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  • 1.
    Abdalla, Hana
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Forslund, Tony
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Schön, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stendahl, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sundqvist, Tommy
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Effects of CNI-1493 on human granulocyte functions2006In: Immunobiology, ISSN 0171-2985, E-ISSN 1878-3279, Vol. 211, no 3, p. 191-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During acute bacterial infections such as sepsis and meningitis, activation of inflammatory mediators such as nitric oxide (NO) plays a crucial role in both pathogenesis and host defense. We have previously reported that CNI-1493, a macrophage deactivator, reduced mortality in infant rats infected with Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) with associated decrease in the number of granulocytes in the infected tissue. The aim of the present study was to investigate how CNI-1493 affects granulocytes and macrophages in vitro. Murine macrophages (RAW 264.7) pre-incubated with CNI-1493 prior to activation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/interferon gamma (IFNγ) had decreased NO production measured as NO2/NO3 levels and reduction in inducible NO-synthase (iNOS) expression. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was increased in formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP)-stimulated granulocytes following CNI-1493 treatment, whereas F-actin content, motility and chemotaxis were decreased under the same conditions. The effects of CNI-1493 on both NO production in LPS/IFNγ-activated macrophages and ROS production, F-actin content, motility and chemotaxis in granulocytes, may contribute to the reduced inflammatory response and increased survival in Hib-infected animals treated with CNI-1493.

  • 2.
    Cholujová, Dana
    et al.
    Laboratory of Molecular Oncology, Cancer Research Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Vlárska 7, Bratislava, Slovakia.
    Jakubíková, Jana
    Laboratory of Tumor Immunology, Cancer Research Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Vlárska 7, Bratislava, Slovakia.
    Kubeš, Miroslav
    Institute of Virology, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dubravska cesta 9, Bratislava, Slovakia.
    Arendacká, Barbora
    Institute of Measurement Science, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dubravska cesta 9, Bratislava, Slovakia.
    Sapák, Michal
    Institute of Immunology, Medical Faculty of Comenius University, Sasinkova 4, Bratislava, Slovakia.
    Ihnatko, Robert
    Institute of Virology, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dubravska cesta 9, Bratislava, Slovakia.
    Sedlák, Ján
    Laboratory of Tumor Immunology, Cancer Research Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Vlárska 7, Bratislava, Slovakia.
    Comparative study of four fluorescent probes for evaluation of natural killer cell cytotoxicity assays2008In: Immunobiology, ISSN 0171-2985, E-ISSN 1878-3279, Vol. 213, no 8, p. 629-640Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cytotoxicity is one of the major defence mechanisms against both virus-infected and tumor cells. Radioactive 51chromium (51Cr) release assay is a “gold standard” for assessment of natural killer (NK) cytolytic activity in vitro. Several disadvantages of this assay led us to design alternative tools based on flow cytometry analysis. Four different fluorescent dyes, calcein acetoxymethyl ester (CAM), carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester (CFSE), Vybrant DiO (DiO) and MitoTracker Green (MTG) were tested for labeling of NK target K-562 cells. Target staining stability, spontaneous release of fluorochromes and subsequent accumulation in bystander unstained cells were measured using fluorimetry and flow cytometry. Healthy donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells and affinity column purified NK cells were used as effectors coincubated with target K-562 cells at different E:T ratios for 3h and 90min, respectively. Fluorescent probe 7-amino-actinomycin D was used for live and dead cell discrimination. Bland–Altman statistical method was applied to measure true agreement for all CAM–51Cr, CFSE–51Cr, DiO–51Cr and MTG–51Cr pairs analyzed. Based on the data, none of the four proposed methods can be stated equivalent to the standard 51Cr release assay. Considering linear relationships between data obtained with four fluorochromes and 51Cr release assay as well as linear regression analysis with R2=0.9393 value for CAM–51Cr pair, we found the CAM assay to be the most closely related to the 51Cr assay.

  • 3.
    Djedovic, Neda
    et al.
    Univ Belgrade, Serbia.
    Jevtic, Bojan
    Univ Belgrade, Serbia.
    Jose Mansilla, M.
    Germans Trias and Pujol Univ Hosp and Res Inst, Spain; Univ Autonoma Barcelona, Spain.
    Petkovic, Filip
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Univ Belgrade, Serbia.
    Blazevski, Jana
    Univ Belgrade, Serbia; Univ Oslo, Norway.
    Timotijevic, Gordana
    Univ Belgrade, Serbia.
    Navarro-Barriuso, Juan
    Germans Trias and Pujol Univ Hosp and Res Inst, Spain; Univ Autonoma Barcelona, Spain.
    Martinez-Caceres, Eva
    Germans Trias and Pujol Univ Hosp and Res Inst, Spain.
    Mostarica Stojkovide, Marija
    Univ Belgrade, Serbia.
    Miljkovic, Dorde
    Univ Belgrade, Serbia.
    Comparison of dendritic cells obtained from autoimmunty-prone and resistant rats2019In: Immunobiology, ISSN 0171-2985, E-ISSN 1878-3279, Vol. 224, no 3, p. 470-476Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dendritic cells (DC) are responsible for the initiation and shaping of the adaptive immune response and are in the focus of autoimmunity research. We were interested in comparison of DC obtained from autoimmunity-prone Dark Agouti (DA) rats and autoimmunity-resistant Albino Oxford (AO) rats. DC were generated from bone marrow precursors and matured (mDC) by lipopolysaccharide. Tolerogenic DC (tolDC) obtained by vitamin D3 treatment were studied in parallel. Profile of cytokine production was different in AO and DA mDC and tolDC. Expression of MHC class II molecules and CD86 were higher in DA DC, while vitamin D3 reduced their expression in dendritic cells of both strains. Allogeneic proliferation of CD4(+) T cells was reduced by AO tolDC, but not with DA tolDC in comparison to respective mDC. Finally, expression of various genes identified as differentially expressed in human mDC and tolDC was also analyzed in AO and DA DC. Again, AO and DA DC differed in the expression of the analyzed genes. To conclude, AO and DA DC differ in production of cytokines, expression of antigen presentation-related molecules and in regulation of CD4(+) T proliferation. The difference is valuable for understanding the divergence of the strains in their susceptibility to autoimmunity.

  • 4.
    Skoglund, Caroline
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wetterö, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tengvall, Pentti
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Bengtsson, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    C1q induces a rapid up-regulation of P-selectin and modulates collagen- and collagen-related peptide-triggered activation in human platelets2010In: Immunobiology, ISSN 0171-2985, E-ISSN 1878-3279, Vol. 215, no 12, p. 987-995Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Blood platelets are emerging as important immunomodulatory cells, but complement interaction with platelets is not well understood. Several platelet structures have been described as complement protein 1q (C1q) binding receptors, such as C1qRp/CD93 and gC1qR. However, there are conflicting results whether these receptors are C1q binding structures, or even at all expressed on the cell surface. Recently, the collagen-binding integrin alphaIIbetaI was reported to bind C1q on mast cells, and this receptor is also present on platelets. The aim of this study was to further characterize the effects of C1q on platelets, by quantifying the platelet surface expression of P-selectin (CD62P) and monitoring the formation of platelet-neutrophil aggregates. Using flow cytometry, we found that C1q dose-dependently triggered a rapid but moderate and transient up-regulation of P-selectin already within 5s of C1q exposure. Pre-incubation with an antibody directed against gC1qR significantly inhibited (with 57% compared to control) the up-regulation, whereas an antibody towards the alphaIIbetaI-integrin showed no effect. Stimulation with C1q did not change the cytosolic calcium-levels, as measured with the fluorescent ratiometric probe Fura-2, however, a protein kinase C inhibitor (GF109203x) blocked the C1q-induced P-selectin expression. Furthermore, pre-incubation of platelets with C1q diminished both the collagen as well as the collagen-related peptide-induced up-regulation of P-selectin, most evident after 90s of stimulation. This indicates that C1q may regulate platelet activation via the GPVI receptor, which is a novel finding. Moreover, C1q antagonized the collagen-induced formation of platelet-neutrophil aggregates, indicating a reduced interaction between platelet P-selectin and neutrophil P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1(PSGL-1/CD162). In summary, C1q induces a moderate rapid platelet P-selectin expression, modulates subsequent collagen and collagen-related peptide stimulation of platelets, and inhibits the formation of platelet-neutrophil aggregates. These immuno-regulatory effects of C1q may have a crucial role in innate immunity and inflammation.

  • 5.
    Svärd, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kastbom, Alf
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Rheumatology in Östergötland.
    Sommarin, Yngve
    Euro-Diagnostica AB, Malmö, Sweden.
    Skogh, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Rheumatology in Östergötland.
    Salivary IgA antibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptides (CCP) in rheumatoid arthritis2013In: Immunobiology, ISSN 0171-2985, E-ISSN 1878-3279, Vol. 218, no 2, p. 232-237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Circulating IgG anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (CCP) are highly specific for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and prognostic of poor outcome. Serum IgA anti-CCP occurs in a subset of IgG-positive cases and relates to still more aggressive disease. Mucosal IgA-class antibodies, however, are generally associated with anti-inflammatory actions and systemic tolerance induction. In the present study, unstimulated salivary samples from 63 patients with established RA and 20 healthy persons were analysed by enzyme-linked immunoassay for the presence of IgA anti-CCP antibodies. To ensure antigen specificity, IgA-reactivity with the corresponding uncitrullinated antigen, cyclic arginine peptide (CAP), was analysed and anti-CCP/anti-CAP ratios calculated. Retrospective data regarding disease activity and radiological outcome were achieved via medical records. Salivary IgA anti-CCP was found in 14/63 (22%) patients and one (5%) control (positive test = anti-CCP/anti-CAP ratio andgt; 1.5). Salivary IgA reactivity was dose-dependently inhibited by pre-incubation with soluble CCP to a degree strongly correlating with anti-CCP/anti-CAP ratio. In salivary IgA anti-CCP positive patients, joint erosions within 6 years of diagnosis was significantly lower (p = 0.043), and at the time for diagnosis there was a trend towards lower erythrocyte sedimentation rate (p = 0.071) and C-reactive protein (p = 0.085). Contrasting to circulating IgG and IgA anti-CCP, our results imply that salivary IgA antibodies may be associated with a less severe outcome of RA. Hypothetically, this relates to an anti-inflammatory and protective immunomodulating role of secretory IgA-class autoantibodies against citrullinated antigens presented at mucosal surfaces.

1 - 5 of 5
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