gender-matched reference group.

  • 30.
    Ågren, Susanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Luttik, Marie Louise A.
    Hanze University of Appl Science, Netherlands.
    Caregiving tasks and caregiver burden; effects of an psycho-educational intervention in partners of patients with post-operative heart failure2015In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 270-275Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of a psycho-educational intervention on caregiver burden in partners of patients with postoperative heart failure. Background: Since partners of cardiac surgery patients play a significant role in the patients recovery, it is important to address their needs during hospitalization and after discharge. Methods: Forty-two patients with postoperative heart failure and their partners participated in a randomized controlled pilot study. Dyads in the intervention group received psycho-educational support from a multidisciplinary team. Dyads in the control group received usual care. Results: No significant differences were found in the performance of caregiving tasks and perceived caregiver burden in the control versus the intervention group. Conclusion: A pilot study exploring the effects of a psycho-educational intervention in patients and their partners did not reveal significant effects with regard to reduced feelings of burden in partners. Alleviating caregiver burden in partners may need a more intense or specific approach. (C) 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

1 - 30 of 30
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf