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  • 1.
    Dahlin, Lars-Göran
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Granfeldt, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Hultkvist, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    A multimodal approach for reducing wound infections after sternotomy2004In: Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 1569-9293, E-ISSN 1569-9285, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 206-210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As previous efforts failed to reduce infection rates after cardiac surgery at our institution, we developed a concept based on adjustment of surgical technique. This concept was then evaluated in clinical practice. We modified our surgical technique towards: minimizing contamination, avoidance of devitalizing tissue, and securing a rigid fixation of the caudal part of sternum. After a pilot series sequential series was compared before and after introduction of the modified technique in a case-series design. All surgical site infections were recorded at discharge, after 6 weeks and by the attending cardiologist at 2 and 6 months. In the pilot series 9/136 patients developed sternal wound infections (SWI) compared with 15/89 patients in the control group (P=0.015). In the larger study population we found a significant drop in the total number of SWIs (72/772 vs 124/772, P≪0.0001). Although not statistically significant a 32% reduction in deep SWIs was observed. No reduction in infections at harvest sites for graft material was seen. The preliminary results from the pilot study appear reproducible and we were able to reduce the incidence of SWIs significantly, using this simple modified surgical technique.

  • 2.
    Friberg, Örjan
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Dahlin, Lars-Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Källman, Jan
    Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Kihlström, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Söderquist, Bo
    Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Svedjeholm, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Collagen-gentamicin implant for prevention of sternal wound infection; long-term follow-up of effectiveness2009In: Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 1569-9293, E-ISSN 1569-9285, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 454-458Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a previous randomized controlled trial (LOGIP trial) the addition of local collagen-gentamicin reduced the incidence of postoperative sternal wound infections (SWI) compared with intravenous prophylaxis only. Consequently, the technique with local gentamicin was introduced in clinical routine at the two participating centers. The aim of the present study was to re-evaluate the technique regarding the prophylactic effect against SWI and to detect potential shifts in causative microbiological agents over time. All patients in this prospective two-center study received prophylaxis with application of two collagen-gentamicin sponges between the sternal halves in addition to routine intravenous antibiotics. All patients were followed for 60 days postoperatively. From January 2007 to May 2008, 1359 patients were included. The 60-day incidences of any SWI was 3.7% and of deep SWI 1.5% (1.0% mediastinitis). Both superficial and deep SWI were significantly reduced compared with the previous control group (OR=0.34 for deep SWI, Pless than0.001). There was no increase in the absolute incidence of aminoglycoside resistant agents. The majority of SWI were caused by coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS). The incidence of deep SWI caused by Staphylococcus aureus was 0.07%. The results indicate a maintained effect of the prophylaxis over time without absolute increase in aminoglycoside resistance.

  • 3.
    Rönnerfalk, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Tamas, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Structure and function of the tricuspid and bicuspid regurgitant aortic valve: an echocardiographic study2015In: Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 1569-9293, E-ISSN 1569-9285, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 71-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The emerging new treatment options for aortic valve disease call for more sophisticated diagnostics. We aimed to describe the echocardiographic pathophysiology and characteristics of the purely regurgitant aortic valve in detail.

    METHODS: Twenty-nine men, with chronic aortic regurgitation without concomitant heart disease referred for aortic valve intervention, underwent 2D transoesophageal echocardiographic (TEE) examination prior to surgery according to a previously published matrix. Measurements of the aortic valve apparatus in long and short axis view were made in systole and diastole and analysed off-line. The aortic valves were grouped as tricuspid (TAV) or bicuspid (BAV), and classified by regurgitation mechanism.

    RESULTS: Twenty-four examinations were eligible for analysis of which 13 presented TAV and 11 BAV. The regurgitation mechanism was classified as dilatation of the aorta in 6 cases, as prolapse in 11 cases and as poor cusp tissue quality or quantity in 7 cases. The ventriculo-aortic junction (VAJ) and valve opening were closely related (TAV r = 0.5, BAV r = 0.73) but no correlation was found between the VAJ and the maximal sinus diameter (maxSiD) or the sinotubular junction (STJ). However, the STJ and maxSiD were significantly related (TAV vs BAV: systole r = 0.9, r = 0.8; diastole r = 0.9, r = 0.7), forming an entity. The conjoined BAV cusps were shorter than the anterior cusps when closed (P = 0.002); the inter-commissural distances of the cusps in the BAV group were significantly different (P = 0.001 resp. 0.03) in both systole and diastole.

    CONCLUSIONS: The VAJ was independent of other aortic dimensions and should thereby be considered as a separate entity with influence on valve opening. The detailed 2D TEE measurements of this study add further important information to our knowledge about the function and echocardiographic anatomy of the pathological aortic valve and root either as a stand-alone examination or as a benchmark and complement to 3D echocardiography. This may have an impact on decisions regarding repairability of the native aortic valve.

  • 4.
    Svedjeholm, Rolf
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Thoracic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Håkansson, Erik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Thoracic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Lindström, M
    Hjort, P
    Post-infarct left ventricular free wall rupture and ventricular septal defect managed by pericardial aspiration during transport to referral hospital2003In: Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 1569-9293, E-ISSN 1569-9285, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 193-195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although left ventricular free wall rupture is a comparatively common cause of death in acute myocardial infarction survival is infrequently reported. However, even in cases where surgical expertise is not immediately available the condition can be temporarily controlled by judicious pericardial aspiration and blood transfusion until definitive repair can be undertaken. Here we report the successful management of a patient sustaining combined left ventricular free wall rupture and ventricular septal rupture in a community hospital 130 km from the referral center.

  • 5.
    Vikholm, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Ivert, Torbjorn
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Johan
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Holmgren, Anders
    Umea Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Freter, Wolfgang
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Temstrom, Lisa
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Ghaidan, Haider
    Blekinge Hosp, Sweden.
    Sartipy, Ulrik
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Olsson, Christian
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Granfeldt, Hans
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Ragnarsson, Sigurdur
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Friberg, Örjan
    Orebro Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Validity of the Swedish Cardiac Surgery Registry2018In: Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 1569-9293, E-ISSN 1569-9285, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 67-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Our goal was to validate the Swedish Cardiac Surgery Registry by reviewing the reported cardiac operations to assess the completeness and quality of the registered data and the EuroSCORE II variables. METHODS: A total of 5837 cardiac operations were reported to the Swedish Cardiac Surgery Registry in Sweden during 2015. A randomly selected sample of 753 patient records (13%) was scrutinized by 3 surgeons at all 8 units in Sweden performing open cardiac surgery in adults. RESULTS: Coverage was excellent with 99% [95% confidence interval (CI) 98-99%] of the performed procedures found in the registry. Reported waiting times for surgery were correct in 78% (95% CI 76-79%) of the cases. The main procedural code was correctly reported in 96% (95% CI 95-97%) of the cases. The correlation between reported and monitored logistic EuroSCORE II had a coefficient of 0.79 (95% CI 0.76-0.82), and the median difference in EuroSCORE II was 0% (interquartile range -0.4% to 0.4%). The majority of EuroSCORE II variables had good agreement and coherence; however, New York Heart Association functional class, preoperative renal dysfunction, left ventricular ejection fraction, Canadian Cardiovascular Society Class IV angina and poor mobility were less robust Postoperative complications were rare and in general had a high degree of completeness and agreement. CONCLUSIONS: The reliability of the variables in the national Swedish Cardiac Surgery Registry was excellent. Thus, the registry is a valuable source of data for quality studies and research. Some EuroSCORE II variables require improved and stricter definitions to obtain uniform reporting and high validity.

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