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  • 1.
    Andersson, Bengt-Åke
    et al.
    Microbiology Laboratory, Division of Medical Services, Department of Laboratory Services, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping.
    Lewin, Freddi
    Department of Oncology, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping.
    Lundgren, Jan
    Department of ENT, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Nilsson, Mats
    Futurum - The Academy for Healthcare, County Council, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping.
    Rutqvist, Lars-Erik
    Department of Scientific Affairs, Swedish Match AB, Stockholm.
    Löfgren, Sture
    Microbiology Laboratory, Division of Medical Services, Department of Laboratory Services, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping.
    Laytragoon-Lewin, Nongnit
    Microbiology Laboratory, Division of Medical Services, Department of Laboratory Services, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping.
    Plasma tumor necrosis factor-α and C-reactive protein as biomarker for survival in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.2014In: Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology, ISSN 0171-5216, E-ISSN 1432-1335, Vol. 140, no 3, p. 515-519Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Tumor TNM staging is the main basis for prognosis and treatment decision for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) despite significant heterogeneity in terms of outcome among patients with the same clinical stage. In this study, a possible role of plasma interleukin-2 (IL-2), interleukin-6 (IL-6), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and C-reactive protein (CRP) as biomarkers for survival of HNSCC patients was investigated.

    METHODS: In this prospective study, plasma levels of IL-2, IL-6, GM-CSF, TNF-α and CRP in patients (n = 100) and controls (n = 48) were analyzed.

    RESULTS: Significantly elevated levels of CRP and TNF-α (p < 0.001) were found in the patients. Combination of upregulated CRP and TNF-α in the patient plasma was significantly related to shorter patient survival, independent of clinical stage.

    CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that CRP and TNF-α might be suitable as biomarkers in combination with tumor TNM staging for predicting survival and individualized treatment of HNSCC patients. Plasma CRP and TNF-α analysis are simple, rapid, cost effective and suitable for clinical practice.

  • 2.
    Bergman, Malin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ahnström, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Palmebäck Wegman, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wingren, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Polymorphism in the manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) gene and risk of breast cancer in young women2005In: Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology, ISSN 0171-5216, E-ISSN 1432-1335, Vol. 131, no 7, p. 439-444Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) is one of the major enzymes implicated in the cellular defence against reactive oxygen species. Low expression of MnSOD has been observed in different cancer tissues and several reports have shown that overexpression of MnSOD inhibits growth in various human cancer cells. These observations suggest that MnSOD is involved in carcinogenesis. A polymorphism (Ala-9Val) in the mitochondrial targeting sequence (MTS) of the MnSOD gene has been proposed to affect protein localization and thereby influence cellular defence against superoxide radicals.

    Methods: In the present case-control study, including 118 early onset breast cancer patients (≤36 years) and 174 age-matched controls, the MTS polymorphism and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in the locus of MnSOD were analysed.

    Results: We found that individuals with MnSODVal/Val and MnSODVal/Ala genotypes showed an increased risk of breast cancer (OR, 2.7; 95% CI, 2.2–5.5, p=0.01, OR, 3.0; 95%CI, 1.4–6.5, p=0.002). Moreover, 45% of the informative cases expressed allelic loss at the chromosomal locus of the MnSOD gene. No correlation was found between LOH and the genotype.

    Conclusion: The present study suggests that MnSOD may be implicated in breast carcinogenesis in young women.

  • 3.
    Bu, Huajie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rosdahl, Inger
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Holmdahl-Källenand, Katarina
    Zhang, Hong
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Importance of polymorphisms at NF-κB1 and NF-κBIα genes in melanoma risk, clinicopathological features and tumor progression in Swedish melanoma patients2007In: Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology, ISSN 0171-5216, E-ISSN 1432-1335, Vol. 133, no 11, p. 859-866Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, functional polymorphisms of NF-κB1 and NF-κBIα genes were examined in 185 melanoma patients and 438 tumor-free individuals. Associations of the polymorphisms with melanoma risk, age and pigment phenotypes of the patients and clinico-pathological tumor characteristics were analyzed. DNAs were isolated from mononuclear cells of venous blood. Polymorphisms of the genes were genotyped by a PCR-RFLP technique, and transcription level of NF-κBIα was examined by a quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR. Results showed that both ATTG insertion polymorphism of NF-κB1 and A to G polymorphism of NF-κBIα genes were correlated with melanoma risk, especially, in a combination of ATTG2/ATTGT2 and GG. NF-κB1 ATTG2/ATTG2 and NF-κBIα GG genotypes were associated with male gender and age > 65 years (at diagnosis). Patients with ATTG1/ATTG1 genotype had thinner tumors and lower Clark levels at diagnosis. Frequency of ATTG1/ATTG1 genotype was higher in patients with melanomas on intermittently sun-exposed pattern of the body and NF-κBIα GG was more frequent in the patients with melanomas at rarely exposed sites. There were no differences in the gene transcription level between patients with different NF-κBIα genotypes. These data suggest that NF-κB1 and NF-κBIα genes might be susceptible genes for melanoma risk and functional polymorphisms of these genes might be biological predictors for melanoma progression.

  • 4.
    Garvin, Stina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Oda, Husam
    Cty Hosp Ryhov, Sweden; Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Arnesson, Lars-Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Lindström, Annelie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Shabo, Ivan
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Tumor cell expression of CD163 is associated to postoperative radiotherapy and poor prognosis in patients with breast cancer treated with breast-conserving surgery2018In: Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology, ISSN 0171-5216, E-ISSN 1432-1335, Vol. 144, no 7, p. 1253-1263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cancer cell fusion with macrophages results in highly tumorigenic hybrids that acquire genetic and phenotypic characteristics from both maternal cells. Macrophage traits, exemplified by CD163 expression, in tumor cells are associated with advanced stages and poor prognosis in breast cancer (BC). In vitro data suggest that cancer cells expressing CD163 acquire radioresistance. Tissue microarray was constructed from primary BC obtained from 83 patients treated with breast-conserving surgery, 50% having received postoperative radiotherapy (RT) and none of the patients had lymph node or distant metastasis. Immunostaining of CD163 in cancer cells and macrophage infiltration (MI) in tumor stroma were evaluated. Macrophage:MCF-7 hybrids were generated by spontaneous in vitro cell fusion. After irradiation (0, 2.5 and 5 Gy gamma-radiation), both hybrids and their maternal MCF-7 cells were examined by clonogenic survival. CD163-expression by cancer cells was significantly associated with MI and clinicopathological data. Patients with CD163-positive tumors had significantly shorter disease-free survival (DFS) after RT. In vitro generated macrophage:MCF-7 hybrids developed radioresistance and exhibited better survival and colony forming ability after radiation compared to maternal MCF-7 cancer cells. Our results suggest that macrophage phenotype in tumor cells results in radioresistance in breast cancer and shorter DFS after radiotherapy.

  • 5.
    Karlsson, Elin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Veenstra, Cynthia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Garsjö, Jon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Fornander, Tommy
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    PTPN2 deficiency along with activation of nuclear Akt predict endocrine resistance in breast cancer2019In: Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology, ISSN 0171-5216, E-ISSN 1432-1335, Vol. 145, no 3, p. 599-607Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose The protein tyrosine phosphatase, non-receptor type 2 (PTNP2) regulates receptor tyrosine kinase signalling, preventing downstream activation of intracellular pathways like the PI3K/Akt pathway. The gene encoding the protein is located on chromosome 18p11; the 18p region is commonly deleted in breast cancer. In this study, we aimed to evaluate PTPN2 protein expression in a large breast cancer cohort, its possible associations to PTPN2 gene copy loss, Akt activation, and the potential use as a clinical marker in breast cancer. Methods PTPN2 protein expression was analysed by immunohistochemistry in 664 node-negative breast tumours from patients enrolled in a randomised tamoxifen trial. DNA was available for 146 patients, PTPN2 gene copy number was determined by real-time PCR. Results PTPN2 gene loss was detected in 17.8% of the tumours. Low PTPN2 protein expression was associated with higher levels of nuclear-activated Akt (pAkt-n). Low PTPN2 as well as the combination variable low PTPN2/high pAkt-n could be used as predictive markers of poor tamoxifen response. Conclusion PTPN2 negatively regulates Akt signalling and loss of PTPN2 protein along with increased pAkt-n is a new potential clinical marker of endocrine treatment efficacy, which may allow for further tailored patient therapies.

  • 6.
    Pfeifer, Daniella
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wallin, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Holmlund, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Protein expression following gamma-irradiation relevant to growth arrest and apoptosis in colon cancer cells with mutant p532009In: Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology, ISSN 0171-5216, E-ISSN 1432-1335, Vol. 135, no 11, p. 1583-1592Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We previously found that p53, p73, survivin and PRL were implicated in the outcome of radiotherapy in rectal cancer patients. In the present study, we tried to understand mechanisms of colon cancer cell line response to radiation based on protein expression related to proliferation and apoptosis. KM12C, KM12SM and KM12L4a, cell lines with one origin, were radiated with 0, 10 or 15 Gy γ-radiation. Radiosensitivity was determined with cell cycle and apoptosis analysis, and protein expression of TAp73, ΔNp73, mutated p53, survivin and PRL-3 was determined by Western blot. KM12C showed transient G2-arrest, low apoptosis and up-regulation of resistance factors such as PRL-3. In KM12C expression of ΔNp73 increased after 10Gy, but not after 15Gy. KM12SM had permanent G2-arrest, low apoptosis and showed up-regulation of the anti-apoptotic survivin and down-regulation of the pro-apoptotic TAp73 and the radioresistance factor PRL-3 was down-regulated. KM12L4a, the most radiosensitive cell line, showed up-regulation of TAp73 and down-regulation/no up-regulation of resistance factors such as ΔNp73, survivin and PRL-3 after radiation. In conclusion, the KM12C cell line was more radioresistant than KM12L4a regarding apoptosis and certain apoptotic proteins. The radiosensitivity of KM12L4a might partly depend on the lack of up-regulation of proteins negative for the outcome of radiotherapy.

     

  • 7.
    Rajala, Hanna L. M.
    et al.
    University of Helsinki, Finland; Helsinki University Hospital, Finland.
    El Missiry, Mohamed
    University of Helsinki, Finland; Helsinki University Hospital, Finland.
    Ruusila, Anniina
    University of Helsinki, Finland; Helsinki University Hospital, Finland.
    Koskenvesa, Perttu
    University of Helsinki, Finland; Helsinki University Hospital, Finland.
    Bruemmendorf, Tim H.
    University Hospital Aachen RWTH, Germany.
    Gjertsen, Bjorn T.
    University of Bergen, Norway.
    Janssen, Jeroen
    Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Lotfi, Kourosh
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology.
    Markevarn, Berit
    University of Bergen, Norway.
    Olsson-Stromberg, Ulla
    Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden.
    Stenke, Leif
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Stentoft, Jesper
    Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
    Richter, Johan
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Hjorth-Hansen, Henrik
    St Olavs Hospital, Norway; NTNU, Norway.
    Kreutzman, Anna
    University of Helsinki, Finland; Helsinki University Hospital, Finland; University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Mustjoki, Satu
    University of Helsinki, Finland; Helsinki University Hospital, Finland; University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy-induced changes in humoral immunity in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia2017In: Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology, ISSN 0171-5216, E-ISSN 1432-1335, Vol. 143, no 8, p. 1543-1554Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have well-characterized immunomodulatory effects on T and NK cells, but the effects on the humoral immunity are less well known. In this project, we studied TKI-induced changes in B cell-mediated immunity. Methods We collected peripheral blood (PB) and bone marrow (BM) samples from chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients before and during first-line imatinib (n = 20), dasatinib (n = 16), nilotinib (n = 8), and bosutinib (n = 12) treatment. Plasma immunoglobulin levels were measured, and different B cell populations in PB and BM were analyzed with flow cytometry. Results Imatinib treatment decreased plasma IgA and IgG levels, while dasatinib reduced IgM levels. At diagnosis, the proportion of patients with IgA, IgG, and IgM levels below the lower limit of normal (LLN) was 0, 11, and 6% of all CML patients, respectively, whereas at 12 months timepoint the proportions were 6% (p = 0.13), 31% (p = 0.042) and 28% (p = 0.0078). Lower initial Ig levels predisposed to the development of hypogammaglobulinemia during TKI therapy. Decreased Ig levels in imatinibtreated patients were associated with higher percentages of immature BM B cells. The patients, who had low Ig levels during the TKI therapy, had significantly more frequent minor infections during the follow-up compared with the patients with normal Ig values (33% vs. 3%, p = 0.0016). No severe infections were reported, except recurrent upper respiratory tract infections in one imatinib-treated patient, who developed severe hypogammaglobulinemia. Conclusions TKI treatment decreases plasma Ig levels, which should be measured in patients with recurrent infections.

  • 8.
    Söderlund Leifler, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Asklid, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fornander, Tommy
    Department of Oncology, karolinska Unvíversity Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Askmalm Stenmark, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    The RAD51 135G/C polymorphism is related to the effect of adjuvant therapy in early breast cancer2015In: Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology, ISSN 0171-5216, E-ISSN 1432-1335, Vol. 141, no 5, p. 797-804Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: A single-nucleotide polymorphism, RAD51 135G/C, in the untranslated region of the RAD51 gene has been found to elevate breast cancer risk among BRCA2 carriers. The purpose of this study was to investigate if this polymorphism is related to RAD51 protein expression, prognosis of early breast cancer and if it contributes to resistance to radiotherapy or cyclophosphamide/5-fluorouracil/methotrexate (CMF) chemotherapy.

    Methods: We genotyped 306 patients with early breast cancer, who were randomised to receive post-operative radiotherapy or CMF chemotherapy, for the RAD51 135G/C polymorphism. Expression of RAD51 protein was evaluated with immunohistochemistry.

    Results: The frequency of C-allele was 15.4% (including three C/C homozygotes). There was no correlation between genotype and protein expression pattern in tumours. Patients who were homozygous for the wildtype G/G genotype had a significant benefit of radiotherapy (RR=0.32, 95% C.I. 0.16-0.64, p=0.001). CMF chemotherapy significantly reduced the risk of distant recurrence during the first 20 years in patients who had the C-allele (RR=0.29, 95% C.I. 0.10-0.88, p=0.03), whereas patients who were G/G homozygotes had no benefit from chemotherapy over radiotherapy (RR=1.09, 95% C.I. 0.77-1.6, p=0.61). There was a significant interaction between chemotherapy and genotype (p=0.02). Genotype was not related to the rate of distant recurrence among patients treated with radiotherapy.

    Conclusion: Breast cancer patients who were homozygous for the wildtype G allele had a significant benefit of radiotherapy. The results suggest that the RAD51 135G/C polymorphism predicts the effect of CMF chemotherapy in early breast cancer.

  • 9.
    Veenstra, Cynthia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Elin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Mirwani, Sanam Mirwani
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Fornander, Tommy
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Perez Tenorio, Gizeh
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    The effects of PTPN2 loss on cell signalling and clinical outcome in relation to breast cancer subtype2019In: Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology, ISSN 0171-5216, E-ISSN 1432-1335, Vol. 145, no 7, p. 1845-1856Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PurposeThe protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPN2 dephosphorylates several tyrosine kinases in cancer-related signalling pathways and is thought to be a tumour suppressor. As PTPN2 is not frequently studied in breast cancer, we aimed to explore the role of PTPN2 and the effects of its loss in breast cancer.MethodsProtein expression and gene copy number of PTPN2 were analysed in a cohort of pre-menopausal breast cancer patients with immunohistochemistry and droplet digital PCR, respectively. PTPN2 was knocked down in three cell lines, representing different breast cancer subtypes, with siRNA transfection. Several proteins related to PTPN2 were analysed with Western blot.ResultsLow PTPN2 protein expression was found in 50.2% of the tumours (110/219), gene copy loss in 15.4% (33/214). Low protein expression was associated with a higher relapse rate in patients with Luminal A and HER2-positive tumours, but not triple-negative tumours. In vitro studies further suggested a subtype-specific role of PTPN2. Knockdown of PTPN2 had no effect on the triple-negative cell line, whilst knockdown in MCF7 inhibited phosphorylation of Met and promoted that of Akt. Knockdown in SKBR3 led to increased Met phosphorylation and decreased Erk phosphorylation as well as EGF-mediated STAT3 activation.ConclusionWe confirm previous studies showing that the PTPN2 protein is lost in half of the breast cancer cases and gene deletion occurs in 15-18% of the cases. Furthermore, the results suggest that the role of PTPN2 is subtype-related and should be further investigated to assess how this could affect breast cancer prognosis and treatment response.

  • 10.
    Zhang, Jin-Ting
    et al.
    Department of Stomatology Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang 050031, Hebei Province, China.
    Wang, Da-Wei
    Department of Stomatology Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang 050031, Hebei Province, China.
    Li, Qing-Xing
    Department of Stomatology Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang 050031, Hebei Province, China.
    Zhu, Zhen-Long
    Department of Pathology Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang 050031, Hebei Province, China.
    Wang, Ming-Wei
    Central Laboratory Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang 050031, Hebei Province, China.
    Cui, Dong-Sheng
    Central Laboratory Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang 050031, Hebei Province, China.
    Yang, Yan-Hong
    Department of Pathology Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang 050031, Hebei Province, China.
    Gu, Yu-Xin
    Department of Stomatology Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang 050031, Hebei Province, China.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Nuclear to cytoplasmic shift of p33ING1b protein from normal oral mucosa to oral squamous cell carcinoma in relation to clinicopathological variables2008In: Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology, ISSN 0171-5216, E-ISSN 1432-1335, Vol. 134, no 3, p. 421-426Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: p33ING1b, as a candidate tumour suppressor gene, has been found to be expressed a proportion of oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs), however, its clinicopathological significance is not studied yet. Our aim was to investigate association of p33ING1b expression with clinicopathological variables and particularly interesting new cysteine-histidine rich protein (PINCH) in OSCCs. Methods: p33ING1b expression was immumohistochemically examined in 20 normal oral mucosa specimens and 49 OSCCs. Results: Normal squamous cells showed only p33ING1b nuclear expression (no cytoplasmic expression), with a rate of 90% positive cases. While 24% of OSCCs appeared cytoplasmic expression (11 of them with weak nuclear staining) and the rest tumours (76%) were negative for p33 ING1b. Furthermore, the cases having lymph node metastasis showed a higher frequency of positive cytoplasmic expression than those without metastasis (P = 0.03). The p33ING1b cytoplasmic expression was positively related to PINCH expression (P = 0.04), the cases positive for both proteins had a high rate of the metastasis (P = 0.03). Conclusions: The transfer of p33ING1b protein from the nucleus to the cytoplasm may result in loss of normal cellular function of the protein, which might play a role in the tumourigenesis and metastasis of OSCCs. © 2007 Springer-Verlag.

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