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  • 1. Atlas, Ann
    et al.
    Gisslen, Magnus
    Nordin, Conny
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Lindstrom, Leif
    Schwieler, Lilly
    Acute psychotic symptoms in HIV-1 infected patients are associated with increased levels of kynurenic acid in cerebrospinal fluid2007In: Brain, behavior, and immunity, ISSN 0889-1591, E-ISSN 1090-2139, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 86-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is associated with psychiatric complications including cognitive impairment, affective disorders, and psychosis. Previous studies have revealed a disturbed kynurenine metabolism in these patients leading to increased levels of neuroactive compounds acting at glutamatergic neurotransmission. Kynurenic acid (KYNA), one of these metabolites is a glutamate-receptor antagonist, preferentially blocking the glycine site of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NNIDA) receptor. Increased levels of brain KYNA have been suggested to induce a NNIDA receptor hypofunction that is associated with psychotic symptoms. In the present study, we analyze the concentration of KYNA in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from HIV-1 infected patients (n = 22), including HIV-1 infected patients with psychotic symptoms (n = 8) and HIV-1 infected patients without psychiatric symptoms (n = 14). We found that HIV-1 infected patients had significantly higher median concentration of CSF KYNA (3.02 nM) compared to healthy controls (1.17 nM). Furthermore, CSF KYNA levels were significantly elevated in HIV-1 infected patients with psychotic symptoms (4.54 nM) compared to patients with HIV-1 without psychiatric symptoms (2.28 nNI). Present results indicate that increased levels of CSF KYNA may be associated with development of psychotic symptoms in HIV-1 infected patients. (c) 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 2.
    Bay-Richter, Cecilie
    et al.
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Linderholm, Klas R.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Lim, Chai K.
    Macquarie University, Australia.
    Samuelsson, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Traskman-Bendz, Lil
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Guillemin, Gilles J.
    Macquarie University, Australia.
    Erhardt, Sophie
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Brundin, Lena
    Michigan State University, MI USA; Van Andel Research Institute, MI USA.
    A role for inflammatory metabolites as modulators of the glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor in depression and suicidality2015In: Brain, behavior, and immunity, ISSN 0889-1591, E-ISSN 1090-2139, Vol. 43, p. 110-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patients with depression and suicidality suffer from low-grade neuroinflammation. Proinflammatory cytokines activate indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, an initial enzyme of the kynurenine pathway. This pathway produces neuroactive metabolites, including quinolinic- and kynurenic acid, binding to the glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate-receptor, which is hypothesized to be part of the neural mechanisms underlying symptoms of depression. We therefore hypothesized that symptoms of depression and suicidality would fluctuate over time in patients prone to suicidal behavior, depending on the degree of inflammation and kynurenine metabolite levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Methods: We measured cytokines and kynurenine metabolites in CSF, collected from suicide attempters at repeated occasions over 2 years (total patient samples n = 143, individuals n = 30) and healthy controls (n = 36). The association between the markers and psychiatric symptoms was assessed using the Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale and the Suicide Assessment Scale. Results: Quinolinic acid was increased and kynurenic acid decreased over time in suicidal patients versus healthy controls. Furthermore, we found a significant association between low kynurenic acid and severe depressive symptoms, as well as between high interleukin-6 levels and more severe suicidal symptoms. Conclusions: We demonstrate a long-term dysregulation of the kynurenine pathway in the central nervous system of suicide attempters. An increased load of inflammatory cytokines was coupled to more severe symptoms. We therefore suggest that patients with a dysregulated kynurenine pathway are vulnerable to develop depressive symptoms upon inflammatory conditions, as a result the excess production of the NMDA-receptor agonist quinolinic acid. This study provides a neurobiological framework supporting the use of NMDA-receptor antagonists in the treatment of suicidality and depression. (C) 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 3.
    Fritz, Michael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Klawonn, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jaarola, Maarit
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Engblom, David
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience.
    Interferon-ɣ mediated signaling in the brain endothelium is critical for inflammation-induced aversion2018In: Brain, behavior, and immunity, ISSN 0889-1591, E-ISSN 1090-2139, Vol. 67, p. 54-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Systemic inflammation elicits malaise and a negative affective state. The mechanism underpinning the aversive component of inflammation include cerebral prostaglandin synthesis and modulation of dopaminergic reward circuits, but the messengers that mediate the signaling between the peripheral inflammation and the brain have not been sufficiently characterized. Here we investigated the role of interferon-ɣ (IFN-ɣ) in the aversive response to systemic inflammation induced by a low dose (10μg/kg) of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in mice. LPS induced IFN-ɣ expression in the blood and deletion of IFN-ɣ or its receptor prevented the development of conditioned place aversion to LPS. LPS induced expression of the chemokine Cxcl10 in the striatum of normal mice, but this induction was absent in mice lacking IFN-ɣ receptors or Myd88 in blood brain barrier endothelial cells. Furthermore, inflammation-induced aversion was blocked in mice lacking Cxcl10 or its receptor Cxcr3. Finally, mice with a selective deletion of the IFN-ɣ receptor in brain endothelial cells did not develop inflammation-induced aversion, demonstrating that the brain endothelium is the critical site of IFN-ɣ action. Collectively, these findings show that circulating IFN-ɣ that binds to receptors on brain endothelial cells and induces Cxcl10, is a central link in the signaling chain eliciting inflammation-induced aversion.

  • 4.
    Hamzik, Namik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tang, Yan-juan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eskilsson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Örtegren Kugelberg, Unn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ruud, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jönsson, Jan-Ingvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsberth, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Interleukin-6 primarily produced by non-hematopoietic cells mediates the lipopolysaccharide-induced febrile response2013In: Brain, behavior, and immunity, ISSN 0889-1591, E-ISSN 1090-2139, Vol. 33, p. 123-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is critical for the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced febrile response. However, the exact source(s) of IL-6 involved in regulating the LPS-elicited fever is still to be identified. One known source of IL-6 is hematopoietic cells, such as monocytes. To clarify the contribution of hematopoietically derived IL-6 to fever, we created chimeric mice expressing IL-6 selectively either in cells of hematopoietic or, conversely, in cells of non-hematopoietic origin. This was performed by extinguishing hematopoietic cells in wild-type (WT) or IL-6 knockout (IL-6 KO) mice by whole-body irradiation and transplanting them with new stem cells. Mice on a WT background but lacking IL-6 in hematopoietic cells displayed normal fever to LPS and were found to have similar levels of IL-6 protein in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and in plasma and of IL-6 mRNA in the brain as WT mice. In contrast, mice on an IL-6 KO background, but with intact IL-6 production in cells of hematopoietic origin, only showed a minor elevation of the body temperature after peripheral LPS injection. While they displayed significantly elevated levels of IL-6 both in plasma and CSF compared with control mice, the increase was modest compared with that seen in LPS injected mice on a WT background, the latter being approximately 20 times larger in magnitude. These results suggest that IL-6 of non-hematopoietic origin is the main source of IL-6 in LPS-induced fever, and that IL-6 produced by hematopoietic cells only plays a minor role.

  • 5.
    Kosek, Eva
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Lowenstromska Hospital, Sweden.
    Martinsen, Sofia
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Mannerkorpi, Kaisa
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Löfgren, Monika
    Danderyd Hospital, Sweden.
    Bileviciute-Ljungar, Indre
    Danderyd Hospital, Sweden.
    Fransson, Peter
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Schalling, Martin
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Ingvar, Martin
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Ernberg, Malin
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Jensen, Karin B.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    The translocator protein gene is associated with symptom severity and cerebral pain processing in fibromyalgia2016In: Brain, behavior, and immunity, ISSN 0889-1591, E-ISSN 1090-2139, Vol. 58, p. 218-227Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The translocator protein (TSPO) is upregulated during glia activation in chronic pain patients. TSPO constitutes the rate-limiting step in neurosteroid synthesis, thus modulating synaptic transmission. Related serotonergic mechanisms influence if pro- or anti-nociceptive neurosteroids are produced. This study investigated the effects of a functional genetic polymorphism regulating the binding affinity to the TSPO, thus affecting symptom severity and cerebral pain processing in fibromyalgia patients. Gene-to-gene interactions with a functional polymorphism of the serotonin transporter gene were assessed. Fibromyalgia patients (n = 126) were genotyped regarding the polymorphisms of the TSPO (rs6971) and the serotonin transporter (5-HTTLPR/rs25531). Functional magnetic resonance imaging (n = 24) was used to study brain activation during individually calibrated pressure pain. Compared to mixed/low TSPO affinity binders, the high TSPO affinity binders rated more severe pain (p = 0.016) and fibromyalgia symptoms (p = 0.02). A significant interaction was found between the TSPO and the serotonin transporter polymorphisms regarding pain severity (p amp;lt; 0.0001). Functional connectivity analyses revealed that the TSPO high affinity binding group had more pronounced pain-evoked functional connectivity in the right frontoparietal network, between the dorsolateral prefrontal area and the parietal cortex. In conclusion, fibromyalgia patients with the TSPO high affinity binding genotype reported a higher pain intensity and more severe fibromyalgia symptoms compared to mixed/low affinity binders, and this was modulated by interaction with the serotonin transporter gene. To our knowledge this is the first evidence of functional genetic polymorphisms affecting pain severity in FM and our findings are in line with proposed glia-related mechanisms. Furthermore, the functional magnetic resonance findings indicated an effect of translocator protein on the affective-motivational components of pain perception. (C) 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  • 6.
    Matsuwaki, Takashi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eskilsson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Örtegren Kugelberg, Unn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jönsson, Jan-Ingvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Interleukin-1 beta induced activation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis is dependent on interleukin-1 receptors on non-hematopoietic cells2014In: Brain, behavior, and immunity, ISSN 0889-1591, E-ISSN 1090-2139, Vol. 40, p. 166-173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 beta (IL-beta) plays a major role in the signal transduction of immune stimuli from the periphery to the central nervous system, and has been shown to be an important mediator of the immune-induced stress hormone release. The signaling pathway by which IL-1 beta exerts this function involves the blood-brain-barrier and induced central prostaglandin synthesis, but the identity of the blood-brain-barrier cells responsible for this signal transduction has been unclear, with both endothelial cells and perivascular macrophages suggested as critical components. Here, using an irradiation and transplantation strategy, we generated mice expressing IL-1 type 1 receptors (IL-1 RI) either in hematopoietic or non-hematopoietic cells and subjected these mice to peripheral immune challenge with IL-beta. Following both intraperitoneal and intravenous administration of IL-beta, mice lacking IL-1R1 in hematopoietic cells showed induced expression of the activity marker c-Fos in the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus, and increased plasma levels of ACTH and corticosterone. In contrast, these responses were not observed in mice with IL-1R1 expression only in hematopoietic cells. Immunoreactivity for IL-1R1 was detected in brain vascular cells that displayed induced expression of the prostaglandin synthesizing enzyme cyclooxygenase-2 and that were immunoreactive for the endothelial cell marker CD31, but was not seen in cells positive for the brain macrophage marker CD206. These results imply that activation of the HPA-axis by IL-1 beta is dependent on IL-1R1 s on non-hematopoietic cells, such as brain endothelial cells, and that IL-1R1 on perivascular macrophages are not involved.

  • 7.
    Matsuwaki, Takashi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Shionoya, Kiseko
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ihnatko, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Eskilsson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kakuta, Shigeru
    University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Dufour, Sylvie
    CNRS, France.
    Schwaninger, Markus
    University of Lubeck, Germany.
    Waisman, Ari
    Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, Germany.
    Mueller, Werner
    University of Manchester, England.
    Pinteaux, Emmanuel
    University of Manchester, England.
    Engblom, David
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Involvement of interleukin-1 type 1 receptors in lipopolysaccharide-induced sickness responses2017In: Brain, behavior, and immunity, ISSN 0889-1591, E-ISSN 1090-2139, Vol. 66, p. 165-176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sickness responses to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were examined in mice with deletion of the interleukin (IL)-1 type 1 receptor (IL-1R1). IL-1R1 knockout (1(0) mice displayed intact anorexia and HPA-axis activation to intraperitoneally injected LPS (anorexia: 10 or 120 mu g/kg; HPA-axis: 120 mu g/kg), but showed attenuated but not extinguished fever (120 g/kg). Brain PGE2 synthesis was attenuated, but Cox-2 induction remained intact. Neither the tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) inhibitor etanercept nor the IL -6 receptor antibody tocilizumab abolished the LPS induced fever in IL -1R1 KO mice. Deletion of IL -1R1 specifically in brain endothelial cells attenuated the LPS induced fever, but only during the late, 3rd phase of fever, whereas deletion of IL-1R1 on neural cells or on peripheral nerves had little or no effect on the febrile response. We conclude that while IL-1 signaling is not critical for LPS induced anorexia or stress hormone release, IL-1R1, expressed on brain endothelial cells, contributes to the febrile response to LPS. However, also in the absence of IL-1R1, LPS evokes a febrile response, although this is attenuated. This remaining fever seems not to be mediated by IL-6 receptors or TNFa, but by some yet unidentified pyrogenic factor. 

  • 8.
    Nilsson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Elander, Louise
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hallbeck, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Örtegren (Kugelberg), Unn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Engblom, David
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The involvement of prostaglandin E2 in interleukin-1β evoked anorexia is strain dependent2017In: Brain, behavior, and immunity, ISSN 0889-1591, E-ISSN 1090-2139, Vol. 60, p. 27-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From experiments in mice in which the prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesizing enzyme mPGES-1 was genetically deleted, as well as from experiments in which PGE2 was injected directly into the brain, PGE2 has been implicated as a mediator of inflammatory induced anorexia. Here we aimed at examining which PGE2 receptor (EP1–4) that was critical for the anorexic response to peripherally injected interleukin-1β (IL-1β). However, deletion of neither EP receptor in mice, either globally (for EP1, EP2, and EP3) or selectively in the nervous system (EP4), had any effect on the IL-1β induced anorexia. Because these mice were all on a C57BL/6 background, whereas previous observations demonstrating a role for induced PGE2 in IL-1β evoked anorexia had been carried out on mice on a DBA/1 background, we examined the anorexic response to IL-1β in mice with deletion of mPGES-1 on a C57BL/6 background and a DBA/1 background, respectively. We confirmed previous findings that mPGES-1 knock-out mice on a DBA/1 background displayed attenuated anorexia to IL-1β; however, mice on a C57BL/6 background showed the same profound anorexia as wild type mice when carrying deletion of mPGES-1, while displaying almost normal food intake after pretreatment with a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor. We conclude that the involvement of induced PGE2 in IL-1β evoked anorexia is strain dependent and we suggest that different routes that probably involve distinct prostanoids exist by which inflammatory stimuli may evoke an anorexic response and that these routes may be of different importance in different strains of mice.

  • 9.
    Nilsson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wilhelms, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Emergency Medicine.
    Mirrasekhian, Elahe
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jaarola, Maarit
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Engblom, David
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Inflammation-induced anorexia and fever are elicited by distinct prostaglandin dependent mechanisms, whereas conditioned taste aversion is prostaglandin independent.2017In: Brain, behavior, and immunity, ISSN 0889-1591, E-ISSN 1090-2139, Vol. 61, p. 236-243, article id S0889-1591(16)30549-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Systemic inflammation evokes an array of brain-mediated responses including fever, anorexia and taste aversion. Both fever and anorexia are prostaglandin dependent but it has been unclear if the cell-type that synthesizes the critical prostaglandins is the same. Here we show that pharmacological inhibition or genetic deletion of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, but not of COX-1, attenuates inflammation-induced anorexia. Mice with deletions of COX-2 selectively in brain endothelial cells displayed attenuated fever, as demonstrated previously, but intact anorexia in response to peripherally injected lipopolysaccharide (10μg/kg). Whereas intracerebroventricular injection of a cyclooxygenase inhibitor markedly reduced anorexia, deletion of COX-2 selectively in neural cells, in myeloid cells or in both brain endothelial and neural cells had no effect on LPS-induced anorexia. In addition, COX-2 in myeloid and neural cells was dispensable for the fever response. Inflammation-induced conditioned taste aversion did not involve prostaglandin signaling at all. These findings collectively show that anorexia, fever and taste aversion are triggered by distinct routes of immune-to-brain signaling.

  • 10.
    Ruud, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Backhed, Fredrik
    University of Gothenburg.
    Engblom, David
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Deletion of the gene encoding MyD88 protects from anorexia in a mouse tumor model2010In: Brain, behavior, and immunity, ISSN 0889-1591, E-ISSN 1090-2139, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 554-557Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The anorexia-cachexia syndrome, characterized by a rise in energy expenditure and loss of body weight that paradoxically are associated with loss of appetite and decreased food intake, contributes significantly to the morbidity and mortality in cancer. While the pathophysiology of cancer anorexia-cachexia is poorly understood, evidence indicates that pro-inflammatory cytokines are key mediators of this response. Although inflammation hence is recognized as an important component of cancer anorexia-cachexia, the molecular pathways involved are largely unknown. We addressed this issue in mice carrying a deletion of the gene encoding MyD88, the key intracellular adaptor molecule in Toll-like and interleukin-1 family receptor signaling. Wild-type and MyD88-deficient mice were transplanted subcutaneously with a syngenic methylcholanthrene-induced tumor (MCG 101) and daily food intake and body weight were recorded. Wild-type mice showed progressively reduced food intake from about 5 days after tumor transplantation and displayed a slight body weight loss after 10 days when the experiment was terminated. In contrast, MyD88-deficient mice did not develop anorexia, and displayed a positive body weight development during the observation period. While the MyD88-deficient mice on average developed somewhat smaller tumors than wild-type mice, this did not explain the absence of anorexia, because anorexia was seen in wild-type mice with similar tumor mass as non-anorexic knock-out mice. These data suggest that MyD88-dependent mechanisms are involved in the metabolic derangement during cancer anorexia-cachexia and that innate immune signaling is important for the development of this syndrome.

  • 11.
    Ruud, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Engström Ruud, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wang, Wenhua
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden .
    Nilsberth, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Iresjo, Britt-Marie
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lundholm, Kent
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Engblom, David
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cancer-induced anorexia in tumor-bearing mice is dependent on cyclooxygenase-12013In: Brain, behavior, and immunity, ISSN 0889-1591, E-ISSN 1090-2139, Vol. 29, p. 124-135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is well-established that prostaglandins (PGs) affect tumorigenesis, and evidence indicates that PGs also are important for the reduced food intake and body weight loss, the anorexia–cachexia syndrome, in malignant cancer. However, the identity of the PGs and the PG producing cyclooxygenase (COX) species responsible for cancer anorexia–cachexia is unknown. Here, we addressed this issue by transplanting mice with a tumor that elicits anorexia. Meal pattern analysis revealed that the anorexia in the tumor-bearing mice was due to decreased meal frequency. Treatment with a non-selective COX inhibitor attenuated the anorexia, and also tumor growth. When given at manifest anorexia, non-selective COX-inhibitors restored appetite and prevented body weight loss without affecting tumor size. Despite COX-2 induction in the cerebral blood vessels of tumor-bearing mice, a selective COX-2 inhibitor had no effect on the anorexia, whereas selective COX-1 inhibition delayed its onset. Tumor growth was associated with robust increase of PGE2 levels in plasma – a response blocked both by non-selective COX-inhibition and by selective COX-1 inhibition, but not by COX-2 inhibition. However, there was no increase in PGE2-levels in the cerebrospinal fluid. Neutralization of plasma PGE2 with specific antibodies did not ameliorate the anorexia, and genetic deletion of microsomal PGE synthase-1 (mPGES-1) affected neither anorexia nor tumor growth. Furthermore, tumor-bearing mice lacking EP4 receptors selectively in the nervous system developed anorexia. These observations suggest that COX-enzymes, most likely COX-1, are involved in cancer-elicited anorexia and weight loss, but that these phenomena occur independently of host mPGES-1, PGE2 and neuronal EP4 signaling.

  • 12.
    Sjögren, Elaine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Leanderson, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Interleukin-6 levels in relation to psychosocial factors: Studies on serum, saliva, and in vitro production by blood mononuclear cells2006In: Brain, behavior, and immunity, ISSN 0889-1591, E-ISSN 1090-2139, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 270-278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Psychosocial factors and interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels are both related to risk of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to investigate how a broad range of psychosocial factors related to levels of IL-6 in different media. Fifty-nine men and women aged 30-65 were recruited from a larger study and selected to cover a broad range of psychosocial status. IL-6 levels were analyzed in serum, in saliva collected at home at three different time points during a day, and in the supernatant of cell cultures stimulated in vitro with lipopolysaccharide. After adjustments for age, gender, self-reported health problems, and lifestyle factors, IL-6-levels in serum were negatively correlated with coping and self-esteem, and positively correlated with cynicism, hostile affect, hopelessness, depression, and vital exhaustion. In saliva samples, at all time points, IL-6 levels were positively correlated to cynicism, and IL-6 levels 30 min after awakening were also positively correlated with hopelessness, depression, and vital exhaustion. After adjustment for age and gender, cynicism, depression, and vital exhaustion were negatively correlated to IL-6 levels in the supernatant of cell cultures stimulated in vitro with lipopolysaccharide, but this effect was lost after control for self-reported health problems and lifestyle factors. In conclusion, we found that IL-6 levels in serum and saliva were negatively related to psychosocial resources and positively related to psychosocial risk factors. These data strengthen the argument that IL-6 is involved in mediating the risk for disease development that has been associated with psychosocial factors. © 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 13.
    Vasilache, Ana-Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Qian, Hong
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Center for Hematology and Regenerative Medicine (HERM), Novum, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Immune challenge by intraperitoneal administration of lipopolysaccharide directs gene expression in distinct blood-brain barrier cells toward enhanced prostaglandin E2 signaling2015In: Brain, behavior, and immunity, ISSN 0889-1591, E-ISSN 1090-2139, Vol. 48, p. 31-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The cells constituting the blood-brain barrier are critical for the transduction of peripheral immune signals to the brain, but hitherto no comprehensive analysis of the signaling events that occur in these cells in response to a peripheral inflammatory stimulus has been performed. Here, we examined the inflammatory transcriptome in blood-brain barrier cells, including endothelial cells, pericytes, and perivascular macrophages, which were isolated by fluorescent-activated cell sorting, from non-immune-challenged mice and from mice stimulated by bacterial wall lipopolysaccharide. We show that endothelial cells and perivascular macrophages display distinct transcription profiles for inflammatory signaling and respond in distinct and often opposing ways to the immune stimulus. Thus, endothelial cells show induced PGE2 synthesis and transport with attenuation of PGE2 catabolism, increased expression of cytokine receptors and down-stream signaling molecules, and downregulation of adhesion molecules. In contrast, perivascular macrophages show downregulation of the synthesis of prostanoids other than PGE2 and of prostaglandin catabolism, but upregulation of interleukin-6 synthesis. Pericytes were largely unresponsive to the immune stimulation, with the exception of downregulation of proteins involved in pericyte-endothelial cell communication. While the endothelial cells account for most of the immune-induced gene expression changes in the blood-brain barrier, the response of the endothelial cells occurs in a concerted manner with that of the perivascular cells to elevate intracerebral levels of PGE2, hence emphasizing the critical role of PGE2 in immune-induced signal transduction across the blood-brain barrier.

  • 14.
    Zajdel, Joanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Zager, Adriano
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Engblom, David
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Shionoya, Kiseko
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Acute maternal separation potentiates the gene expression and corticosterone response induced by inflammation2019In: Brain, behavior, and immunity, ISSN 0889-1591, E-ISSN 1090-2139, Vol. 77, p. 141-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Maternal care is crucial for infants and profoundly affects their responses to different kinds of stressors. Here, we examined how maternal separation affects inflammatory gene expression and the corticosterone response to an acute immune challenge induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 40 µg/kg ip) in mouse pups, 8–9 days old. Maternal separation initially attenuated LPS-induced hypothalamic pro-inflammatory gene expression, but later, at 3 h after immune challenge, robustly augmented such gene expression and increased serum corticosterone levels. Providing the pups with a warm and soft object prevented the separation-induced augmented hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis response. It also prevented the potentiated induction of some, but not all, inflammatory genes to a similar extent as did the dam. Our results show that maternal separation potentiates the inflammatory response and the resulting HPA-axis activation, which may have detrimental effects if separation is prolonged or repeated.

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