liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 13 of 13
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Abbass, Allan
    et al.
    Dalhousie University, Canada.
    Bernier, Denise
    Dalhousie University, Canada.
    Kisely, Steve
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Town, Joel
    Dalhousie University, Canada.
    Johansson, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Dalhousie University, Canada.
    Sustained reduction in health care costs after adjunctive treatment of graded intensive short-term dynamic psychotherapy in patients with psychotic disorders2015In: Psychiatry Research, ISSN 0165-1781, E-ISSN 1872-7123, Vol. 228, no 3, p. 538-543Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the changes in symptom severity and long-term health care cost after intensive short-term dynamic psychotherapy (ISTDP) individually tailored and administered to patients with psychotic disorders undergoing standard psychiatric care. Eleven therapists with different levels of expertise delivered an average of 13 one-hour sessions of graded ISTDP to 38 patients with psychotic disorders. Costs for health care services were compiled for a one-year period prior to the start of ISTDP (baseline) along with four one-year periods after termination. Two validated self-report scales, the Brief Symptom Inventory and the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems, were administered at intake and termination of ISTDP. Results revealed that health care cost reductions were significant for the one-year post-treatment period relative to baseline year, for both physician costs and hospital costs, and the reductions were sustained for the follow-up period of four post-treatment years. Furthermore, at treatment termination self-reported symptoms and interpersonal problems were significantly reduced. These preliminary findings suggest that this brief adjunctive psychotherapy may be beneficial and reduce costs in selected patients with psychotic disorders, and that gains are sustained in long-term follow-up. Future research directions are discussed. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 2.
    Annerbrink, Kristina
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Westberg, Lars
    University of Gothenburg.
    Olsson, Marie
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Allgulander, Christer
    Karolinska Institute.
    Andersch, Sven
    University of Gothenburg.
    Sjödin, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Holm, Goran
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Eriksson, Elias
    University of Gothenburg.
    Association between the catechol-O-methyltransferase Val158Met polymorphism and panic disorder: A replication2010In: Psychiatry Research, ISSN 0165-1781, E-ISSN 1872-7123, Vol. 178, no 1, p. 196-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The association between the catechol-O-methyltransferase Val158Met polymorphism and panic disorder was studied in a Swedish sample of 211 patients and 452 controls. We found a significant excess of the Val allele in both male and female patients, the latter but not the former finding being in line with previous studies.

  • 3.
    Brohede, Sabina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wingren, Gun
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Validation of the Body Dysmorphic Disorder Questionnaire in a community sample of Swedish women2013In: Psychiatry Research, ISSN 0165-1781, E-ISSN 1872-7123, Vol. 210, no 2, p. 647-652Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD) is characterized by a distressing and impairing preoccupation with a nonexistent or slight defect in appearance. Patients with the disorder present to both psychiatric and non-psychiatric physicians. A few studies have assessed BDD prevalence in the general population and have shown that the disorder is relatively common. To date, no BDD assessment instruments have been validated in the general population. Our aim was to validate a brief self-screening instrument, the Body Dysmorphic Disorder Questionnaire (BDDQ), in a female community sample. The BDDQ was translated into Swedish and filled out by 2891 women from a randomly selected community sample. The questionnaire was validated in a subsample of 88 women, using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID) together with clinical assessment as the gold standard. In the validation subsample, the BDDQ showed good concurrent validity, with a sensitivity of 94%, a specificity of 90% and a likelihood ratio of 9.4. The questionnaire can therefore be of value when screening for BDD in female populations.

  • 4.
    Croy, Ilona
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Technical University of Dresden, Germany.
    Geide, Helen
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience (CSAN).
    Paulus, Martin
    Laureate Institute Brain Research, OK USA.
    Weidner, Kerstin
    Technical University of Dresden, Germany.
    Olausson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Affective touch awareness in mental health and disease relates to autistic traits - An explorative neurophysiological investigation2016In: Psychiatry Research, ISSN 0165-1781, E-ISSN 1872-7123, Vol. 245, p. 491-496Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Affective touch is important for social interaction within families and groups and there is evidence that unmyelinated C tactile fibers are involved in this process. Individuals with autism spectrum disorders show alterations in the perception and processing of affective touch. sThus, we hypothesized that affective touch awareness based on C tactile fiber activation is impaired in individuals with high levels of autistic trait. The pleasantness perception of optimal and suboptimal C tactile stimuli was tested in an explorative study in 70 patients recruited from an outpatient psychotherapy clinic and 69 healthy comparison subjects. All participants completed questionnaires about autistic traits, depressive symptomatology, childhood maltreatment, and about the daily amount of touch. Relative to comparison subjects, patients reported engaging in touch less frequently in daily life and rated touch less pleasant. Reduced valence ratings of touch were explained by childhood maltreatment but not by any particular disorder or depression severity. Among all tested variables, the affective touch awareness correlated with autistic traits only - in patients as well as in comparison subjects. Taken together, individuals with mental health issues have a lower baseline of expression and reception of affective touch. Autistic traits and childhood maltreatment modulate the experience of affective touch. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 5.
    Hansson, Caroline
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Annerbrink, Kristina
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Chalmers, Sweden .
    Bah, Jessica
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Olsson, Marie
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Allgulander, Christer
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Andersch, Sven
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Sjödin, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Eriksson, Elias
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Dickson, Suzanne L.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    A possible association between panic disorder and a polymorphism in the preproghrelin gene2013In: Psychiatry Research, ISSN 0165-1781, E-ISSN 1872-7123, Vol. 206, no 1, p. 22-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to investigate whether polymorphisms in the preproghrelin gene are associated with anxiety disorders, such as panic disorder, in humans. Panic disorder is a severe anxiety disorder, characterized by sudden attacks of intense fear or anxiety in combination with somatic symptoms. The preproghrelin gene codes for two gut-derived circulating peptides that have been linked to anxiety-like behaviour in rodents: ghrelin (an orexigenic, pro-obesity hormone) and obestatin. In the present study, we genotyped three missense mutations in the preproghrelin gene in 215 patients suffering from panic disorder and in 451 controls. The A allele of the rs4684677 polymorphism was significantly associated with panic disorder, while there were no significant associations with the two other polymorphisms studied. We conclude that the rs4684677 (Gln90Leu) polymorphism in the preproghrelin gene may be associated with increased risk of panic disorder. It will be important to confirm these findings in additional panic disorder patient groups.

  • 6.
    Holmqvist, Rolf
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    Armelius, K.
    Associations between psychiatric patients' self-image, staff feelings towards them, and treatment outcome2004In: Psychiatry Research, ISSN 0165-1781, E-ISSN 1872-7123, Vol. 128, no 1, p. 89-102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interpersonal theory, as well as relational models of psychoanalytic and cognitive therapy, posits the importance for positive treatment outcome of the therapist's becoming emotionally involved in the patient's interpersonal patterns. Using the same data as in this study, we have previously found associations between psychiatric patients' self-image and the staff's feelings towards them, and differential associations between staff feelings and outcome for different diagnostic groups. The purpose of the present study was to analyze potential connections between patients' self-image, staff feelings, and outcome. Twice a year, staff at small psychiatric units reported their feelings towards 63 psychotic and 21 borderline patients who had rated their self-image at the beginning of the treatment using the Structural Analysis of Social Behavior (SASB) introject and parent images. Feelings reported on the two first occasions at the beginning of the treatment were used. Outcome was assessed after 5 years. Correlation analyses found different associations between patient self-image and staff feelings for patients with favorable and less favorable outcome. The results indicated for psychotic patients associations between positive outcome and less distant staff feelings connected with the patient's freedom-giving introject, less unfree staff feelings connected with a negative image of mother and less positive feelings connected with a positive image of father. For the borderline patients, positive outcome was associated with the fact that a negative image of mother did not evoke helpful staff feelings, a positive image of the patient himself or herself did not evoke helpful staff feelings and a controlling image of father-evoked distant feelings. © 2004 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 7.
    Holmqvist, Rolf
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Jeanneau, M.
    Burnout and psychiatric staff's feelings towards patients2006In: Psychiatry Research, ISSN 0165-1781, E-ISSN 1872-7123, Vol. 145, no 2-3, p. 207-213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of burnout describes a number of destructive aspects in work relationships. In this study, the relations between psychiatric staff members' feelings towards their patients and burnout were analyzed. Staff feelings were measured with a feeling checklist, and burnout with BM (Burnout Measure) and MBI (Maslach's Burnout Inventory). The staff at 28 treatment units rated their feelings towards the patients as a group. The results indicated that high burnout was associated with negative feelings and low levels of burnout with positive feelings towards patients. The correlation patterns for the different measures of burnout were somewhat different. BM had the strongest correlations with unhelpful and rejecting feelings towards patients, whereas Personal accomplishment, one dimension of MBI, was most strongly correlated with accepting and close feelings. The results were interpreted as opening for the question whether negative staff feelings towards patients most profitably can be seen as an aspect of burnout or whether these two phenomena should be distinguished clinically and theoretically. © 2006 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 8.
    Månsson, Kristoffer N T
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Carlbring, Per
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Frick, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Engman, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Olsson, Carl-Johan
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Bodlund, Owe
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Furmark, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Altered neural correlates of affective processing after internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy for social anxiety disorder2013In: Psychiatry Research, ISSN 0165-1781, E-ISSN 1872-7123, Vol. 214, no 3, p. 229-237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Randomized controlled trials have yielded promising results for internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy (iCBT) for patients with social anxiety disorder (SAD). The present study investigated anxiety-related neural changes after iCBT for SAD. The amygdala is a critical hub in the neural fear network, receptive to change using emotion regulation strategies and a putative target for iCBT. Twenty-two subjects were included in pre- and post-treatment functional magnetic resonance imaging at 3T assessing neural changes during an affective face processing task. Treatment outcome was assessed using social anxiety self-reports and the Clinical Global Impression-Improvement (CGI-I) scale. ICBT yielded better outcome than ABM (66% vs. 25% CGI-I responders). A significant differential activation of the left amygdala was found with relatively decreased reactivity after iCBT. Changes in the amygdala were related to a behavioral measure of social anxiety. Functional connectivity analysis in the iCBT group showed that the amygdala attenuation was associated with increased activity in the medial orbitofrontal cortex and decreased activity in the right ventrolateral and dorsolateral (dlPFC) cortices. Treatment-induced neural changes with iCBT were consistent with previously reported studies on regular CBT and emotion regulation in general.

  • 9.
    Persson, Mats
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Sturup, Joakim
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Natl Board Forens Med, Sweden.
    Belfrage, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Forensic Psychiatry.
    Kristiansson, Marianne
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Natl Board Forens Med, Sweden.
    Self-reported violent ideation and its link to interpersonal violence among offenders with mental disorders and general psychiatric patients2018In: Psychiatry Research, ISSN 0165-1781, E-ISSN 1872-7123, Vol. 261, p. 197-203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims at comparing mentally disordered offenders and general psychiatric patients regarding violent ideation and at exploring its association with interpersonal violence. We recruited 200 detainees undergoing forensic psychiatric evaluation and 390 general psychiatric patients at discharge. At baseline, they were asked about violent ideation; at the 20-week follow-up, information about violent acts was gathered from crime conviction registry, interviews, and records. The lifetime prevalence of violent ideation was 32.5% for offenders and 35.6% for patients; the corresponding two-month prevalence was 22.5% and 21.0%, respectively. For the both samples combined, those with violent ideation in their lifetime were significantly more prone to commit violent acts during follow-up than those without such ideation, OR = 2.65. The same applied to the patient sample, OR = 3.41. In terms of positive predictive values, fewer than 25% of those with violent ideation committed violent acts. Contrary to our hypothesis, the prevalence of violent ideation did not differ significantly between offenders and patients. However, there was support for the hypothesized association between violent ideation and violent acts on a group level. On an individual level, the clinician should consider additional factors when assessing the risk for violent acts.

  • 10.
    Samuelsson, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Gerdin, George
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öllinger, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Taurine and glutathione levels in plasma before and after ECT treatment2012In: Psychiatry Research, ISSN 0165-1781, E-ISSN 1872-7123, Vol. 198, no 1, p. 53-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Taurine has been shown to be elevated in plasma and lymphocytes of depressed patients, but the level normalises after successful drug therapy. During depression, levels of glutathione (GSH) are decreased in the plasma and blood. This study was performed to examine taurine and GSH levels in depressed patients before and after electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Fasting blood samples were collected from 23 patients before the first and after the third ECT treatment. The severity of depression was estimated with the Montgomery–Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). We analysed GSH in blood and the levels of taurine and total GSH in plasma. After three ECTs, a significant decrease in MADRS scores was found for the entire group. Simultaneously, the decrease in the plasma taurine levels was significant for the seven responders but not for the sixteen non-responders. We observed no differences in blood or plasma GSH levels after three ECT treatments when compared to values before the therapy. Plasma taurine levels decrease significantly after three ECT treatments in patients who respond to treatment. GSH levels were not affected by ECT treatment. The results indicate that taurine may play a role in the pathophysiology of depression.

  • 11.
    Samuelsson, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Skogh, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Lundberg, Kristina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Öllinger, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Taurine and glutathione in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid in olanzapine treated patients with schizophrenia2013In: Psychiatry Research, ISSN 0165-1781, E-ISSN 1872-7123, Vol. 210, no 3, p. 819-824Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Taurine and glutathione (GSH) have antioxidant and central nervous system protective properties and are proposed to be involved in the pathology of schizophrenia. The aim of this study was to compare the blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of taurine and GSH in patients with schizophrenia medicated with oral olanzapine compared with controls.

    Methods: In total, 37 patients with schizophrenia being medicated with olanzapine and 45 healthy volunteers were recruited. Taurine and GSH levels were analysed in plasma and CSF and correlated to symptoms and level of function.

    Results: Plasma taurine levels were elevated in patients compared with controls (p=0.000003). No differences were found between patients and controls regarding taurine in CSF or GSH concentrations in plasma and CSF.

    Conclusion: The significantly higher levels of plasma but not CSF taurine in patients with schizophrenia treated with olanzapine compared with controls may implicate the involvement of taurine in the pathophysiology of the disease. The absence of GSH differences in plasma and CSF between patients and controls is interesting in the perspective of earlier research proposing a dysregulation of GSH metabolism as a vulnerability factor for the development of schizophrenia.

  • 12.
    Sinai, Cave
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Department of Psychiatry, Västervik, Kalmar County Council, Sweden.
    Hirvikoski, Tatja
    Karolinska Inst KIND, Sweden.
    Wiklander, Maria
    Karolinska Inst Huddinge, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Nordström, Anna-Lena
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Nordström, Peter
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Nilsonne, Åsa
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Wilczek, Alexander
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Åsberg, Marie
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Jokinen, Jussi
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Umeå Univ, Sweden.
    Exposure to interpersonal violence and risk of post-traumatic stress disorder among women with borderline personality disorder2018In: Psychiatry Research, ISSN 0165-1781, E-ISSN 1872-7123, Vol. 262, p. 311-315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: This study aims to determine the validity of the Karolinska Interpersonal Violence Scale (KIVS), as a screening tool for PTSD, among women with borderline personality disorder (BPD) and severe suicidal behavior. Method: 106 women with BPD and at least two suicide attempts were assessed with the KIVS for exposure to interpersonal violence as a child and as an adult. The screening ability of the KIVS for the diagnosis of PTSD was analyzed using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Results: PTSD diagnosis was valid for 61 (58%) women with BPD. The KIVS exposure of lifetime interpersonal violence, displayed fair accuracy of predicting diagnosis of PTSD (area under the curve 0.79, confidence interval [0.71, 0.88]) and performed well (sensitivity 0.90 and specificity 0.62), with a cut-off score of 4 (range 0-10). Poly-traumatization was not significantly related to PTSD diagnosis as compared to single traumatization, whereas sexual victimization was significantly more prevalent in women with PTSD diagnosis, as compared to other types of traumatic events. Conclusion: A score of 4 or more on the KIVS exposure to interpersonal lifetime violence presents well as a screening instrument for risk of PTSD, among women with BPD.

  • 13.
    Zetterqvist, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Barnafrid. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Fredlund, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Priebe, Gisela
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Barnafrid. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Wadsby, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jonsson, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Barnafrid. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Self-reported nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) and sex as self-injury (SASI): Relationship to abuse, risk behaviors, trauma symptoms, self-esteem and attachment2018In: Psychiatry Research, ISSN 0165-1781, E-ISSN 1872-7123, Vol. 265, p. 309-316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focuses on a conceptually unexplored behavior among adolescents who report deliberately using sex as a means of self-injury. In a large high school-based sample (n = 5743), adolescents who engaged in sex as self injury (SASI, n = 43) were compared to adolescents who reported direct nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI, n = 933) and those who reported both NSSI and SASI (n = 82). Re.sults showed that significantly more adolescents with SASI had experience of penetrating sexual abuse, as well as more sexual partners compared to those with NSSI. The SASI group also had higher levels of self-reported trauma symptoms, such as dissociation, posttraumatic stress and sexual concerns compared to those with NSSI, suggesting a distinct relationship between sexual abuse, trauma symptoms and engaging in sex as self-injury. There was no difference between the SASI and NSSI groups regarding experiences of emotional and physical abuse, self-esteem, parental care or overprotection or symptoms of depression, anxiety and anger. Adolescents who engaged in both NSSI + SASI stood out as a more severe and burdened group, with more experience of abuse, risk behaviors and impaired psychosocial health. Adolescents with traumatic experiences such as sexual abuse need to be assessed for SASI and vice versa.

1 - 13 of 13
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf