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  • 1.
    Haapaniemi, Staffan
    et al.
    Department of Surgery, Vrinnevi Hospital, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Sandblom, G.
    Department of Surgery, Motala Hospital, Motala, Sweden.
    Nilsson, E.
    Department of Surgery, Motala Hospital, Motala, Sweden.
    Mortality after elective and emergency surgery for inguinal and femoral hernia1999In: Hernia, ISSN 1265-4906, E-ISSN 1248-9204, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 205-208Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate mortality following elective and emergency groin hernia surgery. Information concerning 17 591 inguinal and 579 femoral hernia operations, including death of patients within 30 days of surgery, were prospectively recorded in the Swedish Hernia Register over a period of six years. Elective surgery for groin hernia is known to be a low-risk procedure. Mortality within 30 days of surgery was compared with the mortality of the general Swedish population using the standard mortality rate (SMR). Of all inguinal and femoral hernia repairs 5.1 % and 35.2 % respectively, were performed as an emergency. Following elective inguinal hernia repair the SMR for men fell significantly below unity. No significant differences between observed and expected mortality were observed following inguinal hernia surgery on females or following elective femoral hernia surgery on either gender. The reduced SMR found after elective hernia repair in men is most likely attributable to patient selection. After elective surgery on patients 70 years or older there is a tendency towards a reduction in SMR of the same order of size as for patients analysed as one group which, however, did not reach statistical significance. Mortality following both inguinal and femoral emergency procedures is increased five- to ten-fold compared to the 30-day mortality in the general population. A further increase in postoperative mortality is noted following emergency surgery with bowel resection.

  • 2.
    Kingsnorth, A
    et al.
    Derriford Hospital, England .
    Gingell-Littlejohn, M
    University of Glasgow, Scotland .
    Nienhuijs, S
    Catharina Hospital, Netherlands .
    Schuele, S
    Klinikum Bremen Mitte, Germany .
    Appel, P
    Herz Jesu Krankenhaus gGmbH, Germany .
    Ziprin, P
    University of London Imperial College of Science Technology and Med, England .
    Eklund, A
    Central Hospital Vasteras, Sweden .
    Miserez, M
    University of Ziekenhuizen Leuven, Belgium .
    Smeds, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Randomized controlled multicenter international clinical trial of self-gripping Parietex (TM) ProGrip (TM) polyester mesh versus lightweight polypropylene mesh in open inguinal hernia repair: interim results at 3 months2012In: Hernia, ISSN 1265-4906, E-ISSN 1248-9204, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 287-294Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To compare clinical outcomes following sutureless Parietex (TM) ProGrip (TM) mesh repair to traditional Lichtenstein repair with lightweight polypropylene mesh secured with sutures. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanThis is a 3-month interim report of a 1-year multicenter international study. Three hundred and two patients were randomized; 153 were treated with Lichtenstein repair (L group) and 149 with Parietex (TM) ProGrip (TM) precut mesh (P group) with or without fixation. The primary outcome measure was postoperative pain using the visual analog scale (VAS, 0-150 mm); other outcomes were assessed prior to surgery and up to 3 months postoperatively. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanCompared to baseline, pain score was lower in the P group at discharge (-10%) and at 7 days (-13%), while pain increased in the L group at discharge (+39%) and at 7 days (+21%). The difference between groups was significant at both time points (P = 0.007 and P = 0.039, respectively). In the P group, patients without fixation suffered less pain compared to those with single-suture fixation (1 month: -20.9 vs. -6.15%, P = 0.02; 3 months: -24.3 vs. -7.7%, P = 0.01). The infection rate was significantly lower in the P group during the 3-month follow-up (2.0 vs. 7.2%, P = 0.032). Surgery duration was significantly shorter in the P group (32.4 vs. 39.1 min; P andlt; 0.001). No recurrence was observed at 3 months in both groups. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanSurgery duration, early postoperative, pain and infection rates were significantly reduced with self-gripping polyester mesh compared to Lichtenstein repair with polypropylene mesh. The use of fixation increased postoperative pain in the P group. The absence of early recurrence highlights the gripping efficiency effect.

  • 3.
    Koch Frisén, Angelica
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Starck, Joachim
    Department of Surgery, Västervik Hospital, Västervik, Sweden.
    Smeds, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Nyström, PO
    Department of Surgery, Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kald, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Analysis of outcome of Lichtenstein groin hernia repair by surgeons in training versus a specialized surgeon2011In: Hernia, ISSN 1265-4906, E-ISSN 1248-9204, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 281-288Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Groin hernia repair is a common procedure in general surgery, and is taught to and performed by surgeons early in their training. The aim of this observational study was to compare hernia repair performance and results of surgical trainees with those of a specialized surgeon. The further aim sought to identify what factors may influence short and long-term outcome, and areas for improvement in surgical training.

    Methods: A non-randomized parallel cohort study was designed to compare a specialized surgeon with surgical trainees, performing the Lichtenstein repair in adult males. Two hundred repairs were included, of which 96 were performed by surgical trainees. Patient characteristics, surgical experience, and operative data including duration of procedural parts and surgical complexity were noted at surgery. Postoperative complications, recurrence, chronic pain and residual symptoms were assessed at longterm follow-up after a median of 34.5 months.

    Results: Surgical trainees had longer overall operative time consume, with an unproportionally longer time for mobilising the sac and cord. They perceived exposure and mobilisation as more difficult than the specialist, and also a greater demand on own experience during surgery. The trainee repairs had a higher rate of postoperative complications (14.7% versus 5.0%) but recurrence rate was the same as for specialist repairs. At long-term follow-up, specialist repairs had a higher symptom burden and more chronic pain.

    Conclusions: Comparison of a specialized surgeon to surgical trainees in performance and outcome for inguinal hernia surgery shows it was more efficient, but not necessarily better to let a specialized surgeon perform the repairs. The better long-term outcome for surgical trainees stands in contrast to the prejudice that it is better to have an experienced surgeon to perform standard procedures. It seems likely that targeted training in dissection and mobilisation could decrease level of perceived complexity and shorten operative time consume for surgical trainees. We believe that adequately supervised hernia surgery should remain as a part of the surgical training.

  • 4.
    Nordin, Pär
    et al.
    Department of Surgery, Östersund Hospital, Östersund, Sweden.
    Hernell, H.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gunnarsson, U.
    Department of Surgery Mora Hospital, University of Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Erik
    Department of Surgery, Motala Hospital, Motala, Sweden.
    Type of anaesthesia and patient acceptance in groin hernia repair: a multicentre randomised trial2004In: Hernia, ISSN 1265-4906, E-ISSN 1248-9204, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 220-225Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background  Groin hernia repair can be performed under general (GA), regional (RA), or local (LA) anaesthesia. This multicentre randomised trial evaluates patient acceptance, satisfaction, and quality of life with these three anaesthetic alternatives in hernia surgery.

    Methods  One hundred and thirty-eight patients at three hospitals were randomised to one of three groups, GA, RA, or LA. Upon discharge, they were asked to complete a specially designed questionnaire with items focusing on pain, discomfort, recovery, and overall satisfaction with the anaesthetic method used. The global quality-of-life instrument EuroQol was used for estimation of health perceived.

    Results  Significantly more patients in the LA group than in the RA group felt pain during surgery (P<0.001). This pain was characterised as light or moderate and for the majority of LA patients was felt during infiltration of the anaesthetic agent. Postoperatively, patients in the LA group first felt pain significantly later than patients in the other two groups (P=0.012) and significantly fewer LA patients consumed analgesics more than three times during the first postoperative day (P=0.002). The results concerning nausea, vomiting, and time to first meal all favour LA. No difference was found among the three groups concerning overall satisfaction and quality of life.

    Conclusion   In a general surgical setting, we found LA to be well tolerated and associated with significant advantages compared to GA and RA.

  • 5.
    Sandblom, G.
    et al.
    Department of Surgery, Motala Hospital, Motala, Sweden.
    Haapaniemi, Staffan
    Department of Surgery, Vrinnevi Hospital, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Nilsson, E.
    Department of Surgery, Motala Hospital, Motala, Sweden.
    Femoral hernias: a register analysis of 588 repairs1999In: Hernia, ISSN 1265-4906, E-ISSN 1248-9204, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 131-134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From 1 January 1992 to 31 December 1997 18,281 inguinal hernias and 588 femoral hernias were recorded in the Swedish Hernia Register. The aim of the present study was to characterise these femoral hernias and to evaluate the reoperation rate following their repair. 64% of all femoral hernias were located in the right groin and 36% in the left groin (p < 0.001). The male to female ratio for femoral hernia was 1:1.6; mean ages of patients with femoral and inguinal hernia were 63.4 ± 17.1 and 59.1 ± 16.4 years, respectively (p < 0.001). Emergency surgery and bowel resection at emergency surgery were more common with femoral than with inguinal hernia. The rate of ambulatory surgery was lower for femoral hernia than for inguinal hernia, mainly due to the higher emergency rate for femoral hernia. At three years the cumulative incidence of reoperation was 4.6% (95% confidence interval 2.4–6.8%) for femoral hernia and 4.0% (95% confidence interval 3.6–4.4%) for inguinal hernia (p > 0.05). Male sex and postoperative complications were associated with a significantly increased risk of reoperation following femoral hernia repair. The relative risk of reoperation was not affected by patient age, elective/emergency surgery, primary/recurrent hernia or hernia side. Repair techniques using mesh were associated with a lower reoperation rate than techniques without mesh, although the difference did not reach statistical significance.

  • 6.
    Zdolsek, Johann
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Enebog, J.
    Wallon, Conny
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Kald, Anders
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    A prospective evaluation of the PerFix® Plug technique for groin hernia repair2000In: Hernia, ISSN 1265-4906, E-ISSN 1248-9204, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 311-315Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to prospectively evaluate complication rates, sick-leave, recurrence rate, and chronic post-operative pain after mesh-plug hernia repair. All 385 consecutive inguinal hernias (373 patients) operated at our department with the PerFix® Plug from September 1996 to December 1997 were included in the study. Follow-up included a questionnaire 3 and 12 months after the repair. Replies to the both of these questionnaires were obtained from 363 of 373 patients (98%). All patients who either reported a lump or sensory disturbance in the operated groin were offered a clinical examination. A third questionnaire focusing on chronic post-operative pain was completed by 77 of 90 patients reporting groin pain. The recurrence rate was 2% (9/385). After 25 months (17-36 months) 38 patients (10%) still experienced inguinal pain to some degree. In 7 male patients there was either pain or discomfort during sexual activities. In a patient with poorly controlled ascites the plug was removed. Day-case surgery was performed in 86% of patients with epidural or local anaesthesia, and 64% in general- or spinal anaesthesia. Employed/self-employed patients were off work for a median of 7 days (0-65). The median time to full recovery for all patients was 20 days. Conclusion: Mesh-plug hernia repair has a reasonably low complication rate together with quick recovery in a non-specialised surgical setting. Chronic inguinal pain is, however, still present to some degree in 10% of patients after two years.

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