liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 41 of 41
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Adeback, Petra
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Schulman, Abbe
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Doris
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Children exposed to a natural disaster: psychological consequences eight years after 2004 tsunami2018In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 72, no 1, p. 75-81Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There is a need for studies that follow up children and adolescents for many years post disaster since earlier studies have shown that exposure during natural disasters constitutes a risk factor for poor psychological health.Aims: The main aim was to examine whether there was an association between severity of exposures during a natural disaster experienced in childhood or adolescence and posttraumatic stress symptoms, psychological distress, self-rated health, diagnosis of depression, anxiety or worry, thoughts about or attempted suicide, physical symptoms or daily functioning eight years later in young adulthood. A second aim was to compare psychological distress and self-rated health of exposed young adults with a matched population-based sample.Method: Young adults, who experienced the 2004 tsunami as children between 10 and 15 years of age, responded to a questionnaire eight years post disaster. The results were compared to a matched population sample.Results: The results showed that the likelihood for negative psychological outcomes was higher for those who had been exposed to several types of exposures during this natural disaster.Conclusions: The negative psychological impact on children and adolescents can still be present eight years post-disaster and seems to have association with the type of exposure; loss, physical presence and subjective experience. It is important for clinicians, who meet young adults seeking help, to be conscious about the impact as long as eight years post disaster and to be aware of possible clinical implications associated with severity of exposures.

  • 2.
    Afzelius, Maria
    et al.
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    Ostman, Margareta
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    Råstam, Maria
    Lund University, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Priebe, Gisela
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Barnafrid. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Lund University, Sweden.
    Parents in adult psychiatric care and their children: a call for more interagency collaboration with social services and child and adolescent psychiatry2018In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 72, no 1, p. 31-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A parental mental illness affects all family members and should warrant a need for support.Aim: To investigate the extent to which psychiatric patients with underage children are the recipients of child-focused interventions and involved in interagency collaboration.Methods: Data were retrieved from a psychiatric services medical record database consisting of data regarding 29,972 individuals in southern Sweden and indicating the patients main diagnoses, comorbidity, children below the age of 18, and child-focused interventions.Results: Among the patients surveyed, 12.9% had registered underage children. One-fourth of the patients received child-focused interventions from adult psychiatry, and out of these 30.7% were involved in interagency collaboration as compared to 7.7% without child-focused interventions. Overall, collaboration with child and adolescent psychiatric services was low for all main diagnoses. If a patient received child-focused interventions from psychiatric services, the likelihood of being involved in interagency collaboration was five times greater as compared to patients receiving no child-focused intervention when controlled for gender, main diagnosis, and inpatient care.Conclusions: Psychiatric services play a significant role in identifying the need for and initiating child-focused interventions in families with a parental mental illness, and need to develop and support strategies to enhance interagency collaboration with other welfare services.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Carlbring, Per
    Kaldo, Viktor
    Ström, Lars
    Screening of psychiatric disorders via the Internet. A pilot study with tinnitus patients2004In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 58, no 4, p. 287-291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tinnitus has been associated with psychiatric disorders and more recently diagnostic tools have been used in a systematic manner. In the present study, we administered the World Health Organisation's Composite International Diagnostic Interview - Short form (CIDI-SF) in a computerized Internet-based version to a self-selected sample of tinnitus patients (n=48). Using the cut-off for 'probable case' (12-month prevalence), 69% of the tinnitus patients fulfilled the criteria for depression, 60% for generalized anxiety disorder, 83% for specific phobia, 67% for social phobia, 58% for agoraphobia, 21% panic attack, 83% obsessive - compulsive disorder, 2% alcohol dependence and 0% drug dependence. Decreased percentages were found for depression (4%), specific phobia (62%) and social phobia (27%) when applying a more conservative criteria (maximum case criteria). In conclusion, the findings suggest that the Internet version of CIDI-SF can be used as a screening tool for psychiatric disturbance in somatic patients, but that diagnostic criteria need to be adjusted for Internet use.

  • 4.
    Bergstrom, Jan
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Karlsson, Andreas
    Mid Sweden University.
    Andreewitch, Sergej
    Karolinska Institute.
    Ruck, Christian
    Karolinska Institute.
    Carlbring , Per
    Karolinska Institute.
    An open study of the effectiveness of Internet treatment for panic disorder delivered in a psychiatric setting2009In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 63, no 1, p. 44-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Panic disorder with or without agoraphobia (PD/A) is common and can be treated effectively with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) medication or cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT). However, the lack of access to CBT services has motivated the development of self-help approaches requiring less therapist contact. A novel treatment modality in this field, showing efficacy in several randomized trials but until now not evaluated within the context of regular psychiatric care, is Internet-based treatment. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Internet-based CBT for patients in a psychiatric setting. Twenty consecutively referred patients with PD were included in the study. A structured clinical interview with a psychiatrist was conducted for inclusion, as well as at post-treatment and at the 6-month follow-up. The treatment consisted of a 10-week CBT-based self-help programme, including minimal therapist support by e-mail. At post-treatment, 94% of patients no longer met DSM-IV criteria for PD (82% at 6-month follow-up). The within-group effect sizes (for the main outcome PDSS; Panic Disorder Severity Scale) were Cohens d=2.5 (pre- to post-treatment) and 2.8 (pre-treatment to follow-up), respectively. The proportion of responders on the PDSS was 75% at post-treatment and 70% at 6-month follow-up. The results supports earlier efficacy data on Internet-based CBT for PD and indicates that it is effective also within a regular psychiatric setting. However, a larger randomized controlled trial should be conducted, directly comparing Internet-based CBT with traditionally administered CBT within such a setting.

  • 5.
    Bogren, Lennart
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Bogren, Inga-Britt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    The defence mechanism test in panic disorder and generalized anxiety2000In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 54, p. 15-15Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Bogren, Lennart
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Psychiatry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Bogren, Inga-Britt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Psychiatry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Ohrt, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Psychiatry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Sjödin, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Psychiatry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Panic disorder and the Defence Mechanism Test2002In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 56, p. 195-199Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to study defence categories according to the modified version of the Defence Mechanism Test (DMTm) and to see if there was a relationship between DMTm and severity of illness. The material consists of 23 patients with panic disorder according to DSM-III-R who participated in a long-term follow-up of two clinical trials. The most common defence categories were repression, denial, disavowal or denial of the threat relation or of the identity of the peripheral person. The patients with denial or polymorphous identification had more severe symptoms and the latter group also were more handicapped by their symptoms. Denial and disavowal or denial of the threat relation may be defence categories, which are not so effective in preventing the individual from experiencing anxiety. Polymorphous identification, although not so common, does not seem to be an appropriate defence among patients with panic disorder.

  • 7. Bulow, P.
    et al.
    Svensson, Tommy
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Sociology .
    Hansson, J.-H.
    Department of Social Work, Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Long-term consequences of the reformation of psychiatric care: A 15-year follow-up study2002In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 56, no 1, p. 15-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although there are a great many epidemiological studies of psychiatric diseases and the outcomes of controlled rehabilitation programmes, there is a shortage of studies of routine psychiatric care. This study is a retrospective cohort study of the total number (n = 138) of patients receiving inpatient care at a psychiatric rehabilitation clinic in Jönköping during 1984. The follow-up period is 15 years, 1984-98. The group had a considerable amount of inpatient care, but this decreased dramatically during the time of investigation. Positive indications were that there were no suicides during the last 5 years of the period and that the number of registered crimes showed a marked decrease from 1992. Negative indications were low levels of work and occupation and few social contacts.

  • 8.
    Cuijpers, Pim
    et al.
    Vrije University of Amsterdam.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Donker, Tara
    Vrije University of Amsterdam.
    van Straten, Annemieke
    Vrije University of Amsterdam.
    Psychological treatment of depression: Results of a series of meta-analyses2011In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 65, no 6, p. 354-364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cuijpers P, Andersson G, Donker T, van Straten A. Psychological treatment of depression: Results of a series of meta-analyses. Nord J Psychiatry 2011;65:354-364. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanBackground: In the past few decades, a considerable number of studies have examined the effects of psychotherapies for adult depression. Aim: We described the results of a series of meta-analyses examining what this large body of research has contributed to our knowledge of these treatments of depression. Results: We found that different types of psychotherapy are efficacious in the treatment of adult depression, including cognitive behavior therapy, interpersonal psychotherapy, problem-solving therapy, non-directive supportive therapy and behavioral activation therapy. Differences between types of psychotherapy are small. The efficacy of psychotherapy for mild to moderate depression is about the same as the efficacy of pharmacotherapy, and that combined treatment is more effective than psychotherapy alone and pharmacotherapy alone. Psychotherapy is not only effective in depressed adults in general, but also in older adults, women with postpartum depression, patients with general medical disorders, in inpatients, in primary care patients, patients with chronic depression and in subthreshold depression. Conclusions: We found no evidence showing that psychotherapy is less efficacious in severe depression ( with mean baseline Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores up to 31, mean Beck Depression Inventory scores up to 35.85 and mean Beck Depression Inventory-II scores up to 36.50), but effects are smaller in chronic depression. We also found that the effects of psychotherapy are probably overestimated because of publication bias and the relatively low quality of many studies in the field.

  • 9.
    Dekeyser, Linda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Agnaförs, Sara
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Self-reported mental health in 12-year-old second-generation immigrant children in Sweden2011In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 65, no 6, p. 389-395Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     Today 29.3% of all newborns in Sweden are second-generation immigrants. Studies on mental health among these children are few, inconclusive and vary widely with regard to the informant used and the age of the immigrant. The majority of previous studies focus on study groups that cover a wide age span but since mental health varies considerably during the pre-adolescent and adolescent years, more age-specific studies are needed. Additional focus on the health and well-being of these children is necessary if a well-functioning society is to develop. Aim: To investigate whether and how second-generation immigrant children in Sweden differ from non-immigrant children in their presentation of self-reported mental health at the age of 12. Methods: Second-generation immigrant children (n = 142) from a birth cohort in southern Sweden, subjects of the SESBiC-study (the South East Sweden Birth Cohort-study) were compared with non-immigrant children (n = 1036) from the same cohort in their presentation of self-reported mental health at the age of 12 using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. Gender, family structure and parents educational level were controlled for. Results: Second-generation immigrant children did not differ from the non-immigrant children in their own presentation of mental health at the age of 12 in any of the categories of immigrant groups. Conclusion: It is a promising sign for future integration that second-generation immigrant childrens self-reported mental health at the age of 12 was quite similar to that of non-immigrant children.

  • 10.
    d'Elia, Giacomo
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognitive Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Attachment: A biological basis for the therapeutic relationship?2001In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 55, no 5, p. 329-336Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When faced with loss, illness, distress, or threat, we tend to seek out an attachment figure from which we can obtain comfort and protection. The attachment theory, an evolutionary biosocial theory of development, postulates that the propensity to make strong emotional bonds to a differentiated and preferred person, conceived as stronger and or wiser, is a basic component of the human nature, distinct from feeding and sexuality. Attachment behaviour is present in germinal form in the neonate and continues to be present ''from the cradle to the grave''. On the basis of day-to-day experience of the responsiveness and accessibility of caregivers, children build internal working models of attachment figures and of themselves. Expectations about the likely behaviour of others, initially preverbal, characterize the approach of the individual to other persons. Internal working models are successively modified on the basis of recent experience. The therapeutic relationship can be viewed as the seeking of a secure base, from which the patient and the therapist, in a joint effort, explore the patient's attachment history and the painful feelings associated with it. The therapist, responsive to the patient's verbal and non-verbal attachment signals, is viewed as a supplementary attachment figure.

  • 11.
    Dobrov, Eugen
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Thorell, Lars-Håkan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    "Reasons For Living" - Translation, psychometric evaluation and relationships to suicidal behaviour in a Swedish random sample2004In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 58, no 4, p. 277-285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The protective role of positive beliefs and expectations against suicide has been studied using the Reasons For Living inventory (RFL). The RFL has shown to be useful in research and suggested for use in clinical practice. A Swedish translation of the RFL was examined for psychometric properties, reliability, latent structure and convergent validity in a Swedish general population. The RFL was distributed with the Suicide Behaviors Questionnaire (SBQ) to 1366 randomly selected subjects aged 20-65 years in the county of Östergötland. The results were based on 506 complete replies. The Cronbach a of the total RFL was 0.92, ranging from 0.72 to 0.93 in the six scales of RFL. The intercorrelations between the scales were weak and the scale to total RFL score moderate to high. The factor structure and item loadings of the inventory showed great similarities with the American one with exception for the scales Responsibility to Family and Child-related Concerns, which formed one common factor. The convergent validity was supported by significant relationships to the items of the SBQ. It is concluded that the Swedish translation of the RFL inventory in a Swedish general sample possesses great similarities to the American original RFL. Thus, it is suggested as an instrument for research and clinical usage in Sweden. © 2004 Taylor & Francis.

  • 12.
    Gustafsson, Berit M.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience (CSAN). Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Högland Hospital, Sweden; Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Proczkowska, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Hospital Jönköping, Sweden.
    The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) for preschool childrena Swedish validation2016In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 70, no 8, p. 567-574Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In Sweden, 80-90% of children aged 1-5 years attend preschool, and that environment is well suited to identify behaviours that may be signs of mental health problems. The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) is a well-known short and structured instrument measuring child behaviours that indicate mental health problems well suited for preschool use.Aim: To investigate whether SDQ is a reliable and valid instrument for identifying behavioural problems in children aged 1-3 years and 4-5 years in a Swedish population, as rated by preschool teachers.Methods: Preschools situated in different sized municipalities in Sweden participated. The preschool teacher rated each individual child. Concurrent validity was tested using the Child-Teacher Report Form (C-TRF) and Child Engagement Questionnaire (CEQ). Exploratory factor analysis was conducted for age groups, 1-3 years and 4-5 years.Results: The preschool teachers considered most of the SDQ items relevant and possible to rate. For the children aged 1-3 years, the subscales Hyperactivity (Cronbach alpha=0.84, split half=0.73) and Conduct (Cronbach alpha=0.76, split half=0.80) were considered to be valid. For the age group 4-5 years, the whole original SDQ scale, 4-factor solution was used and showed reasonable validity (Cronbach alpha=0.83, split half=0.87).Conclusion: SDQ can be used in a preschool setting by preschool teachers as a valid instrument for identifying externalizing behavioural problems (hyperactivity and conduct problems) in young children.Clinical implications: SDQ could be used to identify preschool children at high-risk for mental health problems later in life.

  • 13.
    Gustafsson, Per E.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nelson, Nina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Gustafsson, Per A
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Diurnal cortisol levels, psychiatric symptoms and sense of coherence in abused adolescents2010In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 64, no 1, p. 27-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. The role of the HPA axis in psychiatric disorders following trauma is poorly studied and most studies have been done on adults. Aims. To investigate the association of mental well-being and diurnal cortisol in abused adolescents. Methods. The present crosssectional study examined diurnal salivary cortisol (measured three times a day during three days) in relation to psychiatric symptoms (Trauma Symptoms Checklist for Children) and the salutogenic construct “Sense of coherence”, in fifteen adolescents exposed to childhood abuse. Results. Significant positive correlations were found between symptoms and sense of coherence versus early and late morning cortisol concentrations. The correlations were most consistent for internalizing and externalizing symptoms, and somewhat less for post-traumatic symptoms and sense of coherence. In contrast, evening cortisol did not correlate with any of the psychological measures. Conclusion. These results extend previous research findings by pointing towards a relation between symptoms and higher morning cortisol and accentuated diurnal cortisol variation in abused adolescent as opposed to lower basal cortisol and a flattening of the cortisol rhythm repeatedly observed in traumatized adults.

  • 14.
    Haglund, Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Occupational Therapy.
    Rahm Hallberg, Ingalill
    Pettersson, Merdita
    Psychiatric occupational therapy service - Quality assurance2004In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 58, no 5, p. 403-407Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last few decades, quality assurance has been a central issue in the societies, both in, for example the industrial area and in healthcare. It is a tool to measure the outcomes of product or service provided. A review of the literature during the last 17 years with respect to quality assurance work in psychiatric occupational therapy indicates that few articles have been published in the area and that their scientific quality is questionable. The studies show many methodological shortcomings, which result in difficulty drawing any conclusion from the studies. The number of publications is also decreasing. Furthermore, a survey to investigate quality assurance work in psychiatric occupational therapy service shows that the occupational therapists do not work with quality assurance methods to a great extent. The methods they use most are interviews with patients and patient questionnaire. Both these methods require documentation in order to offer the patient a suitable service. Quality assurance work will be difficult to implement if no documentation is available. Documentation is central to communicating with other professions and with the client. This study points out that occupational therapists need to improve practice as well as research concerning quality assurance in order to ensure that they offer the patient a high-quality service.

  • 15.
    Hanson, J
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, NW Stockholm Med Area, Stockholm, Sweden CMT, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Belfrage, H
    Karolinska Inst, NW Stockholm Med Area, Stockholm, Sweden CMT, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Bergman, B
    Karolinska Inst, NW Stockholm Med Area, Stockholm, Sweden CMT, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Forsling, K
    Karolinska Inst, NW Stockholm Med Area, Stockholm, Sweden CMT, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Dick
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment.
    Lidberg, L
    Karolinska Inst, NW Stockholm Med Area, Stockholm, Sweden CMT, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Multi-problem persons in Stockholm: multi-care consumation and estimated costs - a file study of psychiatrically disturbed offenders2000In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 54, p. 10-10Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Holm, Jonas
    et al.
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Brus, Ole
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Bave, Ullvi
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Landen, Mikael
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Lundberg, Johan
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Nordanskog, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Nordenskjold, Axel
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Improvement of cycloid psychosis following electroconvulsive therapy2017In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 71, no 6, p. 405-410Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The treatment of choice for cycloid psychosis has traditionally been electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), but there is a lack of studies on its effectiveness.Aims: The primary aim of this register study was to determine the rates of remission and response after ECT for cycloid psychosis. The secondary aim was to examine possible predictors of outcome.Methods: Data were obtained from the National Quality Register for ECT in Sweden. The study population was patients (n=42) who received ECT for acute polymorphic psychotic disorder without symptoms of schizophrenia or for cycloid psychosis between 2011-2015 in 13 hospitals. Remission and response rates were calculated using Clinical Global Impression-Severity (CGI-S) and -Improvement scores, respectively. Variables with possible predictive value were tested using Chi-square and Fishers exact test.Results: The response rate was 90.5%. The remission rate was 45.2%. Of 42 patients, 40 improved their CGI-S score after ECT (pamp;lt;0.001). The mean number of ECT treatments was 2.5 for non-responders and 7.0 for responders (p=0.010). The mean number of ECT treatments did not differ significantly between remitters and non-remitters (7.2 vs 6.1, p=0.31). None of the other investigated potential predictors was statistically significantly associated with outcome.Conclusions: ECT is an effective treatment for cycloid psychosis. Future studies need to compare the outcome of ECT to that of other treatment strategies. Clinical implications: The high response rate with ECT indicates that cycloid psychosis is a clinically useful diagnosis.

  • 17.
    Holmqvist, Rolf
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ström, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Foldemo, Anniqa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The effects of psychological treatment in primary care in Sweden—A practice-based study2014In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 68, no 3, p. 204-212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Practice-based studies have found substantial effects of psychological treatment in routine care, often equivalent between treatment methods. Factors that moderate treatment outcome may be important to assess.

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate treatment outcome in psychological treatment in primary care, and to compare outcome between the most frequently used methods. An additional aim was to study factors that might moderate outcome differences.

    Method: The Clinical Outcome in Routine Evaluation (CORE) system was used to evaluate psychological treatment at Swedish primary care centers. Treatment methods were coded by the therapists after treatment. Three major treatment orientations-directive (cognitive, behavioral and CBT), reflective (psychodynamic and relational) and supportive therapy were compared. Patient and therapist variables were studied as treatment moderating factors.

    Results: Analyses of 733 therapies, delivered by 70 therapists, showed good results in short psychological treatments (median session number = 6). Forty-three percent of the patients were remitted, 34% recovered. For patients receiving at least five sessions, the figures were 50% and 40%. Directive therapy and reflective therapy had comparable outcome, and better than supportive treatment. Patients in supportive therapy had higher age and received fewer therapy sessions. The patients' motivation, alliance capacity and reflective ability, as rated by the therapist after treatment, were lower for patients in supportive treatment.

    Conclusions: Psychological treatment in primary care obtains god results. Supportive therapy should be studied more systematically, particularly with regard to variables that may moderate treatment outcome.

     

  • 18.
    Jarkman-Björn, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Ethics and interpreting in psychotherapy with refugee children and families2005In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 59, no 6, p. 516-521Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Basic ethical principles like autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence and justice should be taken into consideration step by step when treating refugee children and their families. These principles may be considered from the point of view of each of the actors involved - patient, therapist and interpreter. This paper is focused on the role of the interpreter and on different aspects to be considered by the therapist when working with interpreters in psychotherapeutic treatment of refugee children and families. Elements of case histories are used to illustrate situations faced in working with an interpreter. An ethical analysis of a case where a teenage refugee received therapeutic treatment using an interpreter is made. © 2005 Taylor & Francis.

  • 19.
    Jarkman-Björn, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Björn, Åke
    Ethical aspects when treating traumatized refugee children and their families2004In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 58, no 3, p. 193-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Basic ethical principles are worth analysing step by step when dealing with refugee children and their families. Three issues where potential ethical conflicts might arise for healthcare professionals in treating refugees with different cultural background are pointed out-traumatic life events, hierarchy and repatriation. An ethical analysis of the decision to admit a traumatized teenage refugee to a psychiatric ward is discussed with respect for the ethical principles autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence and justice. There are both gains and losses, which are valued differently depending on the actors involved.

  • 20.
    Jonsson, Dick
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Center for Medical Technology Assessment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wålinder, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    The socioeconomic cost of treatment of therapy-refractory schizophrenic patients in Sweden1994In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 48, no 5, p. 311-313Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study is to examine the socioeconomic costs of treatment of therapy-refractory schizophrenic patients. The patients usually have a great need for health care and remain in institutions for long periods of time. The method is retrospective, and the data refer to patients who received treatment at the Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital in Linköping, Sweden in 1990. The total annual health care cost for treatment of therapy-refractory schizophrenia is estimated to be SEK 4.8 million (USD 1 = SEK 7.7). Inpatient care amounts to 93% of the total cost, and the cost of outpatient care to 6%. The cost of drugs and laboratory services corresponds to 1 % of the total cost. The high cost of inpatient care and the low cost of outpatient care may indicate that a redistribution of resources from inpatient to outpatient care is necessary. A generalization of the results indicates that the total annual cost of treating all therapy-refractory schizophrenic patients in Sweden is approximately SEK 1.9 billion. The result highlights the need for discussions concerning alternative treatment methods but also focuses on the importance of using health economic evaluations within psychiatry.

  • 21.
    Larsson, Ingbeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Friedrich, William
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Differences and similarities in sexual behaviour among pre-schoolers in Sweden and USA2000In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 54, no 4, p. 251-257Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies of childhood sexual behaviour in a cross-cultural perspective are important in that they increase our knowledge of normative behaviour in general and enhance our understanding of cultural influences on child sexual development. Two studies, one from Sweden (n=185) and one from Minnesota, USA (n=467) of 3-6 year old children, were assessed with a 25-item scale derived from the Child Sexual Behaviour Inventory. Both studies were screened for the absence of sexual abuse. The Swedish parents completed the questionnaire about their child's behaviour at home and the US parents typically completed the questionnaire in the waiting room of a paediatric clinic. Pre-school children in Sweden exhibited more sexual behaviour than American children of the same age according to parental reports. These differences were most pronounced in boys. In both studies exhibitionistic or voyeuristic behaviour and touching behaviour was most frequent. Both intrusive and sexually explicit behaviour was very unusual. The results reflect how cultural context influences which behaviour is permitted in young children, and consequently what adults think constitutes normal and problematic childhood sexual behaviour.

  • 22.
    Lindell, Charlotta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry .
    Svedin, C.G.
    Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Mental health services provided for physically abused children in Sweden. A 4-year follow-up of child and adolescent psychiatric charts2005In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 59, no 3, p. 179-185Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As there has been a considerable increase regarding the number of police reports on physical child abuse in Sweden since the mid-1980s, there should be an increased number of children in need of trauma-focused mental health treatment. During 1986-1996, there were 126 children reported as being physically abused by a parent or equivalent and reported to the police in a police district in Sweden. Fifty-seven of these children (45%) had been the objects of interventions from Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Services (CAPS). The aim of this study was to investigate the extent and content of this. Questions addressed were: when did the children receive interventions, were these trauma-focused and could this be reflected in their charts? This group of children was referred to CAPS for different reasons and 35/122 referrals were made under the label of child physical abuse. Overall, interventions were mainly directed toward the parents. Six of 126 physically abused children received individual therapy. Abuse was not mentioned in the charts for 23 of the children, even though eight of them had been referred due to abuse. The results of this study indicate that physically abused children have often been in contact with mental health services prior to the abuse for different reasons, initially due to individual problems and later on regarding family conflict. Individual interventions for physically abused children were rare due to for instance CAPS workloads, poor motivation among parents and children, and maybe due to professionals' lack of knowledge regarding effective treatment. The introduction of a routine checklist is recommended early on to find indications of abuse, as is the need of exploring methods working with physically abused children in Sweden. © 2005 Taylor & Francis.

  • 23.
    Lundqvist, Gunnar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine.
    Goran, Svedin C.
    Hansson, K.
    School of Social Work, Lund University, SE-221 00 Lund, Sweden.
    Childhood sexual abuse. Women's health when starting in group therapy2004In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 58, no 1, p. 25-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Childhood sexual abuse has been shown to be common among adult women, 15-30% in prevalence studies, and among mentally ill women, 25-77%. These women often suffer from depression, anxiety, sexual and relationship problems. Suicide attempts and self-destructive behaviour are common. Within the Department of Psychiatry at Lund University Hospital, 45 women with experiences of childhood sexual abuse were offered a 2-year-long trauma-focused group therapy. They were well educated but 27% were unemployed. Nearly half of the group had made suicide attempts, 87% had had suicidal thoughts and, according to the questionnaire SCL-90, they were suffering from psychiatric symptoms significantly to a greater degree than both a general group and a clinical group with mixed diagnoses. According to the questionnaire ISSI, they were less well socially integrated than both a general group and a clinical group, and the degree of social adjustment according to the questionnaire SAS-SR was lower than in a general group. The study shows that childhood sexually abused women seeking therapy are a symptom-burdened group. These women probably need psychiatric treatment of a particular character. Special group therapy for these women can potentially improve their health. © 2004 Taylor and Francis.

  • 24.
    Mechler, Jakob
    et al.
    Stockholms Lans Landsting, Sweden.
    Holmqvist, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Deteriorated and unchanged patients in psychological treatment in Swedish primary care and psychiatry2016In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 70, no 1, p. 16-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Despite substantial effect sizes for psychological therapy among different diagnosis groups and in different treatment contexts, many studies show that a large proportion of patients do not attain reliable improvement and a substantial portion are worse off after treatment. Previous studies suggest that patients in psychiatry may have worse outcome than patients in primary care. Aims: In this practice-based study of psychological treatment in Swedish primary care and adult psychiatry, the proportions of patients who did not improve and who deteriorated were assessed. Methods: Proportions of reliably improved, unchanged, and reliably deteriorated patients among 840 patients in primary care and 317 patients in specialist psychiatry were assessed by self-ratings using the Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation - Outcome Measure (CORE-OM). Results: More than half of the patients did not change reliably. About 2% of the patients in primary care and 7% in psychiatry deteriorated. Multilevel analyses of the data from primary care indicated that there were no therapist effects. Conclusions: The results emphasize the importance of monitoring treatment continuously in order to increase results for patients who do not improve.

  • 25.
    Nilsson, Doris
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Lejonclou, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Jonsson, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Holmqvist, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Somatoform dissociation among Swedish adolescents and young adults: The psychometric properties of the Swedish versions of the SDQ-20 and SDQ-52015In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 69, no 2, p. 152-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Somatoform dissociation is supposed to be a vital aspect of the general concept of dissociation. The Somatoform Dissociation Questionnaire-20 (SDQ-20) and the brief version SDQ-5 are self-report instruments constructed to identify somatic dissociation. Aim: In the present study, the psychometric qualities of the Swedish version of the SDQ-20 and its brief version, the SDQ-5, were examined among adolescents and young adults. Reliability and concurrent validity were investigated. Methods: A total of 512 adolescents and young adults participated in the study: 461 adolescents from a non-clinical sample and 50 adolescents and young adults from a clinical eating disorder outpatient unit. They completed the self-report instruments the SDQ-20, the SDQ-5 (part of SDQ-20), the Linköping Youth Life Experience Scale (LYLES, a trauma history scale) and the Dissociation Questionnaire-Sweden (Dis-Q-Sweden). Results: Both internal consistency and test-retest reliability of the Swedish version of SDQ-20 were good in both the non-clinical (α = 0.83) and the clinical groups (α = 0.84); the reliability for the SDQ-5 was, however, lower (non-clinical α = 0.50, clinical α = 0.64). Significant differences were found between the clinical and non-clinical groups on both somatoform and psychoform dissociation. Correlations between the Dis-Q-Sweden, SDQ-20 and SDQ-5 were generally high. The criterion and convergent validity was acceptable for both scales but somewhat better for SDQ-20 than for SDQ-5. Conclusion: The advantage with both the SDQ-20 and the SDQ-5 is that they are short questionnaires, but the results suggests that SDQ-20 is preferable based on the higher-quality psychometric properties of the SDQ-20.

  • 26.
    Nilsson, Doris
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Lejoonclou, Annika
    Region Östergötland.
    Holmqvist, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Psychoform and somatoform dissociation amongindividuals with eating disorders2019In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study analyzed the prevalence of psychoform and somatoform dissociation among individuals with the whole spectrum of eating disorder diagnoses and compared it with ratings from a non-clinical group. The relationship between dissociation and severity of eating disturbance was examined as well as differences between the eating disorder diagnosis groups in extent of dissociation. The validity of a new structural dissociation interview suitable for eating disorder patients was analyzed.

    Method: Sixty individuals with eating disorder completed three self-report questionnaires: Dissociation Questionnaire Sweden, Somatoform Dissociation Questionnaire and Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire. The ratings were compared with the scores in a female non-clinical group (N = 245). Twenty patients with eating disorder diagnoses were interviewed with the Interview for Dissociative Disorders and Trauma Related Symptoms. The validity of the interview was tested by comparing the ratings on the interview subscales with the scores on the Dissociation questionnaires and the Somatoform Dissociation Questionnaire.

    Results: Participants with eating disorders reported a higher extent of both psychoform and somatoform dissociation compared with the non-clinical individuals. Analyses also showed a correlation between degree of dissociation and severity of eating disorder symptoms. No differences in dissociation were found between the ED subgroups. Participants reporting more dissociation got higher ratings on the interview, indicating convergent validity.

    Discussion: Eating disorders seem to be associated with presence and severity of dissociative symptoms. The extent of dissociation needs to be assessed for these individuals as treatment may benefit from a focus on such symptoms in order to increase its effect.

  • 27.
    Nilsson, Doris
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nordenstam, Carin
    Uppsala Univ, Natl Ctr Disaster Psychiat, Akad Sjukhuset, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Green, Sara
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wetterhall, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lundin, Tom
    Uppsala Univ, Natl Ctr Disaster Psychiat, Akad Sjukhuset, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Norrköping.
    Acute stress among adloescents and female rape victims measured by ASC-Kids: A pilot study2015In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 69, no 7, p. 539-545Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Rape is considered a stressful trauma and often with durable consequences. How the aftermath of rape is for young adolescents' girls considering acute stress is an overlooked field and remains to be studied. Aims: In this study, we wanted to investigate acute stress among adolescent victims of rape and the psychometric properties of the Acute Stress Checklist for Children (ASC-Kids). Methods: A clinical sample (n = 79) of raped girls, 13-17 years old who had turned to a special rape victim unit for treatment, answered the ASC-Kids. ASC-Kids was also given to a group of minor stressed, non-raped adolescents in the same age range (n = 154) together with the University of California at Los Angeles Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Reaction Index (UCLA PTSD RI), and the Sense of Coherence Scale 13 (SOC-13). Results: The scores from the groups were compared and showed significant differences in mean values on all the diagnostic criteria of acute stress disorder. In the clinical group, 36.7% obtained full ASD criteria. ASC-Kids could discriminate well between groups. Cronbach's alpha was found to be excellent, and the correlation between the UCLA PTSD RI and ASC-Kids found to be good; both ASC-Kids and UCLA PTSD RI had a good and moderate negative correlation with SOC-13. Conclusion: Adolescent female rape victims were shown to have a very high level of acute stress, and the ASC-Kids was found to have sound psychometrics and can be a valuable screening instrument to support clinicians in their assessments of an indication of adolescents after potentially stressful events such as rape.

  • 28.
    Ohrt, T
    et al.
    Fac Hlth Sci, Dept Neurosci & Locomot Psychiat, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Sjödin, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Thorell, Lars-Håkan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Cognitive distortions in panic disorder and major depression: Specificity for depressed mood1999In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 53, no 6, p. 459-464Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Dysfunctional Attitude Scale (DAS) and the Automatic Thought Questionnaire (ATQ) are two widely used instruments in research on cognitive distortion in psychopathology. To investigate the specificity of the DAS and the ATQ for major depression and for depressive symptoms in panic disorder, 23 patients with panic disorder were examined with the DAS and the ATQ before and after an 8-week treatment period. Patients from a previous study on cognitive distortion in major depression were used for comparison of pretreatment ratings. The results support the hypothesis of specificity of cognitive distortions of type dysfunctional attitudes in accordance with the DAS and negative spontaneous thoughts in accordance with the ATQ for major depression and a sensitivity of negative spontaneous thoughts to absolute and relative levels of mild depressive symptoms in patients with panic disorder.

  • 29.
    Priebe, Gisela
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Hansson, Kjell
    Lund University.
    Göran Svedin, Carl
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sexual abuse and associations with psychosocial aspects of health. A population-based study with Swedish adolescents2010In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 64, no 1, p. 40-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Few population-based Nordic studies with adolescents investigate the associations between sexual abuse (SA) and psychosocial health. Aim: Associations between adolescents self-reported experiences of SA different severity and aspects of psychosocial health such as emotional and behavioral problems, sense of coherence and self-esteem were investigated. Methods: A school-based study with 1107 Swedish high school seniors was conducted. The students completed the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ), the Sense of Coherence Scale (SOC), I think I am and a self-report survey that included questions about SA, socio-demographic variables and family variables. Results: SA was related to more emotional and behavioral problems, weaker SOC and lower self- esteem when compared with non-abuse. There was also a dose-response effect insofar as more severe abuse was related to poorer psychosocial health. When adjusted for socio-demographic and family-related variables, the associations between penetrating SA and most of the health variables weakened or disappeared. SOC was associated with penetrating SA even after adjustment. Conclusions: This population-based study suggests that SA should not be regarded as an isolated factor in relation to psychosocial health as the associations at a group level may be smaller than expected. Among a number of covariates, family variables such as parental bonding showed to be especially important. Sense of Coherence may be of special interest in further research and clinical treatment.

  • 30.
    Rosenbaum, Larry
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Rehabilitation Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland.
    Post-traumatic stress disorder: The chameleon of psyhiatry2004In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 58, no 5, p. 343-348Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been included in the DSM category of psychiatric diagnoses since 1980, classified as an anxiety disorder. Since that time, its definition has undergone considerable change and today many physicians are not aware of its current diagnostic criteria or the clinical significance of its high degree of comorbidity with other psychiatric and somatic conditions. PTSD can appear in different forms, and its many manifestations often identified and dealt with, while the underlying pathological trauma and psychological damage continues unrecognized and untreated, resulting in negative consequences for the patient and society. The extent of the problem is considerable in North America but prevalence studies in Europe are practically non-existent amongst the general population, with the subsequent result being that the degree and severity of the problem in Europe remains unknown. This article briefly looks at the history and metamorphosis of PTSD and discusses its present niche in relation to primary healthcare.

  • 31.
    Rubertsson, Christine
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Borjesson, Karin
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Berglund, Anna
    Central Hospital Västerås.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    The Swedish validation of Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) during pregnancy2011In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 65, no 6, p. 414-418Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Around 10-15% of women suffer from depressive illness during pregnancy or the first year postpartum. Depression during pregnancy constitutes a risk for prenatal stress and preterm birth. No validated screening instrument for detecting depression during pregnancy was available in Swedish. Aims: We aimed to validate the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) against DSM-IV criteria for depression during pregnancy, establish a reliable cut-off and estimate the correlation between the EPDS and HAD-S (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale). Methods: In a population-based community sample of 1175 pregnant women, 918 women (78%) answered questionnaires with the EPDS and HAD-S. In all, 121 were interviewed using the PRIME-MD (Primary Care Evaluation of Mental disorders) for diagnosing depression. Women were interviewed in mean gestational week 13 (range 8-21). For the EPDS, a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was calculated for prediction of depression. Pearsons correlation coefficient was used to investigate the association between EPDS and HAD-S scores. Results: The optimal cut-off score on the EPDS scale for detecting depression was andgt;= 13 (standard error coefficient of 1.09 and c-statistics of 0.84) giving a sensitivity of 77% and specificity of 94%. The EPDS scores correlated strongly with the HAD-S, Pearsons correlation was 0.83 (P andlt; 0.0001). Conclusions: This study confirms that the EPDS is a valid screening instrument for detection of depressive symptoms during pregnancy. The EPDS shows persuasive measuring outcomes with an optimal cut-off at andgt;= 13. Clinical implications: Healthcare for pregnant women should consider screening procedures and follow-up routines for depressive symptoms.

  • 32.
    Samelius, Charlotta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Wingren, Gun
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lifetime history of abuse, suffering, and psychological health2010In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 64, no 4, p. 227-232Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In a representative Swedish sample, we investigated lifetime prevalence of physical, sexual and psychological abuse of women and their current suffering. The relationship between current suffering from abuse and psychological health problems was also studied. Method: The study was cross-sectional and population-based. The Abuse Screening Inventory (ASI), measuring experiences of physical, sexual and psychological abuse and including questions on health and social situation, was sent by mail to 6000 women, randomly selected from the population register. The questionnaire was completed and returned by 4150 (70%) of 5896 eligible women. Results: 27.5% of the women reported abuse of any kind. Of those, 69.5% reported current suffering from abuse. Abused suffering women reported more anxiety, depression and sleep disturbances, and a less advantageous social situation than both non-abused and abused non-suffering women. Also, abused non-suffering women reported more depression than non-abused women. Somatization was reported more often by both abused suffering and non-suffering women than by non-abused women, with no difference between suffering and non-suffering women when adjusted for possible confounders. Conclusion: A majority of abused women, when investigating lifetime history of abuse, report current suffering thereof, which warrants considering abuse an important societal problem. Suffering could be a valuable construct, possibly useful to assess psychological health problems normally not captured by existing diagnostic instruments, although further investigations of the concept are needed.

  • 33.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry .
    Priebe, Gisela
    Barn och Ungdomspsykiatri Lunds Universitet.
    The strengths and difficulties questionnaire as a screening instrument in a community sample of high school seniors in Sweden2008In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 62, no 3, p. 225-232Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) has been used among Swedish children since 1996, usually the parent or the teacher version. The self-report version was originally developed for children aged 11-16 years. The aim of this study was to investigate the application of the Swedish self-report version to a representative sample of 1015 senior high school students aged 17-19 years. Girls reported more emotional symptoms and scored higher on prosocial items than boys. Boys on the other hand scored higher on both conduct and peer problems. The means were similar to means in two Nordic studies that have included subjects of this age group. A confirmatory five-factor analyses explained 44.5% of the variance with a good fit for all subjects and boys but somewhat weaker for girls. The item-subscale correlation (ISC) ranged from moderate to high (r = 0.47-0.76) and the Cronbach's alpha was 0.74 (ranging in the five subscales 0.50-0.70). The SDQ seems to be useful even in this older age group. The psychometric qualities were acceptable but can probably be improved by changing the oppositely worded questions and by considering development of different questionnaires for boys and girls at least in late adolescence.

  • 34.
    Svedin, CG
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, CPS - Centrum för psykiatri och samhällsmedicin, BUP - Barn- och ungdomspsykiatri.
    Back, C
    Söderback, S-B
    Family relations, family climate and sexual abuse2002In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 56, no 5, p. 355-362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Europe, 10-20% of all women and 3-10% of all men have experienced sexual abuse before the age of 18, according to surveys. Psychosocial problems are often seen as both short- and long-term consequences of such abuse. Family dysfunction may be seen as both a risk factor for abuse and a result of the disclosure of abuse. The aim of this research was to study how adolescents and adults, sexually abused during their childhood, experienced their family life and family climate in their family of origin. A clinical sample of 18 adolescent girls and 20 adult women comprised the study group. The methods used were a semi-structured interview and the questionnaire Family Climate Test. The majority of the participants kept quiet about the abuse during their childhood. The abuse took place for an average of 2.5 years among the adolescents and 6 years in the adult group. Secrecy, isolation and family problems were typical attributes in the interviews. The majority of both adolescents and women described their relationships in the family of origin as deviant or interrupted, with a reversed (negative) pattern on the Family Climate Test. This meant a low level of closeness and a high level of distance in the families combined with a low level of spontaneity and a high level of chaos. The study, even if relatively small and based on clinical cases, gives support to earlier research, which shows that sexual abuse in general, but especially intra-familial sexual abuse, is associated with family dysfunction.

  • 35.
    Svensson, Frida
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fredlund, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Priebe, Gisela
    Lunds universitet.
    Wadsby, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Adolescents selling sex: Exposure to abuse, mental health, self-harm behaviour and the need for help and support - a study of a Swedish national sample2013In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 67, no 2, p. 81-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Selling sex is not uncommon among adolescents and we need to increase our knowledge of how this affects them. The aim of this study was to investigate adolescents who sell sex regarding sexual, mental and physical abuse, mental health as estimated by using the Hopkins Symptom Check List-25 (HSCL-25), self-harm behaviour and the adolescents' experience of receiving help and support. The study was carried out on a national representative sample of adolescents (mean age 18.3 years) in Swedish high schools in the final year of their 3-year programme. The study had 3498 participants and a response rate of 60.4%. Of the adolescents, 1.5% stated that they had sold sexual services. The selling of sex was associated with a history of sexual, mental and physical abuse. Poorer mental health and a higher degree of self-harm behaviour were reported among the adolescents who had sold sex. Help and support was sought to a greater extent by adolescents who had sold sex but these adolescents were not as satisfied with this help and support as the other adolescents. Adolescents that sell sex are a group especially exposed to sexual, mental and physical abuse. They have poorer metnal health and engage in more self-harm behaviour than other adolescents. They are in need of more help and support than other adolescents ant it is reasonable to assert that more resources, research and attention should be directed to this group to provide better help and support in the future.

  • 36.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Wadsby, Marie
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Life development for 20 pairs of children with and without psychosocial problems - A 16-year-long study with follow-up2007In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 61, no 1, p. 19-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of the study was to describe 20 matched pairs of children born to psychosocial risk mothers who have been followed from early pregnancy through their first 16 years of life. Interviews and standardized behavior measurements with a focus on the children's development were used. When considering the overall data from the different measurements done over the 16-year study period, the study group has significantly more negative results. Nine of the families in the study group had been investigated for abuse, neglect and inadequate parenting during the 16 years. In the rest of the 11 families from the study group, two siblings had been placed in foster care because of maltreatment. The study group mothers' characteristics from the start had a significantly negative impact on the children's behavior and mental health throughout their lives and when they reached 16 years.

  • 37.
    Söderström, Staffan
    et al.
    Central Hospital Vasteras, Sweden .
    Pettersson, Richard
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Central Hospital Vasteras, Sweden .
    Edlund-Söderström, Kerstin
    Central Hospital Vasteras, Sweden .
    Ganse, Gunnar
    Central Hospital Vasteras, Sweden .
    Holmkvist, Eva
    Central Hospital Vasteras, Sweden .
    Westin, Olof
    Central Hospital Vasteras, Sweden .
    Haglund, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Development of a Swedish Comprehensive International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) Core Set for adult patients with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)2014In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 68, no 3, p. 161-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adults is a phenomenon that attracts a lot of attention in society today. Advances in research have made it clear that many conditions that make people seek medical and psychiatric care may have pervasive deficits in attention, motor control and impulsivity at their roots. Since ADHD in adults is a relatively new and very versatile concept, there is a great need for systemized classification of the ramifications of the deficit that extends into every aspect of these patients lives. Aims: To develop a Swedish Comprehensive International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) Core Set for adult patients with ADHD. Methods: A national expert survey was conducted using the Delphi technique and a formal consensus conference. Forty-two experts from different professions and organizations, including psychiatrists and physicians, psychologists, occupational therapists, a counsellor, a specialist nurse, representatives from a patient organization and representatives from the Swedish Social Insurance Agency, participated in the Delphi process and 28 participants from the expert group attended the consensus conference. Results: At the formal consensus conference, 66 categories from the ICF were identified and included in the national Comprehensive Core Set for ADHD: 21 categories from the component body functions, 26 categories from the component activities and participation, and 19 categories from the component environmental factors. Conclusion: The Comprehensive Core Set for ADHD should be regarded as national and preliminary, and should be further tested and evaluated by experts in ADHD in clinical settings in Sweden.

  • 38.
    Tordön, Rikard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Barnafrid. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Barnafrid. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Fredlund, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jonsson, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Barnafrid. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Pribe, Gisela
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Barnafrid. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Background, experience of abuse, and mental health among adolescents in out-of-home care: a cross-sectional study of a Swedish high school national sample2019In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 73, no 1, p. 16-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To compare experiences for adverse events, especially sexual abuse, and mental health in a group of high school students in out-of-home care with a representative sample of peers of the same age and similar educational attainment living with their parents.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: A sample of 5839 students in the third year of Swedish high school, corresponding to a response rate of 59.7%, answered a study specific questionnaire. Data from 41 students living in out-of-home care were compared with data from peers not in out-of-home care in a cross-sectional analyze.

    RESULTS: Students in out-of-home care had more often an immigrant background and a non-heterosexual orientation, had more often experienced physical and penetrative sexual abuse, and more often sought healthcare for mental problems. Disclosure of sexual abuse was less common, and acts of persuasion or adults' use of their social position was more common among students in out-of-home care.

    CONCLUSIONS: Even where the protective factor 'senior educational attainment' is present, risks for abuse and poor mental health are evident for adolescents in out-of-home care. Disclosure of adversity, when it has occurred, ought to be higher among these adolescents with regular contact with social services, but our findings indicate tendencies for the opposite. We therefore suggest routines to be established to screen for adverse life events and mental health actively, along with general and systematic assessments of adversity and mental health during care.

  • 39. Valigi Björck, R
    et al.
    Själin, M.
    Nordin, Conny
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Psychiatry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Neurological soft signs in schizophrenic patients: Influence of age, age at onset, sex, and family history of schizophrenia.2000In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 54, p. 437-440Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Wadsby, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nelson, Nina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Ingemansson, Fredrik
    Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Leijon, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Behaviour problems and cortisol levels in very-low-birth-weight children2014In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 68, no 8, p. 626-632Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. There are still diverging results concerning the behaviour of children with very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) and they have been questioned to display different levels of stress hormone than normal-birth-weight (NBW) children. Aims. This study examined behaviour and the stress hormone cortisol in children with VLBW at the ages of 7 and 9 years compared with children with NBW. Results. Fifty-one VLBW and 50 NBW children were studied with the Child Behavior Checklist. Cortisol rhythm was measured through saliva samples three times a day for 2 days. VLBW children displayed more behavioural problems than NBW children, specifically social and attention problems, although still within normal ranges. They showed lower cortisol levels both at 7 and 9 years of age. No strong association between behaviour and cortisol levels was shown. Conclusion. VLBW children display more behaviour problems compared with NBW children but both groups score are within the normal range. Down-regulation of their hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) function in terms of lower cortisol levels is also noted.

  • 41.
    Ängarne-Lindberg, Teresia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wadsby , Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fifteen years after parental divorce: mental health and experienced life-events2009In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 63, no 1, p. 32-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The children who experienced their parents divorce when the divorce rate in Sweden had begun to grow to higher levels than in preceding decades are today adults. The aim of this study was to investigate if adults who had experienced parental divorce 15 years before the time of our study, differed in mental health from those with continuously married parents, taking into account life events other than the divorce. Instruments used were the Symptom Checklist (SCL-90) measuring mental health and the Life Event questionnaire capturing the number and experience of occurred events. Forty-eight persons, who were 7-18 years old when their parents divorced, constituted the divorce group, and 48 persons matched on age, sex and growth environment formed the study groups. The SCL-90 showed a limited difference between the groups, but not concerning total mental health. A main finding was a difference with regard to sex and age; women aged 22-27 in the divorce group displayed poorer mental health than other participants in both groups. The results from the Life Event questionnaire showed that the divorce group had experienced a significantly larger number of events, and more life events were described as negative with difficult adjustment. A regression analysis showed a significant relation between the SCL-90, Global Severity Index and life events experienced as negative with difficult adjustment, divorce events excluded, but not with the divorce itself. It seems highly desirable to pay more attention than has thus far been paid to girls with experience of childhood divorce at age 7-12.

1 - 41 of 41
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf