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  • 1.
    Andreasson, Hakan
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Wanders, Alkwin
    Uppsala University.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Willen, Roger
    Uppsala University.
    Graf, Wilhelm
    Uppsala University.
    Nygren, Peter
    Uppsala University.
    Glimelius, Bengt
    Uppsala University.
    Zhang, Zhi-Yong
    Tangshan Gongren Hospital.
    Mahteme, Haile
    Uppsala University.
    Histopathological Classification of Pseudomyxoma Peritonei and the Prognostic Importance of PINCH Protein2012In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 1443-1448Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aims of this study were i) to assess a new and more detailed histopathological classification and to analyze concordance between pathologists in the histopathological classification of pseudomyxoma peritonei (PMP); ii) to analyze the expression in the stroma of the particularly interesting new cysteine-histidine (PINCH) protein and its prognostic importance in PMP. Materials and Methods: Surgical specimens from 81 patients, classified according to the Ronnett et al histopathological classification were compared to a new system with four groups ranging from indolent to aggressive growth patterns. PINCH protein expression was analyzed and was related to clinical variables. Results: The new four-group classification provided better prognostic information than the classification according to Ronnett et al. (p=0.04). Expression of the PINCH protein in the stroma was found in 83% of the cases and was associated with high tumor burden (p=0.002) and a poor prognosis (p=0.04). Conclusion: The proposed new PMP classification system may provide additional prognostic information. PINCH protein is expressed in PMP and has prognostic information.

  • 2. Carlsson, Maria
    et al.
    Strang, Peter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Palliative mediicin. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, ViN, LAH Linnea.
    Bjurström, Christina
    Treatment modality affects long-term quality of life in gyaecological cancer.2000In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 20, no 1B, p. 563-568Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to survey the side effects after cancer treatment, quality of life data were collected from females in clinical remission, Materials and Methods: The study was cross-sectional, every patient that visited the outpatient clinic during a period of thr ee months was asked to anonymously complete the EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaire and five additional specific questions related to gynaecological cancel: Results: In total, 235 patients (90%) returned the questionnaire In general, both the levels of functioning and symptomatology were time-dependent. Patients with short treatment-free intervals reported more problems than the others. When wing treatment modality as an independent variable in the statistical calculations, a treatment-related effect on functioning and symptomatology was demonstrated (p < 0.05 to p < 0.001). Patients previously treated with chemotherapy had poorer role- and cognitive functioning and mole problems with fatigue, nausea, vomiting, dyspnoea, constipation and financial problems, compared with those not treated with chemotherapy (p < 0.05 to p < 0.01). Those patients who had been treated with external radiotherapy and/or brachytherapy had significantly more problems with flatulence and diarrhoea (p < 0.05 to p < 0.001). In conclusion, patients who underwent treatment for gl gynaecological cancer reported long-term side effects also many years after finishing treatment. The problems where related to treatment modality which should be considered, especially when planning adjuvant treatment.

  • 3.
    Dimberg, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hugander, A
    Univ Jonkoping, Coll Hlth Sci, Dept Nat Sci & Biomed, S-55111 Jonkoping, Sweden Fac Hlth Sci, Div Cell Biol, Dept Biomed & Surg, Linkoping, Sweden Ryhov Cty Hosp, Dept Surg, Jonkoping, Sweden Karolinska Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Ctr Mol Med, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sirsjo, A
    Univ Jonkoping, Coll Hlth Sci, Dept Nat Sci & Biomed, S-55111 Jonkoping, Sweden Fac Hlth Sci, Div Cell Biol, Dept Biomed & Surg, Linkoping, Sweden Ryhov Cty Hosp, Dept Surg, Jonkoping, Sweden Karolinska Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Ctr Mol Med, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology.
    Enhanced expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and nuclear beta-catenin are related to mutations in the APC gene in human colorectal cancer2001In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 21, no 2A, p. 911-915Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mutational inactivation of the human tumour suppressor gene adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) results in constitutive activation of beta -catenin/T cell factor-4 (Tcf-4) mediated transcription of target genes. Up-regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein is frequently found in human colorectal cancer (CRC). We analysed 38 CRC for mutations in APC and beta -catenin and found an association between APC mutations and elevated COX-2 levels. Furthermore, APC mutations were predominantly observed in tumour tissues from the rectum compared to tumours of colonic origin. Western blot analysis revealed that nuclear beta -catenin levels were generally higher in tumours with APC mutations compared to tumours with wild type APC. However, there was also a higher level of nuclear beta -catenin in tumour compared to normal tissue, hut nuclear Tcf-4 protein was constitutively expressed in tumour and normal tissue and showed no differences. An identified putative Tcf-4 binding element in the COX-2 promoter may partly explain the enhanced level of COX-2 and support the idea that COX-2 may be a downstream target of the APC/beta -catenin/Tcf-4 pathway.

  • 4.
    Dimberg, Jan
    et al.
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Shamoun, Levar
    Reg Jonkoping Cty Hosp Ryhov, Sweden; Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Landerholm, Kalle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Andersson, Roland
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kolodziej, Blanka
    Reg Jonkoping Cty Hosp Ryhov, Sweden.
    Wagsater, Dick
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Genetic Variants of the IL2 Gene Related to Risk and Survival in Patients With Colorectal Cancer2019In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 39, no 9, p. 4933-4940Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Interleukin 2 (IL2) is a significant factor activating T-cell-mediated immune response by stimulation of natural killer cells, T-cells and in development of regulatory T (Treg) cells. Recent studies have that IL2 participates in cancer development by modifying the local immune response. Based on the suggested role of the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs2069762, rs6822844 and rs11938795 of IL2 in the pathogenesis of certain diseases, the relationship of these SNPs with clinicopathological variables and their possible implication for prognosis and disease outcome were evaluated in a cohort of Swedish patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). Materials and Methods: TaqMan SNP genotype assays based on polymerase chain reaction were used for analysis of the IL2 SNPs in 467 patients with CRC and 467 healthy controls. Expression analysis of IL2 in plasma and CRC tissue was also performed. Results: The allelic variants T in rs11938795 and G in rs6822844 were significantly associated with a higher risk of CRC. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that cancer-specific survival was worse for individuals with C allele for rs2069762 with stage II CRC and with T allele for rs6822844 with stage III CRC. Conclusion: SNPs rs2069762, rs6822844 and rs11938795 of the IL2 gene may be helpful as prognostic biomarkers in the follow-up and management of the patients.

  • 5.
    Elander, Nils
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of cell biology.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of cell biology.
    Fransén, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of cell biology.
    Martix metalloproteinase (MMP) -1, -2, -3 and -9 promoter polymorphisms in colorectal cancer2006In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 26, no 1 B, p. 791-795Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a group of matrix-degrading proteins implicated in several pathological processes, e.g., invasion and metastasis in malignant diseases such as colorectal cancer (CRC). Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty-seven CRC patients and 208 controls were genotyped for MMP-1, -2, -3 and -9 promoter polymorphisms. The genotyping was performed with PCR/primer-extension/DHPLC or PCR/RFLP. Results: The MMP-1 2G allele was significantly associated with CRC (p=0.037). No significant association between CRC and MMP-2, -3 or -9 polymorphisms was evident. The analysis of polymorphisms in the clinicopathological subgroups displayed no significant associations. Conclusion: The MMP-1 promoter polymorphism seems to affect the susceptibility to CRC, while MMP-2, -3 and -9 polymorphisms appear less likely to have any impact on CRC.

  • 6.
    Evertsson, Sofia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wallin, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Arbman, Gunnar
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Norrköping.
    Rütten, Sabine
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Emterling, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Zhang, Hong
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Dermatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Microsatellite instability and MBD4 mutation in unselected colorectal cancer2003In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 3569-3574Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: We investigated the prognostic significance of microsatellite instability (MSI) and the association with clinicopathological factors in colorectal cancer, and further identified MBD4 mutations and their clinicopathological significance.

    PATIENTS AND METHODS: MSI was analyzed in 201 colorectal cancers. Sequencing analysis of MBD4 was performed in 26 MSI and 28 microsatellite stable (MSS) tumors.

    RESULTS: Twenty-seven tumors (13.4%) were MSI but did not correlate with improved survival. MSI was significantly correlated with proximal colon tumors (p < 0.001), poor differentiation or mucinous type (p = 0.005) and multiple tumors (p = 0.04). MBD4 mutations were found in 15% MSI but not in MSS tumors. The mutated cases showed female overrepresentation, proximal site and poorly-differentiated/mucinous type.

    CONCLUSION: MSI was not correlated with survival, but shared other features associated with MSI in colorectal cancer as demonstrated by others. The clinicopathological variables associated with the MBD4 mutations were probably the reflection of MSI features.

  • 7.
    Falk, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Central County. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Self-estimation or Phototest Measurement of Skin UV Sensitivity and its Association with Peoples Attitudes Towards Sun Exposure2014In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 797-803Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Fitzpatrick's classification is the most common way of assessing skin UV sensitivity. The study aim was to investigate how self-estimated and actual UV sensitivity, as measured by phototest, are associated with attitudes towards sunbathing and the propensity to increase sun protection, as well as the correlation between self-estimated and actual UV sensitivity.

    PATIENTS AND METHODS:

    A total of 166 primary healthcare patients filled-out a questionnaire investigating attitudes towards sunbathing and the propensity to increase sun protection. They reported their skin type according to Fitzpatrick, and a UV sensitivity phototest was performed.

    RESULTS:

    Self-rated low UV sensitivity (skin type III-VI) was associated with a more positive attitude towards sunbathing and a lower propensity to increase sun protection, compared to high UV sensitivity. The correlation between the two methods was weak.

    CONCLUSION:

    The findings might indicate that individuals with a perceived low but in reality high UV sensitivity do not seek adequate sun protection with regard to skin cancer risk. Furthermore, the poor correlation between self-reported and actual UV sensitivity, measured by phototest, makes the clinical use of Fitzpatrick's classification questionable.

  • 8.
    Falk, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Olsen Faresjö, Åshild
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Faresjö, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sun Exposure Habits and Health Risk-related Behaviours Among Individuals with Previous History of Skin Cancer2013In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 631-638Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to investigate possible associations between UV exposure and other health risk behaviours in different social environments and in regard to previous history of skin cancer. Patients and Methods: In two closely-located, equally-sized cities in Sweden, representing different social environments (blue collar and white collar), patients aged 55-69 years, diagnosed with skin cancer (study group, n=489) or seborrhoeic keratosis (control group, n=664), were identified through a regional Health Care Register, and were given a questionnaire mapping for sun habits, tobacco smoking, alcohol use, and physical activity. Results: A previous history of skin cancer was associated with reduced UV exposure (pandlt;0.01) and increased UV protection (pandlt;0.00.1), higher alcohol consumption (pandlt;0.05), and higher level of physical activity (pandlt;0.05). Smoking was more common among subjects frequently sunbathing and rarely using sunscreen, but frequent sunbathing was positively associated with physical activity (pandlt;0.05). Daily smoking and risky drinking habits were more common in the blue collar social environment, while no differences were seen for sun habits in this respect. Conclusion: A previous history of skin cancer appears to promote increased UV protection. In contrast to alcohol/smoking habits, no association between social environment and sun habits was found.

  • 9.
    Flejmer, Anna M.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Dohlmar, Frida
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences.
    Nilsson, Mats
    Futurum - Academy for Health and Care, Jönköping.
    Stenmarker, Margaretha
    Futurum - Academy for Health and Care, Jönköping.
    Dasu, Alexandru
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences.
    Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm versus Pencil Beam Convolution for treatment planning of breast cancer: implications for target coverage and radiation burden of normal tissue2015In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 35, no 5, p. 2841-2848Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The present study aimed to investigate the implications of using the analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) for calculation of target coverage and radiation burden of normal tissues. Most model parameters, recommendations and planning guidelines associated with a certain outcome are from the era of pencil beam convolution (PBC) calculations on relatively simple assumptions of energy transport in media. Their relevance for AAA calculations that predict more realistic dose distributions needs to be evaluated. Patients and Methods: Forty patients with left-sided breast cancer receiving 3D conformal radiation therapy were planned using PBC with a standard protocol with 50 Gy in 25 fractions according to existing re-commendations. The plans were subsequently recalculated with the AAA and relevant dose parameters were determined and compared to their PBC equivalents. Results: The majority of the AAA-based plans had a significantly worse coverage of the planning target volume and also a higher maximum dose in hotspots near sensitive structures, suggesting that these criteria could be relaxed for AAA-calculated plans. Furthermore, the AAA predicts higher volumes of the ipsilateral lung will receive doses below 25 Gy and smaller volume doses above 25 Gy. These results indicate that lung tolerance criteria might also have to be relaxed for AAA planning in order to maintain the level of normal tissue toxicity. The AAA also predicts lower doses to the heart, thus indicating that this organ might be more sensitive to radiation than thought from PBC-based calculations. Conclusion: The AAA should be preferred over the PBC algorithm for breast cancer radiotherapy as it gives more realistic dose distributions. Guidelines for plan acceptance might have to be re-evaluated to account for differences in dose predictions in order to maintain the current levels of control and complication rates. The results also suggest an increased radiosensitivity of the heart, thus indicating that a revision of the current models for cardiovascular complications may be needed.

  • 10.
    Flejmer, Anna M.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Josefsson, Dan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Nilsson, Mats
    Futurum - Academy for Health and Care, Jönköping.
    Stenmarker, Margaretha
    Futurum - Academy for Health and Care, Jönköping.
    Dasu, Alexandru
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Clinical implications of the ISC technique for breast cancer radiotherapy and comparison with clinical recommendations2014In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 34, no 7, p. 3563-3568Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The project studied the implications of using the irregular surface compensator (ISC) technique in comparison to three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) for breast cancer treatment. ISC is an electronic compensation algorithm that modulates the fluence across the radiation fields to compensate for irregularly shaped surfaces and deliver a homogeneous dose to a compensation plane. Methods: Ten breast cancer patients (five left- and five right-sided) were planned with both techniques. The planning was done for 50 Gy in 25 fractions with 2 Gy per fraction in all patients. Physical parameters such as doses to the clinical target volume (CTV-T) and the planned target volume (PTV), heterogeneity index and doses to lung and heart were determined and compared for the treatment plans. Results: The ISC technique led to significantly better coverage of the CTV-T and PTV in almost all patients with statistically significant better homogeneity of the dose distribution. The contralateral lung and the heart receive the same doses with both ISC and 3D-CRT plans. However, ISC showed a trend towards decreasing the volumes of the ipsilateral lung irradiated with high doses. Consequently this led to better compliance with the national recommendations for breast radiotherapy. Conclusion: The ISC technique leads to an improvement of the target coverage and the radiation burden of the ipsilateral lung thus allowing better compliance with the national recommendations and increasing the potential for improved quality of life for breast cancer patients. It should therefore be preferred over 3D-CRT for breast cases with difficult dose homogeneity to the PTV or CTV-T.

  • 11.
    Fowler, Jack F.
    et al.
    University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, WI, USA.
    Toma-Dasu, Iuliana
    Stockholm University and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Dasu, Alexandru
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences.
    Is the α/β ratio for prostate tumours really low and does it vary with the level of risk at diagnosis?2013In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 1009-1011Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To answer the questions: Is the α/β ratio (radiosensitivity to size of dose-per-fraction) really low enough to justify using a few large dose fractions instead of the traditional many small doses? Does this parameter vary with prognostic risk factors? Methods and Materials: Three large statistical overviews are critiqued, with results for 5,000, 6,000 and 14,000 patients with prostate carcinoma, respectively. Results: These major analyses agree in finding the average α/β ratio to be less than 2 Gy: 1.55 (95% confidence interval=0.46-4.52), 1.4 (0.9-2.2), and the third analysis 1.7 (1.4-2.2) by ASTRO and 1.6 (1.2-2.2) by Phoenix criteria. All agree that α/β values do not vary significantly with the low, intermediate, high and “all included” risk factors. Conclusion: The high sensitivity to dose-per-fraction is an intrinsic property of prostate carcinomas and this supports the use of hypofractionation to increase the therapeutic gain for these tumours with dose-volume modelling to reduce the risk of late complications in rectum and bladder.

  • 12.
    Heedman, Per-Anders
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Strang, Peter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Palliative mediicin. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, ViN, LAH Linnea.
    Symptom assessment in advanced palliative home care for cancer patients using the ESAS: Clinical aspects2001In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 21, no 6 A, p. 4077-4082Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Four hundred and thirty-one cancer patients were assessed with the ESAS and a VAS-QoL at admission to Hospital-based home care (HBHC) and subsequently. Results: Pain and nausea were well-controlled (mean 2.5 and 1.8) whereas patients were less satisfied with appetite, activity and sense of well-being. Dyspnoea and anxiety (lung cancer, p<0.001 and p<0.01) and pain (prostate cancer, p<0.01), were related to diagnosis while activity, drowsiness, appetite and well-being to survival (p<0.05 to p<0.001). The correlations between individual symptoms and well-being were low (0.2-0.5), whereas the correlation between well-being and the Symptom Distress Score (SDS) was 0.76. "Well-being" was a better word to use than QoL. Discussion: ESAS is useful in HBHC and data show that symptoms other than merely pain and nausea are of importance. As the global measurement (one VAS) of well-being has a high correlation with SDS, this single measurement may be clinically adequate for quality assurance of symptom control in dying cancer patients.

  • 13.
    Holgersson, Georg
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Sandelin, Martin
    Uppsala University.
    Hoye, Even
    Gävle Central Hospital.
    Bergström, Stefan
    Gävle Central Hospital.
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University Hospital.
    Ekman, Simon
    Uppsala University.
    Nyman, Jan
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg.
    Helsing, Martin
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Friesland, Signe
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Brodin, Ola
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Holgersson, Margareta
    Uppsala University.
    Lamberg Lundström, Kristina
    Uppsala University.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University.
    Ekberg, Lars
    Malmö University Hospital.
    Mörth, Charlotte
    Mälar Hospital, Eskilstuna.
    Blystad, Thomas
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Ewers, Sven-Börje
    Lund University Hospital.
    Loden, Britta
    Central Hospital Karlstad.
    Bergqvist, Michael
    Uppsala University.
    The Value of Induction Chemotherapy for Survival in Patients with Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Treated with Radiotherapy2012In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 1339-1346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to retrospectively investigate the impact of induction chemotherapy on treatment outcome in patients treated with curatively intended radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods: Patients with a diagnosed NSCLC that have been subjected to curatively intended irradiation (andgt;= 50 Gy) and treated in an oncology department in Sweden during the years 1990-2000 were included in the study. Operated patients and patients having received concomitant chemotherapy were excluded. The included patients were localised by a manual search of all the oncology departments medical records and radiation charts. Results: Patients treated with induction chemotherapy (n=79) had a significantly better overall survival compared with patients treated with radiotherapy alone (p=0.0097) in a univariate Cox regression analysis. A platinum/taxane combination produced the greatest survival benefit; hazard ratio=0.49 (95% confidence interval=0.31 to 0.75). Conclusion: We found that patients treated with induction chemotherapy in addition to radiotherapy for NSCLC have a better overall survival than patients treated with radiotherapy alone and that the best results are achieved using a platinum/taxane combination.

  • 14.
    Jakobsson, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Palliative mediicin.
    Strang, Peter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Palliative mediicin. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, ViN, LAH Linnea.
    Fentanyl patches for the treatment of pain in dying cancer patients.1999In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 19, p. 4441-4442Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Jerevall, Piiha-Lotta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ahmadi, Ahmad
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bergman, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Wingren, Sten
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of cell biology.
    Sulfotransferase1A1 and risk of postmenopausal breast cancer2005In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 25, no 3 C, p. 2515-2517Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The detoxification enzyme sulfotransferase1A1 (SULT1A1) is implicated in the inactivation of estrogens and the activation of promutagens andprocarcinogens. SULT1A1 activity varies among individuals, and this difference in phenotype is, in part, controlled by genetic polymorphism (Arg→His in codon 213). It is hypothesized that the His allele contributes to the risk of postmenopausal breast cancer. Frequencies of the Arg/His alleles were estimated in 229 postmenopausal breast cancer patients and 227 age-matched controls using a PCR-RFLP assay. Allele frequencies and genotype distributions were not statistically different between postmenopausal breast cancer patients and the population-based controls, i.e. neither of the alleles is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer in the present study.

  • 16.
    Kjellsson Lindblom, Emely
    et al.
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Dasu, Alexandru
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Skandion Clin, Sweden.
    Toma-Dasu, Iuliana
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Hypoxia Induced by Vascular Damage at High Doses Could Compromise the Outcome of Radiotherapy2019In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 39, no 5, p. 2337-2340Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Aim: This study investigated the impact of temporary vascular collapse on tumour control probability (TCP) in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), taking into account different radiosensitivities of chronically and acutely hypoxic cells. Materials and Methods: Three-dimensional tumours with heterogeneous oxygenation were simulated assuming different fractions of collapsed vessels at every treatment fraction. The modelled tumours contained a chronically hypoxic subvolume of 30-60% of the tumour diameter, and a hypoxic fraction amp;lt;= 5 mm Hg of 30-50%. The rest of the tumours were well-oxygenated at the start of the simulated treatment. Results: For all simulated cases, the largest reduction in TCP from 97% to 2% was found in a tumour with a small chronically hypoxic core treated with 60 Gy in eight fractions and assuming a treatment-induced vascular collapse of 35% in the well-oxygenated region. Conclusion: The timing of SBRT fractions should be considered together with the tumour oxygenation to avoid loss of TCP in SBRT.

  • 17. Kälkner, Karl Mikael
    et al.
    Westlin, Jan-Erik
    Strang, Peter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Palliative mediicin. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, ViN, LAH Linnea.
    89Strontium in the management of painful sceletal metastases2000In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 20, no 2 B, p. 1109-1114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To make a review of the literature of 89strontium-chloride and a retrospective study of time to palliative intended external irradiation number of portals and overall-survival after 89strontium-chloride therapy. Results: In total 93 patients were treated 116 times with 89strontium. The patients with prostatic carcinoma received 91% of all 89strontium therapies. Median over-all survival was 10 months after injection. In those cases when 89strontium was given before palliative radiotherapy, the average of total number of local fields was significantly lower (1.1 versus 4.1) compared to those cases where local fields preceded 89strontium therapy. However, time to 89new external irradiation after 89strontium injection was equal between these groups (3.8 versus 2.9 months). Conclusion:A review of literature conclude that 89strontium is effective for the reduction of pain originating from osteoblastic metastases. It also reduce the need for external radiotherapy and therefore is cost-effective. However, 89strontium is more effective in an early phase of the metastatic disease and preferably as an adjuvance to external radiotherapy.

  • 18.
    Lewin, Nongnit
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ryhov Hosp, Sweden.
    Luetragoon, Thitiya
    Ryhov Hosp, Sweden; Naresuan Univ, Thailand.
    Andersson, Bengt-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ryhov Hosp, Sweden.
    Oliva, Delmy
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ryhov Hosp, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Mats
    Ryhov Hosp, Sweden.
    Strandeus, Michael
    Ryhov Hosp, Sweden.
    Lofgren, Sture
    Ryhov Hosp, Sweden.
    Rutqvist, Lars-Erik
    Swedish Match AB, Sweden.
    Lewin, Freddi
    Ryhov Hosp, Sweden.
    The Influence of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms and Adjuvant Radiotherapy on Systemic Inflammatory Proteins, Chemokines and Cytokines of Patients With Breast Cancer2019In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 1287-1292Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Independently of tumour and treatment modulation, the host immune response status plays an important role in the clinical outcome of patients with cancer. The influence of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) on the systemic immune response status of patients with breast cancer was investigated. Materials and Methods: Eighty-six female patients recovering from breast cancer surgery were investigated. As a control cohort, 82 healthy female blood donors were used. Blood-based SNPs, plasma C-reactive protein (CRP), cytokines and chemokines were analyzed for this purpose. Results: Independently of tumour stage and hormone receptor status, dysregulation of plasma CRP, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 4 (CCL4) and interleukin 2 (IL2), but not CCL5, CCL2, platelet-derived growth factor, IL6, IL10, IL12, interferon-gamma or tumour necrosis factor alpha were detected in the patients when compared to controls. The extent of alteration in plasma levels of CRP and IL2 patients was significantly associated with SNPs in CRP rs1800947 and IL2 rs6822844, respectively. These SNPs had no influence on the levels of corresponding plasma biomarkers in the healthy controls. Adjuvant RT reduced plasma CRP and CCL5 levels in patients with regards to CRP rs1800947CC, CCL5 rs2107538GG and CCL5 rs2280789AA sequences. Conclusion: Dysregulation of immune responses, as indicated by plasma levels of CRP, CCL4 and IL2 were found in patients with breast cancer despite the removal of the tumour mass. The benefit of adjuvant RT, as indicated by reduced plasma amounts of inflammatory protein CRP and chemokine CCL5 were based on the SNPs of the patients. Analyses of blood-based SNPs, plasma CRP, IL2 and CCL5 are low cost, rapid and can be carried out using general laboratory facilities while requiring only a peripheral blood sample. The possibility of using these blood-based biomarkers as an indicator of patient immune status for selection of individual patient treatment warrants further investigation.

  • 19.
    Lewin, Nongnit
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ryhov Hosp, Sweden.
    Luetragoon, Thitiya
    Ryhov Hosp, Sweden; Naresuan Univ, Thailand.
    Shamoun, Levar
    Ryhov Hosp, Sweden.
    Oliva, Delmy
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ryhov Hosp, Sweden.
    Andersson, Bengt-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ryhov Hosp, Sweden.
    Lofgren, Sture
    Ryhov Hosp, Sweden.
    Rutqvist, Lars Erik
    Swedish Match AB, Sweden.
    Lewin, Freddi
    Ryhov Hosp, Sweden.
    The Influence of Adjuvant Radiotherapy and Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms on Circulating Immune Response Cell Numbers and Phenotypes of Patients With Breast Cancer2019In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 39, no 9, p. 4957-4963Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Aim: Adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) damages multiple layers of skin, muscle, blood vessels and blood cells that are included within the RT area. Indirect, bystander systemic effects could also develop in cells not directly hit by radiation. Materials and Methods: Ninety-three female patients recovering from breast cancer surgery and 82 female healthy blood donors were analyzed. For identification of systemic adaptive and innate immune response, rapid and low-cost blood-based biomarkers were assayed. Results: Post-operated breast cancer patients had a decreased number of circulating adaptive immune response cells but increased number of circulating immunosuppressive myeloid subpopulations. RT decreased the number of T-cells and platelets without influencing the number of immunosuppressive myeloid subpopulations. Alterations in the number and phenotypes of T-cell subpopulations were associated with SNPs. Conclusion: The combination of RT and immunotherapy might provide optimal treatment for cancer patients.

  • 20. Lindström, A
    et al.
    Backström, T
    Hellberg, D
    Tribukait, B
    Strang, Peter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Palliative mediicin. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, ViN, LAH Linnea.
    Stendahl, U
    Correlations between serum progesterone and smoking, and the growth fraction of cervical squamous cell carcinoma.2000In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 20, p. 3637-3640Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Lionis, C
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, General Practice.
    Faresjö, Tomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, General Practice.
    Fioretos, M
    Trell, Erik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, General Practice.
    Unwinding Ariadne´s thread: some methodological and interpretative considerations on international hospital admission comparisons with special reference to cancer.1999In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 19, p. 1411-1418Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Oliva, Delmy
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Oncology, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden .
    Nilsson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Futurum-The Academy for Healthcare, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Strandeus, Michael
    Department of Oncology, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Andersson, Bengt-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Laboratory medicine, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Sharp, Lena
    Regional Cancer Centre, Stockholm-Gotland, Stockholm, Sweden / Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Lewin, Nongnit
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Laboratory medicine, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Lewin, Freddi
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Oncology, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Individual Genetic Variation Might Predict Acute Skin Reactions in Women Undergoing Adjuvant Breast Cancer Radiotherapy2018In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 38, no 12, p. 6763-6770Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adverse skin reactions during radiotherapy (RT) are common. The aim of this study was to explore whether genetic variation might be linked to acute radiation skin reactions (ARSR). Materials and Methods: One hundred and nineteen women undergoing adjuvant RT for breast cancer were included. The symptoms of itching, burning and irritation were self-reported twice using the visual analogue scale. Assessments used the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scoring system for acute RT skin reaction (RTOG scale). Blood-based single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis was performed. Thirty SNPs of well-defined functional genes were investigated. Results: All women were assessed with ARSR. After RT, the women self-reported itching (n=97), burning (n=64) and irritation (n=96). Two SNPs in X-Ray Repair Cross Complementing 2 gene (XRCC2) rs2040639 and interferon gamma (IFNG) rs2069705 genes were found to be associated with ARSR. Conclusion: An association between two SNPs and ARSR was found. The possibility of using these SNPs as prognostic biomarkers for ARSR as tools to improve the care of patients needs further investigation.

  • 23.
    Shamoun, Levar
    et al.
    Jonköping County, Sweden.
    Kolodziej, Blanka
    Jonköping County, Sweden.
    Andersson, Roland
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Jönköping County, Sweden.
    Dimberg, Jan
    Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Protein Expression and Genetic Variation of IL32 and Association with Colorectal Cancer in Swedish Patients2018In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 321-328Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Interleukin 32 (IL32) is an intracellular pluripotent cytokine produced by epithelial cells, monocytes, T-lymphocytes and natural killer cells and seems to be involved in the pathogenesis of cancer and inflammatory diseases. Our purpose was to assess the role of protein expression and genetic polymorphisms of IL32 in colorectal cancer (CRC) susceptibility. Materials and Methods: To gain insight into clinical significance of IL32 in Swedish patients with CRC, using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we determined whether IL32 protein level is altered in CRC tissue (n=75) compared with paired normal tissue and in plasma from patients with CRC (n=94) compared with controls (n=81). The expression of IL32 protein was confirmed by immunohistochemistry (n=73). We used Luminex technology to investigate protein levels of the cytokines IL6, tumor necrosis factor-a (TNFa) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to relate these to IL32 levels in CRC tissue. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs28372698, rs12934561, rs4786370) of the IL32 gene have been proposed as modifiers for different diseases. The present study evaluated the susceptibility of patients possessing these SNPs to CRC. Using TaqMan SNP genotyping assays, these SNPs were screened in Swedish patients with CRC (n=465) and healthy controls (n=331). Results: We found no significant differences in the genotypic frequencies between the patients and healthy controls and no relation to survival for any of the SNPs. However, the SNP rs12934561 was statisticalLY significant associated with older patients. IL32 protein was up-regulated in CRC tissue and related to IL6, TNF alpha, and VEGF, and seems to be modulated by SNP rs28372698. The IL32 protein level in CRC tissue also reflects both disseminated disease and location. Conclusion. Our results suggest that altered IL32 protein concentrations in CRC tissue and genotypic variants of IL32 are related to disseminated CRC.

  • 24.
    Tell, Roger
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Sederholm, Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pulmonary Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Klintenberg, Claes
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Franksson, Lars
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Branden, Eva
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Hillerdal, Gunnar
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Lonn, Ulf
    Gävle City Hospital.
    Linden, Carl-Johan
    Lund University Hospital.
    Ewers, Sven-Borje
    Lund University Hospital.
    Lamberg, Kristina
    Västerås Hospital.
    Mrazek, Eva
    Västerås Hospital.
    Loden, Britta
    Karlstad Central Hospital.
    Sjogren, Anders
    Karlstad Central Hospital.
    Linne, Thomas
    Bristol Myers Squibb AB.
    Friesland, Signe
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Sirzen, Florin
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Multicentre Phase II Trial of Paclitaxel and Carboplatin with Concurrent Radiotherapy in Locally Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer2008In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 28, no 5B, p. 2851-2857Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To evaluate weekly, induction chemotherapy followed by weekly concomitant chemoradiotherapy in a multicentre phase II study of patients with wiresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC; stage wet IIIB excluded). Patients (aid Methods: Eligible patients received three weekly cycles of paclitaxel 100 mg/m(2) and carboplatin AUC2 followed by six weekly cycles of paclitaxel 60 mg/m(2) and carboplatin AUC2 in combination with thoracic radiotherapy (2 Gy per fraction and day to a total (lose of 60 Gy), Results: Sixty-four patients (40 males and 24 females) with a median age of 63 Years (range, 43-79 years) entered the study. T and N stage were distributed as follows: T1 2 patients (3.2%). T2 10 patients (15.6%), T3 15 patients (23.4%). T4 37 patients (57.8%), N0 10 patients (15.6%). N1 1 patient (1.6%), N2 26 patients (40.6%), N3 26 patients (40.6%), and N missing I patient (1.6%). Seven patients (10.9%) suffered from grade 314 oesophagitis. Grade 112 oesophagitis occurred in 36 patients (56.3%) and pneumonitis grade 112 occurred in 10 patients (15.6%). Sixty-three patients were evaluated on an intent-to-treat basis. The overall response rate was 74.6%. The median time to progression was 247 days and median overall survival was 461 days. According to subgroup analyses, no statistically signicant differences were noted according to gender, age (<65 vs. >= 65 years), perfromance status, histology, or study centre. Conclusion: Induction chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemoradiotherapy with weekly cycles of paclitaxel and carboplatin is feasible and generates moderate toxicity. Efficacy is comparable to other recently published regimens. However, prognosis remains, ill general, poor for this group of patients and further work to develop better therapy is required.

  • 25.
    Tsamandouraki, Kiki
    et al.
    University of Crete, Heraklion, Greece.
    Alamanos, Yannis
    University of Crete, Heraklion, Greece.
    Faresjö, Tomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Davidson, Kristina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Koutis, Antonis
    University of Crete, Heraklion, Greece.
    Lionis, Christos
    University of Crete, Heraklion, Greece.
    Trell, Erik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Fioretos, Michael
    University of Crete, Heraklion, Greece.
    Hospital admissions for different cancer diagnosis: a comparison between two European landscapes1994In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 14, no 5B, p. 2167-2170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cancer frequency has been studied in a Department of Crete and a Department of Sweden, using in-patient data collected in the Departmental Hospitals, for a two-year period. The results of the study suggest that similar trends exist in the prevalence of different forms of cancer between the two areas studied, as well as some significant differences. The differences observed concern mainly the frequency of cancers of the lung, prostate, bladder and large bowel among men and breast and large bowel among women. These findings could to a great extent be explained by life-style and environmental differences between the two areas and are consistent with data concerning the cancer mortality in the two countries.

  • 26.
    Wågsäter, Dick
    et al.
    University of Örebro, Sweden .
    Dimberg, Jan
    University College of Health Sciences, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Expression of chemokine receptor CXCR6 in human colorectal adenocarcinomas2004In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 3711-3714Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Infiltration of inflammatory cells into colorectal adenocarcinonzas is considered of importance for tumour progression. Tumour-associated macrophages and T cells are predominant components of the chemokine-guided filtrate of most colorectal tumours. CXCR6 is a chemokine receptor expressed by Th1, Tc, NKT cells and smooth muscle cells. To determine whether CXCR6 is expressed in human colorecial cancer and corresponding normal tissue, we analysed CXCR6 protein expression in 32 surgical specimens. Immunohistochemistry revealed CXCR6 protein predominantly; localised in normal epithelial cells and some scattered stromal cells. No or weak expression was found in cancerous tissue. Western blot analysis showed, in 41 % of the cases, a notable suppression of CXCR6 protein (13less than0.05) in cancerous tissue compared with non-cancerous tissue. Up-regulation was found in 9% of the cases. CXCR6 protein expression, in 25% of the cases, showed no difference between tumour, and adjacent normal tissue. Furthermore, 25% of the cases revealed undetectable levels of CXCR6 protein in tumour as well as corresponding normal tissue. The results may reflect one of the immunological features of normal and cancerous colorectal tissue and studies on regulation of CXCR6 are necessary in order to determine its role in colorectal carcinogenesis.

  • 27.
    Wågsäter, Dick
    et al.
    University of Örebro, Sweden .
    Dimberg, Jan
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Sweden.
    Hugander, Anders
    Länssjukhuset Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Sirsjö, Allan
    University of Örebro, Sweden .
    Ghaderi, Mehran
    University of Örebro, Sweden .
    Analysis of MICA gene transcripts in human rectal cancers2003In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 23, no 3B, p. 2525-2529Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The human MHC class I chain-related gene A (MICA) encodes a protein which is an activator ligand for the NKG2D receptor on NK cells, CD8+ alphabeta T cells and gammadelta T cells. MICA expression is up-regulated upon cellular stress and its expression is correlated to infiltration of human NKG2D-bearing T cells into the tumors. It is assumed that the interaction of MICA-NKG2D ligand-receptor could play a significant role in induction of innate and adaptive responses against epithelial tumors, specifically those from the gastrointestinal tract. In this study MICA messenger RNA levels in human rectal carcinoma (Dukes stage B-D) and its normal adjacent tissue was analyzed in samples donated by 18 patients undergoing rectal tumor resection. Quantitative RTPCR analysis from rectal tumors revealed that the overall expression of MICA at mRNA level differs extensively among individual tumors. In addition, invasive rectal tumors tend to up-regulate MICA whereas MICA mRNA levels were lower in early tumors. Differential transcription levels of MICA gene expression in rectal carcinomas at different stages is probably a strategy by tumors to escape confrontation with intraepithelial tumor-infiltrating T cells.

  • 28.
    Wågsäter, Dick
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Löfgren, Sture
    Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Hugander, Anders
    Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Dimberg, Jan
    University College of Health Sciences, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Expression of interleukin-17 in human colorectal cancer2006In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 26, no 6B, p. 4213-4216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The proinflammatory cytokine IL-17 plays a potential role in T-cell mediated angiogenesis and promotes tumourigenicity of human cervical cancer. The objective of this study was to determine whether IL-17 protein level is altered in colorectal tumours (n=74) compared with paired normal mucosa and in plasma from patients (n=61) with colorectal cancer (CRC) compared with a healthy group (n=78). Analyses by ELISA showed that IL-17 protein was undetectable in 48.6% of the patients with cancer, as well as corresponding normal tissue which may in part reflect an individual difference. No significant difference was observed regarding IL-17 protein levels between cancer and matched normal tissue or in plasma between patients and the healthy group. Immunohistochemistry (n=20) revealed heterogenous immunoreactivity in 65% of the cases. The results of this study suggest that IL-17 plays a minor or partial role in CRC.

  • 29.
    Zhang, Zhi Y
    et al.
    Tangshan Gongren Hospital, China.
    Tian, Yan F
    First Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, China .
    Wang, Yuan Y
    First Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, China .
    Zhang, Li J
    First Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, China .
    Zhao, Zeng R
    First Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, China .
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    PINCH mRNA Overexpression in Colorectal Carcinomas Correlated with VEGF and FAS mRNA Expression2011In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 31, no 12, p. 4127-4133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Particularly interesting new cysteine-histidine-rich protein (PINCH) was found to be up-regulated in the stroma of colorectal carcinomas (CRCs) in our previous studies and was involved in angiogenesis through activation of fibroblasts in extracellular matrix (ECM) in response to tumors. Here, we examined PINCH mRNA expression in colorectal cancer and investigated its relationship with the clinicopathological features and proliferation cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and FAS.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS:

    The primary cancer tissues, adjacent noncancerous tissues and the proximal and distant margins of normal mucosa were collected from 81 colorectal cancer patients during surgery. PINCH, PCNA, VEGF and FAS mRNA expression was examined by reverse transcriptional PCR (RT-PCR).

    RESULTS:

    PINCH mRNA expression was significantly increased in primary tumors compared with that in adjacent noncancerous tissues, and the proximal and distant margins of normal mucosa (p<0.0001). Expression of PINCH mRNA in colon cancer tended to be higher than expression in rectal cancer (p=0.051). Tumors which had infiltrated through the wall of the colorectum trended to have higher PINCH mRNA expression (p=0.073). PINCH mRNA expression in primary tumors was positively related to the expression of PCNA mRNA (r=0.534, p=0.010), VEGF mRNA (r=0.431, p=0.022) and FAS mRNA (r=0.542, p=0.012).

    CONCLUSION:

    PINCH mRNA was overexpressed in colorectal cancer and associated with PCNA mRNA, VEGF mRNA and FAS mRNA expression. PINCH mRNA was involved in the development of colorectal cancer and might play a role in the epithelial mesenchymal transition in the rectum differently than in the colon, through the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC)/catenin pathway.

1 - 29 of 29
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