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  • 1.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Edvinsson, Emma
    Department of Psychology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Mixed feelings about living with tinnitus: A qualitative study2008In: Audiological Medicine, ISSN 1651-386X, E-ISSN 1651-3835, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 48-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this qualitative study was to interview a group of tinnitus patients (n = 7) who were or had been involved in psychological treatment for their tinnitus. Following semi-structured interviews all conversations were transcribed and later categorized using methods inspired by grounded theory. Results revealed a higher order concept labelled ‘Mixed feelings about living with tinnitus’. Three descriptive categories were derived: 1) Consequences; 2) Treatment experiences; and 3) Tinnitus identity. Results are discussed in relation to the literature on tinnitus, and the future application of qualitative methods in tinnitus research is encouraged.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Kaldo, Viktor
    Strömgren, Tryggve
    Ström, Lars
    Are coping strategies really useful for the tinnitus patient? An investigation conducted via the internet2004In: Audiological Medicine, ISSN 1651-386X, E-ISSN 1651-3835, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 54-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This questionnaire study investigated the role of coping strategies in tinnitus. The Tinnitus Coping Strategy Questionnaire (12) was administered via the internet to a sample of 157 persons with tinnitus who were recruited for participation in a treatment trial. Also included were the Tinnitus Reaction Questionnaire, the Anxiety Sensitivity Index, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Results showed a significant positive correlation between use of coping strategies and tinnitus distress, even when controlling for anxiety sensitivity, and anxiety and depression levels in a multiple regression analysis. In line with previous studies, the role of coping strategies is not uniformly positive for tinnitus patients, and might even be associated with increased distress. Treatment implications are discussed and a possible role of acceptance strategies is put forward.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Ljunggren, Jon
    Larsen, Hans-Christian
    Prediction of balance among patients with vestibular disturbance: Application of the match/mismatch model2008In: Audiological Medicine, ISSN 1651-386X, E-ISSN 1651-3835, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 176-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigated the role of overprediction in patients with vestibular disorders. The study was set up to investigate if the match/mismatch model is applicable for vestibular disorders. This model suggests that a tendency to overestimate the subjective impact of aversive events exists, and that this is a common psychological phenomenon. A group of 20 patients with dizziness and 20 normal controls participated in the experiment. The first part of the experiment consisted of nine spontaneous predictions. During all trials, vibratory calf stimulation of 80 Hz was provided to affect balance. In the second part of the experiment each group was split (randomly assigned) into one overprediction and one underprediction group, who received either 40 or 100 Hz calf stimulation with the change occurring in the fourth trial. Body sway was measured by a force platform. Included also were self-report inventories and measures of predicted and experienced body sway and risk of losing balance. The results showed that the patients overpredicted the first trial to a lesser degree than the controls. In the control group a repeated measures effect was found, but not in the patient group. However, in terms of percentages of correct predictions both groups improved as the trials proceeded. Induced under- or over-prediction was obtained for perceived body sway, but not for the prediction of risk of losing balance, where the overprediction groups instead underpredicted. Body sway data did not result in any interactions, but controls became more stable over trials. Implications for the proposed link between vestibular dysfunction and panic disorder are discussed. © 2008 Informa UK Ltd. (Informa Healthcare, Taylor & Francis As).

  • 4.
    C. Manchaiah, Vinaya K.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Staphens, Dafydd
    Cardiff University, Wales.
    Models to represent communication partners within the social networks of people with hearing impairment2011In: Audiological Medicine, ISSN 1651-386X, E-ISSN 1651-3835, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 103-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: People with hearing impairment have relatively smaller social networks than their normally hearing peers, and may experience more feelings of loneliness. The effects on the person with hearing impairment (PHI) can also impact on their communication partners (CPs). This report discusses the currently available model representing the CPs within the social network context of the PHI and proposes a new model. Study design: The ‘Communication Rings’ proposed and developed by the Ida Institute is discussed. We believe that this model is too simple to represent the complexity and dynamic nature of the CP's role in the life of the PHI and highlights the need for a new model. Results: We suggest that the model ‘Communication World’ based on the analogy of the solar system, may help overcome some of the problems identified. Clinical examples of how to apply this model and its usefulness in rehabilitation are presented. Conclusions: The expanded model could provide novel information, and provision of a visual representation will help CPs understand the problems of the PHI.

  • 5.
    C. Manchaiah, Vinaya K.
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Centre for Long Term and Chronic Conditions, College of Human and Health Sciences, Swansea University, Swansea , UK.
    Stephens, Dafydd
    Department of Psychological Medicine and Neurology, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff , UK.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten , Denmark.
    Information about the prognosis given to sudden-sensorineural hearing loss patients: Implications to 'patient journey' process2012In: Audiological Medicine, ISSN 1651-386X, E-ISSN 1651-3835, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 109-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this short paper is to highlight the implications of information provision about prognosis given to sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) patients. Method: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with four SSNHL patients to develop the patient journey model that is published in our previous paper (12). In this study the implications from general, ethical and legal perspectives about the information provision were considered (i.e. discussion with experts and the use of relevant literature). Results: Three out of four patients interviewed reported that their doctors (both general practitioners and ENT specialists) gave false hopes about prognosis. From the preliminary data it appears that there is considerable variability in the views expressed by patients about preference in information provision. However, this issue needs consideration as the information provided by professionals may have a serious impact on service provision and outcome. Conclusions: It is our view that even though, in some instances, it may appear that false hope provides short-term psychological benefit to patients, providing full and honest information is necessary for general (i.e. to facilitate patient journey process), ethical and legal reasons.

  • 6.
    C. Manchaiah, Vinaya K.
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stephens, Dafydd
    Cardiff University, Wales.
    Zhao, Fei
    Bristol University, UK.
    Kramer, Sophia E.
    VU University Medical Center, The Netherlands.
    The role of communication partners in the audiological enablement/rehabilitation of a person with hearing impairment: An overview2012In: Audiological Medicine, ISSN 1651-386X, E-ISSN 1651-3835, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 21-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Hearing impairment is known to have various effects upon both the person with hearing impairment (PHI) and their communication partners (CPs). In addition, CPs are reported to play an important role in making the decision to seek a consultation and the acceptance of intervention by the PHI. The overall aim of this paper is to provide a comprehensive overview of the role of the CP in the audiological enablement/rehabilitation of the PHI keeping clinical practice in focus. Method: A literature review was conducted using a number of resources including electronic databases, books and websites. Results: An overview of the literature was presented in the following sections: 1) Factors influencing the audiological enablement/rehabilitation of the PHI; 2) Effect of the PHI's hearing impairment on their CPs; 3) CPs’ influence on their PHI's audiological enablement/rehabilitation; 4) Positive experiences reported by CPs of the PHI; 5) Models to represent CPs within the social network context of the PHI; and 6) CP involvement in the audiological enablement/rehabilitation. This paper also identifies gaps in the literature and provides recommendations for further research. Conclusion: It is clear that involvement of the CP in the audiological enablement/rehabilitation can result in mutual advantages for both the PHI and their CPs.

  • 7. Johansson, Magnus
    et al.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Prevalence of dizziness in relation to psychological factors and general health in older adults2006In: Audiological Medicine, ISSN 1651-386X, E-ISSN 1651-3835, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 144-150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study examined the point prevalence of dizziness among older adults in the Swedish population. It also explored the relationship between dizziness and general health and psychological factors, and the impact of dizziness on daily life. Data were obtained by means of a postal survey, administrated to 2000 randomly selected adults. Among the responders, 247 were aged 65-79 years. Dizziness was defined as being at least slightly annoyed by dizziness or unsteadiness at present. Results showed that the point prevalence of dizziness was estimated at 25.2%. Dizziness increased significantly with age among the women, but not among the men. Statistically significant associations were found between dizziness and anxiety, anxiety sensitivity, depression, hearing problems, tinnitus, pain in neck or shoulder and muscle tension. Almost 10% of the sample had visited a physician during the last 12 months concerning their dizziness and more than 10% reported having been prevented from working or performing normal activities for at least a day due to dizziness. In conclusion, the present study suggests that, at present, more than 25% of the older adults in Sweden are suffering from dizziness. It also suggests that a large proportion of the older adults in the country visit a physician concerning their problems with dizziness each year, and that there are associations between dizziness and factors in multiple domains in this population. © 2006 Taylor & Francis.

  • 8.
    Öberg, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wänström, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The effects of a pre-fitting intervention on hearing aid benefit:a randomized controlled trial2009In: Audiological Medicine, ISSN 1651-386X, E-ISSN 1651-3835, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 211-215Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Thirty-nine first time hearing aid users with mild to moderate hearing losses were randomly assigned to a pre-fitting intervention group (N=19) or a control group (N=20). The pre-fitting intervention consisted of three weekly visits, where the user adjusted the amplification of an experimental hearing aid to preferred settings, and wore the aid between the visits. After the pre-fitting intervention phase, both groups received conventional hearing aid fitting. Standardized questionnaires (IOI-HA, HHIE, ECHO, SADL, HADS) were administered before and after pre-fitting intervention, after conventional hearing aid fitting, and at one-year follow-up. Hearing aid success was evaluated by an independent audiologist at the one- year follow-up appointment. The pre-fitting intervention phase showed positive effects for the intervention group but not for the control group on activity limitation and participation restriction, and expectations. However, the intervention in its current version had no lasting effects beyond the control group after conventional hearing aid fitting or after a year. Furthermore, both groups showed mostly successful hearing aid fittings, improved psychosocial well-being, quality of life, and reduced participation restriction.

  • 9.
    Öberg, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wänström, Gunilla
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The effects of a sound awareness pre-fitting intervention: A randomized controlled trial2008In: Audiological Medicine, ISSN 1651-386X, E-ISSN 1651-3835, Vol. 6, no 6, p. 129-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the effects of an individual pre-fitting intervention for first-time hearing aid users. Thirty-eight hearing impaired adults were randomly assigned to a sound awareness pre-fitting intervention (n=19) or to a control group (n=19). The purpose of the sound awareness training was to facilitate the users' acclimatization to amplified sound. The pre-fitting intervention consisted of three visits and was followed by conventional hearing aid fitting that was identical for both groups. Standardized questionnaires were administered before and after the pre-fitting intervention, after the conventional hearing aid fitting, and at a one-year follow-up. The follow-up also included a clinical assessment by means of a telephone interview performed by an independent audiologist. The pre-intervention did not result in any major improvement over and above the control group. However, improvements were found for both groups following hearing aid fitting. In addition, most participants were considered as successful users in the interview. Future research should target individuals in need of extended hearing aid rehabilitation.

  • 10.
    Öberg, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Psychometric evaluation of hearing specific self-report measures and their associations with psychosocial and demographic variables2007In: Audiological Medicine, ISSN 1651-386X, E-ISSN 1651-3835, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 188-199Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main aim of this study was to collect descriptive data and to evaluate the psychometric properties of a range of self-report questionnaires in a Swedish population. Other aims were to investigate the correlations between these measures and the higher order factorial structure of the included questionnaires. One hundred and sixty-two first-time hearing aid users completed four standardized hearing specific questionnaires: the Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly (HHIE); the Satisfaction with Amplification in Daily Life (SADL); the Communication Strategies Scale (CSS); and the International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids (IOI-HA). In addition, two psychosocial questionnaires were completed: the Sense of Coherence scale (SOC); and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). All measures were administered at one year post hearing aid fitting. Mean scores for the questionnaires were in agreement with previous studies. The questionnaires were found to be reliable and acceptable for further clinical use. Correlations were seen across different hearing specific questionnaires, and between hearing aid use and satisfaction. Psychosocial variables were more strongly associated with participation restriction and satisfaction than with the demographic variables, confirming the importance of subjective measures. The factor analysis extracted four factors: psychosocial well-being, hearing aid satisfaction, adaptive communications strategies, and residual participation restriction, and indicated that the number of questionnaires could be reduced. It is concluded that psychosocial factors are important to consider in hearing aid rehabilitation and their possible role should be further investigated in future studies.

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