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  • 1.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Department of Nursing, School of Health and Welfare, Sweden.
    Pakpour, A. H.
    Department of Nursing, School of Health and Welfare, Sweden; Social Determinants of Health Research Center Qazvin, Iran.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fridlund, B.
    CICE Linneus University, Sweden.
    Ulander, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Psychometric properties of the Ethos Brief Index (EBI) using factorial structure and Rasch Analysis among patients with obstructive sleep apnea before and after CPAP treatment is initiated.2019In: Sleep and Breathing, ISSN 1520-9512, E-ISSN 1522-1709, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 761-768Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Continuous positive airway treatment (CPAP) is the recommended treatment for patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Outcome measures often focus on clinical and/or self-rated variables related to the medical condition. However, a brief validated instrument focusing on the whole life situation (i.e., ethos) suitable for clinical practice is missing. The aim of this study was to investigate factorial structure, categorical functioning of the response scale, and differential item functioning across sub-populations of the Ethos Brief Index (EBI) among patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) before and after initiation of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP).

    METHODS: A prospective design, including 193 patients with OSA (68% men, 59.66 years, SD 11.51) from two CPAP clinics, was used. Clinical assessment and overnight respiratory polygraphy were used to diagnose patients. Questionnaires administered before and after 6 months of CPAP treatment included EBI, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and global perceived health (initial item in SF-36). The validity and reliability of the EBI were investigated using Rasch and confirmatory factor analysis models. Measurement invariance, unidimensionality, and differential item functioning across gender groups, Apnea-Hypopnea Index, and ESS groups were assessed.

    RESULTS: The reliability of the EBI was confirmed using composite reliability and Cronbach's alpha. The results supported unidimensionality of the EBI in confirmatory factor analysis and the Rasch model. No differential item functioning was found. A latent profile analysis yielded two profiles of patients with low (n = 42) and high (n = 151) ethos. Patients in the low ethos group were younger and had higher depression scores, lower perceived health, and higher body mass index.

    CONCLUSIONS: The EBI is a valid tool with robust psychometric properties suitable for use among patients with OSA before and after treatment with CPAP is initiated. Future studies should focus on its predictive validity.

  • 2.
    Johansson, Peter
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Svensson, Erland
    Swedish Defence Research Agency, Linköping .
    Alehagen, Urban
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Broström, Anders
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Sleep disordered breathing, hypoxia and inflammation: associations with sickness behaviour in community dwelling elderly with and without cardiovascular disease2015In: Sleep and Breathing, ISSN 1520-9512, E-ISSN 1522-1709, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 263-271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Inflammation can induce a cluster of symptoms, referred to as sickness behaviour (e.g., depressive symptoms, sleep disturbances, pain and fatigue). Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and sleep disordered breathing (SDB) are common in older adults. CVD is associated with an increased inflammatory activity and in SDB, hypoxia can also increase inflammation. The purpose of this study is to explore if SDB-related hypoxia is associated differently with inflammation and the presence of sickness behaviour in older adults with and without CVD.

    METHODS: Three hundred and thirty-one older adults, whose mean age is 78 years, underwent one-night polygraphic recording to measure SDB and hypoxia. CVD was established by a clinical investigation. Questionnaires were used to measure sickness behaviour and depressive symptoms. High sensitivity C-reactive protein was used as a marker of inflammation.

    RESULTS: Structural Equation Modelling showed that SDB-related hypoxia was associated with inflammation (β > 0.40) which mediated indirect associations with sickness behaviour (β = 0.19) and depressive symptoms (β = 0.11), but only in those with CVD (n = 119). In this model, inflammation had a direct effect on sickness behaviour (β = 0.43) and an indirect effect on depressive symptoms (β = 0.24). Hypoxia had the strongest effect (i.e., β = 0.41; significant) on inflammation, whereas the AHI or ODI had weak and non-significant effects (β = 0.03 and β = 0.15).

    CONCLUSIONS: Older adults with CVD and SDB are at a particular risk of developing sickness behaviour and depressive symptoms. The effect of SDB was mainly caused by hypoxia, suggesting that hypoxia is an important marker of SDB severity in older adults with CVD.

  • 3.
    Sarberg, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Svanborg, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Sleepiness and sleep disordered breathing during pregnancy2016In: Sleep and Breathing, ISSN 1520-9512, E-ISSN 1522-1709, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 1231-1237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Study objectives: To investigate if sleep recordings show differences in prevalence of sleep-disturbed breathing among pregnant women compared to non-pregnant controls. To compare the Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS) scores between the two groups. To evaluate obstetric outcomes.

    Setting: At one antenatal care center at an outpatient unit in Linköping, Sweden.

    Participants: One hundred pregnant women (gestational week 24-34) and 80 non-pregnant women age- and body mass index-matched as controls.

    Interventions: Whole-night respiratory recordings were performed in the homes of all participants, who also answered the same questionnaire, including the Epworth Sleepiness Scale.

    Measurements and results: Objectively recorded snoring was more common among the pregnant women (median value 10% of total estimated sleep time) than among the non-pregnant controls (2.5% of total sleep time, p<0.001). The prevalence of obstructive events was low and similar in pregnant and non-pregnant women (1% vs. 3% had obstructive apnea-hypopnea index ≥5). The total ESS score was higher among pregnant women than controls (median 9 vs. 7, p<0.001) but no significant differences were found between the two groups in the scores for the separate items of the ESS. Sleep-disturbed breathing and snoring showed no impact on obstetric outcome. There were no significant associations between either subjectively reported or objectively recorded snoring and ESS scores.

    Conclusion: Snoring increases during pregnancy, but sleep recordings could not verify an increased prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea among pregnant women. Development of obstructive sleep apnea is not a likely explanation for the increased daytime sleepiness seen in pregnant women.

  • 4.
    Sunnergren, Ola
    et al.
    Ear, Nose and Throat Clinic, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping.
    Broström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Svanborg, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Neurophysiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurophysiology UHL.
    Positional sensitivity as a confounder in diagnosis of severity of obstructive sleep apnea2013In: Sleep and Breathing, ISSN 1520-9512, E-ISSN 1522-1709, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 173-179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The apnea–hypopnea index (AHI) is used to grade obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) into mild, moderate, and severe forms. Obstructive events are most common in the supine position. The amount of supine sleep thus influences total AHI. Our aim was to determine the prevalence of position-dependent OSA (POSA) and its relation to OSA severity classification as recommended by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM).

    Methods: Two hundred sixty-five subjects were recruited from primary care hypertension clinics. Whole-night respiratory recordings were performed to determine the AHI in the supine and non-supine positions, respectively. POSA was defined as supine AHI twice the non-supine AHI with supine AHI ≥5.

    Results: Fifty-three percent had POSA, 22% had non-position-dependent OSA, and 25% had normal respiration. By AASM classification, 81 subjects did not have OSA, but 42% of them had some degree of obstruction when supine, and 5 subjects would have been classified as moderate–severe if they had only slept supine. Conversely, of the 53 classified as mild OSA, 30% would have changed to a more severe classification if they had exclusively slept supine.

    Conclusions: POSA was common both in subjects that by AASM classification had OSA as well as those without. The severity of OSA, as defined by AASM, could be dependent on supine time in a substantial amount of subjects

  • 5.
    Ulander, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Broström, Anders
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Letter: Response to Akar et al., regarding our study "Side effects to continuous positive airway pressure treatment for obstructive sleep apnoea" in SLEEP AND BREATHING, vol 19, issue 4, pp 1345-13452015In: Sleep and Breathing, ISSN 1520-9512, E-ISSN 1522-1709, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 1345-1345Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 6.
    Ulander, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Svensson Johansson, Malin
    Department of Nursing, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University College, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Ekegren Ewaldh, Amanda
    Department of Nursing, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University College, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Svanborg, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Broström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Side effects of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure treatment for Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Changes over time and association to adherence2014In: Sleep and Breathing, ISSN 1520-9512, E-ISSN 1522-1709, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 799-807Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Continuous Positive Airway Pressure is an effective treatment for obstructive sleep apnea, but adherence is often low and side effects are common. It is unclear from previous research whether side effects are significant causes of non-adherence. No study has examined if side effects vary within subjects over time. The aims were to 1) examine the evolution of CPAP side effects over time; and 2) prospectively assess correlations  between early CPAP side effects and treatment adherence. Methods: 186 obstructive sleep apnea patients from three sleep centres were prospectively enrolled. They completed the Side Effects to CPAP Inventory, where the respondent rates the frequency, magnitude and perceived impact on adherence from 15 side effects. Adherence was measured by treatment dropout and machine usage time. Results: The most common side effects were dry mouth, increased number of awakenings, blocked up nose, mask pressure and mask leaks. While some side effects were stable over time, others could both resolve and emerge within subjects. Dry mouth, mask leakage and blocked up nose emerged within one year in approximately 30% of patients who had not experienced them after two weeks. Increased number of awakenings and dry mouth after 1-2 weeks were significantly associated to treatment dropout during the first year and machine usage time after six months. Conclusions: While some side effects are related to adherence, most are not. Not all side effects are stable over time. This, together with differences in methodology between studies, might explain the conflicting findings in earlier research.

  • 7.
    Ulander, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Neurophysiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Svanborg, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Neurophysiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Broström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    The fairness of the Epworth Sleepiness Scale: two approaches to differential item functioning2013In: Sleep and Breathing, ISSN 1520-9512, E-ISSN 1522-1709, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 157-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Differential item functioning (DIF) is said to exist in an item if a subject’s response to the item is affected by other aspects than that which the test is intended to assess. DIF might affect the validity of a test. The aim of this study was thus to examine whether any of the items in the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) exhibits DIF regarding age or gender, and if so, to which degree.

    Methods

    Using previously collected cross-sectional ESS data from 1,168 subjects with different clinical characteristics (61% males, mean age 67.8 year (SD 12.2 year)), ordinal regression as well as Rasch-based DIF analyses were performed.

    Results

    Concerning age, both DIF analyses showed DIF for age in items 3 (inactive in a public place), 4 (passenger in a car), and 8 (in a car that has stopped in traffic). The Rasch model also showed DIF for gender in item 3. The DIF magnitudes as judged by McFadden pseudo-R2 changes were, however, only minor.

    Conclusions

    ESS has small but reproducible DIF for age in items 3, 4, and 8. The detected DIF might be worth to consider in large-sample studies, although it probably has no effect on an individual basis.

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