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  • 1.
    Boyle, R J
    et al.
    Imperial College London.
    Pedroletti, C
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Wickman, M
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Bjermer, L
    Lund University Hospital.
    Valovirta, E
    Terveystalo Allergy Clinic, Turku, Finland.
    Dahl, R
    Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark .
    Von Berg, A
    Marien-Hospital, Wesel, Germany .
    Zetterström, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Allergy Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Warner, J O
    Imperial College London.
    Nocturnal temperature controller laminar airflow for treating atopic asthma: a randomised controlled trial2012In: Thorax, ISSN 0040-6376, E-ISSN 1468-3296, Vol. 67, no 3, p. 215-221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

       Objective To determine whether environmental control using nocturnal temperature controlled laminar airflow (TLA) treatment could improve the quality of life of patients with persistent atopic asthma. <br> <br>Design Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial. <br> <br>Setting Nineteen European asthma clinics. <br> <br>Participants 312 patients aged 7-70 with inadequately controlled persistent atopic asthma. <br> <br>Main outcome measure Proportion of patients with an increase of &gt;= 0.5 points in asthma quality of life score after 1 year of treatment. <br> <br>Results TLA devices were successfully installed in the bedrooms of 282 (90%) patients included in the primary efficacy analysis. There was a difference in treatment response rate between active (143 of 189, 76%) and placebo (56 of 92, 61%) groups, difference 14.8% (95% CI 3.1 to 26.5, p=0.02).(3) In patients aged &gt;= 12, on whom the study was powered, the difference in response rate was similar-active 106 of 143 (74%), placebo 42 of 70 (60%), difference 14.1% (0.6 to 27.7, p=0.059). There was a difference between groups in fractional exhaled nitric oxide change of -7.1 ppb (-13.6 to -0.7, p=0.03). Active treatment was associated with less increase in cat-specific IgE than placebo. There was no difference in adverse event rates between treatment groups. <br> <br>Conclusion Inhalant exposure reduction with TLA improves quality of life, airway inflammation and systemic allergy in patients with persistent atopic asthma. TLA may be a treatment option for patients with inadequately controlled persistent atopic asthma.

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  • 2.
    Ekstrom, Magnus Pär
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Anders
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Bergström, Göran
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Brandberg, John
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Caidahl, Kenneth
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Engström, Gunnar
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Eriksson, Maria
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Gränsbo, Klas
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Hansen, Tomas
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Jernberg, Tomas
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Lars
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Ulf
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Olin, Anna-Carin
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Persson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Respiratory Medicine.
    Rosengren, Annika
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sandelin, Martin
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Sköld, Magnus
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Sundström, Johan
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Söderberg, Stefan
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Tanash, Hanan A.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Torén, Kjell
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Ödeshög.
    Lindberg, Eva
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    The association of body mass index, weight gain and central obesity with activity-related breathlessness: the Swedish Cardiopulmonary Bioimage Study2019In: Thorax, ISSN 0040-6376, E-ISSN 1468-3296, Vol. 74, no 10, p. 958-964Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Breathlessness is common in the population, especially in women and associated with adverse health outcomes. Obesity (body mass index (BMI) amp;gt;30 kg/m(2)) is rapidly increasing globally and its impact on breathlessness is unclear. Methods This population-based study aimed primarily to evaluate the association of current BMI and self-reported change in BMI since age 20 with breathlessness (modified Research Council score amp;gt;= 1) in the middle-aged population. Secondary aims were to evaluate factors that contribute to breathlessness in obesity, including the interaction with spirometric lung volume and sex. Results We included 13 437 individuals; mean age 57.5 years; 52.5% women; mean BMI 26.8 (SD 4.3); mean BMI increase since age 20 was 5.0 kg/m(2); and 1283 (9.6%) reported breathlessness. Obesity was strongly associated with increased breathlessness, OR 3.54 (95% CI, 3.03 to 4.13) independent of age, sex, smoking, airflow obstruction, exercise level and the presence of comorbidities. The association between BMI and breathlessness was modified by lung volume; the increase in breathlessness prevalence with higher BMI was steeper for individuals with lower forced vital capacity (FVC). The higher breathlessness prevalence in obese women than men (27.4% vs 12.5%; pamp;lt;0.001) was related to their lower FVC. Irrespective of current BMI and confounders, individuals who had increased in BMI since age 20 had more breathlessness. Conclusion Breathlessness is independently associated with obesity and with weight gain in adult life, and the association is stronger for individuals with lower lung volumes.

  • 3.
    Molnar, Miklos Z
    et al.
    University of Tennessee HealthScience Center, Memphis, USA.
    Mucsi, Istvan
    University of Toronto, Cananda, Semmelweis University Budapest, Hungary.
    Novak, Marta
    Semmelweis University Budapest, Hungary, University of Toronto, Canada.
    Szabo, Zoltan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Freire, Amado X
    Memphis Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Memphis, USA.
    Huch, Kim M
    Memphis Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Memphis, USA.
    Arah, Onyebuchi A
    University of California, Los Angeles, USA.
    Ma, Jennie Z
    University of Virginia, Charlottesville, USA .
    Lu, Jun L
    University of Tennessee HealthScience Center, Memphis, USA.
    Sim, John J
    Kaiser Permanente, Los Angeles, USA.
    Streja, Elani
    University of California, Irvine, USA.
    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar
    University of California, Irvine, USA .
    Kovesdy, Csaba P
    University of Tennessee HealthScience Center, Memphis, USA, Memphis Affairs Medical Center, Memphis, USA.
    Association of incident obstructive sleep apnoea with outcomes in a large cohort of US veterans2015In: Thorax, ISSN 0040-6376, E-ISSN 1468-3296, Vol. 70, no 9, p. 888-895Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    RATIONALE: There is a paucity of large cohort studies examining the association of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) with clinical outcomes including all-cause mortality, coronary heart disease (CHD), strokes and chronic kidney disease (CKD).

    OBJECTIVES: We hypothesised that a diagnosis of incident OSA is associated with higher risks of these adverse clinical outcomes.

    METHODS, MEASUREMENTS: In a nationally representative cohort of over 3 million (n=3 079 514) US veterans (93% male) with baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR)≥60 mL/min/1.73 m(2), we examined the association between the diagnosis of incident OSA, treated and untreated with CPAP, and: (1) all-cause mortality, (2) incident CHD, (3) incident strokes, (4)incident CKD defined as eGFR<60 mL/min/1.73 m(2), and (5) slopes of eGFR.

    MAIN RESULTS: Compared with OSA-negative patients, untreated and treated OSA was associated with 86% higher mortality risk, (adjusted HR and 95% CI 1.86 (1.81 to 1.91) and 35% (1.35 (1.21 to 1.51)), respectively. Similarly, untreated and treated OSA was associated with 3.5 times (3.54 (3.40 to 3.69)) and 3 times (3.06 (2.62 to 3.56)) higher risk of incident CHD; 3.5 times higher risk of incident strokes (3.48 (3.28 to 3.64) and 3.50 (2.92 to 4.19)) for untreated and treated OSA, respectively. The risk of incident CKD was also significantly higher in untreated (2.27 (2.19 to 2.36)) and treated (2.79 (2.48 to 3.13)) patients with OSA. The median (IQR) of the eGFR slope was -0.41 (-2.01 to 0.99), -0.61 (-2.69 to 0.93) and -0.87 (-3.00 to 0.70) mL/min/1.73 m(2) in OSA-negative patients, untreated OSA-positive patients and treated OSA-positive patients, respectively.

    CONCLUSIONS: In this large and contemporary cohort of more than 3 million US veterans, a diagnosis of incident OSA was associated with higher mortality, incident CHD, stroke and CKD and with faster kidney function decline.

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  • 4. von Mutius, E
    et al.
    Pearce, N
    Beasley, R
    Cheng, S
    von Ehrenstein, O
    Björkstén, B
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Barn.
    Weiland, S
    International patterns of tuberculosis and the prevalence of symptoms of asthma, rhinitis, and eczema2000In: Thorax, ISSN 0040-6376, E-ISSN 1468-3296, Vol. 55, no 6, p. 449-453Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background - An ecological analysis was conducted of the relationship between tuberculosis notification rates and the prevalence of symptoms of asthma, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, and atopic eczema in 85 centres from 23 countries in which standardised data are available. These essentially comprised countries in Europe as well as the USA, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. Methods - Tuberculosis notification rates were obtained from the World Health Organization. Data on the prevalence of symptoms of asthma, rhinitis, and eczema in 235,477 children aged 13-14 years were based on the responses to the written and video questionnaires from the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC). The analysis was adjusted for gross national product (GNP) as an estimate of the level of affluence. Results - Tuberculosis notification rates were significantly inversely associated with the lifetime prevalence of wheeze and asthma and the 12 month period prevalence of wheeze at rest as assessed by the video questionnaire. An increase in the tuberculosis notification rates of 25 per 100,000 was associated with an absolute decrease in the prevalence of wheeze ever of 4.7%. Symptoms of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in the past 12 months were inversely associated with tuberculosis notification rates, but there were no other significant associations with other ISAAC questions on allergic rhinoconjunctivitis or atopic eczema. Conclusions - These findings are consistent with recent experimental evidence which suggests that exposure to Mycobacterium tuberculosis may reduce the risk of developing asthma.

  • 5. von Plessen, Christian
    et al.
    Strand, Trond-Eirik
    Wentzel-Larsen, Tore
    Omenaas, Ernst
    Wilking, Nils
    Sundstrøm, Stein
    Sörenson, Sverre
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Pulmonary Medicine . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Respiratory Medicine UHL.
    Effectiveness of third generation chemotherapy on the survival of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer - a national study2008In: Thorax, ISSN 0040-6376, E-ISSN 1468-3296Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 5 of 5
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