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  • 1. Blomqvist, P
    et al.
    Lycke, J
    Strang, Peter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Palliative mediicin. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, ViN, LAH Linnea.
    Törnqvist, H
    Ekbom, A
    Brain tumours in Sweden 1996: care and costs.2000In: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, ISSN 0022-3050, E-ISSN 1468-330X, Vol. 69, p. 792-798Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Burman, Joachim
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden; University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden.
    Iacobaeus, Ellen
    Karolinska Institute Solna, Sweden.
    Svenningsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Sweden; University Hospital Northern Sweden, Sweden.
    Lycke, Jan
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Gunnarsson, Martin
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden; University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Petra
    Skåne University Hospital Lund, Sweden.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Fredrikson, Sten
    Karolinska Institute Huddinge, Sweden.
    Martin, Claes
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Sandstedt, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Uggla, Bertil
    University of Örebro, Sweden; Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Lenhoff, Stig
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Johansson, Jan-Erik
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Isaksson, Cecilia
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Hagglund, Hans
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden.
    Carlson, Kristina
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden.
    Fagius, Jan
    Uppsala University, Sweden; University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden.
    Autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation for aggressive multiple sclerosis: the Swedish experience2014In: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, ISSN 0022-3050, E-ISSN 1468-330X, Vol. 85, no 10, p. 1116-1121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a viable option for treatment of aggressive multiple sclerosis (MS). No randomised controlled trial has been performed, and thus, experiences from systematic and sustained follow-up of treated patients constitute important information about safety and efficacy. In this observational study, we describe the characteristics and outcome of the Swedish patients treated with HSCT for MS. Methods Neurologists from the major hospitals in Sweden filled out a follow-up form with prospectively collected data. Fifty-two patients were identified in total; 48 were included in the study and evaluated for safety and side effects; 41 patients had at least 1 year of follow-up and were further analysed for clinical and radiological outcome. In this cohort, 34 patients (83%) had relapsing-remitting MS, and mean follow-up time was 47 months. Results At 5 years, relapse-free survival was 87%; MRI event-free survival 85%; expanded disability status scale (EDSS) score progression-free survival 77%; and disease-free survival (no relapses, no new MRI lesions and no EDSS progression) 68%. Presence of gadolinium-enhancing lesions prior to HSCT was associated with a favourable outcome (disease-free survival 79% vs 46%, p=0.028). There was no mortality. The most common long-term side effects were herpes zoster reactivation (15%) and thyroid disease (8.4%). Conclusions HSCT is a very effective treatment of inflammatory active MS and can be performed with a high degree of safety at experienced centres.

  • 3. Cucchiara, B
    et al.
    Kasner, SE
    Wolk, DA
    Lyden, PD
    Knappertz, VA
    Ashwood, T
    Odergren, T
    Nordlund, Anders
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, National Centre for Work and Rehabilitation.
    Lack of hemispheric dominance for consciousness in acute ischaemic stroke2003In: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, ISSN 0022-3050, E-ISSN 1468-330X, Vol. 74, no 7, p. 889-892Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Previous reports have suggested left hemispheric dominance for maintaining consciousness, although there is controversy over this claim. Objective: To compare early impairment of level of consciousness between patients with right and left hemispheric stroke. Methods: Data from 564 patients with ischaemic stroke enrolled in the placebo arm of a trial of a putative neuroprotectant were analysed. All patients had major hemispheric stroke with cortical dysfunction, visual field deficit, and limb weakness, with symptom onset within 12 hours of enrolment. Patients were prospectively evaluated on a predefined scale (1-6, 1 = fully awake, higher scores representing greater impairment) to measure level of consciousness at multiple time points over the initial 24 hours after presentation. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) stroke scale score at presentation and infarct volume at 30 days were determined. Results: Some degree of impairment in level of consciousness was observed in 409 of the 564 patients (73%). Median maximum sedation score was 2 for both right and left hemispheric stroke (p = 0.91). Mean sedation score over 24 hours was 1.5 for both right and left stroke (p = 0.75). There was no difference between level of consciousness scores in right and left stroke at any individual time point during the 24 hour monitoring period. No association between side and impairment in level of consciousness was seen after adjustment for stroke severity and infarct volume. Conclusions: In contrast to previous reports, there was no evidence for hemispheric dominance for consciousness in the setting of a major hemispheric stroke.

  • 4.
    Fytagoridis, Anders
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Sandvik, Ulrika
    Umeå University.
    Åström, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Bergenheim, Tommy
    Umeå University.
    Blomstedt, Patric
    Umeå University.
    Long term follow-up of deep brain stimulation of the caudal zona incerta for essential tremor2012In: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, ISSN 0022-3050, E-ISSN 1468-330X, Vol. 83, no 3, p. 258-262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose The ventral intermediate nucleus of thalamus is the standard target for deep brain stimulation (DBS) in essential tremor (ET). However, favourable data have recently highlighted the caudal zona incerta (cZi) as an alternative target. Reports concerning the long-term results are however lacking, and we have therefore evaluated the long-term effects in our patients with ET and cZi DBS. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods 18 patients were evaluated using the Essential Tremor Rating Scale (ETRS) before and on-/off-stimulation at 1 and 3-5 years after surgery (mean 48.5+/-10.6 months). Two patients were operated on bilaterally but all electrodes were evaluated separately. The stimulation parameters were recorded and the stimulation strength calculated. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults A baseline total ETRS mean score of 46.0 decreased to 21.9 (52.4%) at the final evaluation. On the treated side, tremor of the upper extremity (item 5 or 6) improved from 6.1 to 0.5 (91.8%) and hand function (items 11-14) improved from 9.3 to 2.0 (78.0%). Activities of daily living improved by 65.8%. There was no increase in stimulation strength over time. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion cZi DBS is a safe and effective treatment for the long term suppression of ET.

  • 5. Gray, L J
    et al.
    Sprigg, N
    Bath, P M W
    Sörensen, P
    Lindenström, E
    Boysen, G
    De Deyn, P P
    Friis, P
    Leys, D
    Marttila, R
    Olsson, Jan-Edvin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    O´Neill, D
    Ringelstein, B
    van der Sande, J-J
    Turpie, A G G
    Significant variation in mortality and functional outcome after acute ischaemic stroke between western countries: Data from the tinzaparin in acute ischaemic stroke trial (TAIST)2006In: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, ISSN 0022-3050, E-ISSN 1468-330X, Vol. 77, no 3, p. 327-333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The medical care of patients with acute stroke varies considerably between countries. This could lead to measurable differences in mortality and functional outcome. Objective: To compare case mix, clinical management, and functional outcome in stroke between 11 countries. Methods: All 1484 patients from 11 countries who were enrolled into the tinzaparin in acute ischaemic stroke trial (TAIST) were included in this substudy. Information collected prospectively on demographics, risk factors, clinical features, measures of service quality (for example, admission to a stroke unit), and outcome were assessed. Outcomes were adjusted for treatment assignment, case mix, and service relative to the British Isles. Results: Differences in case mix (mostly minor) and clinical service (many of prognostic relevance) were present between the countries. Significant differences in outcome were present between the countries. When assessed by geographical region, death or dependency were lower in North America (odds ratio (OR) adjusted for treatment group only = 0.52 (95% confidence interval, 0.39 to 0.71) and north west Europe (OR = 0.54 (0.37 to 0.78)) relative to the British Isles, similar reductions were found when adjustments were made for 11 case mix variables and five service quality measures. Similarly, case fatality rates were lower in North America (OR = 0.44 (0.30 to 0.66)) and Scandinavia (OR = 0.50 (0.33 to 0.74)) relative to the British Isles, whether crude or adjusted for case mix and service quality. Conclusions: Both functional outcome and case fatality vary considerably between countries, even when adjusted for prognostic case mix variables and measures of good stroke care. Differing health care systems and the management of patients with acute stroke may contribute to these findings.

  • 6.
    Isaksson, A.-K.
    et al.
    Department of Caring Sciences, University of Örebro, S-701 82 Örebro, Sweden, Department of Caring Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ahlstrom, G.
    Department of Caring Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Gunnarsson, L.-G.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Quality of life and impairment in patients with multiple sclerosis2005In: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, ISSN 0022-3050, E-ISSN 1468-330X, Vol. 76, no 1, p. 64-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aims of this study were to describe the quality of life in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) given immunological treatment and in those not given immunological treatment and to investigate the relationship between impairment and quality of life. Methods: Twenty nine patients given immunological treatment were matched with the same number of patients not given such treatment. Matching variables were sex, Kurtzke's Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS), years since diagnosis, and age (total n = 58). The patients were interviewed using the self-reported impairment checklist and they answered two questionnaires on quality of life, the 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) and the Subjective -Estimation of Quality of Life (SQoL). Results: The self-reported impairment checklist captured a more differentiated picture of the patients' symptoms of MS than the EDSS. Health related quality of life was markedly reduced, while the subjective quality of life was less affected. There was a stronger association between self-reported ratings of impairment and health related quality of life on the SF-36 than between impairment and global ratings of quality of life on the SQoL. Subjective quality of life on the SQoL was not directly dependent on impairment expressed in physical limitations. There were no statistically significant differences between the treated and untreated groups. A non-significant trend towards better health related quality of life was found in favour of the treated group with respect to emotional role, physical role, and social function on the SF-36. Conclusions: The self-reported impairment checklist and SF-36 proved to be valuable complements to the well established EDSS in describing the diverse symptoms of MS. Measuring both health related quality of life and subjective wellbeing provides valuable knowledge about the consequences of MS.

  • 7. Kristensen, B.
    et al.
    Malm, J.
    Fagerlund, M.
    Hiettala, S-O.
    Johansson, B.
    Ekstedt, J.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Regional cerebral blood-flow in the adult hydrocephalus syndrom1996In: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, ISSN 0022-3050, E-ISSN 1468-330X, Vol. 60, p. 282-288Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Kümhe, Tobias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Thoracic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Franzén, Stefan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Thoracic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    The simple solution to a complex case2001In: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, ISSN 0022-3050, E-ISSN 1468-330X, Vol. 70, no 2, p. 263-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9. Landén, M
    et al.
    Thorsell, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wallin, A
    Blennow, K
    The apolipoprotein E allele epsilon 4 does not correlate with the number of senile plaques or neurofibrillary tangles in patients with Alzheimer's disease.1996In: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, ISSN 0022-3050, E-ISSN 1468-330X, Vol. 61, no 4, p. 352-256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Apolipoprotein E (apoE) has been implicated in regenerative processes in the brain after trauma, as well as in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Inheritance of a specific apo epsilon allele (apo epsilon 4) determines in part the risk and the mean age at onset of Alzheimer's disease. ApoE has been found to bind isoform specifically to beta-amyloid protein, the major component of senile plaques, and to the microtubule associated protein tau, which forms paired helical filaments and neurofibrillary tangles. The aim was to further examine the relation between apo epsilon alleles, especially apo epsilon 4, and the development of neuropathological changes associated with Alzheimer's disease.

    METHODS: Brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease (n = 44) and vascular dementia (n = 11) and of age matched controls (n = 29) were studied. Senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the hippocampus and frontal cortex were quantified.

    RESULTS: No correlation was found between the number of apo epsilon 4 alleles and the number of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the hippocampus or the frontal cortex of patients with Alzheimer's disease, or vascular dementia, or control groups. No significant differences in duration or severity of dementia were found between patients with or. without the apo epsilon 4 allele. No increased frequency of apo epsilon 4 was found in vascular dementia. CONCLUSION AND COMMENT: Although the apo epsilon genotype clearly affects whether Alzheimer's disease will develop or not, the present study suggests that it has no influence on pathology or clinical intellectual status, once the dementia has manifested itself. No increased apo epsilon 4 allele frequency was found in neuropathologically diagnosed patients with vascular dementia in whom concomitant Alzheimer's disease can be excluded.

  • 10.
    Lundin, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Tisell, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tullberg, M.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Wikkelso, C.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Leijon, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Reduced thalamic N-acetylaspartate in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus: a controlled (1)H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy study of frontal deep white matter and the thalamus using absolute quantification2011In: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, ISSN 0022-3050, E-ISSN 1468-330X, Vol. 82, no 7, p. 772-778Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (INPH) frequently have a reduction in cerebral blood flow in the subcortical frontal lobe/basal ganglia/thalamic areas. With magnetic resonance spectroscopy, the metabolism in the brain can be examined. The aim of this study was to investigate if there was a compromised metabolism in the thalamus and in the subcortical frontal areas in INPH patients. This was done by measuring total creatine, myo-inositol, total choline, N-acetylaspartate (NAA), total N-acetylaspartate (tNA), glutamate and lactate levels. A comparison was made with healthy individuals (HI). Subjects and methods 16 patients (nine males, seven females, mean age 74 years, range 49-83) diagnosed as INPH and 15 HI (nine males, six females, mean age 74 years, range 62-89) were examined. 1 H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1.5 T, point-resolved spectroscopy, echo time/relaxation time 30/3000 ms, volume of interest 2.5-3 ml) was performed in frontal deep white matter and in the thalamus. Absolute quantification with internal water as a reference was used. Results INPH patients had lower NAA (p = 0.02) and lower tNA (p = 0.05) concentrations in the thalamus compared with HI. NAA and tNA in the frontal deep white matter did not differ between patients and HI. The absolute metabolic concentrations of total creatine, myoinositol total choline, tNA, lactate and Cr ratios in frontal deep white matter and in the thalamus were similar in INPH patients and HI. Conclusion Reduced thalamic NAA and tNA in INPH patients suggest a compromised metabolic neuronal function in these regions. Thus, the thalamus might have an important role in the pathogenesis of INPH.

  • 11.
    Lundin, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Tisell, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Leijon, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Davidsson, Leif
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Grönqvist, Anders
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics.
    Wikkelso, Carsten
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Preoperative and postoperative H-1-MR spectroscopy changes in frontal deep white matter and the thalamus in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus2013In: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, ISSN 0022-3050, E-ISSN 1468-330X, Vol. 84, no 2, p. 188-193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background In a previous study we found significantly decreased N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) and total N-acetyl (tNA) groups in the thalamus of patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) compared with healthy individuals (HI). No significant difference between the groups could be found in the frontal deep white matter (FDWM). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanObjective The primary aim of this study was to investigate if these metabolites in the thalamus were normalised after shunt surgery. The secondary aim was to investigate postoperative metabolic changes in FDWM. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanSubjects and methods Fourteen patients with iNPH, mean age 74 years, and 15 HI, also mean age 74 years, were examined. Assessment of a motor score (MOSs) was performed before and after shunt surgery. Absolute quantitative H-1-MR spectroscopy (1.5 T, volumes of interest 2.5-3 ml) was performed on the patients in the FDWM and in the thalamus, before and 3 months after shunt surgery, and also once on the HI. The following metabolites were analysed: tNA, NAA, total creatine, total choline (tCho), myo-inositol (mIns), glutamate and lactate concentrations. MRI volumetric calculations of the lateral ventricles were also performed. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults At 3 months postoperatively, we found no significant changes of tNA or NAA in the thalamus. In contrast, in the FDWM, there was a significant increase of tCho (p=0.01) and a borderline significant decrease of mIns (p=0.06). 12/14 patients were shunt responders (motor function). Median reduction of the lateral ventricle was 16%. A weak correlation between MOS and ventricular reduction was seen. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions Normalisation of thalamic tNA and NAA could not be detected postoperatively. The increased tCho and decreased mIns in the FDWM postoperatively might relate to clinical improvement.

  • 12. Sjögren, M
    et al.
    Davidsson, P
    Tullberg, M
    Minthon, L
    Wallin, A
    Wikkelso, C
    Granérus, Ann-Kathrine
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Geriatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MC - Medicincentrum, Geriatrik-LAH.
    Vanderstichele, H
    Vanmechelen, E
    Blennow, K
    Both total and phosphorylated tau are increased in Alzheimer's disease2001In: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, ISSN 0022-3050, E-ISSN 1468-330X, Vol. 70, no 5, p. 624-630Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background - Pathological tau protein concentrations in CSF are found in both Alzheimer's disease (AD) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD), but studies on brain tissue have suggested that the tau pathology in AD differs from that in FTD and that the difference may be related to the degree of phosphorylation. As CSF tau protein is increased after stroke, tau may also be implicated in the pathophysiology of vascular dementia, of which subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy (SAE) is a putative subtype. Objectives - To investigate the nature of tau protein in CSF and the involvement of total CSF tau and phosphorylated CSF tau (phosphotau) in various types of dementia. Methods - Using ELISAs for total tau and tau phosphorylated at Thr181 (phosphotau), the CSF concentrations of total tau and phosphotau were determined in patients with probable and possible AD (n=41 and 19, respectively), FTD (n=18), SAE (n=17), and Parkinson's disease (PD, n= 15) and in age matched controls (n=17). All the antibodies stained the lower molecular weight bands, whereas only the antibodies that recognise phosphorylated tau stained the higher molecular bands. Results - Both CSF tau and CSF phosphotau were increased in probable AD compared with FTD (p<0.001), SAE (p<0.001), PD (p<0.001), and controls (p<0.001). CSF phosphotau was increased in possible AD compared with FTD (p<0.001) and SAE (p<0.001). CSF tau and CSF phosphotau were positively correlated in all the groups. Molecular weight forms of tau ranging from 25 kDa to 80 kDa were found in the CSF Conclusion - Both phosphorylated and unphosphorylated tau isoforms were present in the CSF, and tau protein appeared in both truncated and full length forms. The results suggest that the CSF concentrations of tau and phosphotau are increased in about two thirds of patients with probable AD and in half of those with possible AD but are normal in FTD, SAE, and PD compared with normal aging. Values in the normal range do not exclude AD.

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