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  • 1.
    Abdiu, Avni
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Larsson, Sven-Erik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Wasteson, Åke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology.
    Walz, Thomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Suramin blocks growth-stimulatory effects of platelet-derived growth factor on malignant fibrous histiocytomas in vitro.1999In: Cancer Letters, ISSN 0304-3835, E-ISSN 1872-7980, Vol. 146, p. 189-194Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Abdiu, Avni
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Wingren, Sten
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology.
    Larsson, S-E
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Wasteson, Åke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology.
    Walz, Thomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Effects of human platelet-derived growth factor-AB on sarcoma growth in vitro and in vivo.1999In: Cancer Letters, ISSN 0304-3835, E-ISSN 1872-7980, Vol. 141, p. 39-45Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Berndt, Carsten
    et al.
    Division of Biochemistry, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden; Institute for Clinical Cytobiology and Cytopathology, Philipps-Universität, 35037 Marburg, Germany..
    Kurz, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bannenberg, Sarah
    Division of Biochemistry, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jacob, Ralf
    Institute for Clinical Cytobiology and Cytopathology, Philipps-Universität, 35037 Marburg, Germany..
    Holmgren, Arne
    Division of Biochemistry, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Brunk, Ulf T
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ascorbate and endocytosed Motexafin gadolinium induce lysosomal rupture.2011In: Cancer Letters, ISSN 0304-3835, E-ISSN 1872-7980, Vol. 307, no 2, p. 119-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Motexafin gadolinium (MGd) sensitizes malignant cells to ionizing radiation, although the underlying mechanisms for uptake and sensitization are both unclear. Here we show that MGd is endocytosed by the clathrin-dependent pathway with ensuing lysosomal membrane permeabilization, most likely via formation of reactive oxygen species involving redox-active metabolites, such as ascorbate. We propose that subsequent apoptosis is a synergistic effect of irradiation and high MGd concentrations in malignant cells due to their pronounced endocytic activity. The results provide novel insights into the mode of action of this promising anti-cancer drug, which is currently under clinical trials.

  • 4.
    Chen, Han
    et al.
    Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Peoples R China .
    Mun Yee Ko, Josephine
    University of Hong Kong, Peoples R China .
    Chun Lam Wong, Victor
    University of Hong Kong, Peoples R China .
    Hyytiainen, Marko
    University of Helsinki, Finland University of Helsinki, Finland .
    Keski-Oja, Jorma
    University of Helsinki, Finland University of Helsinki, Finland .
    Chua, Daniel
    University of Hong Kong, Peoples R China University of Hong Kong, Peoples R China Hong Kong Sanat and Hospital, Peoples R China .
    Nicholls, John M
    University of Hong Kong, Peoples R China University of Hong Kong, Peoples R China .
    Man Fung Cheung, Florence
    University of Hong Kong, Peoples R China Pamela Youde Nethersole Eastern Hospital, Peoples R China .
    Wing Mui Lee, Anne
    University of Hong Kong, Peoples R China Pamela Youde Nethersole Eastern Hospital, Peoples R China .
    Lai-Wan Kwong, Dora
    University of Hong Kong, Peoples R China University of Hong Kong, Peoples R China University of Hong Kong, Peoples R China .
    Man Chiu, Pui
    University of Hong Kong, Peoples R China University of Hong Kong, Peoples R China .
    Zabarovsky, Eugene R
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wah Tsao, Sai
    University of Hong Kong, Peoples R China University of Hong Kong, Peoples R China University of Hong Kong, Peoples R China .
    Tao, Qian
    Chinese University of Hong Kong, Peoples R China .
    Kan, Rebecca
    University of Hong Kong, Peoples R China .
    Ho Kin Chan, Stephen
    University of Hong Kong, Peoples R China .
    Stanbridge, Eric J
    University of Calif Irvine, CA 92697 USA .
    Li Lung, Maria
    University of Hong Kong, Peoples R China University of Hong Kong, Peoples R China University of Hong Kong, Peoples R China .
    LTBP-2 confers pleiotropic suppression and promotes dormancy in a growth factor permissive microenvironment in nasopharyngeal carcinoma2012In: Cancer Letters, ISSN 0304-3835, E-ISSN 1872-7980, Vol. 325, no 1, p. 89-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study identified LTBP-2 as a pleiotropic tumor suppressor in nasopharyngeal carcinoma, which safeguards against critical malignant behaviors of tumor cells. LTBP-2 expression was significantly decreased or lost in up to 100% of NPC cell lines (7/7) and 80% of biopsies (24/30). Promoter hypermethylation was found to be involved in LTBP-2 silencing. Using a tetracycline-regulated inducible expression system, we unveiled functional roles of LTBP-2 in suppressing colony formation, anchorage-independent growth, cell migration, angiogenesis, VEGF secretion, and tumorigenicity. Three-dimensional culture studies suggested the involvement of LTBP-2 in maintenance of tumor cell dormancy in a growth factor favorable microenvironment.

  • 5.
    Fransén, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Elander, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS2) promoter polymorphisms in colorectal cancer2005In: Cancer Letters, ISSN 0304-3835, E-ISSN 1872-7980, Vol. 225, no 1, p. 99-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previously, increased expression of nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS2) in colorectal cancer (CRC) has been identified. The NOS2 gene is transcriptionally regulated, which suggests that polymorphisms in the NOS2 promoter may have a role for CRC development and progression. The genotyping was performed with PCR/RFLP, single strand conformation analysis or MegaBACE genotyping of normal blood DNA from CRC patients and normal healthy controls. However, no significant association between NOS2 polymorphisms and CRC onset or clinical outcome was evident. In conclusion, these results, therefore, suggest that NOS2 promoter polymorphisms have a limited effect on the onset or progression of CRC.

  • 6.
    Garvin, Stina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology.
    Öllinger, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Dabrosin, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Resveratrol induces apoptosis and inhibits angiogenesis in human breast cancer xenografts in vivo2006In: Cancer Letters, ISSN 0304-3835, E-ISSN 1872-7980, Vol. 231, no 1, p. 113-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Resveratrol, a polyphenol found in grapes and wine, is considered a potential cancer chemopreventive agent. Resveratrol has been shown to induce transcription via both ERα and ERβ. We observed significantly lower tumor growth, decreased angiogenesis, and increased apoptotic index in ERα- ERβ+ MDA-MB-231 tumors in resveratrol-treated nude mice compared with controls. In vitro we found a significant increase in apoptosis in resveratrol-treated MDA-MB-231 cells in addition to significantly reduced extracellular levels of VEGF. This study supports the potential use of resveratrol as a chemotherapeutic agent in breast cancers. © 2005 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 7.
    Green, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Bachmeier, K
    Central Hospital, Karlstad.
    Bäcklund, L M
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Carlsson, L
    District Hospital, Sundsvall.
    Hansen, J
    Central Hospital, Karlstad.
    Lagerlund, M
    District Hospital, Kalmar.
    Norberg, B
    District Hospital, Jönköping.
    Franzén, A
    MSD Sweden, Stockholm.
    Åleskog, A
    MSD Sweden, Stockholm.
    Malmström, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, LAH Linköping.
    Pegylated liposomal doxorubicin as first-line monotherapy in elderly women with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer: Novel treatment predictive factors identified2011In: Cancer Letters, ISSN 0304-3835, E-ISSN 1872-7980, Vol. 313, no 2, p. 145-153Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated the efficacy and safety of single-agent pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) as first-line treatment for elderly women with advanced breast cancer and evaluated predictive markers for response and toxicity. Twenty-five women ⩾65years received 40mg/m(2) PLD every 28days. Time to treatment failure (TTF), response rate, time to progression (TTP) and overall survival (OS) was calculated. The ABCB1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP), tumor MRN complex, and TOPOIIα were analyzed. A mean of 7.4 cycles PLD were administered and TTF was 5.5months and OS 20.6months. ABCB1 SNPs were found to correlate to both efficacy and toxicity, while tumor expression of the MRN complex and TOPOIIα correlated to TTP. PLD is a safe and effective treatment for elderly breast cancer patients. Also potential predictive markers were identified.

  • 8.
    Hillert, Ellin-Kristina
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Brnjic, Slavica
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Zhang, Xiaonan
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Mazurkiewicz, Magdalena
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Saei, Amir Ata
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Mofers, Arjan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Selvaraj, Karthik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Zubarev, Roman
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Linder, Stig
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    D´arcy, Padraig
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Proteasome inhibitor b-AP15 induces enhanced proteotoxicity by inhibiting cytoprotective aggresome formation2019In: Cancer Letters, ISSN 0304-3835, E-ISSN 1872-7980, Vol. 448, p. 70-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Proteasome inhibitors have been shown to induce cell death in cancer cells by triggering an acute proteotoxic stress response characterized by accumulation of poly-ubiquitinated proteins, ER stress and the production of reactive oxygen species. The aggresome pathway has been described as an escape mechanism from proteotoxicity by sequestering toxic cellular aggregates. Here we show that b-AP15, a small-molecule inhibitor of proteasomal deubiquitinase activity, induces poly-ubiquitin accumulation in absence of aggresome formation. b-AP15 was found to affect organelle transport in treated cells, raising the possibility that microtubule-transport of toxic protein aggregates is inhibited, leading to enhanced cytotoxicity. In contrast to the antiproliferative effects of the clinically used proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, the effects of b-AP15 are not further enhanced by the histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA). Our results suggest an inhibitory effect of b-AP15 on the transport of misfolded proteins, resulting in a lack of aggresome formation, and a strong proteotoxic stress response.

  • 9. Lindemalm, S
    et al.
    Liliemark, J
    Juliusson, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Haematology UHL.
    Larsson, R
    Albertioni, F
    Cytotoxicity and pharmacokinetics of cladribine metabolite, 2-chloroadenine in patients with leukemia2004In: Cancer Letters, ISSN 0304-3835, E-ISSN 1872-7980, Vol. 210, no 2, p. 171-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The nucleoside analog 2-chlorodeoxyadenosine (Cladribine, CdA) is used in the treatment of patients with several hematological malignancies. After administration of CdA, the major catabolite measured in plasma and urine is 2-chloroadenine (CAde). This study was performed to determine the pharmacokinetics after oral and intravenous (iv) infusion of CdA in patients treated for chronic lymphocytic leukemia and to evaluate the toxicity of CAde to leukemia cells in vitro. CdA and CAde were also determined in plasma from 31 patients and in urine from 16 patients with reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic. The toxicity of CdA and CAde was also determined in leukemic cells from 7 patients by fluorometric microculture cyotoxicity assay. Five times more CAde was quantified after oral treatment compared with an iv infusion of CdA. After iv infusion, the half-life was the same for CdA and CAde, but after oral administration the half-life was doubled for CAde. Excreted amount of CAde in urine constituted about 1.1% after iv infusion and 4.7% after oral CdA treatment. In vitro exposure of leukemia cells to CAde showed that it was eight times less toxic as compared to CdA. We conclude that CAde has a lower cytotoxic effect than CdA but may contribute significantly to the cytotoxicity after oral administration.

  • 10.
    Lotfi, Kourosh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Zackrisson, Anna Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Peterson, Curt
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Comparison of idarubicin and daunorubicin regarding intracellular uptake, induction of apoptosis, and resistance2002In: Cancer Letters, ISSN 0304-3835, E-ISSN 1872-7980, Vol. 178, no 2, p. 141-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anthracycline antibiotics are widely used as anticancer agents. Idarubicin (4-demethoxydaunorubicin; Ida), a semisynthetic derivative of daunorubicin (Dnr) is more potent than the parent compound in vitro and in vivo. The equitoxic dose of Ida in patients is about one-fourth of that of Dnr. We compared these drugs regarding cytotoxicity, apoptosis induction, and resistance mechanisms in human leukaemic cell lines. Cytotoxicity was studied by means of the 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay and drug-induced apoptosis by means of the Annexin V–fluorescein isothiocyanate method at similar intracellular concentrations (extracellular concentrations of 0.35 μM for Ida and 1 μM for Dnr). Ida was at least twice as potent as Dnr in MOLT-4, HL60, CEM, and K562 cell lines. It took 8 h for Ida to induce approximately 20% apoptosis, but at least 22 h for Dnr to reach 20% apoptosis at identical intracellular concentration. Ida induces a faster and higher apoptosis rate compared with Dnr. The human chronic myelogenous leukaemia cell line (K562) was selected for resistance to Dnr and Ida with and without verapamil (Ver). Continuous incubation with Dnr, but not with Ida, led to an increased mdr1 gene expression as assessed by real-time PCR. The development of mdr1 gene expression in Dnr-resistant cells could be reversed by the presence of Ver. Ver also reversed the cytotoxicity to Dnr, but not to Ida, in K562/Dnr cells. The results show that Ida is more effective than Dnr in inducing apoptosis and that there are differences in resistance mechanisms between the drugs.

  • 11.
    Mi, Yushuai
    et al.
    Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Peoples R China.
    Zhang, Dongyuan
    Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Peoples R China.
    Jiang, Weiliang
    Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Peoples R China.
    Weng, Junyong
    Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Peoples R China.
    Zhou, Chongzhi
    Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Peoples R China.
    Huang, Kejian
    Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Peoples R China.
    Tang, Huamei
    Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Peoples R China.
    Yu, Yang
    Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Peoples R China.
    Liu, Xisheng
    Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Peoples R China.
    Cui, Weiyingqi
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Zhang, Meng
    Fudan University, Peoples R China.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Zhou, Zongguang
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China.
    Peng, Zhihai
    Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Peoples R China.
    Zhao, Senlin
    Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Peoples R China.
    Wen, Yugang
    Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Peoples R China.
    miR-181a-5p promotes the progression of gastric cancer via RASSF6-mediated MAPK signalling activation2017In: Cancer Letters, ISSN 0304-3835, E-ISSN 1872-7980, Vol. 389, p. 11-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We previously discovered that Ras association domain family member 6 (RASSF6) was downregulated and predicted poor prognosis in GC patients. However, the mechanisms of the down regulation of RASSF6 in GC remained unclear. Increasing evidence indicates that dysregulation of microRNAs promotes the progression of cancer through the repression of tumour suppressors. Here, we identified miR-181a-5p as a novel regulator of RASSF6 in GC. Functionally, ectopic expression or silencing of miR-181a-5p, respectively, promoted or inhibited GC cell proliferation, colony formation and cell cycle transition, as well as enhanced or prevented the invasion, metastasis of GC cells and epithelial to mesenchymal transition of GC cells in vitro and in vivo. Molecularly, miR-181a-5p functioned as an onco-miRNA by activating the RASSF6-regulated MAKP pathway. Overexpression or silencing of RASSF6 could partially reverse the effects of the overexpression or repression of miR-181a-5p on GC progress caused by activation of the MAKP pathway in vitro and in vivo. Clinically, high miR-181a-5p expression predicted poor survival in GC patients, especially combined with low RASSF6 expression. Collectively, we identified miR-181a-5p as an onco-miRNA, which acts by directly repressing RASSF6 in GC. (C) 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  • 12.
    Ryk, C
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute.
    Kumar, R
    Karolinska Institute.
    Sanyal, S
    Karolinska Institute.
    de Verdier, PJ
    Karolinska Hospital.
    Hemminki, K
    Karolinska Institute.
    Larsson, Per C M
    Karolinska Hospital.
    Steinbeck, G
    Karolinska Hospital.
    Hou, SM
    Karolinska Institute.
    Influence of polymorphism in DNA repair and defence genes on p53 mutations in bladder tumours2006In: Cancer Letters, ISSN 0304-3835, E-ISSN 1872-7980, Vol. 241, no 1, p. 142-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We studied the effects of polymorphisms in nine genes involved in DNA repair and detoxification on occurrence and type of p53 mutation in 327 bladder cancer patients. The included polymorphisms are XPC(Lys939Gln), XPD(Lys751Gln), XPG(Asp1104His), XRCC1(Arg3999Gln), XRCC3(Thr241Met), NBS1(Glu185Gln), cyclin D1(Pro241Pro), MTHFR(Ala222Val and Glu429Ala) and NQO1(Arg139Trp and Pro187Ser). We found increased risk for p53 mutation among cyclin D1 variant allele homozygotes (OR 2.4 CI 0.8–6.7). Among non-smokers, 75% (3/4) with p53 mutation but only 12.5% (3/24) without p53 mutations were XRCC3 241Met homozygotes (P=0.03). Among smokers, all p53 transversions (3/3), but only 41.7% (5/12) of p53 transitions were found among carriers of the XPC 939Gln allele. Individuals carrying the NQO1 187Ser allele showed increased risk for p53 transversions (OR 4.7, CI 0.9–26.1). All (2/2) NQO1 139Trp allele carriers but only 17.5% (7/40) of the Arg139 homozygotes had p53 transversions. Our findings suggest that altered repair and detoxification due to genetic polymorphism may influence the occurrence of p53 mutations in bladder cancer.

  • 13.
    Zhang, Hong
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of dermatology and venereology.
    p53 plays a central role in UVA and UVB induced cell damage and apoptosis in melanoma cells2006In: Cancer Letters, ISSN 0304-3835, E-ISSN 1872-7980, Vol. 244, no 2, p. 229-238Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated whether p53 plays a role in UV induced apoptosis in melanoma. UVA and UVB induced apoptosis in dose dependent and wild type p53 melanoma cells were much more vulnerable than the mutant cells, indicating that p53 played a role in UV-induced apoptosis in melanoma. No difference in p53 expression pattern between the primary and matched metastatic melanomas was noticed in tumour tissue or cell lines from the same patients. Our findings indicate that expression of p53 plays a role in UV-induced apoptosis in melanoma cells, but not important in melanoma progression from primary to metastasis. © 2006 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 14.
    Zhang, Hong
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of dermatology and venereology.
    Rosdahl, Inger
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of dermatology and venereology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Expression profiles of Id1 and p16 proteins in all-trans-retinoic acid-induced apoptosis and cell cycle re-distribution in melanoma2005In: Cancer Letters, ISSN 0304-3835, E-ISSN 1872-7980, Vol. 217, no 1, p. 33-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    All-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) exerts its effects via apoptosis and cell cycle re-distribution. However, the mechanisms behind the effects have not been fully understood. In this study, we used a model system of matched primary and metastatic melanoma cells to investigate whether expression of Id1 and p16 proteins were involved in atRA-induced apoptosis and cell cycle re-distribution. Melanoma cells were exposed to 0.1 or 10 μM atRA for 1-96 h. Apoptosis and cell cycle were measured by flow cytometry. Expression of Id1 and p16 proteins was examined by Western blotting and immunocytochemistry. After exposure to atRA we found a marked increase in apoptosis and cell cycle re-distribution in both primary and metastatic melanoma cells. Expression level of Id1 protein was decreased and the p16 was increased in a dose- and time-dependent (P<0.05) manner after treatment with atRA. Alterations of these proteins were more pronounced in the primary melanoma cells than the matched metastases (P<0.05). These data suggested that the alterations of Id1 and/or p16 proteins were involved in atRA-induced apoptosis and cell cycle re-distribution in melanoma. These expression profiles of Id1 and p16 proteins may provide molecular evidence for better chemotherapy primarily for early stages of melanoma.

  • 15.
    Zhang, Jiao
    et al.
    West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China.
    Zhou, Bin
    IWest China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China.
    Liu, Yinghua
    DWest China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China.
    Chen, Keling
    West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China.
    Bao, Pingqian
    West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China.
    Wang, Yi
    West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China.
    Wang, Jiaxiang
    First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Henan, China.
    Zhou, Zongguang
    West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology. nstitute of Digestive Surgery, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China.
    Li, Yuan
    West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China.
    Wnt inhibitory factor-1 functions as a tumor suppressor through modulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling in neuroblastoma2014In: Cancer Letters, ISSN 0304-3835, E-ISSN 1872-7980, Vol. 348, no 1–2, p. 12-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial solid tumor in childhood and is associated with serious morbidity and mortality. The effective treatment of neuroblastoma remains one of the major challenges in pediatric oncology. The Wnt signaling pathway has been shown to play a significant role in the pathogenesis of adult and pediatric tumors. WIF-1 has been identified as an important Wnt antagonist which inhibits Wnt/β-catenin signaling by directly binding to Wnt proteins. However, the expression and function of WIF-1 in neuroblastoma remains unknown. The present study showed that WIF-1 was downregulated with high level promoter methylation in neuroblastoma cells, and was significantly upregulated after exposure to demethylating agent. This finding suggests that downregulation of WIF-1 was associated with its promoter methylation in neuroblastoma. To further study the potential function of WIF-1 in neuroblastoma, we constructed a plasmid that over-expressed WIF-1 and transfected the plasmid into one neuroblastoma cell line SK-N-SH. We found that restoration of WIF-1 inhibited the growth and proliferation of neuroblastoma cells in vitro. Morever, Wnt/β-catenin signaling activity and target genes expression were reduced by WIF-1 restoration. These results provide support that WIF-1 is downregulated and functions as a tumor suppressor by antagonizing Wnt/β-catenin signaling in neuroblastoma, suggesting a potential role as a therapeutic target in neuroblastoma.

  • 16.
    Zhuang, Shi-Mei
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology.
    Wiseman, Roger W
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology.
    Mutation analysis of the pRb pathway in 2',3'-dideoxycytidine- and 1,3-butadiene-induced mouse lymphomas2000In: Cancer Letters, ISSN 0304-3835, E-ISSN 1872-7980, Vol. 152, no 2, p. 129-134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The pRb pathway plays a key role in controlling the G1/S transition in cell cycle progression. Aberrations of various components of the pRb pathway, such as retinoblastoma protein and its upstream actors including cyclin D1, cyclin dependence kinase-4 and p16/p15 cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors, have been reported in a variety of human tumors. Furthermore, the alterations of retinoblastoma protein and its upstream components often occur in a reciprocal manner. Previously, we have reported frequent inactivation of the Cdkn2a/Cdkn2b loci encoding p16/p15 cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors in a subset of 2',3'-dideoxycytidine- and 1,3-butadiene-induced mouse lymphomas (S.-M. Zhuang, A. Schippert, A. Haugen-Strano, R.W. Wiseman, P. Soderkvist, Inactivation of p16(INK4a)-a, p16(INK4a)-▀ and p15(INK4b) genes in 2',3'-dideoxycytidine- and 1,3-butadiene-induced lymphomas, Oncogene 16 (1998) 803-808), indicating the involvement of pRb pathway in lymphomagenesis. To investigate whether alteration of other components in pRb pathway is an alternative mechanism underlying the development of these chemically induced lymphomas, we have examined the genetic status of Rb1, Ccnd1 and Cdk4 genes that encode retinoblastoma protein, cyclin D1 and cyclin dependence kinase-4, respectively. Gross alterations of the Rb1, Ccnd1, and Cdk4 genes were not detected by Southern analysis in any of the tumors examined. In addition, single-strand conformation analysis failed to reveal point mutations in the Cdk4 amino terminal domain that is important for its association with Cdkn2a gene products. These results indicate that the mechanisms underlying the development of 2',3'-dideoxycytidine- and 1,3-butadiene-induced lymphomas involve inactivation of p16/p15 cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors but not genomic alterations of the Rb1, Ccnd1 and Cdk4 genes. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd.

  • 17.
    Österström, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology.
    Dimberg, Jan
    Fransén, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology.
    Expression of cytosolic and group X secretory phospholipase A2 genes in human colorectal adenocarcinomas2002In: Cancer Letters, ISSN 0304-3835, E-ISSN 1872-7980, Vol. 182, no 2, p. 175-182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gene expression of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) and protein level of secretory PLA2 group X (sPLA2-X) are upregulated in human colorectal cancer and provide cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) with arachidonic acid, resulting in increased levels of PGE2. Mutated ras-genes are suggested to be involved in the regulatory pathway of cPLA2 in lung cancer cells. We analysed the gene expression of cPLA2 and sPLA2-X in 42 and 38 primary colorectal tumours, respectively, with and without K-ras mutations. We found an up-regulation of cPLA2 mRNA but the induction in tumour tissues does not correlate with Ras-gene mutations. Moreover, our results cannot consistently reflect an overexpression of sPLA2-X gene in colorectal cancer tissues.

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