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  • 1. Cheng, Q.
    et al.
    Jiang, GX
    Fredrikson, S
    Link, H
    de Pedro-Cuesta, J
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Incidence of Guillain-Barré syndrome in Sweden 1996.2000In: European Journal of Neurology, ISSN 1351-5101, E-ISSN 1468-1331, Vol. 7, p. 11-16Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Cheng, Q.
    et al.
    Division of Neurology, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden, Division of Neurology, Huddinge University Hospital, S-141 86 Huddinge, Sweden.
    Jiang, G.-X.
    Division of Neurology, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Press, R.
    Division of Neurology, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andersson, M.
    Department of Neurology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ekstedt, B.
    Department of Neurology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Vrethem, M.
    Department of Neurology, Örebro Medical Centre Hospital, Sweden.
    Liedholm, L.J.
    Lindsten, H.
    Department of Neurology, Östersund Hospital, Östersund, Sweden.
    Brattstrom, L.
    Brattström, L., Department of Neurology, University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
    Fredrikson, S.
    Department of Medicine, County Hospital, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Link, H.
    Division of Neurology, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    De, Pedro-Cuesta J.
    De Pedro-Cuesta, J., Division of Neurology, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden, Department of Applied Epidemiology, National Centre for Epidemiology 'Carlos III', Institute of Health, Madrid, Spain.
    Clinical epidemiology of Guillain-Barré syndrome in adults in Sweden 1996-97: A prospective study2000In: European Journal of Neurology, ISSN 1351-5101, E-ISSN 1468-1331, Vol. 7, no 6, p. 685-692Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We described clinical manifestations, outcomes, prognostic indicators and clinico-epidemiological subgroups for 53 adult patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) in Sweden during the period 1996-97. These patients were identified from a population of 2.8 million inhabitants and prospectively followed up for one year by a network of neurologists. An additional 10 cases, of whom five were adults who had not been prospectively followed up, were not included in the analyses. At 6 months after onset 80% of the patients could walk without aid, while at 1 year 46% were fully recovered, 42% had mild residual signs or symptoms, 4% had moderate and 6% severe disabilities, and 2% had died. Intravenous human immunoglobulin or plasmapheresis were used in 72% of the patients. The sum of the Medical Research Council (MRC) score at nadir was found as the only significant predictor for residual signs at 1 year in a multivariate model. Three subgroups, with different clinico-epidemiological characteristics, were identified by using cluster analysis. In conclusion, GBS in Sweden is frequently preceded by a respiratory infection, is often treated with immunomodulatory therapies, and exhibits a high recovery rate and a low fatality rate.

  • 3. Cheng, Q.
    et al.
    Jiang, GX
    Press, R.
    Andersson, M.
    Ekstedt, B.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Clinical epidemiology of Guillain-Barre syndrome in Sweden 1996-1997: a prospective study.2000In: European Journal of Neurology, ISSN 1351-5101, E-ISSN 1468-1331, Vol. 7, p. 685-692Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Huang-Link, YuMin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science.
    Eleftheriou, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Yang, G.
    Southern Med Univ, Peoples R China.
    Johansson, J. M.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Apostolou, Alexandros
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Link, H.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Jin, Y-P
    Univ Toronto, Canada.
    Optical coherence tomography represents a sensitive and reliable tool for routine monitoring of idiopathic intracranial hypertension with and without papilledema2019In: European Journal of Neurology, ISSN 1351-5101, E-ISSN 1468-1331, Vol. 26, no 5, p. 808-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose We previously reported that certain optical coherence tomography (OCT) measures were sensitive and reliable in identifying idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). This prospective study aimed to define OCT measures that allow differentiation of IIH with and without papilledema, thereby helping clinical decision-making. Methods Eight patients with IIH with papilledema, nine without papilledema and 19 with other neurological diseases were included. OCT measures were obtained before lumbar puncture and within 2 h, 1, 3 and 6 months after lumbar puncture with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) removal. Results All patients with papilledema had increased retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness and elevated CSF pressure. All patients without papilledema had normal RNFL but elevated CSF pressure. After CSF removal, reduced RNFL thickness was registered in all eight patients with IIH with papilledema. No significant change in RNFL thickness after CSF removal was observed in IIH without papilledema or in patients with other neurological diseases, although reduced CSF pressure was documented. RNFL thickness tended to be normal in patients with IIH with papilledema at 3-6 months after CSF removal. All patients with IIH showed increased rim area and rim thickness, but reduced optic cup volume regardless of RNFL thickness or papilledema. Conclusions Retinal nerve fiber layer thickness is sensitive for monitoring acute IIH and evaluating treatment effect. Increased rim area and rim thickness and decreased optic cup volume are reliable parameters that indicate persistently increased CSF pressure and risk of relapse. OCT measures are sensitive and reliable for diagnosing subtle IIH even in the absence of papilledema.

  • 5.
    Håkansson, Irene
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tisell, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Cassel, Petra
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Blennow, K.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Zetterberg, H.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden; UCL Institute Neurol, England.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Neurofilament light chain in cerebrospinal fluid and prediction of disease activity in clinically isolated syndrome and relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis2017In: European Journal of Neurology, ISSN 1351-5101, E-ISSN 1468-1331, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 703-712Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose: Improved biomarkers are needed to facilitate clinical decision-making and as surrogate endpoints in clinical trials in multiple sclerosis (MS). We assessed whether neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory markers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) at initial sampling could predict disease activity during 2 years of follow-up in patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) and relapsing-remitting MS. Methods: Using multiplex bead array and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, CXCL1, CXCL8, CXCL10, CXCL13, CCL20, CCL22, neurofilament light chain (NFL), neurofilament heavy chain, glial fibrillary acidic protein, chitinase-3-like-1, matrix metalloproteinase-9 and osteopontin were analysed in CSF from 41 patients with CIS or relapsing-remitting MS and 22 healthy controls. Disease activity (relapses, magnetic resonance imaging activity or disability worsening) in patients was recorded during 2 years of follow-up in this prospective longitudinal cohort study. Results: In a logistic regression analysis model, NFL in CSF at baseline emerged as the best predictive marker, correctly classifying 93% of patients who showed evidence of disease activity during 2 years of follow-up and 67% of patients who did not, with an overall proportion of 85% (33 of 39 patients) correctly classified. Combining NFL with either neurofilament heavy chain or osteopontin resulted in 87% overall correctly classified patients, whereas combining NFL with a chemokine did not improve results. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the potential prognostic value of NFL in baseline CSF in CIS and relapsing-remitting MS and supports its use as a predictive biomarker of disease activity.

  • 6.
    Kurien, M.
    et al.
    Univ Sheffield, England.
    Ludvigsson, J. F.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Sanders, D. S.
    Univ Sheffield, England.
    Zylberberg, H. M.
    Columbia Univ Coll Phys and Surg, NY 10032 USA.
    Green, P. H.
    Columbia Univ Coll Phys and Surg, NY 10032 USA.
    Sundelin, Heléne
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Lebwohl, B.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Columbia Univ Coll Phys and Surg, NY 10032 USA.
    Persistent mucosal damage and risk of epilepsy in people with celiac disease2018In: European Journal of Neurology, ISSN 1351-5101, E-ISSN 1468-1331, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 592-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purposeCeliac disease (CD) is associated with an increased risk of developing epilepsy, a risk that persists after CD diagnosis. A significant proportion of patients with CD have persistent villous atrophy (VA) on follow-up biopsy. The objective of this study was to determine whether persistent VA on follow-up biopsy affected long-term epilepsy risk and epilepsy-related hospital emergency admissions. MethodsThis was a nationwide cohort study. We identified all people in Sweden with histological evidence of CD who underwent a follow-up small intestinal biopsy (1969-2008). We compared those with persistent VA with those who showed histological improvement, assessing the development of epilepsy and related emergency hospital admissions (defined according to relevant International Classification of Diseases codes in the Swedish Patient Register). Cox regression analysis was used to assess outcome measures. ResultsVillous atrophy was present in 43% of 7590 people with CD who had a follow-up biopsy. The presence of persistent VA was significantly associated with a reduced risk of developing newly-diagnosed epilepsy (hazard ratio, 0.61; 95% confidence interval, 0.38-0.98). On stratified analysis, this effect was primarily amongst males (hazard ratio, 0.35; 95% confidence interval, 0.15-0.80). Among the 58 patients with CD with a prior diagnosis of epilepsy, those with persistent VA were less likely to visit an emergency department with epilepsy (hazard ratio, 0.37; 95% confidence interval, 0.09-1.09). ConclusionsIn a population-based study of individuals with CD, persisting VA on follow-up biopsy was associated with reduced future risk of developing epilepsy but did not influence emergency epilepsy-related hospital admissions. The mechanism as to why persistent VA confers this benefit requires further exploration.

  • 7. Masterman, Thomas
    et al.
    Ligers, Arturs
    Olerup, Olle
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Hillert, Jan
    CTLA-4 dimorphisms in gammopathyassociateperipheral neuropathy.1999In: European Journal of Neurology, ISSN 1351-5101, E-ISSN 1468-1331, Vol. 6, p. 491-493Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Mellergård, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Tisell, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Blystad, Ida
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Grönqvist, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Blennow,, K.
    Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Institution of Neuroscience and Physiology, Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Olsson,, B.
    Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Institution of Neuroscience and Physiology, Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Cerebrospinal fluid levels of neurofilament and tau correlate with brain atrophy in natalizumab-treated multiple sclerosis2017In: European Journal of Neurology, ISSN 1351-5101, E-ISSN 1468-1331, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 112-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose

    Brain atrophy is related to clinical deterioration in multiple sclerosis (MS) but its association with intrathecal markers of inflammation or neurodegeneration is unclear. Our aim was to investigate whether cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) markers of inflammation or neurodegeneration are associated with brain volume change in natalizumab-treated MS and whether this change is reflected in non-lesional white matter metabolites.

    Methods

    About 25 patients with natalizumab-treated MS were followed for 3 years with assessment of percentage brain volume change (PBVC) and absolute quantification of metabolites with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS). Analyses of inflammatory [interleukin 1β (IL-1β), IL-6, C-X-C motif chemokine 8 (CXCL8), CXCL10, CXCL11, C-C motif chemokine 22] and neurodegenerative [neurofilament light protein (NFL), glial fibrillary acidic protein, myelin basic protein, tau proteins] markers were done at baseline and 1-year follow-up.

    Results

    The mean decline in PBVC was 3% at the 3-year follow-up, although mean 1H MRS metabolite levels in non-lesional white matter were unchanged. CSF levels of NFL and tau at baseline correlated negatively with PBVC over 3 years (r = −0.564, P = 0.012, and r = −0.592, P = 0.010, respectively).

    Conclusions

    A significant 3-year whole-brain atrophy was not reflected in mean metabolite change of non-lesional white matter. In addition, our results suggest that CSF levels of NFL and tau correlate with brain atrophy development and may be used for evaluating treatment response in inflammatory active MS.

  • 9.
    Taba, P.
    et al.
    University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Schmutzhard, E.
    Medical University of Innsbruck, Austria.
    Forsberg, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Lutsar, I.
    University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Ljostad, U.
    Sorlandet Hospital, Norway; University of Bergen, Norway.
    Mygland, A.
    Sorlandet Hospital, Norway; University of Bergen, Norway.
    Levchenko, I.
    National Academic Medical Science Ukraine, Ukraine.
    Strle, F.
    University of Medical Centre Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Steiner, I.
    Rabin Medical Centre, Israel.
    EAN consensus review on prevention, diagnosis and management of tick-borne encephalitis2017In: European Journal of Neurology, ISSN 1351-5101, E-ISSN 1468-1331, Vol. 24, no 10, p. 1214-+Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose: Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) is an infection of the central nervous system (CNS) caused by tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) and transmitted by ticks, with a variety of clinical manifestations. The incidence of TBE in Europe is increasing due to an extended season of the infection and the enlargement of endemic areas. Our objectives are to provide recommendations on the prevention, diagnosis and management of TBE, based on evidence or consensus decisions. Methods: For systematic evaluation, the literature was searched from 1970 to 2015 (including early online publications of 2016), and recommendations were based on evidence or consensus decisions of the Task Force when evidence-based data were not available. Recommendations: Vaccination against TBE is recommended for all age groups above 1 year in highly endemic areas (amp;gt;= 5 cases/100 000/year), but also for individuals at risk in areas with a lower incidence. Travellers to endemic areas should be vaccinated if their visits will include extensive outdoor activities. Post-exposure prophylaxis after a tick bite is not recommended. A case of TBE is defined by the presence of clinical signs of meningitis, meningoencephalitis or meningoencephalomyelitis with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pleocytosis (amp;gt;5 x 10(6) cells/l) and the presence of specific TBEV serum immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG antibodies, CSF IgM antibodies or TBEV IgG seroconversion. TBEV-specific polymerase chain reaction in blood is diagnostic in the first viremic phase but it is not sensitive in the second phase of TBE with clinical manifestations of CNS inflammation. Lumbar puncture should be performed in all patients with suspected CNS infection unless there are contraindications. Imaging of the brain and spinal cord has a low sensitivity and a low specificity, but it is useful for differential diagnosis. No effective antiviral or immunomodulating therapy is available for TBE; therefore the treatment is symptomatic. Patients with a potentially life threatening meningoencephalitis or meningoencephalomyelitis should be admitted to an intensive care unit. In the case of brain oedema, analgosedation should be deepened; osmotherapy and corticosteroids are not routinely recommended. If intracranial pressure is increased, therapeutic hypothermia or decompressive craniectomy might be considered. Seizures should be treated as any other symptomatic epileptic seizures. Conclusions: Tick-borne encephalitis is a viral CNS infection that may result in long-term neurological sequelae. Since its incidence in Europe is increasing due to broadening of endemic areas and prolongation of the tick activity season, the health burden of TBE is enlarging. There is no effective antiviral treatment for TBE, but the disease may be effectively prevented by vaccination.

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