liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 36 of 36
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Abrate, Alberto
    et al.
    IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Buono, Roberta
    IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Canu, Tamara
    IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Esposito, Antonio
    IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Del Maschio, Alessandro
    IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Luciano, Roberta
    IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy; IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Bettiga, Arianna
    IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Colciago, Giorgia
    IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Guazzoni, Giorgio
    IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Benigni, Fabio
    IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Hedlund, Petter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology. IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Altaner, Cestmir
    Slovak Academic Science, Slovakia; St Elisabeth Cancer Institute, Slovakia.
    Montorsi, Francesco
    IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Cavarretta, Ilaria T. R.
    IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Mesenchymal stem cells expressing therapeutic genes induce autochthonous prostate tumour regression2014In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 50, no 14, p. 2478-2488Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) as vehicles of therapeutic genes represent a unique tool to activate drugs within a neoplastic mass due to their property to home and engraft into tumours. In particular, MSC expressing the cytosine deaminase:: uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (CD-MSC) have been previously demonstrated to inhibit growth of subcutaneous prostate cancer xenografts thanks to their ability to convert the non-toxic 5-fluorocytosine into the antineoplastic 5-fluorouracil. Since both the immune system and the tumour microenvironment play a crucial role in directing cancer progression, in order to advance towards clinical applications, we tested the therapeutic potential of this approach on animal models that develop autochthonous prostate cancer and preserve an intact immune system. As cell vectors, we employed adipose-tissue and bone-marrow MSC. CD-MSC toxicity on murine prostate cancer cells and tumour tropism were verified in vitro and ex-vivo before starting the preclinical studies. Magnetic Resonance Imaging was utilised to follow orthotopic tumour progression. We demonstrated that intravenous injections of CD-MSC cells, followed by intraperitoneal administration of 5-fluorocytosine, caused tumour regression in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) model, which develops aggressive and spontaneous prostate cancer. These results add new insights to the therapeutic potential of specifically engineered MSC in prostate cancer disease.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Patiyan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cellbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Varenhorst, Eberhard
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Urology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cellbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Androgen receptor and vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms and prostate cancer risk2006In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 42, no 16, p. 2833-2837Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study the CAG repeat region in exon 1 of the androgen receptor (AR) and the TaqI polymorphism in exon 9 of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and the association with prostate cancer. 137 incidentally discovered, histologically verified prostate cancers were analysed for CAG repeat length in AR and genotype at the TaqI site of the VDR. 124 control subjects were analysed to determine the CAG repeat length and TaqI genotype determined for 176 control subjects. An unpaired t-test shows that the mean CAG repeat length was significantly (p < 0.001) shorter among cases (20.1 repeats) compared with controls (22.5 repeats). Dividing the prostate cohort and controls into tertiles (19, 20–22, 23 repeats) shows that short repeats are significantly more common among cases (odds ratio (OR) 4.45, p = 0.00003). Genotype frequencies for the TaqI polymorphism reveals no significant differences between cases and controls. We conclude that men with a short CAG repeat in the androgen receptor gene have an increased risk of developing prostate cancer.

  • 3.
    Coomans, Marijke
    et al.
    Leiden Univ, Netherlands.
    Dirven, Linda
    Leiden Univ, Netherlands; Haaglanden Med Ctr, Netherlands.
    Aaronson, Neil K.
    Netherlands Canc Inst, Netherlands.
    Baumert, Brigitta G.
    Univ Hosp Bonn, Germany; Maastricht Univ, Netherlands; Maastricht Univ, Netherlands.
    van den Bent, Martin
    Erasmus MC Canc Inst, Netherlands.
    Bottomley, Andrew
    European Org Res Treatment Canc, Belgium.
    Brandes, Alba A.
    Azienda USL IRCCS Inst Neurol Sci, Italy.
    Chinot, Olivier
    Aix Marseille Univ, France.
    Coens, Corneel
    European Org Res and Treatment Canc Headquarters, Belgium.
    Gorlia, Thierry
    Univ Bonn, Germany; Univ Bonn, Germany.
    Herrlinger, Ulrich
    Grp Hop Pitie Salpetriere, France.
    Keime-Guibert, Florence
    Groupe Hôpital Pitié-Salpetrière, Paris, France.
    Malmström, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Linköping.
    Martinelli, Francesca
    Northwestern Univ, IL 60611 USA.
    Stupp, Roger
    Azienda Osped San Giovanni Addolorata, Italy.
    Talacchi, Andrea
    Univ Hosp, Switzerland; Univ Zurich, Switzerland.
    Weller, Michael
    Univ Hosp Heidelberg, Germany; German Consortium Translat Canc Res DKTK, Germany.
    Wick, Wolfgang
    Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Reijneveld, Jaap C.
    Leiden Univ, Netherlands; Haaglanden Med Ctr, Netherlands.
    Taphoorn, Martin J. B.
    Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, Netherlands; Haaglanden Medical Center, Den Haag, Netherlands.
    The added value of health-related quality of life as a prognostic indicator of overall survival and progression-free survival in glioma patients: a meta-analysis based on individual patient data from randomised controlled trials2019In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 116, p. 190-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Prognostic value of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) data may be important to inform patients in clinical practice and to guide clinical decision-making. Our study investigated the added prognostic value of HRQoL for overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) in a large heterogeneous sample of glioma patients, besides known prognostic factors. Methods: We included individual baseline data from previously published randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in glioma patients in which HRQoL was assessed through the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30 and QLQ-BN20 questionnaires. Multivariable Cox regression models (stratified for newly diagnosed versus recurrent disease) were constructed, first with clinical variables (age, sex, tumour type, performance status, allocated treatment and extent of resection) only and subsequently with HRQoL variables added, separately for OS and PFS. The added prognostic value of HRQoL was calculated using C-indices. Results: Baseline HRQoL and clinical data from 15 RCTs were included, comprising 5217 patients. In the model including both clinical and HRQoL variables, better cognitive and role functioning and less motor dysfunction were independently associated with longer OS, whereas better role and cognitive functioning, less nausea and vomiting and more appetite loss were independently associated with prolonged PFS. However, C-indices indicated only a small prognostic improvement of the models for OS and PFS when adding HRQoL to the clinical prognostic variables (+1.1% for OS and +.7% for PFS). Conclusion: Our findings demonstrate that several baseline HRQoL variables are independently prognostic for OS and PFS, yet the added value of HRQoL to the known clinical prognostic variables was small. (C) 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 4.
    Dittrich, Christian
    et al.
    Kaiser Franz Josef Spital, Austria Kaiser Franz Josef Spital, Austria .
    Papai-Szekely, Zsolt
    St George Hospital Fejer County, Hungary .
    Vinolas, Nuria
    Hospital Clin Barcelona, Spain .
    Sederholm, Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Respiratory Medicine.
    Hartmann, Joerg T.
    Department Internal Medical II Hematol and Medical Oncol, Germany Catholic Hospital Consortium Ostwestfalen, Germany .
    Behringer, Dirk
    Clin Hematol and Oncol, Germany .
    Kazeem, Gbenga
    Eli Lilly UK, England .
    Desaiah, Durisala
    Eli Lilly Corp Centre, IN USA .
    Leschinger, Monika I.
    Lilly Deutschland GmbH, Germany .
    von Pawel, Joachim
    Asklepios Hospital Munchen Gauting, Germany .
    A randomised phase II study of pemetrexed versus pemetrexed plus erlotinib as second-line treatment for locally advanced or metastatic non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer2014In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 50, no 9, p. 1571-1580Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Pemetrexed and erlotinib have been approved as second-line monotherapy for locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This multicentre, randomised, open-label, parallel phase II study assessed efficacy and safety of pemetrexed versus pemetrexed + erlotinib in patients with advanced non-squamous NSCLC. Methods: NSCLC stage III-IV patients who failed one prior platinum-based chemotherapy regimen, greater than= 1 measurable lesion by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status less than= 2 were eligible. Patients received pemetrexed 500 mg/m(2) with vitamin B-12 and folic acid q3w alone or combined with erlotinib 150 mg daily. The primary end-point was progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary end-points were overall survival (OS), time-to-treatment failure (TTTF), response and toxicity. Results: Of 165 randomised non-squamous patients, 159 were treated (pemetrexed: 83; pemetrexed + erlotinib: 76). The median PFS (months; 95% CI) was 2.89 (1.94, 3.38) for pemetrexed versus 3.19 (2.86, 4.70) for pemetrexed + erlotinib (hazard ratio [HR] 0.63; 95% CI: (0.44, 0.90); P = 0.0047). The median OS (months; 95% CI) was 7.75 (5.29, 10.41) for pemetrexed versus 11.83 (8.18, 16.66) for pemetrexed + erlotinib (HR: 0.68; 95% CI: 0.46, 0.98; P = 0.019). The median TTTF (months: 95% CI) was 2.4 (1.74, 2.99) for pemetrexed versus 3.0 (2.23, 4.07) for pemetrexed + erlotinib (HR 0.64; 95% CI: 0.46, 0.89; P = 0.0034). One patient died in pemetrexed + erlotinib arm due to febrile neutropenia. Grades 3/4 drug-related toxicities (in greater than= 5% of patients) in pemetrexed/pemetrexed + erlotinib were febrile neutropenia (2.4%/10.5%), diarrhoea (1.2%/5.3%), rash (1.2%/9.2%); anaemia (6%/11.8%), leukopenia (9.6%/23.7%), neutropenia (9.6%/25.0%), and thrombocytopenia (4.8%/14.5%). Conclusions: Pemetrexed + erlotinib treatment significantly improved PFS, OS and TTTF in 2nd line non-squamous NSCLC and was associated with an increase in grade 3/4 toxicities compared with pemetrexed alone.

  • 5. Duffy, SW
    et al.
    Tabar, L
    Vitak, B
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology UHL.
    Day, NE
    Smith, RA
    Chen, HHT
    Yen, MFA
    The relative contributions of screen-detected in situ and invasive breast carcinomas in reducing mortality from the disease2003In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 39, no 12, p. 1755-1760Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We aimed to quantify the benefits of detecting ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and of downwards stage-shifting within invasive tumours in mammographic screening. Using data from the Swedish Two-County Trial of breast cancer screening, we examined the 20-year death rates from invasive tumours of stage II or worse, invasive tumours of stage I and DCIS. We then used these rates and their respective incidences in invited (active study population, ASP) and control (passive study population, PSP) arms of the trial, to estimate the numbers of deaths avoided by downward stage-shifting the larger stage II or worse tumours to stage I and the stage I cancers to DCIS. We also studied the association between the mortality reduction achieved and the proportion of DCIS cases detected in the randomised trials of breast cancer screening. In the Swedish Two County Trial, 141 breast cancer deaths were avoided in the ASP compared with the PSP at approximately 20 years of follow-up. Of these, 65% (91/141) were avoided as a result of stage-shifting from invasive stage II or worse to invasive stage I, and 5% (7/141) as a result of stage-shifting from invasive stage I to DCIS. If we assumed that 10% of stage II or worse tumours avoided were shifted not to stage I, but to DCIS, the estimated number of deaths prevented by shifting from invasive disease to in situ was 17, which is 12% of all deaths prevented. When the results of all the randomised trials of breast cancer screening were reviewed, there was no clear association between the percentage of DCIS cases diagnosed and the observed mortality reduction. We conclude that compared with downward stage-shifting of invasive tumours, detection of DCIS plays a small part in saving lives from breast cancer. Treatment decisions in DCIS, as in invasive carcinoma, should take full account of histopathological, clinical and radiological attributes of the tumour. ⌐ 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 6.
    Ejlertsen, B.
    et al.
    Department of Oncology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Bldg. 5012, Rigshospitalet, 9. Blegdamsvej, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Mouridsen, H.T.
    Department of Oncology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Bldg. 5012, Rigshospitalet, 9. Blegdamsvej, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark, DBCG Registry, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Jensen, M.-B.
    DBCG Registry, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Andersen, J.
    Department of Oncology, Aarhus Hospital, Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Cold, S.
    Department of Oncology, Esbjerg County Hospital, Esbjerg, Denmark.
    Edlund, P.
    Department of Oncology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark.
    Ewertz, M.
    Department of Oncology, Gaavle County Hospital, Gaavle, Sweden.
    Jensen, B.B.
    Department of Oncology, Aalborg Hospital, Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Kamby, C.
    Department of Oncology, Herlev University Hospital, Herlev, Denmark.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Bergh, J.
    Radiumhemmet, Stockholm Oncology, Karolinska Institute, University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Improved outcome from substituting methotrexate with epirubicin: Results from a randomised comparison of CMF versus CEF in patients with primary breast cancer2007In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 43, no 5, p. 877-884Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We compared the efficacy of CEF (cyclophosphamide, epirubicin, and fluorouracil) against CMF (cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and fluorouracil) in moderate or high risk breast cancer patients. We randomly assigned 1224 patients with completely resected unilateral breast cancer to receive nine cycles of three-weekly intravenous CMF or CEF. Patients were encouraged to take part in a parallel trial comparing oral pamidronate 150 mg twice daily for 4 years versus control (data not shown). Substitution of methotrexate with epirubicin significantly reduced the unadjusted hazard for disease-free survival (DFS) by 16% (hazard ratio 0.84, 95% CI, 0.71-0.99) and for overall survival by 21% (hazard ratio 0.79, 95% CI, 0.66-0.94). The risk of secondary leukaemia and congestive heart failure was similar in the two groups. Overall CEF was superior over CMF in terms of DFS and OS in patients with operable breast cancer without subsequent increase in late toxicities. © 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 7.
    Ekholm, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Dept Oncol, Jönköping, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Bendahl, P. O.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Ferno, M.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Ryden, L.
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Effects of adjuvant tamoxifen over three decades on breast cancerefree and distant recurrence-free interval among premenopausal women with oestrogen receptor-positive breast cancer randomised in the Swedish SBII:2pre trial2019In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 110, p. 53-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: The primary aim was to compare 2 years of adjuvant tamoxifen versus no systemic treatment in premenopausal patients with oestrogen receptor (ER) epositive tumours, regarding breast cancerefree interval (BCFi) and distant recurrenceefree interval (D-RFi), with 30 years of follow-up and for specified intervals. Moreover, we aimed to investigate the effects of adjuvant tamoxifen on the incidence of secondary malignancies and survival after distant recurrence. Methods: Premenopausal patients with primary breast cancer were randomised to 2 years of tamoxifen (n=277) or no systemic treatment (n=287), irrespective of ER status. Information regarding events was collected by a review of medical records and from national registers. Results: The median follow-up for all patients without events was 28 years, and only four of the patients alive had a follow-up of amp;lt;20 years. With 30 years of follow-up, tamoxifen prolonged BCFi in the intention-to-treat population (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.76, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.61-0.94, p = 0.011) compared with no treatment. In patients with ER-positive tumours (n = 362), tamoxifen prolonged BCFi (HR = 0.62, 95% CI 0.47-0.82, p = 0.001) and D-RFi (HR = 0.73, 95% CI 0.54-0.99, p = 0.043). The positive effect on BCFi was significant also for the interval amp;gt; 15-30 years (HR = 0.53, 95% CI 0.28-0.98, p = 0.042). For patients with ER-positive tumours who were diagnosed with distant recurrence (n=165), survival after distant recurrence was shorter among tamoxifen-treated patients (median, 29 months versus 43 months). The incidence of contralateral breast cancer was 42% lower in the tamoxifen group (HR=0.58, 95% CI 0.35-0.96, p=0.035), whereas no differences were observed regarding other secondary malignancies. Conclusions: With three decades of follow-up, 2 years of adjuvant tamoxifen reduced the incidence of breast cancererelated events and distant recurrence, and the carryover effect seems to extend beyond 15 years. Moreover, adjuvant tamoxifen seems to be associated with shorter survival after diagnosis of distant recurrence. (C) 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  • 8.
    Eriksson, Hanna
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lyth, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Center South East Sweden.
    Månsson-Brahme, Eva
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Frohm-Nilsson, Margareta
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ingvar, Christian
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Lindholm, Christer
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Center South East Sweden.
    Naredi, Peter
    Umeå University, Sweden .
    Stierner, Ulrika
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wagenius, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Carstensen, John
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hansson, Johan
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Low level of education is associated with later stage at diagnosis and reduced survival in cutaneous malignant melanoma: A nationwide population-based study in Sweden2013In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 49, no 12, p. 2705-2716Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    A worse outcome has been reported for cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) patients with low socioeconomic status. We have investigated the association between level of education, clinical stage at diagnosis (stage at diagnosis) and CMM-specific survival in Sweden.

    METHODS:

    We identified 27,235 patients from the Swedish Melanoma Register diagnosed with a primary invasive CMM between 1990 and 2007 and linked data to nationwide, population-based, health and census registers with a follow-up to 2010.

    RESULTS:

    The odds ratio (OR) of higher disease stage at diagnosis was significantly increased in lower education groups (OR stage II versus I=1.6; 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.5-1.7. OR stage III-IV versus I=2.3; 95% CI=1.8-2.9). The risk of dying of CMM, was significantly increased in patients with low (hazard ratio (HR) low versus high=2.02; 95% CI=1.80-2.26; p<0.0001) and intermediate (HR intermediate versus high=1.35; 95% CI=1.20-1.51; p<0.0001) level of education. After adjustment for age, gender, stage at diagnosis and other known prognostic factors, the HRs remained significant for low versus high (HR=1.13; 95% CI=1.01-1.27; p=0.04) but not for intermediate versus high (HR=1.11; 95% CI=0.99-1.24; p=0.08) education. The HR associated with low level of education was significantly higher among female patients, patients <55years, patients with truncal tumours and during the first 5years after diagnosis.

    CONCLUSION:

    Lower level of education is associated with reduced CMM-specific survival, which may at least partially be attributed to a more advanced stage at diagnosis. These results emphasise the need for improved early detection strategies.

  • 9.
    Evertsson, Sofia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindblom, A
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    APC I1307K and E1317Q variants are rare or do not occur in Swedish colorectal cancer patients2001In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 499-502Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, a germ line mutation of the APC gene, I1307K, was discovered in a subset of Ashkenazi jews. The mutation involves an amino acid exchange and creates a tract consisting of eight contiguous adenosine residues believed to cause hypermutability in this region. Another germ line missense variant, E1317Q, not restricted to a certain ethnic population, could functionally alter the protein. These APC variants have been linked with increased colorectal cancer risk in several studies. However, they have not yet been investigated in Swedish colorectal cancer patients. Thus, our aim was to investigate the prevalence of I1307K and E1317Q in Swedish colorectal cancer patients in order to determine if these genetic variants are important predisposing factors to colorectal cancer in this population. To this end, sequence analysis was carried out of the APC gene in order to identify any I1307K and E1317Q variants in 106 unselected cases and 88 hereditary/familial colorectal cancer cases including 22 cases of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) fulfilling the Amsterdam criteria. Out of a total of 194 cases examined, we did not find any variants. It seems that these alterations are rare or absent in the Swedish population.

  • 10.
    Fohlin, Helena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Center South East Sweden.
    Perez-Tenorio, Gizeh
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fornander, Tommy
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Skoog, Lambert
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Carstensen, John
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Akt2 expression is associated with good long-term prognosis in oestrogen receptor positive breast cancer2013In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 49, no 6, p. 1196-1204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Akt is a signalling modulator for many cellular processes, including metabolism, cell proliferation, cell survival and cell growth. Three isoforms of Akt have been identified, but only a few studies have concerned the isoform-specific roles in the prognosis of breast cancer patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic value of v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homologue 1 (Akt1) and v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homologue 2 (Akt2) in oestrogen receptor positive (ER+) and oestrogen receptor negative (ER–) breast cancer with long-term follow-up.

    Material and methods

    The expression of Akt in tumour tissue was analysed with immunohistochemistry in a cohort of 272 postmenopausal patients with stage II breast cancer. The median follow-up time was 19 years. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using the Cox’s proportional hazards model.

    Results

    The risk of distant recurrence was reduced for patients with ER+ tumours expressing Akt2 compared to patients with no Akt2 expression (HR = 0.49, 95% CI 0.29–0.82, p = 0.007). When adjusting for important clinical tumour characteristics and treatment, Akt2 was still an independent prognostic factor (HR = 0.38, 95% CI 0.21–0.68, p = 0.001) and the association remained long-term. The prognostic value of Akt2 increased with higher oestrogen receptor levels from no effect among patients with ER– tumours to 68% risk reduction for the group with high ER-levels (P for trend = 0.042). Akt1 showed no significant prognostic information.

    Conclusion

    Our results indicate that Akt2 expression is associated with a lower distant recurrence rate for patients with ER+ tumours and that this association remains long-term. The prognostic value of Akt2 increases with higher oestrogen receptor expression, motivating further mechanistic studies on the role of Akt2 in ER+ breast cancer.

  • 11. Fredriksson, I
    et al.
    Liljegren, G
    Arnesson, Lars-Gunnar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC - Medicin och kirurgicentrum, GE: endokir.
    Emdin, SO
    Palm-Sjovall, M
    Fornander, T
    Frisell, J
    Holmberg, L
    Time trends in the results of breast conservation in 4694 women2001In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 37, no 12, p. 1537-1544Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a population-based cohort of 4694 women with invasive breast cancer, operated upon with breast conserving surgery (BCS) in 1981-1990 and followed through to 1997, we studied how this technique had been adopted into clinical practice, especially with reference to the use of radiotherapy (RT). Our main aim was to see whether there was a drift in the risk of local recurrence and breast cancer death over time. During the 30 151 person-years of observation in the cohort, there were 582 local recurrences, 456 breast cancer deaths and 438 deaths due to other causes. Postoperative RT was given to 70.2%, but usage increased over the period. The women not receiving RT were mostly elderly, but also in women <70 years, 20.4% did not receive RT. The risk for local recurrence after RT were 7.6 and 17.8% at 5 and 10 years, respectively. Without RT, more than 30% had a local recurrence at 10 years. Thus, the choice not to irradiate failed to target women at a low risk. In a multivariate Cox analysis taking tumour size, nodal status, age at operation and RT into account, there was a trend for a higher risk of local recurrence in the later time period, relative hazard 1.5 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.0-2.1). Corrected survival was 93.3 and 85.2% at 5 and 10 years, respectively. ⌐ 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 12. Fredriksson, I
    et al.
    Liljegren, G
    Arnesson, Lars-Gunnar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Emdin, SO
    Palm-Sjövall, M
    Fornander, T
    Holmqvist, M
    Holmberg, L
    Frisell, J
    Local recurrence in the breast after conservative surgery - A study of prognosis and prognostic factors in 391 women2002In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 38, no 14, p. 1860-1870Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a population-based cohort of 6613 women with invasive breast cancer, who had breast-conserving surgery between 1981 and 1990, 391 recurrences in the operated breast were identified. The main aim of this study was to examine the prognosis and prognostic factors in different subgroups of local recurrences, characterised by the time to recurrence, location of recurrence and previously given radiotherapy. The median follow-up for women who had a local recurrence was 7.9 years. The life-table estimates for breast cancer-specific survival in women with local recurrences were 84.5% (standard error (S.E.) 1.8) at 5 years and 70.9% (S.E. 2.7) at 10 years. The risk of breast cancer death was highest among women who had an early (=2 years) recurrence in the same quadrant as the primary tumour, with a breast cancer-specific survival of 67.9% (S.E. 4.8) at 5 years and 56.0% (S.E. 5.9) at 10 years. There was a statistically significant difference in the probability of breast cancer-specific survival, as measured from the recurrence, between women who initially did or did not receive radiotherapy (P=0.0123). However, when measured from primary treatment, there was no significant difference, indicating that the difference in prognosis could be due to a lead-time bias. Independent prognostic factors for breast cancer-specific survival in women with local recurrences were time to local recurrence and the Nottingham Prognostic Index (NPI). ⌐ 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 13.
    Gentile, Massimiliano
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bergman Jungeström, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olsen, K. E.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Forensic Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wingren, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    p53 and survival in early onset breast cancer: analysis of gene mutations, loss of heterozygosity and protein accumulation1999In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 35, no 8, p. 1202-1207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The p53 protein has proven to be central in tumorigenesis by its cell cycle regulatory properties and both gene mutations and protein accumulation have been associated with poor prognosis in breast cancer. The present study was undertaken to investigate the prognostic significance of gene mutations, p53 protein accumulation and of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at the TP53 locus in young (age <37 years) breast cancer patients. In total, gene mutations were found in 21 of the 123 patients (17%), LOH in 20 of the 47 informative cases (43%) and protein accumulation in 47 of the 102 available cases (46%). Log rank analysis revealed no significant association between survival and TP53 mutations (in general), p53 protein accumulation or LOH. However, missense mutations localised to the zinc binding domain were significantly (P=0.0007) associated with poorer prognosis. As indicated in this as well as other studies, p53 protein accumulation is frequently found in young breast cancer patients, but this protein overexpression appears to be of minor significance for survival. Nevertheless, the present report also suggests that specific mutations contribute substantially to tumour aggressiveness.

  • 14.
    Hall, Kirsten Sundby
    et al.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Bruland, Oyvind S.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway; Univ Oslo, Norway.
    Bjerkehagen, Bodil
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Zaikova, Olga
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Engellau, Jacob
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Hagberg, Oskar
    Reg Canc Ctr South, Sweden.
    Hansson, Lina
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Hagberg, Hans
    Uppsala Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Ahlstrom, Marie
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Knobel, Heidi
    St Olavs Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Papworth, Karin
    Norrlands Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Zemmler, Maja
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Goplen, Dorota
    Haukeland Hosp, Norway.
    Bauer, Henrik C. F.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Mikael
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Adjuvant chemotherapy and postoperative radiotherapy in high-risk soft tissue sarcoma patients defined by biological risk factors-A Scandinavian Sarcoma Group study (SSG XX)2018In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 99, p. 78-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate the outcome following adjuvant doxorubicin and ifosfamide in a prospective non-randomised study based on a soft tissue sarcoma (STS) patient subgroup defined by specific morphological characteristics previously shown to be at a high-risk of metastatic relapse. The expected 5-year cumulative incidence of metastases in patients with this risk profile has previously been reported to be about 50% without adjuvant chemotherapy. Methods: High-risk STS was defined as high-grade morphology (according to the Federation Nationale des Centres de Lutte Contre le Cancer [FNCLCC] grade II-III) and either vascular invasion or at least two of the following criteria: tumour size amp;gt;= 8.0 cm, infiltrative growth and necrosis. Six cycles of doxorubicin (60 mg/m(2)) and ifosfamide (6 g/m(2)) were given. Postoperative accelerated radiotherapy was applied and scheduled between cycles 3 and 4. Results: For the 150 eligible patients, median follow-up time for metastases-free survival was 3.9 years (range 0.2-8.7). Five-year metastases-free survival (MFS) was 70.4% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 63.1-78.4) with a local recurrence rate of 14.0% (95% CI: 7.8-20.2). For overall survival (OS), the median follow-up time was 4.4 years (range: 0.2-8.7). The five-year OS was 76.1% (95% CI: 68.8-84.2). Tumour size, deep location and reduced dose intensity (amp;lt;80%) had a negative impact on survival. Toxicity was moderate with no treatment-related death. Conclusions: A benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy, compared to similar historical control groups, was demonstrated in STS patients with defined poor prognostic factors. Vascular invasion, tumour size, growth pattern and necrosis may identify patients in need of adjuvant chemotherapy. (C) 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 15.
    Holgersson, Georg
    et al.
    University of Uppsala Hospital.
    Bergstrom, Stefan
    Gävle Central Hospital.
    Bergqvist, Michael
    University of Uppsala Hospital.
    Nyman, Jan
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Hoye, Even
    Gävle Central Hospital.
    Helsing, Martin
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Friesland, Signe
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Holgersson, Margareta
    University of Uppsala Hospital.
    Birath, Elisabet
    Skåne University Hospital.
    Ekrnan, Simon
    University of Uppsala Hospital.
    Blystad, Thomas
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Respiratory Medicine.
    Ewers, Sven-Borje
    University of Lund Hospital.
    Morth, Charlotte
    Malar Hospital.
    Loden, Britta
    Central Hospital Karlstad.
    Henriksson, Roger
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Swedish Lung Cancer Radiation Study Group: Predictive value of histology for radiotherapy response in patients with non-small cell lung cancer2011In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 47, no 16, p. 2415-2421Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the potential predictive value of histology in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with curatively intended radiotherapy. In a collaborative effort among all the Swedish Oncology Departments, clinical data were collected for 1146 patients with a diagnosed non-small cell lung cancer subjected to curatively intended irradiation (greater than= 50 Gy) during the years 1990 to 2000. The included patients were identified based on a manual search of all medical and radiation charts at the oncology departments from which the individual patient data were collected. Only patients who did not have a histological diagnosis date and death date/last follow-up date were excluded (n = 141). Among the 1146 patients with non-small cell carcinoma eligible for analysis, 919 were diagnosed with either adenocarcinoma (n = 323) or squamous cell carcinoma (n = 596) and included in this study. The median survival for the 919 patients was 14.8 months, while the 5-year survival rate was 9.5%. Patients with adenocarcinoma had a significantly better overall survival compared with patients with squamous cell carcinoma (p = 0.0062, log-rank test). When comparing different stages, this survival benefit was most pronounced for stages IIA-IIB (pless than0.0001, log-rank test). The difference in survival between the two histological groups was statistically significant in a univariate Cox analysis (p = 0.0063) as well as in two multivariate Cox analyses including demographic and treatment variables (p = 0.037 and p = 0.048, respectively). In this large population based retrospective study we describe for the first time that patients with adenocarcinoma have a better survival after curatively intended radiation therapy in comparison with squamous cell carcinoma patients, particularly those with clinical stages IIA-IIB.

  • 16.
    Jayson, G.C.
    et al.
    Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Research UK, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Wilmslow Road, Withington, Manchester M20 4BX, United Kingdom.
    Mulatero, C.
    Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Research UK, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Wilmslow Road, Withington, Manchester M20 4BX, United Kingdom.
    Ranson, M.
    Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Research UK, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Wilmslow Road, Withington, Manchester M20 4BX, United Kingdom.
    Zweit, J.
    Cancer Research UK, UMIST Radiochemical Targeting I., Paterson Inst. for Cancer Research, Wilmslow Road, Withington, Manchester M20 4BX, United Kingdom, Manchester PET Centre, Paterson Inst. for Cancer Research, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Wilmslow Road, Withington, Manchester M20 4BX, United Kingdom.
    Jackson, A.
    Div. Imaging Sci. and Biomed. Eng., Department of Medicine, Stopford Building, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PT, United Kingdom.
    Broughton, L.
    Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Research UK, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Wilmslow Road, Withington, Manchester M20 4BX, United Kingdom.
    Wagstaff, J.
    Department of Medical Oncology, Academisch Ziekenhuis Maastricht, P. Debyelaan 25, NL-6202 AZ Maastricht, Netherlands.
    Håkansson, L.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology.
    Groenewegen, G.
    Department of Medical Oncology, Universitair Medisch Centrum Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, NL-3508 AB Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Lawrance, J.
    Department of Radiology, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Wilmslow Road, Withington, Manchester M20 4BX, United Kingdom.
    Tang, M.
    Protein Design Laboratories, 34801 Campus Drive, Fremont, CA, United States.
    Wauk, L.
    Protein Design Laboratories, 34801 Campus Drive, Fremont, CA, United States.
    Levitt, D.
    Protein Design Laboratories, 34801 Campus Drive, Fremont, CA, United States.
    Marreaud, S.
    EORTC Data Centre, Ave E. Mounier, 83, B-1200 Brussels, Belgium.
    Lehmann, F.F.
    EORTC Data Centre, Ave E. Mounier, 83, B-1200 Brussels, Belgium.
    Herold, M.
    Innsbruck Universitaetsklinik, Dept. of Medicine, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria.
    Zwierzina, H.
    Innsbruck Universitaetsklinik, Dept. of Medicine, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria.
    Phase I investigation of recombinant anti-human vascular endothelial growth factor antibody in patients with advanced cancer2005In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 41, no 4, p. 555-563Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We assessed the tolerability, safety, pharmacokinetics and dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) of the recombinant humanized IgG4 anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) monoclonal antibody, HuMV833, in patients with advanced cancer. Cohorts of patients with progressive solid tumours received escalating doses of HuMV833 as a 1-h intravenous (I.V.) infusion on days 1, 15, 22, and 29. Twenty patients (median Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) score 1) were accrued. HuMV833 infusions were well tolerated and there were no grade III or IV toxicities definitely related to the antibody. Grade I or II toxicities probably related to the antibody included fatigue, dyspnoea and rash. There were two episodes of asymptomatic hypocalcaemia, one at grade III and one grade IV, which were recorded in early follow-up. There were eight grade I episodes of asymptomatic elevation of activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) and two grade III events, one in a patient receiving 1 mg/kg and the other receiving extended doses of 10 mg/kg. Pharmacokinetic analysis revealed a non-linear kinetic and an elimination half-life of between 8.2 (0.3 mg/kg) and 18.7 (10 mg/kg) days. One patient with ovarian cancer experienced a partial response (PR) of 9 months duration and eight had disease stabilisation (SD) including one patient with colorectal carcinoma whose disease was stable for 14 months. In 13 of the 14 samples taken from 12 patients, the plasma concentration of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) was reduced 24 h after drug administration. HuMV833 is safe and lacked DLT at doses up to 10 mg/kg on this schedule. Multiple doses were well tolerated, despite occasional asymptomatic elevations in APTT. By combining pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and toxicity data, we can identify doses of 1 and 3 mg/kg for further investigation. HuMV833 appears to possess some clinical activity. © 2004 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  • 17.
    Koch, Andrea
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Allergy Centre UHL.
    Bergman, Bengt
    Department of Respiratory Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Holmberg, Erik
    Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sederholm, Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pulmonary Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Respiratory Medicine UHL.
    Ek, Lars
    Department of Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Kosieradzki, Jaroslaw
    Department of Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Lamberg, Kristina
    Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Thaning, Lars
    Department of Pulmonary Medicine, University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ydreborg, Sven-Olof
    Department of Medicine, County Hospital Ryhov, 551 85 Jönköping, Sweden.
    Sörenson, Sverre
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pulmonary Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Respiratory Medicine UHL.
    Effect of celecoxib on survival in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer: A double blind randomised clinical phase III trial (CYCLUS study) by the Swedish Lung Cancer Study Group2011In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 47, no 10, p. 1546-1555Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Increased expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is common in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and has been associated with poor prognosis. Experimental and clinical phase II trials have indicated that the addition of the COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib to palliative chemotherapy might increase survival time in patients with advanced NSCLC.

    METHODS: We performed a double-blind, placebo-controlled multicentre phase III trial at 13 centres in Sweden. Three hundred and nineteen patients with advanced NSCLC stage IIIB-IV and performance status 0-2 were randomised to receive celecoxib 400mg b.i.d. or placebo in addition to palliative chemotherapy. The primary objective was to compare overall survival. Other end-points were quality of life, progression-free survival, toxicity, cardiovascular events and biological markers. The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, No. NCT00300729.

    FINDINGS: Three hundred and sixteen patients were included in the analysis, 158 in each treatment group. Median survival time was 8.5months. There was no survival difference between the treatment arms. Small but not statistically significant differences in global quality of life and pain were seen favouring the celecoxib group. No increased incidence of cardiovascular events was observed in the celecoxib group.

    INTERPRETATION: This study failed to demonstrate a survival benefit of the addition of celecoxib to palliative chemotherapy.

  • 18. Lacombe, D
    et al.
    Fumoleau, P
    Zwierzina, H
    Twelves, C
    Håkansson, Leif
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Jayson, G
    Lehmann, F
    Verweij, J
    The EORTC and drug development2002In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 38, p. 19-23Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Lyth, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mikiver, R.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Center South East Sweden.
    Nielsen, K.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Isaksson, K.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Ingvar, C.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Prognostic instrument for survival outcome in melanoma patients: based on data from the population-based Swedish Melanoma Register2016In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 59, p. 171-178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Several major analyses have identified a consistent set of independent risk factors for cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM). A few prognostic models have been presented but some are based on a limited number of patients and others are based on selected groups of patients referred to major institutions. No nationwide population-based prognostic instrument for survival of CMM has been presented. The Swedish Melanoma Register (SMR) database covers 99% of CMM diagnosed in Sweden and includes today &gt;50,000 cases. Objectives: To create a prognostic instrument based on SMR data to give highly reliable risk profiles for patients diagnosed with localised CMM. Methods: Clinicopathological data were linked to the cause of death registry for calculation of CMM-specific survival. A generalised gamma method was used to derive 1, 5 and 10year probabilities of death for each combination of patient and tumour data: age, sex, tumour site, tumour thickness, tumour ulceration, Clarks level of invasion and when applicable also outcome of sentinel node biopsy (SNB). Results: Tumour thickness had the highest prognostic impact, explaining 77% of the model. Women had 30% lower risk of death because of CMM than men. Presence of ulceration nearly doubled the risk. If the patient had a positive SNB status the risk of death due to CMM increased three times versus a negative SNB status. Conclusion: This unique population-based prognostic model for primary CMM shows better survival than the American Joint Commission on Cancer prognostic model widely used. The reason is probably that the referral bias is eliminated in a population-based cohort.

  • 20. Marchand, M
    et al.
    Punt, CJA
    Aamdal, S
    Escudier, B
    Kruit, WHJ
    Keilholz, U
    Håkansson, Leif
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    van Baren, N
    Humblet, Y
    Mulders, P
    Avril, M-F
    Eggermont, AMM
    Scheibenbogen, C
    Uiters, J
    Wanders, J
    Delire, M
    Boon, T
    Stoter, G
    Immunisation of metastatic cancer patients with MAGE-3 protein combined with adjuvant SBAS-2: A clinical report2003In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 70-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fifty-seven patients with MAGE-3-positive measurable metastatic cancer, most of them with melanoma, were vaccinated with escalating doses of a recombinant MAGE-3 protein combined with a fixed dose of the immunological adjuvant SBAS-2, which contained MPL and QS21. The immunisation schedule included 4 intramuscular (i.m.) injections at 3-week intervals. Patients whose tumour stabilised or regressed after 4 vaccinations received 2 additional vaccinations at 6-week intervals. The vaccine was generally well tolerated. Among the 33 melanoma patients who were evaluable for tumour response, we observed 2 partial responses, 2 mixed responses and 1 stabilisation. Time to progression in these 5 patients varied from 4 to 29 months. In addition, a partial response lasting 10 months was observed in 1 of the 3 metastatic bladder cancer patients included. None of the tumour responses described above involved visceral metastases. Immunological responses to the vaccine will be reported separately. ⌐ 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 21. Morales, MM
    et al.
    Olsen, J
    Johansen, P
    Kaerlev, L
    Guénel, P
    Arveux, P
    Wingren, Gun
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Hardell, L
    Ahrens, W
    Stang, A
    Llopis, A
    Merletti, F
    Villanueva, MA
    Viral infection, atopy and mycosis fungoides: A European multicentre case-control study2003In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 511-516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) is a rare disease with an unknown aetiology, although it has been suggested that infections may play a role. The present study investigates whether infections, atopic disorders and some other diseases are risk indicators for MF. A European multicentre case-control study involving seven rare cancers, including MF, was conducted from 1995 to 1998. Patients between 35 and 69 years of age diagnosed with MF (n=140) were recruited, and the diagnoses were verified by a reference pathologist, who classified 83 cases as definitive and 35 cases as possible, 22 cases were not accepted. Of the 118 accepted cases, 104 patients were interviewed (including 76 definitive cases and 28 possible cases). These 76 definitive cases were used for this study. A common set of controls to serve all case groups were interviewed, representing a total of 4574 controls. The latter included 1008 colon cancer patients and 3566 subjects selected from population registers. Information on infections, skin pathology and clinical history 5 years before the diagnosis of MF was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) derived from logistic regression-modelling, which included gender, age and country. The highest ORs for MF were found in patients who reported a history of psoriasis 5 years before MF was diagnosed (OR 7.2, 95% CI: 3.6-14.5). Urticaria had an OR of 1.4 (95% CI: 0.6-3.6). Infections and atopic diseases were not closely associated with MF. Some diseases correlate to MF. Whether this has a causal background or reflects early diagnostic uncertainty is not known.

  • 22. Morales Suarez-Varela, MM
    et al.
    Olsen, J
    Kaerlev, L
    Guénel, P
    Arveux, P
    Wingren, Gun
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Hardell, L
    Stang, A
    Llopis-Gonzalez, A
    Merletti, F
    Guillén, F
    Johansen, P
    Are alcohol intake and smoking associated with mycosis fungoides? A European multicentre case-control study.2001In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 37, p. 392-397Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Ringberg, A.
    et al.
    Department of Plastic Surgery, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Nordgren, H.
    Department of Pathology, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Thorstensson, S.
    Department of Pathology, Central Hospital, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Idvall, I.
    Department of Pathology, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Garmo, H.
    Regional Oncologic Center, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Granstrand, B.
    Department of Surgery, Norrland University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
    Arnesson, Lars-Gunnar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Sandelin, K.
    Department of Surgery, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wallgren, A.
    Department of Oncology, Sahlgenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Anderson, H.
    Regional Oncologic Center, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Emdin, S.
    Department of Surgery, Norrland University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
    Holmberg, L.
    Regional Oncologic Center, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Histopathological risk factors for ipsilateral breast events after breast conserving treatment for ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast - Results from the Swedish randomised trial2007In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 291-298Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The primary aims were to study risk factors for an ipsilateral breast event (IBE) after sector resection for ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast (DCIS) in a trial comparing adjuvant radiotherapy to no therapy and to assess predictive factors for response to radiotherapy. Secondary aims were to analyse reproducibility of the histopathological evaluation and to estimate correctness of diagnosis in the trial. Setting: A randomised trial in Sweden (the SweDCIS trial), including 1046 women with a median of 5.2 years of follow-up in a population, offered routine mammographic screening. Methods: A case-cohort design with a total of 161 cases of IBE (42 of those being members of the subcohort) and 284 sampled for the sub-cohort. Ninety five percent of the participants' slides could be retrieved and were re-evaluated by three experienced pathologists. Results: Low nuclear grade (NG 1-2) and absence of necrosis halves the risk of IBE in both irradiated and non-irradiated patients. Lesion size, margins of excision and age at diagnosis did not modify these associations. The presence of necrosis modified the effect of radiotherapy: relative risk was 0.40 with necrosis present and 0.07 with necrosis absent (p-value for interaction 0.068). In all subsets of prognostic factors, radiotherapy conferred a substantial benefit. The risk factors for in situ and invasive IBE were similar. The agreement between pathologists was moderate (? = 0.486). Correctness of diagnosis in the subcohort of SweDCIS was 84.8%. Conclusion: Although nuclear grade and necrosis carry prognostic information, we could not define a group with very low risk after sector resection alone. Radiotherapy has a protective effect in all substrata of risk factors studied. The interaction between the presence of necrosis and radiotherapy is a clinically and biologically relevant research area. © 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 24.
    Rydén, Lisa
    et al.
    Department of Surgery, Helsingborgs Lasarett, Helsingborg, Sweden and Department of Laboratory Medicine, div of Pathology, University Hospital, Malmö.
    Jönsson, Per-Ebbe
    Department of Surgery, Helsingborgs Lasarett, Helsingborg, Sweden.
    Chebil, Gunilla
    Department of Pathology, Helsingborgs Lasarett, Helsingborg.
    Dufmats, Monika
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fernö, Mårten
    Department of Oncology, University Hospital, Lund.
    Jirström, Karin
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, div of Pathology, University Hospital, Malmö.
    Källström, Ann-Christine
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Landberg, Göran
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, div of Pathology, University Hospital, Malmö.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Thorstenson, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Two years of adjuvant tamoxifen in premenopausal patients with breast cancer: a randomised, controlled trial with long-term follow-up2005In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 256-264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adjuvant tamoxifen treatment increases recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) in early breast cancer, although in premenopausal patients the number of studies comparing tamoxifen vs no treatment are limited. We report herein the effect on RFS of adjuvant tamoxifen treatment in a multicentre trial of premenopausal patients with stage II breast cancer patients randomised between 1986 and 1991 to 2 years of tamoxifen treatment (n = 276) or no treatment (n = 288). The receptor status of the tumour was known for 541 (96%) of the patients included. Tamoxifen treatment significantly increased RFS in patients with hormone receptor-positive (oestrogen receptor-positive (ER+) and/or progesterone receptor-positive (PR+)) tumours (Relative Risk (RR) 0.65; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.48–0.89, P = 0.006), and the beneficial effect of tamoxifen was extended to patients with indicators of poor prognosis, such as young age and nodal-positivity. PR status was a significant predictor of response to tamoxifen in multivariate models with testing of interactions of hormone receptor status and adjuvant therapy.

  • 25.
    Ryott, Michael
    et al.
    Department of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden. .
    Wangsa, Darawalee
    Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institute, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. Genetics Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Building 50, Bethesda, MD, USA..
    Heselmeyer-Haddad, Kerstin
    Genetics Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Building 50, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Lindholm, Johan
    Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institute, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Elmberger, Göran
    Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institute, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Auer, Gert
    Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institute, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Åvall Lundqvist, Elisabeth
    Department of Gynaecologic Oncology, Radiumhemmet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ried, Thomas
    Genetics Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Building 50, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Munck-Wikland, Eva
    Department of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.
    EGFR protein overexpression and gene copy number increases in oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma.2009In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 45, no 9, p. 1700-1708Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New promising therapeutic agents targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) have been developed although clinical information concerning EGFR status in oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC) is limited. We investigated EGFR protein expression and gene copy numbers in 78 pretreatment OTSCC paraffin samples. EGFR protein expression was found in all 78 tumours, of which 72% showed an intense staining. Fifty-four percent of the tumours had high (> or =four gene copies) EGFR gene copy numbers. EGFR gene copy number was significantly associated with EGFR protein expression (P=0.002). Pretreatment EGFR staining intensity tended to be associated with non-pathological complete remission after preoperative radiotherapy for Stage II OTSCC. No correlation was found between EGFR status and survival. EGFR FISH results were significantly (P=0.003) higher in more advanced tumours (Stages II, III and IV) than in the tumours in Stage I. Non-smokers exhibited a significantly higher EGFR gene copy number and protein overexpression in Stages I and II OTSCC than smokers (P=0.001, P=0.009). In conclusion, EGFR was found to be overexpressed in all OTSCCs making this cancer type interesting for exploring new therapeutic agents targeting the EGFR receptor.

  • 26.
    Salehi, Sahar
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Åvall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Legerstam, Berit
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Carlson, Joseph W.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Falconer, Henrik
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Robot-assisted laparoscopy versus laparotomy for infrarenal paraaortic lymphadenectomy in women with high-risk endometrial cancer: A randomised controlled trial2017In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 79, p. 81-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate if robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery (RALS) was non-inferior to laparotomy (LT) in harvesting infrarenal paraaortic lymph nodes in patients with presumed stage IeII high-risk endometrial cancer. Patients and methods: Patients with histologically proven endometrial cancer, presumed stage IeII with high-risk tumour features, were randomised to hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, pelvic and paraaortic lymphadenectomy by either RALS or LT. Primary outcome was paraaortic lymph node count. Secondary outcomes were perioperative events, postoperative complications and total health care cost. Results: Overall 120 patients were randomised and 96 patients were included in the per protocol analysis. Demographic, clinical and tumour characteristics were evenly distributed between groups. Mean (+/- SD) paraaortic lymph node count was 20.9 (+/- 9.6) for RALS and 22 (+/- 11, p = 0.45) for LT. The difference of means was within the non-inferiority margin (-1.6, 95% CI -5.78, 2.57). Mean pelvic node count was lower after RALS (28 +/- 10 versus 22 +/- 8, p amp;lt; 0.001). There was no difference in perioperative complications or readmissions between the groups. Operation time was longer (p amp;lt; 0.001) but total blood loss less (amp;lt;0.001) and hospital stay shorter (amp;lt;0.001) in RALS group than LT group. Health care costs for RALS was significantly lower (mean difference $1568 USD/(sic)1225 Euro, p amp;lt; 0.05). Conclusion: Our results demonstrate non-inferiority in paraaortic lymph node count, comparable complication rates, shorter hospital length and lower total cost for RALS over laparotomy. Generalisability of the latter finding requires a high-volume setting and high surgical proficiency. In women with high-risk endometrial cancer confined to the uterus, RALS is a valid treatment modality. Clinical trials registrations: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01847703. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 27.
    Sanchez, B. C.
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute.
    Sundqvist, M.
    Kalmar Hospital.
    Fohlin, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Spyratos, F.
    Ctr Rene Huguenin, Lab Oncogenet, St Cloud, France.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Linderholm, B. K,
    Karolinska Institute.
    Prolonged tamoxifen treatment increases relapse-free survival for patients with primary breast cancer expressing high levels of VEGF2010In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 46, no 9, p. 1580-1587Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous retrospective studies have shown that high intratumoural levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) correlate with an inferior outcome for patients treated with adjuvant tamoxifen. Our objectives were to validate the impact of VEGF on survival after adjuvant tamoxifen and to investigate the interaction between VEGF and treatment duration. For this purpose tumour homogenates from 402 patients with operable oestrogen receptor positive breast cancer (BC), treated with tamoxifen for 2 (n = 149) or 5 years (n = 253) as the only systemic adjuvant therapy were included. The median follow-up time for surviving patients was 9.8 years (range 0.5-14.8 years). Expression of VEGF was assessed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and investigated in relation to the standard BC parameters and survival. In the total population, higher VEGF was significantly correlated with shorter recurrence-free survival (RFS) (HR = 1.63, 95%CI = 1.11-2.39, p = 0.010), breast cancer corrected survival (BCCS) (HR = 1.82, 95%CI = 1.13-2.93, p = 0.014) and overall survival (OS) (HR = 1.51, 95%CI = 1.11-2.05, p = 0.009). High VEGF was significantly associated with reduced RFS (HR = 2.61, 95%CI = 1.45-4.70, p = 0.001) after two years of tamoxifen, whilst no difference was seen in patients treated for five years (HR = 1.09, 95%CI = 0.64-1.84, p = 0.760). A statistically significant interaction was observed between high VEGF expression and improved RFS after 5-year tamoxifen (p = 0.034). In concordance with previous studies, high VEGF was significantly correlated with shorter survival. We present data not reported previously revealing that patients expressing high levels of VEGF display a better outcome provided that tamoxifen is given for five years. Further studies on the impact of VEGF on a 5-year regimen are motivated.

  • 28.
    Sonnenblick, Amir
    et al.
    University of Libre Bruxelles, Belgium.
    Francis, Prudence A.
    Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Australia; Australia and New Zealand Breast Cancer Trials Grp, Australia; Int Breast Cancer Study Grp, Switzerland.
    Azim, Hatem A. Jr.
    University of Libre Bruxelles, Belgium.
    de Azambuja, Evandro
    University of Libre Bruxelles, Belgium.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Gutierez, Jorge
    Clin Las Condes, Chile.
    Quinaux, Emmanuel
    Int Institute Drug Dev, Belgium.
    Mastropasqua, Mauro G.
    University of Milan, Italy; University of Milan, Italy.
    Ameye, Lieveke
    University of Libre Bruxelles, Belgium.
    Anderson, Michael
    Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark; Danish Breast Cancer Cooperat Grp, Denmark.
    Lluch, Ana
    University of Valencia, Spain.
    Gnant, Michael
    Medical University of Vienna, Austria; Medical University of Vienna, Austria.
    Goldhirsch, Aron
    European Institute Oncol, Italy; Int Breast Cancer Study Grp, Switzerland.
    Di Leo, Angelo
    Hospital Prato, Italy.
    Barnadas, Agusti
    University of Autonoma Barcelona, Spain.
    Cortes-Funes, Hernan
    University Hospital 12 Octubre, Spain.
    Piccart, Martine
    University of Libre Bruxelles, Belgium.
    Crown, John
    St Vincets University Hospital, Ireland.
    Final 10-year results of the Breast International Group 2-98 phase III trial and the role of Ki67 in predicting benefit of adjuvant docetaxel in patients with oestrogen receptor positive breast cancer2015In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 51, no 12, p. 1481-1489Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Breast International Group (BIG) 2-98 is a randomised phase III trial that tested the effect of adding docetaxel, either in sequence to or in combination with anthracycline-based adjuvant chemotherapy, in women with node-positive breast cancer (BC). Here, we present the 10-year final trial safety and efficacy analyses. We also report an exploratory analysis on the predictive value of Ki67 for docetaxel efficacy, in the BIG 2-98 and using a pooled analysis of three other randomised trials. Patients and methods: 2887 patients were randomly assigned in a 2 x 2 trial design to one of four treatments. The primary objective was to evaluate the overall efficacy of docetaxel on disease free survival (DFS). Secondary objectives included comparisons of sequential docetaxel versus sequential control arm, safety and overall survival (OS). Ki67 expression was centrally evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Results: After a median follow-up of 10.1 years, the addition of docetaxel did not significantly improve DFS or OS (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.91, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.81-1.04; P = 0.16 and HR = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.76-1.03; P = 0.11, respectively). Sequential docetaxel did not improve DFS compared to the sequential control arm (HR = 0.86, 95% CI = 0.721.03; P = 0.10). In oestrogen receptor (ER)-positive tumours with Ki67 greater than= 14%, the addition of docetaxel resulted in 5.4% improvement in 10-year OS (P = 0.03, test for interaction = 0.1). In a multivariate model, there was a trend for improved DFS and OS in ER-positive patients with high Ki67 and treated with docetaxel (HR = 0.79, 95% CI = 0.63-1.01; P = 0.05 and HR = 0.76, 95% CI = 0.57-1.01; P = 0.06, respectively). A pooled analysis of four randomised trials showed a benefit of taxanes in highly proliferative ER-positive disease but not in low proliferating tumours (interaction test P = 0.01). Conclusion: The DFS benefit previously demonstrated with sequential docetaxel is no longer observed at 10 years. However, an exploratory analysis suggested a benefit of docetaxel in patients with highly proliferative ER-positive BC.

  • 29.
    Sörenson, Sverre
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pulmonary Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Respiratory Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Fohlin, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Center South East Sweden.
    Lindgren, Andrea
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Lindskog, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Bergman, Bengt
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden .
    Sederholm, Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pulmonary Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Respiratory Medicine.
    Ek, Lars
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden .
    Lamberg, Kristina
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden .
    Clinchy, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Predictive role of plasma vascular endothelial growth factor for the effect of celecoxib in advanced non-small cell lung cancer treated with chemotherapy2013In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 115-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim of the study: The primary purpose of this study is to investigate if pretreatment plasma levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) are predictive of the effect of celecoxib on survival in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with palliative chemotherapy. A secondary objective is to describe the course of plasma VEGF levels during and after treatment with cytotoxic chemotherapy combined with celecoxib or placebo. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods: In a previously published double-blind multicenter phase III trial, 316 patients with NSCLC stage IIIB or IV and World Health Organisation (WHO) performance status 0-2 were randomised to receive celecoxib 400 mg b.i.d. or placebo in combination with two-drug platinum-based chemotherapy. Chemotherapy cycle length was three weeks and planned duration of chemotherapy was four cycles. Celecoxib was given for a maximum of one year but was stopped earlier in case of disease progression or prohibitive toxicity. In a subset of patients, plasma VEGF levels were examined at onset of treatment and at 6, 12 and 20 weeks. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: VEGF levels at start of treatment were obtained in 107 patients at four study sites. The median value was 70 pg/ml. Mean values declined during the first 12 weeks and then increased at 20 weeks. A subpopulation treatment effect pattern plot (STEPP) analysis showed an inverse relationship between initial plasma VEGF and the impact of celecoxib on survival with zero effect at 200 pg/ml. The effect on survival by celecoxib in the whole subset of patients was positive (hazard ratio (HR)=0.64 [confidence interval (CI) 0.43-0.95], p=0.028). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion: Low pretreatment plasma levels of VEGF appear to be predictive of a positive effect of celecoxib on survival.

  • 30.
    Vikingsson, Svante
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carlsson, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Coulthard, S
    Newcastle University, Northern Institute for Cancer Research.
    Josefsson, Martin
    National Board of Forensic Medicine, Department of Forensic Genetics and Forensic Toxicology, Linkoping.
    Almer, Sven
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Peterson, Curt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Rapid Method to Measure Thioguanine Incorporation Into DNA2011In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 47, no Supplement 1, p. S650-S650Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The thiopurine drugs, 6-mercaptopurine, azathioprine, and thioguanine, are used in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). During treatment the thioguanine nucleotides formed are incorporated into the DNA, causing apoptosis due to the cells inability to repair the resulting damage. This mechanism is believed to be important for the effects of thiopurine drugs. We have developed a novel method for the determination of thioguanine incorporation into DNA which is both faster and cheaper than earlier methods.

    Monitoring the effects of thiopurine treatment by measuring thiopurine metabolites in erythrocytes has proven to be elusive due to the lack of good correlation between measured concentrations and thiopurine effects. If the incorporation is the main mechanism of thiopurine action, a reliable method capable of measuring the incorporation in an ordinary blood sample, such as the method we have developed, should provide a significantly better correlation with treatment effect.

    Material and Methods: Briefly, DNA extracted from buffy coat is degraded using nuclease P1 and alkaline phosphatase to produce free nucleosides which are purified by filtration. Thioguanosine and thymidine are separated and detected using an LC-MS/MS system and the ratio between the bases provides a measurement of the extent of thioguanine incorporation in DNA. The method has been successfully applied to cell culture samples as well as samples from patients treated orally with thiopurines.

    Results: In 8 inflammatory bowel disease patients treated with azathioprine the measured incorporation ranged from 2.2 to 8.4 thioguanine bases for every 10 000 thymidine bases (median 5.2). This is in agreement with earlier reports on incorporation in childhood leukemia patients.

    Conclusions: With the presented method it is possible to determine the incorporation of thioguanine into DNA during thiopurine treatment in a cost effective manner, but further research is needed to determine if there is a place for this type of methods in the monitoring of thiopurine treatment.

    An ongoing study aims to compare the incorporation to treatment effects as well as conventional measurements of erythrocyte metabolite levels. By this study we hope to determine if incorporation is a more reliable measurement to predict treatment effect and if the erythrocyte metabolite levels correlate with the incorporation.

  • 31. Viprey, Virginie F
    et al.
    Corrias, Maria V
    Kågedal, Bertil
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of clinical chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Oltra, Silvestre
    Swerts, Katrien
    Vicha, Ales
    Ladenstein, Ruth
    Burchill, Susan A
    Standardisation of operating procedures for the detection of minimal disease by QRT-PCR in children with neuroblastoma: Quality assurance on behalf of SIOPEN-R-NET2007In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 341-350Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The clinical utility of detecting minimal residual disease (MRD) in children with neuroblastoma (NB) by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (QRT-PCR) is not clear. This in part reflects the lack of uniform methodology for analysis and reporting. Reference laboratories across Europe have therefore established standard operating procedures (SOPs) for the detection of NB cells by QRT-PCR. Haemopoietic samples are collected into PAXgene™ blood RNA tubes, which stabilise mRNA for 48 h at room temperature and more than 6 months at -80 °C. Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) was selected as the target for NB cell detection, expression is normalised to β2-microglobulin and reported using the ΔΔCt method. The sensitivity of QRT-PCR increased from 58% to 90% following the development of SOPs. A robust, transferable, objective method for the detection of NB cells by QRT-PCR has been defined to improve the power and consistency of studies on MRD in children with NB. © 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 32. Yen, MA
    et al.
    Tabar, L
    Vitak, B
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology UHL.
    Smith, RA
    Chen, HH
    Duffy, SW
    Quantifying the potential problem of overdiagnosis of ductal carcinoma in situ in breast cancer screening2003In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 39, no 12, p. 1746-1754Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relevance of detection of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in a breast cancer screening programme, and the extent of overdiagnosis of non-progressive lesions, remains controversial. It was the purpose of this paper to estimate the incidence of non-progressive, 'overdiagnosed' DCIS. We defined non-progressive DCIS (DCIS0) as DCIS which could not have progressed to invasive disease if left untreated. Progressive DCIS (DCIS1) was defined as DCIS which has the propensity to progress to invasive disease. We fitted a Markov process model of the incidence of progressive and non-progressive DCIS, the transition of the former to preclinical invasive disease and the subsequent progression to clinical symptomatic cancer. We used data from the Swedish Two-County Trial and from service screening programmes in the UK, Netherlands, Australia and the USA to estimate the incidence of progressive and non-progressive DCIS, and the detection rates of each at the first and subsequent screening. Average incidence of non-progressive DCIS was 1.11 per 100 000 per year. Average incidence of progressive DCIS was 2.1 per 1000 per year. At prevalence screen, 37% of DCIS cases were estimated to be non-progressive. A woman attending prevalence screen has a 19 times greater chance of having a progressive DCIS or an invasive tumour diagnosed than of having a non-progressive DCIS diagnosed. At incidence screen, only 4% of DCIS cases were estimated to be non-progressive. A woman attending an incidence screen has a 166 times higher probability of having a progressive DCIS or invasive lesion diagnosed than of having a non-progressive DCIS diagnosed. There is an element of overdiagnosis of DCIS in breast cancer screening, but the phenomenon is small in both relative and absolute terms. ⌐ 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 33.
    Zhang, Hong
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of dermatology and venereology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Dufmats, Monika
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    K-ras mutations in colorectal adenocarcinomas and neighbouring transitional mucosa.1998In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 34, no 13, p. 2053-2057Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The K-ras gene in codons 12 and 13 was investigated using allele-specific polymerase chain reaction in matched normal mucosa (n = 106), transitional mucosa (n = 69) and tumours (n = 149) from 149 patients with colorectal adenocarcinomas. K-ras mutations in codon 12 were detected in 41/149 (28%) of tumours and 4/69 (6%) of transitional mucosa samples, but not in the normal mucosa. Further, mutation rates were increased in younger patients (P = 0.001) and in mucinous carcinomas (50%) compared with well differentiated (17%), moderately differentiated (26%) or poorly differentiated (24%) tumours. Our findings indicate that mucinous carcinoma may represent a distinct genetic entity.

  • 34.
    Åvall Lundqvist, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sjövall, K
    Eneroth, P H
    Initial experiences with serum alkaline DNase activity in monitoring the effects of therapy for carcinoma of the uterine cervix.1991In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 27, no 10, p. 1313-1315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective was to evaluate if variations in serum alkaline DNase activity (SADA) can predict the effects of therapy in women with early stages of primary cervical carcinoma. 29 out of 33 patients had no evidence of disease after therapy. Only 5 out of the 29 women showed increased SADA levels after therapy compared with the pretreatment SADA value. Of the 4 women with evidence of disease after therapy, 3 had unchanged or decreased SADA levels. We conclude that serum alkaline DNase activity seems to have little to offer in predicting the effects of treatment in stage I and stage II cervical carcinoma.

  • 35.
    Åvall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Department of Gynecologic Oncology Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute and Hospital, S-171 76 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Silfverswärd, C
    Department of Tumour Pathology Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute and Hospital, S-171 76 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Aspenblad, U
    Department of Tumour Pathology Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute and Hospital, S-171 76 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nilsson, B R
    Department of Cancer Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute and Hospital, S-171 76 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Auer, G U
    Department of Tumour Pathology Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute and Hospital, S-171 76 Stockholm, Sweden.
    The impact of tumour angiogenesis, p53 overexpression and proliferative activity (MIB-1) on survival in squamous cervical carcinoma.1997In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 33, no 11, p. 1799-1804Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tumour angiogenesis (antifactor VIII-related antigen antibody), p53 overexpression (DO-1) and proliferative activity (MIB-1) were immunohistochemically analysed for the prediction of long-term survival in 113 patients with squamous cervical carcinoma. The median follow-up time was 82 months (range 72-99). In early stages (IB-IIA), neovascularisation was significantly related to tumour size. Significantly more patients in stage IIA had high tumour vascularity compared to stage IB (P < 0.01) but no significant difference was found between early and advanced stages (IIB-IVB) of cervical carcinoma. p53 overexpression was correlated to the stage of disease (P < 0.01). No relationship was found between tumour angiogenesis, p53 overexpression or MIB-1 and pelvic lymph node metastases, histological subtype or differentiation. Tumours with more than 50% p53 overexpression was significantly correlated with survival in the univariate analysis, but no independent predictive value was found. It is concluded that immunohistochemically detectable p53 overexpression as measured by DO-1 and proliferative activity as measured by MIB-1 seems of no clinical value for the prediction of long-term survival in squamous cervical carcinoma. The predictive value of tumour angiogenesis for survival outcome has still to be determined in squamous cervical carcinoma.

  • 36.
    Åvall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sjövall, K
    Nilsson, B R
    Eneroth, P H
    Prognostic significance of pretreatment serum levels of squamous cell carcinoma antigen and CA 125 in cervical carcinoma.1992In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 28A, no 10, p. 1695-1702Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Serum levels of squamous cell carcinoma antigen SCC, carcinoembryonic antigen CA 125, and tissue polypeptide antigen were determined in 142 patients with primary cervical carcinoma, 60 patients with precancerous lesions and in 129 healthy women. With regard to elevated tumour marker levels, specificity ranged from 94.6% to 97.7%. Sensitivity was highest (44.4%) for SCC. A stage relation was found for all tumour markers except for carcinoembryonic antigen. In stage Ib, SCC levels increased according to tumour volume. SCC, CA 125 or both markers were elevated in 7 of 8 patients with pelvic lymph node metastases compared with only 17 of 58 patients with negative nodes (P = 0.005). In a multivariate analysis, pretreatment serum levels of SCC and CA 125 were found to be significantly related to patient survival, in addition to stage. In cervical SCC, the risk of a fatal outcome increased 16 times with SCC levels > or = 4.5 ng/ml, compared with SCC levels < or = 1.3 ng/ml. We conclude that pretreatment serum levels of SCC may be of value as an adjunct to clinical staging. In addition, serum determinations of SCC and CA 125 seem to be useful in predicting the risk of pelvic lymph node metastases and as prognostic risk factors for disease outcome.

1 - 36 of 36
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf