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  • 1.
    Amandusson, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hermanson, Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Colocalization of oestrogen receptor immunoreactivity and preproenkephalin mRNA expression to neurons in the superficial laminae of the spinal and medullary dorsal horn of rats1996In: European Journal of Neuroscience, ISSN 0953-816X, E-ISSN 1460-9568, Vol. 8, no 11, p. 2440-2445Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A double-labelling procedure combining immunohistochemical staining with in situ hybridization using a radiolabelled cRNA probe was employed to demonstrate oestrogen receptor-like immunoreactivity and preproenkephalin-A mRNA in the medullary and spinal dorsal horn of female rats. Both markers labelled large numbers of neurons in the substantia gelatinosa and its trigeminal homologue. Many of these neurons were double-labelled, displaying both oestrogen receptor-like-immunoreactivity and preproenkephalin-A mRNA; cell counts showed that 40-60% of the of the oestrogen receptor-like-immunoreactive cells in the superficial laminae also were labelled for preproenkephalin-A mRNA, and that 60-70% of the preproenkephalin-A mRNA-labelled neurons in the same laminae displayed oestrogen receptor-like immunoreactivity. Previous studies have shown that oestrogen receptors can bind to the promoter region of the preproenkephalin-A gene, and studies on the hypothalamus have demonstrated that oestrogen regulates enkephalin expression in select neuronal populations. The present results demonstrate that enkephalinergic neurons in the superficial dorsal horn contain oestrogen receptors and suggest that oestrogen may play an important role in the modulation of sensory and nociceptive processing in the lower medulla and spinal cord.

  • 2.
    Böhme, Rebecca
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Charite, Germany.
    Lorenz, Robert C.
    Charite, Germany; Max Planck Institute Human Dev, Germany.
    Gleich, Tobias
    Charite, Germany; NeuroCure Excellence Cluster, Germany.
    Romund, Lydia
    Charite, Germany.
    Pelz, Patricia
    Charite, Germany.
    Golde, Sabrina
    Charite, Germany.
    Flemming, Eva
    Charite, Germany.
    Wold, Andrew
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Deserno, Lorenz
    Charite, Germany; Max Planck Institute Human Cognit and Brain Science, Germany; Otto von Guericke University, Germany.
    Behr, Joachim
    Charite, Germany; Charite, Germany; Medical School Brandenburg, Germany.
    Raufelder, Diana
    Freie University, Germany.
    Heinz, Andreas
    Charite, Germany.
    Beck, Anne
    Charite, Germany.
    Reversal learning strategy in adolescence is associated with prefrontal cortex activation2017In: European Journal of Neuroscience, ISSN 0953-816X, E-ISSN 1460-9568, Vol. 45, no 1, p. 129-137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adolescence is a critical maturation period for human cognitive control and executive function. In this study, a large sample of adolescents (n=85) performed a reversal learning task during functional magnetic resonance imaging. We analyzed behavioral data using a reinforcement learning model to provide individually fitted parameters and imaging data with regard to reward prediction errors (PE). Following a model-based approach, we formed two groups depending on whether individuals tended to update expectations predominantly for the chosen stimulus or also for the unchosen one. These groups significantly differed in their problem behavior score obtained using the child behavior checklist (CBCL) and in a measure of their developmental stage. Imaging results showed that dorsolateral striatal areas covaried with PE. Participants who relied less on learning based on task structure showed less prefrontal activation compared with participants who relied more on task structure. An exploratory analysis revealed that PE-related activity was associated with pubertal development in prefrontal areas, insula and anterior cingulate. These findings support the hypothesis that the prefrontal cortex is implicated in mediating flexible goal-directed behavioral control.

  • 3.
    Garces, A.
    et al.
    INSERM U 583, INM-Hôpital St. Eloi, 80 rue Augustin Fliche, 34091 Montpellier Cedex 5, France.
    Bogdanik, L.
    Institut de Génomique Fonctionnelle, CNRS UMR 5203 INSERM U661 Universités Montpellier I et II, 141 rue de la Cardonille, 34094 Montpellier Cedex 5, France.
    Thor, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Carroll, P.
    INSERM U 583, INM-Hôpital St. Eloi, 80 rue Augustin Fliche, 34091 Montpellier Cedex 5, France.
    Expression of Drosophila BarH1-H2 homeoproteins in developing dopaminergic cells and segmental nerve a (SNa) motoneurons2006In: European Journal of Neuroscience, ISSN 0953-816X, E-ISSN 1460-9568, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 37-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Barh1/h2 genes encode two related homeobox transcription factors (B-H1 and B-H2) previously shown to play essential roles in the formation and specification of the distal leg segments and in retinal neurogenesis. Here we describe the restricted expression pattern of the B-H1/-H2 homeoprotein within the embryonic ventral nerve cord of Drosophila. We show that B-H1/-H2 are specifically expressed in a subset of dopaminergic neurons, namely the unpaired ventral midline dopaminergic neuron, and in a subpopulation of laterally projecting motoneurons, i.e. the five motoneurons forming the segmental nerve a (SNa) branch. Using the GAL4-UAS system we show that B-H1/-H2Gal4 in combination with a membrane-targeted enhanced green fluorescent protein reporter line provides a powerful genetic tool reproducibly to label SNa motoneuron projections and terminals at the periphery, and their dendritic tree in the ventral nerve cord. Thus, the highly restricted expression pattern of the B-H1/-H2 homeoproteins and notably the related Gal4 driver represent powerful genetic tools to identify and study genes that control axon guidance, synaptogenesis or dendritic arborization within a small subpopulation of motoneurons identifiable from embryogenesis to late larval stages. © The Authors (2006).

  • 4.
    Hilke, Susanne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Theodorsson, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fetissov, Serguei
    Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Åman, Katarina
    Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Holm, Lovisa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hökfelt, Tomas
    Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Estrogen induces a rapid increase in galanin levels in female rat hippocampal formation: possibly a nongenomic/indirect effect2005In: European Journal of Neuroscience, ISSN 0953-816X, E-ISSN 1460-9568, Vol. 21, no 8, p. 2089-2099Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Administration of 17β-estradiol to ovariectomized rats increased the concentrations of galanin-like immunoreactivity (LI) in the hippocampal formation by 215% (P < 0.001) within 1 h. An increase of 125% (P < 0.05) was observed in the same brain region in the proestrous phase of a normal estrous cycle. Tamoxifen® did not block the 17β-estradiol-induced increase in the concentration of galanin-LI but resulted in a 62% decrease in the hypothalamus within 1 h. In vivo microdialysis in the dorsal hippocampal formation showed a decrease of extracellular galanin-LI (P < 0.001) 1−2 h after treatment with 17β-estradiol, indicating a decreased release of galanin. For comparision, we studied the concentrations of neuropeptide Y, which were not influenced significantly in any of the regions studied. Taken together our results suggest that 17β-estradiol inhibits galanin release, presumably from noradrenergic nerve terminals, and primarily via a nongenomic/indirect action, not necessarily involving the classical nuclear receptors ER-α or ER-β. These rapid estrogen-induced changes in galanin release could influence transmitter signalling and plasticity in the hippocampal formation.

  • 5.
    Jerregard, HE
    et al.
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Biomed & Surg, Div Cell Biol, Linkoping, Sweden Karolinska Inst, MBB, Div Neurobiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Akerud, P
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Biomed & Surg, Div Cell Biol, Linkoping, Sweden Karolinska Inst, MBB, Div Neurobiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Arenas, E
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Biomed & Surg, Div Cell Biol, Linkoping, Sweden Karolinska Inst, MBB, Div Neurobiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hildebrand, Claes
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology.
    Behaviour of rat dorsal root ganglion neurones cocultured in vitro with foot skin fibroblasts or neurotrophin-transfected 3T3-cells2000In: European Journal of Neuroscience, ISSN 0953-816X, E-ISSN 1460-9568, Vol. 12, p. 330-330Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6. Konsman, Jan Pieter
    et al.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of cell biology.
    Forebrain patterns of c-Fos and FosB induction during cancer-associated anorexia-cachexia in rat2005In: European Journal of Neuroscience, ISSN 0953-816X, E-ISSN 1460-9568, Vol. 21, no 10, p. 2752-2766Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Forebrain structures are necessary for the initiation of food intake and its coupling to energy expenditure. The cancer-related anorexia-cachexia syndrome is typified by a prolonged increase in metabolic rate resulting in body weight loss which, paradoxically, is accompanied by reduced food intake. The aim of the present work was to study the forebrain expression of Fos proteins as activation markers and thus to identify potential neurobiological mechanisms favouring catabolic processes or modulating food intake in rats suffering from cancer-related anorexia-cachexia. Neurons in forebrain structures showing most pronounced induction of Fos proteins were further identified neurochemically. To provoke anorexia-cachexia, cultured Morris hepatoma 7777 cells were injected subcutaneously in Buffalo rats. This resulted in a slowly growing tumour inducing ≈7% body weight loss and a 20% reduction in food intake when the tumour represented 1-2% of body mass. Anorexia-cachexia in these animals was found to be accompanied by Fos induction in several hypothalamic nuclei including the paraventricular and ventromedial hypothalamus, in the parastrial nucleus, the amygdala, the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, ventral striatal structures and the piriform and somatosensory cortices. Neurochemical identification revealed that the vast majority of FosB-positive neurons in the nucleus accumbens, ventral caudate-putamen and other ventral striatal structures contained prodynorphin or proenkephalin mRNA. These findings indicate that forebrain structures that are part of neuronal networks modulating catabolic pathways and food ingestion are activated during tumour-associated anorexia-cachexia and may contribute to the lack of compensatory eating in response to weight loss characterizing this syndrome. © 2005 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies.

  • 7. Konsman, J.P.
    et al.
    Luheshi, G.N.
    INSERM U394, Neurobiologie Intégrative, Institut François Magendie, Rue Camille Saint-Saëns, 33077 Bordeaux Cedex, France.
    Bluthe, R.-M.
    Bluthé, R.-M., INSERM U394, Neurobiologie Intégrative, Institut François Magendie, Rue Camille Saint-Saëns, 33077 Bordeaux Cedex, France.
    Dantzer, R.
    Douglas Hospital Research Center, 6875, Boulevard LaSalle, Verdun, Que. H4H 1R3, Canada.
    The vagus nerve mediates behavioural depression, but not fever, in response to peripheral immune signals, a functional anatomical analysis2000In: European Journal of Neuroscience, ISSN 0953-816X, E-ISSN 1460-9568, Vol. 12, no 12, p. 4434-4446Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cytokines act on the brain to induce fever and behavioural depression after infection. Although several mechanisms of cytokine-to-brain communication have been proposed, their physiological significance is unclear. We propose that behavioural depression is mediated by the vagus nerve activating limbic structures, while fever would primarily be due to humoral mechanisms affecting the preoptic area, including interleukin-6 (IL-6) action on the organum vasculosum of the laminae terminalis (OVLT) and induction of prostaglandins. This study assessed the effects of subdiaphragmatic vagotomy in rats on fever, behavioural depression, as measured by the social interaction test, and Fos expression in the brain. These responses were compared with induction of the prostaglandin-producing enzyme cyclooxygenase-2 and the transcription factor Stat3 that translocates after binding of IL-6. Vagotomy blocked behavioural depression after intraperitoneal injection of recombinant rat IL-1ß (25 µg/kg) or lipopolysaccharide (250 µg/kg, LPS) and prevented Fos expression in limbic structures and ventromedial preoptic area, but not in the OVLT. Fever was not affected by vagotomy, but associated with translocation of Stat3 in the OVLT and cyclooxygenase-2 induction around blood vessels. These results indicate that the recently proposed vagal link between the immune system and the brain activates limbic structures to induce behavioural depression after abdominal inflammation. Although the vagus might play a role in fever in response to low doses of LPS by activating the ventromedial preoptic area, it is likely to be overridden during more severe infection by action of circulating IL-6 on the OVLT or prostaglandins induced along blood vessels of the preoptic area.

  • 8.
    Larsson, Max
    et al.
    Department of Experimental Medical Science, Division of Neuroscience, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Broman, Jonas
    Department of Experimental Medical Science, Division of Neuroscience, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Different basal levels of CaMKII phosphorylated at Thr286/287 at nociceptive and low-threshold primary afferent synapses.2005In: European Journal of Neuroscience, ISSN 0953-816X, E-ISSN 1460-9568, Vol. 21, no 9, p. 2445-2458Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Postsynaptic autophosphorylation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) at Thr286/287 is crucial for the induction of long-term potentiation at many glutamatergic synapses, and has also been implicated in the persistence of synaptic potentiation. However, the availability of CaMKII phosphorylated at Thr286/287 at individual glutamatergic synapses in vivo is unclear. We used post-embedding immunogold labelling to quantitatively analyse the ultrastructural localization of CaMKII phosphorylated at Thr286/287 (pCaMKII) at synapses formed by presumed nociceptive and low-threshold mechanosensitive primary afferent nerve endings in laminae I-IV of rat spinal cord. Immunogold labelling was enriched in the postsynaptic densities of such synapses, consistent with observations in pre-embedding immunoperoxidase-stained dorsal horn. Presynaptic axoplasm also exhibited sparse immunogold labelling, in peptidergic terminals partly associated with dense core vesicles. Analysis of single or serial pCaMKII-immunolabelled sections indicated that the large majority of synapses formed either by presumed peptidergic or non-peptidergic nociceptive primary afferent terminals in laminae I-II of the spinal cord, or by presumed low-threshold mechanosensitive primary afferent terminals in laminae IIi-IV, contained pCaMKII in their postsynaptic density. However, the postsynaptic levels of pCaMKII immunolabelling at low-threshold primary afferent synapses were only approximately 50% of those at nociceptive synapses. These results suggest that constitutively autophosphorylated CaMKII in the postsynaptic density is a common characteristic of glutamatergic synapses, thus potentially contributing to maintenance of synaptic efficacy. Furthermore, pCaMKII appears to be differentially regulated between high- and low-threshold primary afferent synapses, possibly reflecting different susceptibility to synaptic plasticity between these afferent pathways.

  • 9. Magnusson, AK
    et al.
    Tham, Richard
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery .
    The GABA-b antagonist CGP 36742 has decompensatory effects on vestibulo-oculomotor behaviour in pigmented rats with a unilateral vestibular lesion.2000In: European Journal of Neuroscience, ISSN 0953-816X, E-ISSN 1460-9568, Vol. 12, p. 143-143Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Rybnikova, Elena
    et al.
    Pavlov Institute of Physiology RAS, St. Petersburg, Russia .
    Damdimopoulos, A. E.
    Department of Biosciences, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden .
    Gustafsson, Jan-Åke
    Department of Biosciences, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden .
    Spyrou, Giannis
    Department of Biosciences, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden .
    Pelto-Huikko, M.
    Tampere University Medical School and Department of Pathology, Tampere University Hospital, Finland.
    Expression of novel antioxidant thioredoxin-2 in the rat brain2000In: European Journal of Neuroscience, ISSN 0953-816X, E-ISSN 1460-9568, Vol. 12, no 5, p. 1669-1678Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thioredoxins are a class of small redox-regulating proteins that have been implicated in the control of various aspects of cellular functions and seem to be one of the key regulators of signalling in the cellular responses to various stresses. Thioredoxin-2 (Trx2) is a novel mammalian thioredoxin which, in contrast to previously known cytosolic thioredoxin (Trx1), has been localized to the mitochondria. Trx2 is abundantly expressed in skeletal muscle, heart and adrenal gland, as well as in some other peripheral tissues with high metabolic activity. Using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, we have studied the distribution and regulation of Trx2 expression in the rat brain. Trx2 mRNA and protein are highly expressed in the neurons in several brain regions, including the olfactory bulb, frontal cortex, hippocampus, some hypothalamic and thalamic nuclei, cerebellum and numerous brainstem nuclei. In addition, the Trx2 mRNA expression in paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus and reticular thalamic nucleus was found to be sensitive to peripheral glucocorticoids, as dexamethasone treatment caused significant elevation of Trx2 mRNA level in this area. No changes in other brain areas were observed after dexamethasone treatment. These findings implicate a significant regulatory and/or protective function of Trx2 in the nervous system.

  • 11.
    Signoret, Carine
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Gaudrain, Etienne
    Centre for the Neural Basis of Hearing, Department of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.
    Perrin, Fabien
    Auditory Cognition and Psychoacoustics.
    Similarities in the neural signature for the processing of behaviorally categorized and uncategorized speech sounds2013In: European Journal of Neuroscience, ISSN 0953-816X, E-ISSN 1460-9568, Vol. 37, no 5, p. 777-785Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent human behavioral studies have shown semantic and/or lexical processing for stimuli presented below the auditory perceptionthreshold. Here, we investigated electroencephalographic responses to words, pseudo-words and complex sounds, in conditionswhere phonological and lexical categorizations were behaviorally successful (categorized stimuli) or unsuccessful(uncategorized stimuli). Data showed a greater decrease in low-beta power at left-hemisphere temporal electrodes for categorizednon-lexical sounds (complex sounds and pseudo-words) than for categorized lexical sounds (words), consistent with the signatureof a failure in lexical access. Similar differences between lexical and non-lexical sounds were observed for uncategorized stimuli,although these stimuli did not yield evoked potentials or theta activity. The results of the present study suggest that behaviorallyuncategorized stimuli were processed at the lexical level, and provide evidence of the neural bases of the results observed in previousbehavioral studies investigating auditory perception in the absence of stimulus awareness.

  • 12. Watanabe, Futoshi
    et al.
    Kirkegaard, Mette
    Matsumoto, Suguru
    Gont, Cecilia
    Mannström, Paula
    Ulfendahl, Mats
    Fridberger, Anders
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Signaling through erbB receptors is a critical functional regulator in the mature cochlea2010In: European Journal of Neuroscience, ISSN 0953-816X, E-ISSN 1460-9568, Vol. 32, no 5, p. 717-724Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Noise, ototoxic substances and various genetic factors are common causes of profound hearing loss. Cochlear implants can often restore hearing in these cases, but only if a sufficient number of responsive auditory nerve fibers remain. Over time, these nerve fibers degenerate in the damaged ear, and it is therefore important to establish factors that control neuronal survival and maintain neural excitability. Recent studies show that neuregulins and their receptors are important for survival and proper targeting of neurons in the developing inner ear. A role for neuregulins as maintainers of the neuronal population in the mature inner ear was therefore hypothesized. Here, this hypothesis was directly tested by chronic local application of substances that block neuregulin receptors. Using auditory brainstem response measurements, we demonstrate that such receptor block leads to a progressive hearing impairment that develops over the course of weeks. This impairment occurs despite a normal number of auditory neurons and preserved outer hair cell function. Real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction shows alterations in neurotrophin-3 expression, suggesting that this growth factor participates in regulating cochlear sensitivity. The present work demonstrates the critical importance of neuregulin/erbB signaling in long-term functional regulation in the mature guinea pig hearing organ.

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