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  • 1.
    Aspegren Kendall, Sally
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Rehabilitation Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Brolin-Magnusson, Kerstin
    Sörén, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Rehabilitation Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Henriksson, Karl-Gösta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurophysiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    A pilot study of body awareness programs in the treatment of fibromyalgia syndrome2000In: Arthritis Care and Research, ISSN 0893-7524, E-ISSN 1529-0123, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 304-311Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To compare in a pilot study the effect of two physical therapies, the Mensendieck system (MS) and body awareness therapy (BAT) according to Roxendal, in fibromyalgia patients and to investigate differences in effect between the two interventions. Methods. Twenty female patients were randomized to either MS or BAT in a program lasting 20 weeks. Evaluations were tender point examination and questionnaires, including visual analog scales (pain intensity at worst site, muscular stiffness, evening fatigue, and global health), Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), Coping Strategies Questionnaire, Quality of Life Scales, Arthritis Self-Efficacy Scale (ASES), and disability before, immediately after, and at 6 and 18 months followup. Results. The BAT group had improved global health at 18 months followup, but lower results than the MS group. The MS group had improved FIQ, ASES other symptoms, and pain at worst site at 18 months followup. Conclusion. In the present pilot study, MS was associated with more positive changes than BAT.

  • 2.
    Hallert, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Björk, Mathilda
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Skogh, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Disease activity and disability in women and men with early rheumatoid arthritis: An 8-year follow-up of the Swedish TIRA project2012In: Arthritis Care and Research, ISSN 0893-7524, E-ISSN 1529-0123, Vol. 64, no 8, p. 1101-1107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To compare women and men regarding course of disease activity and disability over 8 years from diagnosis of recent onset rheumatoid arthritis (RA). PATIENTS AND METHODS: 149 patients were followed for 8 years from RA diagnosis (1996-98) regarding 28-joint count disease activity score (DAS28), pain (visual analogue scale, VAS), grip force, Grip Ability Test (GAT), Signals of Functional Impairment (SOFI hand, upper/lower extremity), walking speed, activity limitation (Health Assessment Questionnaire, HAQ) and prescribed disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs). RESULTS: Disease activity pattern over time was similar in women and men, showing improvement during the first year and thereafter a stable situation during 6 years. However, at the 7- and 8-year follow-ups deterioration was seen with a less favourable course in women. HAQ did not differ between sexes at diagnosis, but at all follow-ups women had significantly higher scores than men. Women also had lower grip force and lower walking speed, but higher upper extremity mobility. DMARD prescription was similar for both sexes. Over eight years, disease duration, sex, biologics, grip force, SOFI-hand and pain intensity together explained 43% of the variation in DAS, while grip force, SOFI-lower, GAT and pain intensity could together explain 55% of variations in HAQ. CONCLUSIONS: Disease activity was fairly well managed, but disability gradually deteriorated. Despite similar medication, women had more disability than men. The discrepancy between disease activity and disability indicates unmet needs for multi-professional interventions to prevent progressing disability and patients at risk for disability need to be identified early in the process. © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  • 3.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hass, Ursula A. M.
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordenskiöld , Ulla
    Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Skogh, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A Survey of the use and effect of assistive devices in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: A two-year followup of women and men2004In: Arthritis Care and Research, ISSN 0893-7524, E-ISSN 1529-0123, Vol. 51, no 3, p. 413-421Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To identify activity limitation in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to detect patients needing assistive devices. To evaluate the effects of assistive devices.

    Methods: A multicenter cohort of 284 early RA patients was examined using the Evaluation of Daily Activity Questionnaire 12 and 24 months after diagnosis.

    Results: The extent of activity limitation was stable over time for both women and men. Most limitations concerned eating and drinking. Women reported more difficulties than did men. The use of assistive devices was related to subgroups with severe disease and more disability. Use of assistive devices reduced difficulties significantly. For both women and men, assistive devices were mostly used in activities related to eating and drinking.

    Conclusion: Already 1 year after diagnosis, RA patients reported activity limitation that remained stable over time. Use of assistive devices was related to more severe disease and more pronounced disability. Use of devices reduced difficulties significantly.

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