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  • 1.
    Brodtkorb, Thor- Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Center for Medical Technology Assessment.
    Kogler, Géza F.
    Dept of Rehabilitation School of Health Sciences, Jönköping.
    Arndt, Anton
    Karolinska Institute.
    The influence of metatarsal support height and longitudinal axis position on plantar foot loading2008In: Clinical Biomechanics, ISSN 0268-0033, E-ISSN 1879-1271, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 640-647Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 2.
    Grip, Helen
    et al.
    Universitetssjukhuset Umeå.
    Sundelin, Gunnevi
    Umeå universitet.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Rehabilitation Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Universitetssjukhuset Umeå.
    Variations in the axis of motion during head repositioning - A comparison of subjects with whiplash-associated disorders or non-specific neck pain and healthy controls2007In: Clinical Biomechanics, ISSN 0268-0033, E-ISSN 1879-1271, Vol. 22, no 8, p. 865-873Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The ability to reproduce head position can be affected in patients after a neck injury. The repositioning error is commonly used as a measure of proprioception, but variations in the movement might provide additional information. Methods: The axis of motion and target performance were analyzed during a head repositioning task (flexion, extension and side rotations) for 24 control subjects, 22 subjects with whiplash-associated disorders and 21 with non-specific neck pain. Questionnaires regarding pain intensity and fear avoidance were collected. Head position and axis of motion parameters were calculated using a helical axis model with a moving window of 4°. Findings: During flexion the whiplash group had a larger constant repositioning error than the control group (-1.8(2.9)° vs. 0.1(2.4)°, P = 0.04). The axis was more inferior in both neck pain groups (12.0(1.6) cm vs. 14.5(2.0) cm, P < 0.05) indicating movement at a lower level in the spine. Including pain intensity from shoulder and neck region as covariates showed an effect on the axis position (P = 0.03 and 0.04). During axial rotation to the left there was more variation in axis direction for neckpain groups as compared with controls (4.0(1.7)° and 3.7(2.4)° vs. 2.3(1.9)°, P = 0.01 and 0.05). No significant difference in fear avoidance was found between the two neck pain groups. Interpretation: Measuring variation in the axis of motion together with target performance gives objective measures on proprioceptive ability that are difficult to quantify by visual inspection. Repositioning errors were in general small, suggesting it is not sufficient as a single measurement variable in a clinical situation, but should be measured in combination with other tests, such as range of motion.

  • 3.
    Kvist, Joanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy.
    Good, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Tagesson (Sonesson), Sofi
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Changes in knee motion pattern after anterior cruciate ligament injury - A case report2007In: Clinical Biomechanics, ISSN 0268-0033, E-ISSN 1879-1271, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 551-556Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: After an anterior cruciate ligament injury, the contra-lateral non-injured leg has been found to adapt towards the injured leg. Accordingly, in order to study changes in knee motion pattern after an anterior cruciate ligament injury, the ideal is to compare the same leg prior to and after the injury. However, this is very seldom possible. The purpose of the present study was to describe changes in static and dynamic sagittal tibial translation, electromyographic activity and muscle torque relevant to an anterior cruciate ligament tear in one patient evaluated both before and after the injury.

    Methods: A male soccer player was examined 11 weeks before and eight weeks after an anterior cruciate ligament injury. Sagittal tibial translation was measured with the CA-4000 electrogoniometer, statically during Lachman's test, and dynamically during isokinetic muscle testing, one-legged squat and level walking. The electromyographic activity of mm. quadriceps and hamstrings, was registered simultaneously during the one-legged squat test.

    Findings: Static tibial translation was increased by ∼2 mm, while dynamic tibial translation was decreased by 0.4 mm at isokinetic testing, 0.9 mm at one-legged squat and 2.4 mm during level walking compared to before the injury. Muscle torque decreased 30% and 35% for the quadriceps and the hamstrings muscle, respectively. The electromyographic activity revealed similar activation levels in quadriceps and a doubled level of activation in hamstring compared to before the injury.

    Interpretation: In spite of an increase in static tibial translation eight weeks after an anterior cruciate ligament injury, the tibial translation decreased during activity, thus indicating that the patient could stiffen the knee in order to protect it against increased shear forces.

  • 4.
    Sjödahl, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gutke, Annelie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ghaffari, Ghazaleh
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Strömberg, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Response of the muscles in the pelvic floor and the lower lateral abdominal wall during the Active Straight Leg Raise in women with and without pelvic girdle pain: An experimental study2016In: Clinical Biomechanics, ISSN 0268-0033, E-ISSN 1879-1271, Vol. 35, p. 49-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The relationship between activation of the stabilizing muscles of the lumbopelvic region during the Active Straight Leg Raise test and pelvic girdle pain remains unknown. Therefore, the aim was to examine automatic contractions in relation to pre-activation in the muscles of the pelvic floor and the lower lateral abdominal wall during leg lifts, performed as the Active Straight Leg Raise test, in women with and without persistent postpartum pelvic girdle pain. Methods: Sixteen women with pelvic girdle pain and eleven pain-free women performed contralateral and ipsilateral leg lifts, while surface electromyographic activity was recorded from the pelvic floor and unilaterally from the lower lateral abdominal wall. As participants performed leg lifts onset time was calculated as the time from increased muscle activity to leg lift initiation. Findings: No significant differences were observed between the groups during the contralateral leg lift. During the subsequent ipsilateral leg lift, pre-activation in the pelvic floor muscles was observed in 36% of women with pelvic girdle pain and in 91% of pain-free women (P = 0.01). Compared to pain-free women, women with pelvic girdle pain also showed significantly later onset time in both the pelvic floor muscles (P = 0.01) and the muscles of the lower lateral abdominal wall (P amp;lt; 0.01). Interpretation: We suggest that disturbed motor activation patterns influence womens ability to stabilize the pelvis during leg lifts. This could be linked to provocation of pain during repeated movements. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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