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  • 1.
    Askling, Helena H
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lesko, Birgitta
    Swedish National Board of Health & Welfare, Stockholm, Sweden; Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control, Stockholm.
    Vene, Sirkka
    Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Berndtson, Angerd
    Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Björkman, Per
    Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Bläckberg, Jonas
    Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Bronner, Ulf
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Follin, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases in Östergötland.
    Hellgren, Urban
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Palmerus, Maria
    County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Ekdahl, Karl
    European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tegnell, Anders
    Swedish National Board of Health & Welfare, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Struwe, Johan
    Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Serologic Analysis of Returned Travelers with Fever, Sweden2009In: Emerging Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1080-6040, E-ISSN 1080-6059, Vol. 15, no 11, p. 1805-1808Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We studied 1,432 febrile travelers from Sweden who had returned from malaria-endemic areas during March 2005-March 2008. In 383 patients, paired serum samples were blindly analyzed for influenza and 7 other agents. For 21% of 115 patients with fever of unknown origin, serologic analysis showed that influenza was the major cause.

  • 2. Bronzwaer, S
    et al.
    Cars, O
    Buchholz, U
    Mölstad, Sigvard
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, General Practice.
    Goettsch, W
    Veldhuijzen, I
    Kool, J
    Sprenger, M
    Degener, J
    The Relationship between Antimicrobial Use and Antimicrobial Resestance in Europe2002In: Emerging Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1080-6040, E-ISSN 1080-6059, Vol. 8, p. 278-282Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Bucardo, Filemon
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Department of Microbiology, University of León, UNAN-León, Nicaragua.
    Carlsson, Beatrice
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular Virology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordgren, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larson, Göran
    University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Blandon, Patricia
    Department of Microbiology University of León, Nicaragua (UNAN-León).
    Vilchez, Samuel
    Department of Microbiology University of León, Nicaragua (UNAN-León).
    Svensson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular Virology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Susceptibility of Children to Sapovirus Infections, Nicaragua, 2005–20062012In: Emerging Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1080-6040, E-ISSN 1080-6059, Vol. 18, no 11, p. 1875-1878Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe the genetic diversity of sapovirus (SaV) in children in Nicaragua and investigate the role of host genetic factors and susceptibility to SaV infections. Our results indicate that neither ABO blood group, Lewis phenotype, nor secretor status affects susceptibility to SaV infection in Nicaragua.

  • 4. Eliasson, H
    et al.
    Lindbäck, J
    Nuorti, P
    Arneborn, M
    Giesecke, J
    Tegnell, Anders
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases in Östergötland.
    The 2000 tularemia outbreak: A case-control study of risk factors in disease-endemic and emergent areas, Sweden.2002In: Emerging Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1080-6040, E-ISSN 1080-6059, Vol. 8, p. 956-960Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Fomsgaard, Anders
    et al.
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark .
    Fertner, Mette E
    Statens Serum Institute, Denmark .
    Essbauer, Sandra
    Institute Mikrobiol Bundeswehr, Germany .
    Nielsen, Alex Y
    Statens Serum Institute, Denmark .
    Frey, Stefan
    Institute Mikrobiol Bundeswehr, Germany .
    Lindblom, Pontus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindgren, Per-Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bodker, Rene
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark .
    Weidmann, Manfred
    University of Medical Gottingen, Germany .
    Dobler, Gerhard
    Institute Mikrobiol Bundeswehr, Germany .
    Letter: Tick-borne Encephalitis Virus, Zealand, Denmark, 20112013In: Emerging Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1080-6040, E-ISSN 1080-6059, Vol. 19, no 7, p. 1171-1173Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 6.
    Grankvist, Anna
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Labbe Sandelin, Lisa
    Kalmar County Hospital, Sweden; Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Andersson, Jennie
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Fryland, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wilhelmsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lindgren, Per-Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden.
    Forsberg, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Wenneras, Christine
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Infections with Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis and Cytokine Responses in 2 Persons Bitten by Ticks, Sweden2015In: Emerging Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1080-6040, E-ISSN 1080-6059, Vol. 21, no 8, p. 1462-1465Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The prevalence of Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis infection was determined in 102 persons bitten by ticks in Sweden. Two infected women had erythematous rashes; 1 was co-infected with a Borrelia sp., and the other showed seroconversion for Anaplasma phagocytophilum. Both patients had increased levels of Neoehrlichia DNA and serum cytokines for several months.

  • 7.
    Henningsson, Anna J.
    et al.
    Regional Jonköping County, Sweden.
    Lindqvist, Richard
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Norberg, Peter
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindblom, Pontus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Roth, Anette
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Forsberg, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Bergstrom, Tomas
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Overby, Anna K.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Per-Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Regional Jonköping County, Sweden.
    Human Tick-Borne Encephalitis and Characterization of Virus from Biting Tick2016In: Emerging Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1080-6040, E-ISSN 1080-6059, Vol. 22, no 8, p. 1485-1487Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report a case of human tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) in which the TBE virus was isolated from the biting tick. Viral growth and sequence were characterized and compared with those of a reference strain. Virus isolation from ticks from patients with TBE may offer a new approach for studies of epidemiology and pathogenicity.

  • 8.
    Hoffman, Tove
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Lindeborg, Mats
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Barboutis, Christos
    Hellen Ornithol Soc Birdlife, Greece.
    Erciyas-Yavuz, Kiraz
    Ondokuz Mayis Univ, Turkey.
    Evander, Magnus
    Umeå Univ, Sweden.
    Fransson, Thord
    Swedish Museum Nat Hist, Sweden.
    Figuerola, Jordi
    Estn Biol Donana, Spain; Ciber Epidemil and Salud Publ, Spain.
    Jaenson, Thomas G. T.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Kiat, Yosef
    Hebrew Univ Jerusalem, Israel.
    Lindgren, Per-Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lundkvist, Ake
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Mohamed, Nahla
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Moutailler, Sara
    Agence Natl Secur Sanit Alimentat, France.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Olsen, Bjorn
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Salaneck, Erik
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Alkhurma Hemorrhagic Fever Virus RNA in Hyalomma rufipes Ticks Infesting Migratory Birds, Europe and Asia Minor2018In: Emerging Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1080-6040, E-ISSN 1080-6059, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 879-882Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alkhurma hemorrhagic fever virus RNA was detected in immature Hyalomma rufipes ticks infesting northward migratory birds caught in the North Mediterranean Basin. This finding suggests a role for birds in the ecology of the Alkhurma hemorrhagic fever virus and a potential mechanism for dissemination to novel regions. Increased surveillance is warranted.

  • 9. Koopmans, Marion
    et al.
    Vennema, Harry
    Heersma, Herre
    van Strien, Elisabeth
    van Duynhoven, Yvonne
    Brown, David
    Reacher, Marc
    Lopman, Ben
    Svensson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular Virology.
    Early identification of common-source foodborne virus outbreaks in Europe.2003In: Emerging Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1080-6040, E-ISSN 1080-6059, Vol. 9, no 9, p. 1136-1142Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Lindeborg, Mats
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Barboutis, Christos
    Hellenic Ornithological Society and Natural History Museum of Crete, Greece.
    Ehrenborg, Christian
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Fransson, Thord
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jaenson, Thomas G. T.
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Lindgren, Per-Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundkvist, Åke
    Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control, Solna, Sweden .
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Salaneck, Erik
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Waldenström, Jonas
    Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden .
    Olsen, Björn
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Migratory Birds, Ticks, and Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus2012In: Emerging Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1080-6040, E-ISSN 1080-6059, Vol. 18, no 12, p. 2095-2097Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Munster, Vincent J.
    et al.
    Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.
    Wallensten, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular Virology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Baas, Chantal
    Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.
    Rimmelzwaan, Guus F.
    Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.
    Schutten, Martin
    Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.
    Olsen, Björn
    Umea University, Umea, Sweden.
    Osterhaus, Albert D.M.E
    Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.
    Fouchier, Ron A.M
    Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.
    Mallards and highly pathogenic avian influenza ancestral viruses, northern Europe2005In: Emerging Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1080-6040, E-ISSN 1080-6059, Vol. 11, no 10, p. 1545-1551Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI), which originate in poultry upon transmission of low pathogenic viruses from wild birds, have occurred relatively frequently in the last decade. During our ongoing surveillance studies in wild birds, we isolated several influenza A viruses of hemagglutinin subtype H5 and H7 that contain various neuraminidase subtypes. For each of the recorded H5 and H7 HPAI outbreaks in Europe since 1997, our collection contained closely related virus isolates recovered from wild birds, as determined by sequencing and phylogenetic analyses of the hemagglutinin gene and antigenic characterization of the hemagglutinin glycoprotein. The minor genetic and antigenic diversity between the viruses recovered from wild birds and those causing HPAI outbreaks indicates that influenza A virus surveillance studies in wild birds can help generate prototypic vaccine candidates and design and evaluate diagnostic tests, before outbreaks occur in animals and humans.

  • 12.
    Nordgren, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindgren, Per-Eric
    County Hospital Ryhov, Jonkoping, Sweden .
    Matussek, Andreas
    County Hospital Ryhov, Jonkoping, Sweden Capio St Gorans Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Svensson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular Virology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Norovirus Gastroenteritis Outbreak with a Secretor-independent Susceptibility Pattern, Sweden2010In: Emerging Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1080-6040, E-ISSN 1080-6059, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 81-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Norovirus (NoV) is recognized as the commonest cause of acute gastroenteritis among adults. Susceptibility to disease has been associated with histo-blood group antigens and secretor status; nonsecretors are almost completely resistant to disease. We report a foodborne outbreak of GI.3 NoV gastroenteritis that affected 33/83 (40%) persons. Symptomatic disease was as likely to develop in nonsecretors as in secretors (odds ratio [OR] 1.41, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.46-4.36 vs. OR 0.71, 95% Cl 0.23-2.18, p = 0.57). Moreover, no statistical difference in susceptibility was found between persons of different Lewis or ABO phenotypes. The capsid gene of the outbreak strain shares high amino acid homology with the Kashiwa645 GI.3 strain, previously shown to recognize nonsecretor saliva, as well as synthetic Lewis a. This norovirus outbreak affected persons regardless of secretor status or Lewis or ABO phenotypes.

  • 13.
    Nordgren, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nitiema, Leon W
    University of Ouagadougou.
    Sharma, Sumit
    University of Ouagadougou.
    S Traore, Alfred
    University of Ouagadougou.
    Simpore, Jacques
    University of Ouagadougou.
    Svensson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular Virology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Emergence of Unusual G6P[6] Rotaviruses in Children, Burkina Faso, 2009-20102012In: Emerging Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1080-6040, E-ISSN 1080-6059, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 589-597Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To obtain more information about rotavirus (ROTAV) genotypes in Burkina Faso, we characterized 100 ROTAVs isolated from fecal samples of children with acute gastroenteritis in the capital city of Ouagadougou, during December 2009 March 2010. Of note, 13% of the ROTAV-positive samples, including those with mixed infections, were positive for the unusual G6 genotype ROTAV strain. The genotypes identified were G9P[8], G6P[6], G1P[6], G3P[6], G1P[8], and G2P[4]. G9P[8] subgroup (SG) II strains dominated during the beginning of the ROTAV season, but later in the season, other G types associated with P[6] and SGI specificity emerged. This emergence was related to a shift in the overall age of infected children; ROTAV SGII infected younger children and induced more severe symptoms. The finding of a high incidence of G6P[6] strains highlights the need for long-term surveillance of ROTAV strains in Burkina Faso, especially when ROTAV vaccination is being considered in several African countries.

  • 14. Nygard, K
    et al.
    Torven, M
    Ancker, C
    Knauth, SB
    Hedlund, KO
    Giesecke, J
    Andersson, Y
    Svensson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular Virology .
    Emerging genotype (GGIIb) of norovirus in drinking water, Sweden2003In: Emerging Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1080-6040, E-ISSN 1080-6059, Vol. 9, no 12, p. 1548-1552Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From May through June 2001, an outbreak of acute gastroenteritis that affected at least 200 persons occurred in a combined activity camp and conference center in Stockholm County. The source of illness was contaminated drinking water obtained from private wells. The outbreak appears to have started with sewage pipeline problems near the kitchen, which caused overflow of the sewage system and contaminated the environment. While no pathogenic bacteria were found in water or stools specimens, norovirus was detected in 8 of 11 stool specimens and 2 of 3 water samples by polymerase chain reaction. Nucleotide sequencing of amplicons from two patients and two water samples identified an emerging genotype designated GGIIb, which was circulating throughout several European countries during 2000 and 2001. This investigation documents the first waterborne outbreak of viral gastroenteritis in Sweden, where nucleotide sequencing showed a direct link between contaminated water and illness.

  • 15.
    Papa, Anna
    et al.
    Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece .
    Sidira, Persefoni
    Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece .
    Larichev, Victor
    DI Ivanovskii Institute Virol, Russia .
    Gavrilova, Ludmila
    DI Ivanovskii Institute Virol, Russia .
    Kuzmina, Ksenia
    DI Ivanovskii Institute Virol, Russia .
    Mousavi-Jazi, Mehrdad
    Swedish Institute Communicable Disease Control, Sweden .
    Mirazimi, Ali
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stroeher, Ute
    Centre Disease Control and Prevent, GA USA .
    Nichol, Stuart
    Centre Disease Control and Prevent, GA USA .
    Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus, Greece2014In: Emerging Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1080-6040, E-ISSN 1080-6059, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 288-290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Seroprevalence of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is high in some regions of Greece, but only 1 case of disease has been reported. We used 4 methods to test 118 serum samples that were positive for CCHFV IgG by commercial ELISA and confirmed the positive results. A nonpathogenic or low-pathogenicity strain may be circulating.

  • 16.
    Spreco, Armin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Department of Health and Care Development.
    Eriksson, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, The Division of Statistics and Machine Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cowling, Benjamin John
    Univ Hong Kong, Peoples R China.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Department of Health and Care Development.
    Evaluation of Nowcasting for Detecting and Predicting Local Influenza Epidemics, Sweden, 2009-20142018In: Emerging Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1080-6040, E-ISSN 1080-6059, Vol. 24, no 10, p. 1868-1873Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The growing availability of big data in healthcare and public health opens possibilities for infectious disease control in local settings. We prospectively evaluated a method for integrated local detection and prediction (nowcasting) of influenza epidemics over 5 years, using the total population in Ostergotland County, Sweden. We used routine health information system data on influenza-diagnosis cases and syndromic telenursing data for July 2009-June 2014 to evaluate epidemic detection, peak-timing prediction, and peak-intensity prediction. Detection performance was satisfactory throughout the period, except for the 2011-12 influenza A(H3N2) season, which followed a season with influenza B and pandemic influenza A(H1N1) pdm09 virus activity. Peak-timing prediction performance was satisfactory for the 4 influenza seasons but not the pandemic. Peak-intensity levels were correctly categorized for the pandemic and 2 of 4 influenza seasons. We recommend using versions of this method modified with regard to local use context for further evaluations using standard methods.

  • 17.
    Thegerström, Johanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology.
    Romanus, V
    Friman, V
    Brudin, L
    Haemig, P D
    Olsen, B
    Mycobacterium avium lymphadenopathy among children, Sweden2008In: Emerging Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1080-6040, E-ISSN 1080-6059, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 661-663Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We studied Mycobacterium avium lymphadenopathy in 183 Swedish children (<7 years of age) from 1998 through 2003. Seasonal variation in the frequency of the disease, with a peak in October and a low point in April, suggests cyclic environmental factors. We also found a higher incidence of the disease in children who live close to water.

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