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  • 1.
    Burman, Joseph
    et al.
    Department of Plant Protection Biology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Box 102, 230 53 Alnarp, Sweden/Ecology Research Group, Canterbury Christ Church University, Canterbury, Kent, CT1 1QU, England, UK .
    Westerberg, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ostrow, Suzanne
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ryrholm, Nils
    University of Gävle, 801 76 Ga¨vle, Sweden.
    Bergman, Karl-Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Winde, Inis
    Department of Plant Protection Biology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences,Alnarp, Sweden, Department of Biology, Lund University, So¨lvegatan 37, 223 62 Lund, Sweden.
    Nyabuga, Franklin N.
    Department of Plant Protection Biology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Box 102, 230 53 Alnarp, Sweden, Department of Biology, Lund University, So¨lvegatan 37, 223 62 Lund, Sweden.
    Larsson, Mattias C.
    Department of Plant Protection Biology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Box 102, 230 53 Alnarp, Sweden.
    Milberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Revealing hidden species distribution with pheromones: the caseof Synanthedon vespiformis (Lepidoptera: Sesiidae) in Sweden2016In: Journal of Insect Conservation, ISSN 1366-638X, E-ISSN 1572-9753, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 11-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Synanthedon vespiformis L. (Lepidoptera:Sesiidae) is considered a rare insect in Sweden, discoveredin 1860, with only a few observations recorded until a sexpheromone attractant became available recently. This studydetails a national survey conducted using pheromones as asampling method for this species. Through pheromonetrapping we captured 439 specimens in Southern Sweden at77 sites, almost tripling the number of previously reportedrecords for this species. The results suggest that S. vespiformisis truly a rare species with a genuinely scattereddistribution, but can be locally abundant. Habitat analyseswere conducted in order to test the relationship betweenhabitat quality and the number of individuals caught. InSweden, S. vespiformis is thought to be associated with oakhosts, but our attempts to predict its occurrence by theabundance of oaks yielded no significant relationships. Wetherefore suggest that sampling bias and limited knowledgeon distribution may have led to the assumption that thisspecies is primarily reliant on oaks in the northern part ofits range, whereas it may in fact be polyphagous, similar toS. vespiformis found as an agricultural pest in Central andSouthern Europe. We conclude that pheromones canmassively enhance sampling potential for this and otherrare lepidopteran species. Large-scale pheromone-basedsurveys provide a snapshot of true presences and absencesacross a considerable part of a species national distributionrange, and thus for the first time provide a viable means ofsystematically assessing changes in distribution over timewith high spatiotemporal resolution.

  • 2.
    Hilszczanski, Jacek
    et al.
    Forest Research Institute, Raszyn, Poland .
    Jaworski, Tomasz
    Forest Research Institute, Raszyn, Poland .
    Plewa, Radoslaw
    Forest Research Institute, Raszyn, Poland .
    Jansson, Niklas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Surrogate tree cavities: boxes with artificial substrate can serve as temporary habitat for Osmoderma barnabita (Motsch.) (Coleoptera, Cetoniinae)2014In: Journal of Insect Conservation, ISSN 1366-638X, E-ISSN 1572-9753, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 855-861Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many saproxylic insects have declined or became extinct, mainly due to habitat loss and fragmentation, and their survival increasingly depends on active conservation. Efforts to achieve this goal may be supported by the introduction of new methods, including creation of artificial habitats. Here we present results of studies on the use of wooden boxes mimicking tree cavities for an endangered saproxylic species, Osmoderma barnabita. Boxes were filled with the feeding substrate for larvae and installed on trees. Second and third-instar O. barnabita larvae were introduced in half of the boxes; the remaining ones were left uninhabited. Later inspection of boxes showed a high survival rate of introduced larvae, as well as successful breeding of a new generation inside the boxes. At the same time boxes were not colonized by the local population of O. barnabita, although other cetoniids did so. The co-occurring larvae of other cetoniids did not affect O. barnabita larvae. Thermal conditions inside boxes and natural tree cavities were almost identical and based on the results of our studies we conclude that wooden boxes may serve as temporary habitat for O. barnabita. They may be particularly useful in cases of destruction of species natural habitat, in restoration programs, and have the potential to act as a stepping stones in cases of a lack of habitat continuity.

  • 3.
    Jansson, Nicklas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Bergman, Karl-Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Ecology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Jonsell, Mats
    Department of Ecology, SLU, Box 7044, 750 07 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Milberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Ecology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    An indicator system for identification of sites of high conservation value for saproxylic oak (Quercus spp.) beetles in southern Sweden2009In: Journal of Insect Conservation, ISSN 1366-638X, E-ISSN 1572-9753, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 399-412Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The saproxylic beetle fauna on old oaks was sampled in four regions of southern Sweden using two methods: window and pitfall trapping. The aim was to test a way of finding indicator species which can be used to identify sites with high species number or that scored high on a conservation priority species index, based on occurrence of red-listed species. From 92 sites surveyed, in total 164 species of saproxylic beetles were identified. Different sets of indicator species were selected based upon 22 sites from a centrally located region. Predictions of species number and the index for 30 other sites from the same province were made. The correlation between observed and predicted species number and the index increased with increasing number of indicators. When comparing different treatment of species indata, the explanatory power of predictions was strongest for presence/absence data. Indicator sets of species effectively caught with pitfall traps gave overall the best predictions of both species number and the index. Predictions of species number and the index worked well within the same regions but gave varied result for the three other regions which shows that transferability of indicators between regions may be doubtful.

  • 4.
    Milberg, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Bergman, Karl-Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Norman, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Pettersson, Roger B.
    Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies, SLU, 901 83 Umea°, Sweden.
    Westerberg, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wikars, Lars-Ove
    Hovgården 66, Borlänge, Sweden .
    Jansson, Nicklas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A burning desire for smoke? Sampling insects favoured by forestfire in the absence of fire2015In: Journal of Insect Conservation, ISSN 1366-638X, E-ISSN 1572-9753, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 55-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fire-favoured insects are difficult to sampleexcept opportunistically after forest fires. Here, we tested ifsmoke from a small fire could be an efficient way to samplesuch insects. Insects were sampled over ca. 10 h hours, byhand-picking and netting on screens put up around the fire.Two specimens of the rare and redlisted Hormopeza spp.(Diptera, Empididae) were caught. Large numbers([20,000) of Microsania spp. (Diptera, Platypezidae) werecaught, but none in the absence of smoke. The numbers ofMicrosania spp. clearly peaked in late afternoon, and ashort sampling period would be sufficient if targeting onlythis taxon. Of the almost 200 species of Coleoptera, 17 %were considered as fire-favoured, contributing 9 % of thespecimens, suggesting low efficiency of the method for thisgroup. Using 23 sites differing in fire history, catches ofMicrosania spp. were unaffected by numbers and area offorest fire (preceding 5 years and within 10 km radius overthe sampling sites). In contrast, there was a weak trend forthe proportion of fire-favoured Coleoptera to increase withincreasing number of fires. To conclude, smoke as producedin our study can clearly attract fire-favoured Diptera,but smoke had only a weak effect on fire-favoured Coleopterain the study area. It is still likely that selectivelypicking specimens of species attracted to smoke is a morecost-efficient method than using, e.g., Malaise traps thatcatch indiscriminately.

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