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  • 1.
    Adolfsson, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Arthroscopic removal of os centrale carpi causing wrist pain.2000In: Arthroscopy: The Journal of Arthroscopy And Related, ISSN 0749-8063, E-ISSN 1526-3231, Vol. 16, p. 537-539Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Os centrale carpi is a relatively rare accessory carpal bone of the wrist that infrequently has been reported to cause symptoms. This report describes 2 cases where an apparently mobile Os centrale carpi caused painful clicking and crepitus and where the symptoms disappeared after arthroscopic removal of the ossicles.

  • 2.
    Andersson-Molina, Helene
    et al.
    Department of Radiology, Vrinnevi Hospital, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Håkan
    Department of Radiology, Vrinnevi Hospital, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Rockborn, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Sports Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Arthroscopic Partial and Total Meniscectomy: A Long-term Follow-up Study With Matched Controls2002In: Arthroscopy: The Journal of Arthroscopy And Related, ISSN 0749-8063, E-ISSN 1526-3231, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 183-189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical and radiographic outcome of arthroscopic partial and total meniscectomy.

    Type of Study: Retrospective outcome study.

    Methods: Thirty-six male patients with stable knees, no previous knee injury, and arthroscopic meniscectomy were matched into 2 groups: partial or total. In addition, a group of individuals with no known history of knee injury was matched to each patient with meniscectomy. All patients were re-examined by a clinical and radiographic examination 14 years after surgery.

    Results: At follow-up, radiographic changes, including Fairbank changes and joint space narrowing, were seen in 6 of 18 patients (33%) after partial meniscectomy and in 13 of 18 patients (72%) after total meniscectomy (P < .05). Joint space narrowing >50% of the joint space was seen in 1 patient after partial meniscectomy but was present in 7 patients after total meniscectomy. In the healthy controls, 4 of 36 patients (11%) had radiographic changes but none had joint space narrowing. Fourteen years after surgery almost 70% of patients had a Lysholm score >94 (i.e., normal). Only 5 of 36 patients (14%) in the total meniscectomy group had knee symptoms during activities of daily living. A similar decline in activity levels according to Tegner was seen over time in the control group and in the 2 meniscectomy groups. Conclusions: The frequency of radiographic changes 14 years after meniscectomy is related to the size of the meniscus removed, but the grades of these changes are low and have little influence on activity and knee function.

  • 3.
    Ardern, Clare
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. School of Allied Health, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Österberg, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tagesson, Sofi
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Gauffin, Håkan
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Webster, Kate E.
    La Trobe University, Australia.
    Kvist, Joanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Satisfaction With Knee Function After Primary Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Is Associated With Self-Efficacy, Quality of Life, and Returning to the Preinjury Physical Activity2016In: Arthroscopy: The Journal of Arthroscopy And Related, ISSN 0749-8063, E-ISSN 1526-3231, Vol. 32, no 8, p. 1631-1638Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To assess whether patient-reported outcomes (psychological factors, appraisals of knee function, and physical activity participation) were associated with satisfaction with knee function after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Methods: Participants who were aged 18 to 45 years and a minimum 12 months post primary ACL reconstruction completed a questionnaire battery evaluating knee self-efficacy, knee-related quality of life, self-reported function, and physical activity participation. Participants responses to the question "If you were to spend the rest of your life with your knee just the way it has been in the last week, would you feel.... (7-point ordinal scale; 1 = happy, 7 = unhappy)" were categorized as satisfied, mostly satisfied, or dissatisfied and used as the primary outcome. Ordinal regression was used to examine associations between independent variables and the primary outcome. Results: A total of 177 participants were included at an average of 3 years after primary ACL reconstruction. At follow-up, 44% reported they would be satisfied, 28% mostly satisfied, and 28% dissatisfied with the outcome of ACL reconstruction. There were significant differences in psychological responses and appraisal of knee function between the 3 groups (P = .001), and significantly more people in the satisfied group had returned to their preinjury activity (58%) than in the mostly satisfied (28%) and dissatisfied (26%) groups (P = .001). Multivariable analysis demonstrated that the odds of being satisfied increased by a factor of 3 with higher self-efficacy, greater knee-related quality of life, and returning to the preinjury activity. Conclusions: People who had returned to their preinjury physical activity and who reported higher knee-related self-efficacy and quality of life were more likely to be satisfied with the outcome of ACL reconstruction.

  • 4.
    Balasingam, Sadeshkumar
    et al.
    NU Hosp Grp Trollhattan Uddevalla, Sweden.
    Sernert, Ninni
    NU Hosp Grp Trollhattan Uddevalla, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kartus, Juri
    NU Hosp Grp Trollhattan Uddevalla, Sweden.
    Patients With Concomitant Intra-articular Lesions at Index Surgery Deteriorate in Their Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score in the Long Term More Than Patients With Isolated Anterior Cruciate Ligament Rupture: A Study From the Swedish National Anterior Cruciate Ligament Register2018In: Arthroscopy: The Journal of Arthroscopy And Related, ISSN 0749-8063, E-ISSN 1526-3231, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 1520-1529Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To analyze and compare clinical outcomes after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction 5 and 10 years postsurgery between patients with concomitant intra-articular injuries and those with isolated ACL injury at reconstruction. Methods: Registrations were made using a web-based protocol by physicians for baseline and surgical data. Patients registered their Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) preoperatively and at 5 and 10 years postsurgery. The exclusion criteria for the present study were revisions of previously unregistered ACL surgeries, non-ACL surgeries, patients for whom 10-year follow-up data had not yet been collected, and the proportion of index surgeries that were revision or contralateral interventions. Results: There were 1,295 KOOS scores available for patients 5 years postsurgery, and 1,023 10 years postsurgery from a baseline of 2,751 index reconstructions. A deterioration between the 5-and 10-year scores was observed for patients with concomitant meniscus injury on the KOOS subscales for pain (P = .015), symptoms (P = .005), sport and recreation (P = .011), and knee-related quality of life (QoL) (P = .03) compared with patients with isolated ACL injury. Correspondingly, KOOS subscale score deterioration was seen for combined concomitant cartilage and meniscus injuries for pain (P = .005), symptoms (P = .009), sport and recreation (P = .006), and QoL (P amp;lt; .001). The largest deteriorations were found in sport and recreation (-5.9 points; confidence interval [CI] -10.1, -1.1) and QoL (-6.5 points; CI -10.3, -2.8) subscale scores for patients with concomitant meniscal and cartilage injuries. A similar pattern was not seen between patients with concomitant cartilage injury and isolated ACL injury. Conclusions: The present study reveals that concomitant meniscus injuries at the index operation, either in isolation or in combination with cartilage lesions, render a deterioration of scores on the KOOS outcome subscales for pain, sport and recreation, and quality of life between 5-and 10-year postsurgery follow-up of ACL-reconstructed patients. No such deterioration was seen for patients who had isolated ACL injury.

  • 5.
    Haapaniemi, T
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Adolfsson, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Complete transection of the median and radial nerves during arthroscopic release of post-traumatic elbow contracture.1999In: Arthroscopy: The Journal of Arthroscopy And Related, ISSN 0749-8063, E-ISSN 1526-3231, Vol. 15, p. 784-787Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Hoe-Hansen, Carsten
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Norlin, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The Clinical Effect of Ketoprofen After Arthroscopic Subacromial Decompression: A Randomized Double-Blind Prospective Study1999In: Arthroscopy: The Journal of Arthroscopy And Related, ISSN 0749-8063, E-ISSN 1526-3231, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 249-252Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the clinical effect of ketoprofen after arthroscopic subacromial decompression (ASD). The design was randomized, prospective, and double-blind, with a placebo control group. Forty-one consecutive patients with subacromial impingement syndrome, were randomized to treatment with ketoprofen 200 mg once daily or placebo for 6 weeks following ASD. For additional analgesia, patients used paracetamol if necessary. Clinical follow-up was performed at 6 weeks and at 2 years postoperatively. At the 6-week follow-up, the patients treated with ketoprofen had a statistically significant increase in UCLA total score (P < .05), range of movement (P < .05), and satisfaction (P < .05), and they had significantly less pain (P < .05). There was no statistical difference between the ketoprofen and placebo groups regarding strength. Patients receiving ketoprofen had significantly less need for additional analgesia (P < .05). At the 2-year follow-up, there were no differences in the scores between the ketoprofen and placebo group.

  • 7.
    Johansson, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kuiper, Jan-Herman
    Keele University, England Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaed Hospital, England .
    Sundqvist, Tommy
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Persson, Fredrik
    BioOptico AB, Sweden .
    Speier, Craig
    ConMedical Linvatec, CA USA .
    DAlfonso, David
    ConMedical Linvatec, CA USA .
    Richardson, James B
    Keele University, England Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaed Hospital, England .
    Öberg, Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Spectroscopic Measurement of Cartilage Thickness in Arthroscopy: Ex Vivo Validation in Human Knee Condyles2012In: Arthroscopy: The Journal of Arthroscopy And Related, ISSN 0749-8063, E-ISSN 1526-3231, Vol. 28, no 10, p. 1513-1523Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of articular cartilage thickness measurement when implementing a new technology based on spectroscopic measurement into an arthroscopic camera. Methods: Cartilage thickness was studied by ex vivo arthroscopy at a number of sites (N = 113) in human knee joint osteoarthritic femoral condyles and tibial plateaus, removed from 7 patients undergoing total knee replacement. The arthroscopic image spectral data at each site were used to estimate cartilage thickness. Arthroscopically derived thickness values were compared with reference cartilage thickness as measured by 3 different methods: needle penetration, spiral computed tomography scanning, and geometric measurement after sample slicing. Results: The lowest mean error (0.28 to 0.30 mm) in the regression between arthroscopic and reference cartilage thickness was seen for reference cartilage thickness less than 1.5 mm. Corresponding values for cartilage thickness less than 2.0 and 2.5 mm were 0.32 to 0.40 mm and 0.37 to 0.47 mm, respectively. Cartilage thickness images-created by pixel-by-pixel regression model calculations applied to the arthroscopic images-were derived to demonstrate the clinical use of a camera implementation. Conclusions: On the basis of this investigation on osteoarthritic material, when one is implementing the spectroscopic method for estimating cartilage thickness into an arthroscopic camera, errors in the range of 0.28 to 0.30 mm are expected. This implementation does not, however, influence the fact that the spectral method performs less well in the cartilage thickness region from 1.5 to 2.5 mm and cannot assess cartilage thicker than 2.5 mm. Clinical Relevance: Imaging cartilage thickness directly in the arthroscopic camera video stream could serve as an interesting image tool for in vivo cartilage quality assessment, in connection with cartilage diagnosis, repair, and follow-up.

  • 8.
    Kvist, Joanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kartus, Juri
    NU Hospital Group, Trollhättan/Uddevalla, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Jon
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Forssblad, Magnus
    Karolinska Institutet, and Capio Artro Clinic AB, Sophiahemmet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Results From the Swedish National Anterior Cruciate Ligament Register2014In: Arthroscopy: The Journal of Arthroscopy And Related, ISSN 0749-8063, E-ISSN 1526-3231, Vol. 30, no 7, p. 803-810Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:

    The purpose of the study was to analyze the baseline variables and clinical outcomes for almost 24,000 patients entered into the Swedish National ACL Register between January 2005 and December 2012.

    METHODS:

    The register consists of 2 parts: 1 section in which surgeons report baseline and surgical data and 1 section in which patients report the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and the EQ-5D score before and 1, 2, and 5 years after surgery.

    RESULTS:

    By December 2012, 23,744 patients had been entered into the surgeons' part of the register. The female-male ratio in the register is 42:58. The mean age at primary anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction was 26 years (SD, 11 years) and 28 years (SD, 9 years) for the female and male patients, respectively. The ACL injury occurred during soccer in 36% of the female patients and 49% of the male patients. In 2012, 95% of the primary ACL reconstructions were performed using hamstring tendon autografts. For patients who had a minimum of 5 years' follow-up, the revision rate was 3.3% and the contralateral reconstruction rate was 3.8%. On all follow-up occasions up to 5 years, patients who had undergone revision had a significantly (P < .001) poorer outcome than those who had undergone primary unilateral ACL reconstructions in all KOOS and EQ-5D dimensions. On all follow-up occasions, smokers obtained significantly poorer scores than nonsmokers in terms of both the KOOS (P < .008) and the EQ-5D (P < .024).

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Soccer is the most common cause of injury in both female and male patients, and patients undergoing revisions fare less well than those undergoing primary unilateral ACL reconstructions, as well as bilateral reconstructions. Furthermore, smokers fare less well than nonsmokers. The cumulative risk of an ACL revision or contralateral ACL reconstruction during a 5-year period is approximately 7%. For patients aged younger than 19 years, the cumulative risk is significantly higher.

    LEVEL OF EVIDENCE:

    Level II, retrospective prognostic study.

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