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  • 1.
    Albert, Jörg G
    et al.
    First Department of Medicine, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Germany.
    Gimm, Oliver
    General Surgery, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Germany.
    Stock, Karsten
    Department of Radiology, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Germany.
    Bilkenroth, Udo
    Department of Pathology, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Germany.
    Marsch, Wolfgang C H
    Department of Dermatology, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Germany.
    Helmbold, Peter
    Department of Dermatology, University of Heidelberg, Germany.
    Small-bowel endoscopy is crucial for diagnosis of melanoma metastases to the small bowel: a case of metachronous small-bowel metastases and review of the literature.2007In: Melanoma research, ISSN 0960-8931, E-ISSN 1473-5636, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 335-8Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Andersson, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Dermatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rosdahl, Inger
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Dermatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Törmä, H.
    Department of Medical Sciences, Sect. of Dermatol. and Venereology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Vahlquist, A.
    Department of Medical Sciences, Sect. of Dermatol. and Venereology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ultraviolet irradiation depletes cellular retinol and alters the metabolism of retinoic acid in cultured human keratinocytes and melanocytes1999In: Melanoma research, ISSN 0960-8931, E-ISSN 1473-5636, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 339-346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vitamin A is an intrinsic modulator of proliferation and differentiation in human epidermis, and may be destroyed by ultraviolet radiation (UVR) impinging on the skin. To identify the deleterious effects of a perturbed cellular vitamin A status, we investigated the endogenous retinoid concentrations and the metabolism of [3H]retinol and all-trans [3H]retinoic acid in cultured human keratinocytes and melanocytes exposed to UVR, using high performance liquid chromatography. Before UVR the retinoid content was similar in keratinocytes and melanocytes, but the uptake of [3H]retinol was three-fold higher and the uptake of [3H]retinoic acid was 10-fold higher in the melanocytes. In both cell types, UVR (UVA 360 mJ/cm2 plus UVB 140 mJ/cm2) instantaneously reduced the concentration of retinol by about 50% and that of 3,4-didehydroretinol by about 20%. The retinoid concentrations returned to normal within 1-2 days post-irradiation, despite there being no overt increase in the uptake of [3H]retinol or the biosynthesis of 3,4- didehydroretinol. However, in both types of irradiated cells, the accumulation of the biologically most active metabolite, all-trans [3H]retinoic acid, was about 60% higher than in control cells. Furthermore, the metabolism of authentically supplied [3H]retinoic acid was reduced, especially in irradiated keratinocytes, which probably contributed to the restoration of retinoid levels after UV exposure.

  • 3.
    Dizdar (Dizdar Segrell), Nil
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kullman, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kågedal, Bertil
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Årstrand, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Effects on interstitial glutathione, cysteine and 5-S-cysteinyldopa of buthionine sulphoximine in human melanoma transplants1997In: Melanoma research, ISSN 0960-8931, E-ISSN 1473-5636, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 322.-328Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using microdialysis of human melanoma transplants in athymic mice we have shown that interstitial glutathione levels decreased during treatment with buthionine sulphoximine (BSO) and recovered after cessation of treatment. The cysteine concentrations also decreased, while 5-S-cysteinyldopa tended to increase during BSO treatment. Restoration of the glutathione levels was not seen after either N-acetylcysteine (NAC) or L-2-oxothiazolidine-4-carboxylate (OTC) injections, given on the third day of BSO treatment. These results were to be expected since NAC and OTC were given during the BSO treatment, and BSO is a specific and potent inhibitor of glutathione synthesis. Cysteine levels, however, increased after the NAC injection but remained unaltered after the OTC injection, while 5-S-cysteinyldopa remained unaltered after both the NAC and the OTC injections.

  • 4.
    Djerf, Emelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Trinks, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Abdiu, Avni
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Thunell, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hallbeck, Anna-Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Walz, Thomas M
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    ErbB receptor tyrosine kinases contribute to proliferation of malignant melanoma cells: inhibition by gefitinib (ZD1839)2009In: Melanoma research, ISSN 0960-8931, E-ISSN 1473-5636, ISSN 0960-8931, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 156-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Members of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) family of structurally related tyrosine kinase receptors, known as the ErbB receptors (EGFR/ErbB1/HER1, ErbB2/HER2/neu, ErbB3/HER3 and ErbB4/HER4) and their respective ligands, have been suggested to be involved in the development and progression of malignant melanoma. Here we investigate the effects of the ErbB1 tyrosine kinase inhibitor gefitinib (ZD1839, Iressa) on human malignant melanoma cells (RaH3 and RaH5) in vitro. ZD1839 inhibited proliferation of exponentially growing RaH3 and RaH5 cells in a dose-dependent manner with a half-maximally effective dose of 3.5 and 2.0 mu mol/l, respectively. Cell growth was inhibited at 0.1 mu mol/l ZD1839 in both cell lines. Maximal inhibition was accomplished at 10 mu mol/l ZD1839; however, the effect was not complete as both cell lines showed a continuous slow growth during the treatment period. Flow cytometry analysis of cell-cycle distribution showed that ZD1839 treatment caused accumulation of RaH3 and RaH5 cells in the G, phase. The growth arrest induced by ZD1839 coincided with upregulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27(KIP1). There was no increase in apoptosis as determined by analysis of plasma phosphatidyl serine redistribution. Western blot analysis revealed that ZD1839 substantially reduced tyrosine phosphorylation of ErbB1 as well as ErbB2 and ErbB3. This was accompanied by a concomitant decrease in Akt-phosphorylation, Erk1/2-phosphorylation, and Stat3-phosphorylation. Our results show that ZD1839 interferes with the growth of human malignant melanoma cells by cytostatic effects. These findings indicate the possible use of ErbB receptor kinase inhibitors as a novel treatment strategy in malignant melanoma.

  • 5.
    Håkansson, Annika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Håkansson, Leif
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Gustafsson, Bertil
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Krysander, Lennart
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Rettrup, Björn
    Ruiter, Dirk
    Bernsen, Monique R
    On the effect of biochemotherapy in metastatic malignant melanoma: An immunopathological evaluation2003In: Melanoma research, ISSN 0960-8931, E-ISSN 1473-5636, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 401-407Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although immunotherapy and biochemotherapy have shown promise, producing a subset of durable responses, for the majority of patients with metastatic melanoma the prognosis is still poor. Therefore there is a great need for predictive tests to identify patients with a high probability of responding. Furthermore, there is also a need for a better understanding of the mechanisms of action during treatment in order to be able to monitor the relevant antitumour reactivity during treatment and to optimize the efficacy of future immunotherapy and biochemotherapy. In the present study histopathological regression criteria were used to study the efficacy of biochemotherapy. Thirty-two patients with metastatic malignant melanoma (18 with regional disease and 14 with systemic disease) were treated with biochemotherapy (cisplatin 30 mg/m2 intravenously on days 1-3, dacarbazine 250 mg/m2 intravenously on days 1-3 and interferon-a2b 10 million IU subcutaneously 3 days a week, every 28 days). Pre-treatment fine needle aspirates were obtained from metastases to analyse the number of tumour-infiltrating CD4+ lymphocytes. Therapeutic efficacy was evaluated in metastases resected after treatment using histopathological criteria of tumour regression. Comparisons were also made with metastases from 17 untreated patients, all with regional disease. Regressive changes of 25% or more (of the section area) were found in two of the 17 untreated patients with regional disease compared with 13 of the 18 patients with regional disease and 10 of the 14 patients with systemic disease after biochemotherapy. Fifty per cent of the patients with regional disease showed a high degree of regressive changes (75-100% of the section area) after biochemotherapy. These results demonstrate the occurrence of an antitumour reactivity in the majority of patients. Patients with extensive regressive changes in 75-100% of the analysed biopsies were also found to have a longer overall survival (P = 0.019). In patients with regional disease there was a close correlation between a larger number of CD4+ lymphocytes pre-treatment and a higher degree of regressive changes post-treatment (P < 0.05). Thus, immunohistochemical analysis of tumour biopsies shortly after treatment seems to be a good surrogate endpoint This technique also allows detailed analysis of antitumour reactivity and escape mechanisms. ⌐ 2003 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

  • 6.
    Johansson, Malin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Takasaki, A.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lenner, Liselotte
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Årstrand, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kågedal, Bertil
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Quantitative relationships between pigment-related mRNA and biochemical melanoma markers in melanoma cell lines2002In: Melanoma research, ISSN 0960-8931, E-ISSN 1473-5636, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 193-200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of melanoma-specific transcripts for the identification of circulating melanoma cells has shown very variable results in different studies on melanoma patients. We have therefore developed quantitative methods to study both analytical and biological variations as possible causes of this phenomenon. Pigment-related and S-100β transcripts were quantified in 12 different melanoma cell lines and related to the amounts of 5-S-cysteinyldopa, pigment and S-100B protein. A real-time PCR method was used and the results were expressed as absolute number of transcripts per cell. Tyrosinase, tyrosinase-related protein (TRP)-1, TRP-2 and MART-1/Melan-A mRNA varied from undetectable (< 10-4 transcripts/cell) to 103 transcripts/cell, i.e. by a factor > 107 in the different cell lines. S-100β mRNA varied from 2.8 to 165 transcripts/cell, i.e. by a factor of 60. Tyrosinase, TRP-1 and TRP-2 mRNA correlated significantly with the amount of 5-S-cysteinyldopa, an intermediate pigment metabolite (P < 0.001, P < 0.001 and P < 0.01, respectively). The amount of S-100β mRNA correlated significantly with the amount of S-100B protein (P < 0.001). No cross-correlations were seen between the pigment-related and S-100-related analytes. We conclude that one reason behind the negative results of RT-PCR measurement of pigment-related mRNA may be that these transcripts are not always expressed in the particular cells present in the patient's blood. Furthermore, variation in the expression of the order of 107 must have great impact on the diagnostic sensitivity. Measurement of S-100β mRNA would be more sensitive, but the use of this transcript is hampered by its presence in the blood cells. © 2002 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

  • 7.
    Johansson, Malin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Årstrand, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Håkansson, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindholm, C
    Department of Oncology, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Kågedal, Bertil
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Quantitative analysis of tyrosinase and tyrosinase-related protein-2 mRNA from melanoma cells in blood by real-time polymerase chain reaction2000In: Melanoma research, ISSN 0960-8931, E-ISSN 1473-5636, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 213-222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several studies have evaluated the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of tyrosinase mRNA to detect melanoma cells in blood. However, contradictory results have been obtained from different groups. We therefore have developed and validated a quantitative PCR method for tyrosinase and tyrosinase-related protein-2 (TRP-2) mRNA. An important methodological finding was that high concentrations of reverse transcriptase or RNA sample inhibited the following PCR. This could be abolished by dilution of the cDNA sample before the PCR. Standard curves with a linear range over at least five logs were obtained with dilutions of melanoma cell cDNA. Controls (RNA and cDNA) consisting of melanoma cells (1000/ml) added to blood were analysed repeatedly over 3 months, resulting in means between 880 and 1074 AU/ml. The RNA controls were stable, whereas the cDNA controls, as well as the calibrators, showed a tendency to change over time. The variation in the RNA controls was 25% for tyrosinase and 22% for TRP-2. Seven stage III-IV melanoma patients were tested for tyrosinase and TRP-2 transcripts in blood drawn from a peripheral vein and from a Port-a-cath. Tyrosinase mRNA was found in three patients (0.8-12.4 AU/ml). For TRP-2, the same amount was found in the patients as in healthy donors. No differences were seen between blood from a peripheral vein and from the Port-a-cath. We here present fast and sensitive methods for the quantification of tyrosinase and TRP-2 mRNA in blood.

  • 8. Kärnell, R
    et al.
    Kågedal, Bertil
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Lindholm, C
    Nilsson, B
    Årstrand, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry.
    Ringborg, U
    The value of cysteinyldopa in the follow-up of disseminated malignant melanoma2000In: Melanoma research, ISSN 0960-8931, E-ISSN 1473-5636, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 363-369Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a series of 92 patients with malignant melanoma, clinical stage III or IV, both 5-S-cysteinyldopa (5SCD) and 6-hydroxy-5-methoxyindole-2-carboxylic acid (6H5MI2C) were measured in urine during chemotherapy. A total of 434 urine specimens were analysed. The sensitivity of 5SCD for the detection of stage III-IV melanoma was 83%, while the corresponding sensitivity of 6H5MI2C was 52%. Fifty per cent of patients with one metastatic site had increased 5SCD excretion, while all patients with four or more metastatic sites had increased excretion. A significant correlation was found between 5SCD decrease and clinical regression (P < 0.001) and between 5SCD increase and clinical progression (P < 0.001). Corresponding correlations were not found for 6H5MI2C. Increments in 5SCD excretion (median 269 ╡mol/mol creatinine) were seen for 83% of the occasions when clinical progression was recorded, and decrements in 5SCD excretion (median 145 ╡mol/mol creatinine) were seen for 85% of the occasions when clinical regression was seen. During clinical 'stable disease' increases in 5SCD excretion were seen in 59% and decreases in 41%. The median value of 5SCD changes for stable disease was 7.0 ╡mol/mol creatinine, indicating a chemical marker stability in many cases. We recommend the use of 5SCD in urine as a valuable, reliable and simple biochemical marker to use in the clinical follow-up of melanoma patients with advanced disease.

  • 9.
    Lyth, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Regional Board, Research and Development Unit.
    Conditional recurrence-free survival in patients with primary stage I-II cutaneous malignant melanoma - a population-based study2018In: Melanoma research, ISSN 0960-8931, E-ISSN 1473-5636, Vol. 28, no 6, p. 637-640Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conditional survival in patients with localized primary cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) is well described. However, conditional recurrence-free survival (RFS) has not been investigated before. The aim of this study was to determine conditional RFS and test for time dependency in prognostic factors in patients with localized stage I-II CMM. This study included 1437 CMM patients registered in one region of Sweden during 1999-2012 followed up through 31 December 2012. To identify first recurrence of CMM disease, data from a care data warehouse, the pathology and radiology department registries were used. Patients were also followed through a Census Register and the National Cause of Death Register. The time-dependent risk of recurrence was analysed in a Coxs proportional hazard regression. The 5-year conditional RFS increased from 86% (95% confidence interval: 84-88) at diagnosis to 96% (95% confidence interval: 94-98) at 5 years after diagnosis. Women showed a 60% lower risk of recurrence than men and this effect was stable over time (P = 0.39). Patients aged greater than or equal to 65 years had a 40% higher risk of recurrence than patients aged less than 65 years, and this effect was stable over time (P = 0.65). Patients with tumour ulceration showed a 70% higher risk of recurrence than nonulcerated patients, but this effect disappeared after 2 years (P = 0.04). For patients with T3-T4 CMM, the hazard ratios decreased over time and were similar to hazard ratio of patients with T2 CMM after 2 years and later. The decreasing impact of tumour thickness and ulceration over time could have important implications for CMM patients in terms of counselling and follow-up. Copyright (C) 2018 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 10.
    Petersson, S
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Shubbar, Emman
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Enerbäck, Lennart
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Enerbäck, Charlotta
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Expression patterns of S100 proteins in melanocytes and melanocytic lesions2009In: Melanoma research, ISSN 0960-8931, E-ISSN 1473-5636, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 215-225Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    S100 proteins are differentially expressed in tumours of epithelial origin. Little is known about their expression in melanocyte-derived tumours of neuroectodermal origin. We have analysed the expression of some S100 proteins in this line of lesions using SAGE Genie informatics, cell culture and human tumour tissue. The pattern of expression of six S100 proteins was investigated at both the mRNA and protein levels, using quantitative real-time PCR, western blotting and immunohistochemical analysis. No differential expression was observed with respect to S100A4, S100A7, S100A8, S100A9 and S100A11. In contrast, S100A10 was downregulated in three melanoma cell lines compared with normal melanocytes. Using SAGE informatics, two-dimensional displays of microarray expression data from the NCI60_Novartis cell lines displayed a positive correlation between the expression of S100A10 and the expression of the proliferation marker, Ki67. Our data suggest that S100A10, like its binding partners S100A7 and annexin A2, is an oxidant-sensitive protein. In addition, higher expression of S100A10 was detected in melanocyte cell lines with long projections compared with melanoma cell lines with small ripples. In a panel of 47 melanocyte-derived lesions comprising melanocytic naevi and melanomas, S100A10 was expressed to varying degrees in the melanocytic lesions. The antigen was primarily expressed in regions with a strong proliferating or differentiating capacity, especially in regions in or near the epidermis. We suggest that S100A10 may play a role in the regulation of the proliferation or early maturation sequence of melanocytic lesions, and that it merits further study as a potential biomarker of activity.

  • 11.
    Rosdahl, Inger
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Dermatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andersson, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kågedal, Bertil
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Törma, H.
    Department of Dermatology, University of Uppsala, Sweden.
    Vitamin A metabolism and mRNA expression of retinoid-binding protein and receptor genes in human epidermal melanocytes and melanoma cells1997In: Melanoma research, ISSN 0960-8931, E-ISSN 1473-5636, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 267-274Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Retinoids inhibit proliferation of melanocytes and melanoma cells and affect disorders of hypo- and hyperpigmentation. Such effects might involve retinoid-binding proteins, retinoid metabolites and nuclear retinoid receptors for transcriptional activation. We detected messenger RNA transcripts for the cellular retinol- and retinoic acid-binding proteins (CRBP, CRABP I and II) in cultured epidermal melanocytes. In the melanoma cell lines the major transcript was CRABP II. Nuclear retinoic acid (RA) receptor transcripts and the 9-cis-retinoic acid receptor transcript were detected in all cells. The endogenous concentrations of retinol (ROH) and its metabolite 3,4-didehydroretinol (ddROH) in melanocytes were five times those in melanoma cells. When cells were incubated with [3H]ROH the main metabolites in the melanocytes were [3H]ddROH (4%) and [3H]RA (0.4%). Formation of [3H]RA was only detected in one melanoma cell line. Both melanocytes and melanoma cells produced an unidentified metabolite when incubated with [3H]ROH and [3H]RA. Dissimilarities in the metabolism and endogenous concentration of retinoids between benign and malignant melanocytes might play a key role in differentiation and growth regulation.

  • 12.
    Thunell, Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bivik, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wäster, Petra
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stjernstrom, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Synnerstad, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology.
    Rosdahl, Inger
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology.
    Enerbäck, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology.
    MDM2 SNP309 promoter polymorphism confers risk for hereditary melanoma2014In: Melanoma research, ISSN 0960-8931, E-ISSN 1473-5636, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 190-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The p53 pathway regulates stress response, and variations in p53, MDM2, and MDM4 may predispose an individual to tumor development. The aim of this study was to study the impact of genetic variation on sporadic and hereditary melanoma. We have analyzed a combination of three functionally relevant variants of the p53 pathway in 258 individuals with sporadic malignant melanomas, 50 with hereditary malignant melanomas, and 799 healthy controls. Genotyping was performed by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism, pyrosequencing, and allelic discrimination. We found an increased risk for hereditary melanoma in MDM2 GG homozygotes, which was more pronounced among women (P=0.035). In the event of pairwise combinations of the single nucleotide polymorphisms, a risk elevation was shown for MDM2 GG homozygotes/p53 wild-type Arg in hereditary melanoma (P=0.01). Individuals with sporadic melanomas of the superficial spreading type, including melanoma in situ, showed a slightly higher frequency of the MDM2 GG genotype compared with those with nodular melanomas (P=0.04). The dysplastic nevus phenotype, present in the majority of our hereditary melanoma cases and also in some sporadic cases, further enhanced the effect of the MDM2 GG genotype on melanoma risk (P=0.005). In conclusion, the results show an association between MDM2 SNP309 and an increased risk for hereditary melanoma, especially among women. Analysis of sporadic melanoma also shows an association between MDM2 and the superficial spreading melanoma subtype, as well as an association with the presence of dysplastic nevi in sporadic melanoma.

  • 13.
    Wu, ZY
    et al.
    Univ Queensland, Princess Alexandra Hosp, Dept Med, Brisbane, Qld 4109, Australia Univ Queensland, Princess Alexandra Hosp, Dept Surg, Brisbane, Qld 4109, Australia Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Dermatol, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Smithers, BM
    Univ Queensland, Princess Alexandra Hosp, Dept Med, Brisbane, Qld 4109, Australia Univ Queensland, Princess Alexandra Hosp, Dept Surg, Brisbane, Qld 4109, Australia Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Dermatol, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Anderson, C
    Roberts, MS
    Univ Queensland, Princess Alexandra Hosp, Dept Med, Brisbane, Qld 4109, Australia Univ Queensland, Princess Alexandra Hosp, Dept Surg, Brisbane, Qld 4109, Australia Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Dermatol, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Can tissue drug concentrations be monitored by microdialysis during or after isolated limb perfusion for melanoma treatment?2000In: Melanoma research, ISSN 0960-8931, E-ISSN 1473-5636, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 47-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Isolated limb perfusion (ILP) with melphalan is used to treat recurrent melanoma. This study aimed to develop a microdialysis technique for melphalan tissue concentration measurement during ILP. The effects of melphalan concentration (50-600 mu g/ml), microdialysis flow rate (0.55-17.5 mu l/min), probe length (5-50 mm) and temperature (25-41.5 degrees C) on in vitro recovery were studied. In addition, in vivo recovery was measured in rat hindlimbs perfused with melphalan using 50 mm microdialysis probes implanted subcutaneously and into muscle. Both dialysate and tissue sample melphalan concentrations were determined by high performance liquid chromatography. The in vitro recovery of melphalan was not affected by melphalan concentration or temperature, but increased with probe length and decreased with flow rate. The melphalan concentrations in subcutaneous and muscle dialysates were not significantly different. A linear relationship was found between tissue dialysate concentrations and actual tissue concentrations of melphalan (r(2) = 0.97). Microdialysis is a potential method for tissue drug monitoring which may assist in the efficacious use of cytotoxics in human ILP. (C) 2000 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

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