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  • 1.
    Aazh, H
    et al.
    Ealing General Hospital.
    Moore, B
    Cambridge University.
    Peyvandi, AA
    Ealing General Hospital.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Influence of ear canal occlusion and static pressure difference on bone conduction thresholds: Implications for mechanisms of bone conduction2005In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 44, no 5, p. 302-306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of air pressure change on bone conduction (BC) hearing thresholds in the occluded ear was investigated. The pump manometer system of an impedance bridge was used to change the air pressure in the ear canal of twenty-two normally hearing subjects. BC thresholds were measured with: (1) open ear; (2) the ear canal occluded with a probe tube and application of 0 daPa air pressure; and (3) the ear canal occluded with a probe tube and application of -350 daPa air pressure. Thresholds were lower in condition 2 than in condition 1, the difference decreasing from 27 dB at 2500 Hz to 4.5 dB at 2000 Hz. Thresholds were higher in condition 3 than in condition 2. The results are interpreted in terms of changes in the relative contribution of the three routes of transmission for BC sound produced by occlusion and by a static pressure difference.

  • 2.
    Akeroyd, Michael A.
    et al.
    MRC, England.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bentler, Ruth A.
    University of Iowa, IA 52242 USA.
    Boothroyd, Arthur
    San Diego State University, CA 92182 USA.
    Dillier, Norbert
    University of Zurich, Switzerland.
    Dreschler, Wouter A.
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Gagne, Jean-Pierre
    University of Montreal, Canada.
    Lutman, Mark
    University of Southampton, England.
    Wouters, Jan
    Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Wong, Lena
    University of Hong Kong, Peoples R China.
    Kollmeier, Birger
    Carl von Ossietzky University of Oldenburg, Germany; Carl von Ossietzky University of Oldenburg, Germany; HorTechnical gGmbH, Germany.
    International Collegium of Rehabilitative Audiology (ICRA) recommendations for the construction of multilingual speech tests ICRA Working Group on Multilingual Speech Tests2015In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 54, p. 17-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To provide guidelines for the development of two types of closed-set speech-perception tests that can be applied and interpreted in the same way across languages. The guidelines cover the digit triplet and the matrix sentence tests that are most commonly used to test speech recognition in noise. They were developed by a working group on Multilingual Speech Tests of the International Collegium of Rehabilitative Audiology (ICRA). Design: The recommendations are based on reviews of existing evaluations of the digit triplet and matrix tests as well as on the research experience of members of the ICRA Working Group. They represent the results of a consensus process. Results: The resulting recommendations deal with: Test design and word selection; Talker characteristics; Audio recording and stimulus preparation; Masking noise; Test administration; and Test validation. Conclusions: By following these guidelines for the development of any new test of this kind, clinicians and researchers working in any language will be able to perform tests whose results can be compared and combined in cross-language studies.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Magnusson, Lennart
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Hamrin, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Audiometric screening of a population with intellectual disability2013In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 52, no 1, p. 50-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Evaluation of pure-tone audiometry (PTA) in hearing screening of a population with mild to profound intellectual disability (ID).

    Design: PTA was performed at six frequencies at the screening level 20 dB HL. Referral criteria were threshold levels ≥ 25 dB HL at two or more frequencies for one ear or both.

    Study sample: 1478 participants aged 7–91 years were included.

    Results: 1470 (99.5%) people cooperated in screening of which 1325 (90%) could be tested on both ears at all six frequencies. A majority, 987 (66.8%), performed ordinary PTA, 234 (15.8%) conditioned play audiometry, and 249 (16.9%) behavioural observation audiometry. Six hundred and sixty-nine (45%) passed and 809 (55%) failed according to referral criteria. Of those failing, 441 (54.5%) accepted referral to clinical evaluation.

    Conclusions: PTA with slight modifications is applicable for screening of a population with mild to profound intellectual disability. The most challenging and time-consuming activity is to introduce the test procedure in a way that reduces anxiety and establishes trust.

  • 4.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Porsaeus, Daniel
    Wiklund, Magnus
    Kaldo, Viktor
    Larsen, Hans-Christian
    Treatment of tinnitus in the elderly: A controlled trial of cognitive behavior therapy2005In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 44, no 11, p. 671-675Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in elderly people with tinnitus (<65 years). Thirty-seven patients were called in for a structured interview. Following exclusion, twenty-three participated in the trial. All participants underwent medical ear, nose, and throat (ENT) examination, audiometry, and tinnitus matchings. A randomized controlled design with a waiting list control group was used. A CBT treatment package was delivered in six weekly two hour group sessions. Outcome was measured using validated self-report inventories and daily diary ratings of annoyance, loudness and sleep quality for one week pre-treatment, post-treatment. A three month follow-up was included at which time all participants had received treatment, but in a shorter format for the control group. Results showed statistically significant reductions of tinnitus-related distress. Thus, CBT was better than no treatment, but the particular aspects of CBT that contributed to the effects can not be established. In conclusion, the findings give some support for the use of group CBT for elderly people with tinnitus. © 2005 British Society of Audiology, International Society of Audiology, and Nordic Audiological Society.

  • 5.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Westin , Vendela
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Understanding tinnitus distress: Introducing the concepts of moderators and mediators2008In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 47, no S2, p. S106-S111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We focus this theoretical paper on a neglected distinction in tinnitus research between moderators and mediators of tinnitus distress. A moderator variable is one that influences the strength of a relationship between two other variables. In the paper we propose that several variables might act as moderators of tinnitus distress. Degree of hearing loss, arousal, insomnia, characteristics of tinnitus, noise sensitivity, and a range of psychological factors such as personality and perceived control are discussed as potential moderators. We then move on to mediator variables. A mediator variable is one that explains the relationship between the two other variables, and must by definition be caused by a predictor, and then mediate between the predictor and the dependent variable. We propose that stress levels (caused by tinnitus), classical conditioning, selective attention towards tinnitus, and psychological acceptance of tinnitus (versus experiential avoidance) might be mediators of distress. We encourage more research on moderators and mediators of tinnitus distress, as these will help illuminate treatment protocols and how they might work.

  • 6.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    A survey of public health policy on bilateral fittings and comparison with market trends: The evidence-base required to frame policy2006In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 45, no SUPPL. 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This report presents a review of the situation in a number of countries with respect to public health policy for funding of hearing aid services in general and support to bilateral fittings in particular. The data show considerable variations among the countries studied in number of hearing aids fitted per 1000 inhabitants, differing by a factor of 6 between the extremes. Also the percentage of bilateral fittings differs with an average estimated to be of the order of 50%. For hearing-impaired children, bilateral fittings are given full financial support in most countries studied. The data presented indicate the need for a reliable, scientifically valid evidence-base regarding bilateral hearing aid fitting. © 2006 British Society of Audiology, International Society of Audiology, and Nordic Audiological Society.

  • 7.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery.
    Letter from the editor-in-chief2002In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 41, no 1Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    [abstract not available]

  • 8.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, RC - Rekonstruktionscentrum, ÖNH - Öron- Näsa- Halskliniken.
    Negative consequences of uncorrected hearing loss - A review2003In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 42, no SUPPL. 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hearing loss gives rise to a number of disabilities. Problems in recognizing speech, especially in difficult environments, give rise to the largest number of complaints. Other kinds of disabilities may concern the reduced ability to detect, identify and localize sounds quickly and reliably. Such sounds may be warning or alarm signals, as well as music and birds singing. The communicative disability affects both hearing-impaired people and other people in their environment-family members, fellow workers, etc. Hearing-impaired people are not always aware of all the consequences of the impairment, they do not always know what they are missing. Several studies have shown that uncorrected hearing loss gives rise to poorer quality of life, related to isolation, reduced social activity, and a feeling of being excluded, leading to an increased prevalence of symptoms of depression. These findings indicate the importance of early identification of hearing loss and offers of rehabilitative support, where the fitting of hearing aids is usually an important component. Several studies also point to a significant correlation between hearing loss and loss of cognitive functions. Most of these studies show such a correlation without being able to show whether the hearing loss caused the reduction in cognitive performance or if both the hearing loss and the cognitive decline are parts of a common, general age-related degeneration. A couple of these studies, however, indicate that the uncorrected hearing loss may be the cause of cognitive decline. Whichever alternative is true, the correlation should be seen as a clear indication for early hearing aid fitting for those needing it. Monaural hearing aid fitting in subjects with bilateral hearing loss may give rise to a reduced ability to recognize speech presented to the unaided ear, the so-called late-onset auditory deprivation effect. This functional decline is reversible in some but not all subjects after fitting of a hearing aid also on the previously unaided ear.

  • 9.
    Asp, Filip
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Karltorp, Eva
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Harder, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Hergils, Leif
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Eskilsson, Gunnar
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    A longitudinal study of the bilateral benefit in children with bilateral cochlear implants2015In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 54, no 2, p. 77-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To study the development of the bilateral benefit in children using bilateral cochlear implants by measurements of speech recognition and sound localization. Design: Bilateral and unilateral speech recognition in quiet, in multi-source noise, and horizontal sound localization was measured at three occasions during a two-year period, without controlling for age or implant experience. Longitudinal and cross-sectional analyses were performed. Results were compared to cross-sectional data from children with normal hearing. Study sample: Seventy-eight children aged 5.1-11.9 years, with a mean bilateral cochlear implant experience of 3.3 years and a mean age of 7.8 years, at inclusion in the study. Thirty children with normal hearing aged 4.8-9.0 years provided normative data. Results: For children with cochlear implants, bilateral and unilateral speech recognition in quiet was comparable whereas a bilateral benefit for speech recognition in noise and sound localization was found at all three test occasions. Absolute performance was lower than in children with normal hearing. Early bilateral implantation facilitated sound localization. Conclusions: A bilateral benefit for speech recognition in noise and sound localization continues to exist over time for children with bilateral cochlear implants, but no relative improvement is found after three years of bilateral cochlear implant experience.

  • 10.
    Asp, Filip
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karltorp, Eva
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Harder, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Hergils, Leif
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Eskilsson, Gunnar
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden .
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bilateral versus unilateral cochlear implants in children: Speech recognition, sound localization, and parental reports2012In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 51, no 11, p. 817-832Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To compare bilateral and unilateral speech recognition in quiet and in multi-source noise, and horizontal sound localization of low and high frequency sounds in children with bilateral cochlear implants. Design: Bilateral performance was compared to performance of the implanted side with the best monaural speech recognition in quiet result. Parental reports were collected in a questionnaire. Results from the CI children were compared to binaural and monaural performance of normal-hearing peers. Study sample: Sixty-four children aged 5.1-11.9 years who were daily users of bilateral cochlear implants. Thirty normal-hearing children aged 4.8-9.0 years were recruited as controls. Results and Conclusions : Group data showed a statistically significant bilateral speech recognition and sound localization benefit, both behaviorally and in parental reports. The bilateral speech recognition benefit was smaller in quiet than in noise. The majority of subjects localized high and low frequency sounds significantly better than chance using bilateral implants, while localization accuracy was close to chance using unilateral implants. Binaural normal-hearing performance was better than bilateral performance in implanted children across tests, while bilaterally implanted children showed better localization than normal-hearing children under acute monaural conditions.

  • 11.
    Bergemalm, P.-O.
    et al.
    Ahlsèn Research Institute, Örebro University Hospital, S-701 85 Örebro, Sweden, ENT Department, Lindesberg County Hospital, Lindesberg, Sweden.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Appearances are deceptive? Long-term cognitive and central auditory sequelae from closed head injury2005In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 39-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the present study was to examine possible signs of long-term cognitive and/or central auditory sequelae seven to eleven years after a closed head injury (CHI) of sufficient severity to cause scull fracture and/or brain contusion. Another purpose was that this investigation should be carried out in a group of recovered trauma victims with, to the individual, no known or minimal sequelae. A computer-based set of five cognitive tests and three central auditory tests were used in a group of formerly brain-injured patients who considered themselves as well recovered. Most of the participants did not report any signs of cognitive or auditory impairment. Tests of working memory capacity, verbal information processing speed, phonological processing and verbal inference-making ability were used. Auditory brain response (ABR), distorted speech audiometry (interrupted speech), and phase audiometry were used to test central auditory function. The initial severity of brain damage, i.e. status when the patient arrived at the emergency ward, was estimated with Swedish Reaction Level Scale (RLS). Cognitive shortcomings after CHI were demonstrated in a high percentage (59%, 13/22) of the cases seven to eleven years after the injury. Central auditory processing disorders (APD) were also demonstrated in a fairly high percentage (58%, 11/19) of the subjects. None of the correlations between RLS and the results on cognitive and central auditory tests reached statistical significance. However, there was a correlation between cognitive performance and the results on the central auditory tests used in this investigation. Eighty percent (8/10) of those participants with pathologies on ABR and/or phase audiometry and/or IS also failed on one or more of the cognitive tasks, compared to 44% (4/9) among those with no signs of APD. It is possible, many years after CHI, to observe cognitive shortcomings and APD in a relatively high percentage of CHI cases that are subjectively considered to be fairly well recovered. The cognitive tasks used in the study have proved to be a sensitive method to discover cognitive impairments. Long-term cognitive sequelae and APD could not be predicted from RLS scores. © 2005 British Society of Audiology, International Society of Audiology, and Nordic Audiological Society.

  • 12.
    Beukes, Eldre W.
    et al.
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA; Audiol India, India; Manipal Univ, India.
    Baguley, David M.
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England; NIHR, England; Univ Nottingham, England.
    Allen, Peter M.
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England; Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Process evaluation of Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy for adults with tinnitus in the context of a randomised control trial2018In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 57, no 2, p. 98-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The research objective was to identify processes that could either facilitate or hinder clinical implementation of an Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy intervention for tinnitus in the UK. This was done by exploring the research context, the intervention components and the factors that contributed to the outcomes obtained. Design: This study investigated eight processes including the recruitment strategies, reach, research context, treatment dose delivered and received, implementation fidelity, barriers to implementation and effectiveness of the intervention. Study sample: Of the 169 registered participants, 146 were randomly assigned to the experimental or control groups (23 were excluded). The mean age was 55.57 years with an average tinnitus duration of 11.63 years. Results: The intended sample of people with distressing tinnitus who were underserved with evidence-based tinnitus interventions was reached. The full guided intervention was delivered. The recommended modules were read more than the optional modules. Intervention components such as the easily readable format and the benefits of the applied relaxation programme facilitated significant positive post-intervention outcomes. Barriers hampering the intervention application included time pressures and low self-motivation. Conclusions: Results of this process evaluation together with the outcome data can be used to facilitate translating this research into clinical practice.

  • 13.
    Borch Petersen, Eline
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark,.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark,.
    Vestergaard, Martin
    University of Cambridge, Centre for the Neural Basis of Hearing.
    Sundewall Thorén, Elisabet
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark,.
    Danish Reading Span data from 283 hearing-aid users, including a sub-group analysis of their relationship to speech-in-noise performance2016In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 55, no 4, p. 254-261Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study provides descriptive statistics of the Danish reading span (RS) test for hearing-impaired adults. The combined effect of hearing loss, RS score, and age on speech-in-noise performance in different spatial settings was evaluated in a subset of participants. Design: Data from published and unpublished studies were re-analysed. Data regarding speech-in-noise performance with co-located or spatially separated sound sources were available for a subset of participants. Study sample: RS scores from 283 hearing-impaired participants were extracted from past studies, and 239 of these participants had completed a speech-in-noise test. Results: RS scores (mean = 41.91%, standard deviation = 11.29%) were related to age (p <0.01), but not pure-tone average (PTA) (p = 0.29). Speech-in-noise performance for co-located sound sources was related to PTA and RS score (both p < 0.01, adjusted R-squared = 0.226). Performance for spatially separated sounds was related to PTA (p < 0.01, adjusted R-squared = 0.10) but not RS score (p = 0.484). We found no differences between the standardized coefficients of the two regression models. Conclusions: The distribution of RS scores indicated a high test difficulty. We found that age should be controlled when RS scores are compared across populations. The experimental setup of the speech-in-noise test may influence the relationship between performance and RS score.

  • 14.
    Borch Petersen, Eline
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Snekkersten, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Vestergaard, Martin
    University of Cambridge, Centre for the Neural Basis of Hearing.
    Sundewall Thorén, Elisabet
    Snekkersten, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Normative Reading Span Data from 283 Hearing Aid Users and the Relationship to Performance in Speech-in-Noise Test2014In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Båsjö, Sara
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Audiological Research Centre, School of Health and Medical Sciences / Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Audiological Research Centre, School of Health and Medical Sciences / Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Widen, Stephen
    Audiological Research Centre, School of Health and Medical Sciences / Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Jutengren, Göran
    School of Health Sciences, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Kähäri, Kim
    Division of Audiology , Sahlgrens' Academy at Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Hearing thresholds, tinnitus, and headphone listening habits in nine-year-old children2016In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 55, no 10, p. 587-596Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Investigate hearing function and headphone listening habits in nine-year-old Swedish children. Design: A cross-sectional study was conducted and included otoscopy, tympanometry, pure-tone audiometry, and spontaneous otoacoustic emissions (SOAE). A questionnaire was used to evaluate headphone listening habits, tinnitus, and hyperacusis. Study sample: A total of 415 children aged nine years. Results: The prevalence of a hearing threshold20dB HL at one or several frequencies was 53%, and the hearing thresholds at 6 and 8kHz were higher than those at the low and mid frequencies. SOAEs were observed in 35% of the children, and the prevalence of tinnitus was 5.3%. No significant relationship between SOAE and tinnitus was found. Pure-tone audiometry showed poorer hearing thresholds in children with tinnitus and in children who regularly listened with headphones. Conclusion: The present study of hearing, listening habits, and tinnitus in nine-year old children is, to our knowledge, the largest study so far. The main findings were that hearing thresholds in the right ear were poorer in children who used headphones than in children not using them, which could be interpreted as headphone listening may have negative consequences to childrens hearing. Children with tinnitus showed poorer hearing thresholds compared to children without tinnitus.

  • 16.
    Dobrev, Ivo
    et al.
    University of Zurich Hospital, Switzerland.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Roosli, Christof
    University of Zurich Hospital, Switzerland.
    Bolt, Lucy
    University of Zurich Hospital, Switzerland.
    Pfiffner, Flurin
    University of Zurich Hospital, Switzerland.
    Gerig, Rahel
    University of Zurich Hospital, Switzerland.
    Huber, Alexander
    University of Zurich Hospital, Switzerland.
    Hoon Sim, Jae
    University of Zurich Hospital, Switzerland.
    Influence of stimulation position on the sensitivity for bone conduction hearing aids without skin penetration2016In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 55, no 8, p. 439-446Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study explores the influence of stimulation position on bone conduction (BC) hearing sensitivity with a BC transducer attached using a headband. Design:(1) The cochlear promontory motion was measured in cadaver heads using laser Doppler vibrometry while seven different positions around the pinna were stimulated using a bone anchored hearing aid transducer attached using a headband. (2) The BC hearing thresholds were measured in human subjects, with the bone vibrator Radioear B71 attached to the same seven stimulation positions. Study sample: Three cadaver heads and twenty participants. Results: Stimulation on a position superior-anterior to the pinna generated the largest promontory motion and the lowest BC thresholds. Stimulations on the positions superior to the pinna, the mastoid, and posterior-inferior to the pinna showed similar magnitudes of promontory motion and similar levels of BC thresholds. Conclusion: Stimulations on the regions superior to the pinna, the mastoid, and posterior-inferior to the pinna provide stable BC transmission, and are insensitive to small changes of the stimulation position. Therefore it is reliable to use the mastoid to determine BC thresholds in clinical audiometry. However, stimulation on a position superior-anterior to the pinna provides more efficient BC transmission than stimulation on the mastoid.

  • 17. Durrant, JD
    et al.
    Palmer, CV
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Analysis of counted behaviors in a single-subject design: Modeling of hearing-aid intervention in hearing-impaired patients with Alzheimer's disease2005In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 31-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clinical procedures related to patients with Alzheimer's Disease (AD) largely fail to address the patient's hearing. Given the challenges of this population, unconventional indicators of treatment efficacy may be required. Palmer et al (1999) reported on caregiver-tracked behaviors as outcome measures for hearing aid intervention. Using these data, hearing aid use and subsequent behavior was modeled as a first-order dynamic system, characterized by responses following an exponential time course. The results of such modeling suggest predictable outcomes of hearing aid intervention, or at least useful parameters of quantification (e.g. time-constant and steady-state response), permitting critical assessment of effects of intervention on negative behaviors versus hearing aid use, comparisons among behaviors, and/or comparisons of hearing-aid-use patterns and behavior counts among patients. Use in this and other difficult-to-test populations warrant further study to evaluate clinical efficacy of the analysis described. © 2005 British Society of Audiology, International Society of Audiology, and Nordic Audiological Society.

  • 18.
    Eeg-Olofsson, Mans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology .
    Tjellstrom, Anders
    University of Gothenburg.
    Granstrom , Gosta
    University of Gothenburg.
    Transmission of bone-conducted sound in the human skull measured by cochlear vibrations2008In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 47, no 12, p. 761-769Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One limitation with the Bone Anchored Hearing Aid (Baha) is too poor amplification for patients with moderate to severe sensorineural hearing losses. Therefore, we investigated if bone conducted (BC) sound transmission improves when the stimulation approaches the cochlea. Also the influence from the squamosal suture on BC sound transmission was investigated. Both sides of the heads on seven human cadavers were used and vibrational stimulation was applied at eight positions on each side with a frequency range of 0.1-10 kHz. A laser Doppler vibrometer was used to measure the resulting velocity of the cochlear promontory. It was found that the velocity of the promontory increases as the stimulation position approaches the cochlea; this was especially apparent at distances within 2.5 cm from the ear canal opening and when the stimulation position was in the opened mastoid. At frequencies above 500 Hz there was on average 10 to 20 dB greater vibrational response at the cochlea when the stimulation was close to the cochlea compared with the normal Baha position. Moreover, even if there were general indications of attenuation of BC sound when passing the squamosal suture, an effect from the suture could not be conclusively determined.

  • 19.
    Ellis, Rachel J.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Munro, Kevin J.
    University of Manchester, England .
    Does cognitive function predict frequency compressed speech recognition in listeners with normal hearing and normal cognition?2013In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 52, no 1, p. 14-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective:The aim was to investigate the relationship between cognitive ability and frequency compressed speech recognition in listeners with normal hearing and normal cognition. Design:Speech-in-noise recognition was measured using Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers sentences presented over earphones at 65 dB SPL and a range of signal-to-noise ratios. There were three conditions:unprocessed, and at frequency compression ratios of 2:1 and 3:1 (cut-off frequency, 1.6 kHz). Working memory and cognitive ability were measured using the reading span test and the trail making test, respectively. Study sample:Participants were 15 young normally-hearing adults with normal cognition. Results:There was a statistically significant reduction in mean speech recognition from around 80% when unprocessed to 40% for 2:1 compression and 30% for 3:1 compression. There was a statistically significant relationship between speech recognition and cognition for the unprocessed condition but not for the frequency-compressed conditions. Conclusions:The relationship between cognitive functioning and recognition of frequency compressed speech-in-noise was not statistically significant. The findings may have been different if the participants had been provided with training and/or time to acclimatize to the frequency-compressed conditions.

  • 20.
    Ellis, Rachel J
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. School of Psychological Sciences, University of Manchester, UK.
    Munro, Kevin J
    School of Psychological Sciences, University of Manchester, UK; Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester, UK.
    Predictors of aided speech recognition, with and without frequency compression, in older adults.2015In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 54, no 7, p. 467-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The aim was to investigate whether cognitive and/or audiological measures predict aided speech recognition, both with and without frequency compression (FC).

    DESIGN: Participants wore hearing aids, with and without FC for a total of 12 weeks (six weeks in each signal processing condition, ABA design). Performance on a sentence-in-noise recognition test was assessed at the end of each six-week period. Audiological (severity of high frequency hearing loss, presence of dead regions) and cognitive (reading span and trail making test scores) measures were obtained and assessed as predictors of sentence-in-noise recognition with and without FC enabled.

    STUDY SAMPLE: Twelve experienced hearing-aid users (aged 65-84 years old) with moderate-to-severe high-frequency hearing loss took part in the study.

    RESULTS: The results suggest that both auditory and cognitive factors can be predictive of sentence-in-noise recognition with conventional amplification. However, only auditory factors were significantly correlated with the degree of benefit obtained from FC.

    CONCLUSIONS: The strongest predictor of aided speech recognition, both with and without FC, was high frequency hearing loss. Cognitive performance was also a predictor of benefit from conventional amplification, but not of additional benefit from the use of FC.

  • 21.
    Ellis, Rachel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. University of Manchester, England.
    Munro, Kevin J.
    University of Manchester, England; Central Manchester University Hospital NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Benefit from, and acclimatization to, frequency compression hearing aids in experienced adult hearing-aid users2015In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 54, no 1, p. 37-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim was to investigate whether frequency compression (FC) hearing aids provide additional benefit to that conferred by conventional amplification. Design: Participants wore the same hearing aid with FC enabled and disabled for six weeks (ABA design) in each condition. Speech recognition tests (in both quiet and in noise) were administered alongside two questionnaires. Performance was compared across the two signal processing conditions and at different time points. Study sample: Twelve experienced hearing-aid users (aged 65-84 years old) with moderate-to-severe high-frequency hearing loss participated in the study. Results: FC resulted in statistically significantly higher mean scores in all of the administered speech tests. Improvements over time were limited to high frequency phoneme perception. No effect of FC on self-report outcomes was observed. Conclusions: FC may lead to significant improvements in speech perception outcomes in both quiet and noise for many individuals. No participant was significantly disadvantaged by the use of FC.

  • 22.
    Finke, Mareike
    et al.
    Hannover Medical Sch, Germany; Cluster Excellence Hearing4all, Germany; Cluster Excellence Hearing4all, Germany.
    Boenitz, Hanna
    Hannover Medical Sch, Germany.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Illg, Angelika
    Hannover Medical Sch, Germany.
    Cochlear implant effectiveness in postlingual single-sided deaf individuals: whats the point?2017In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 56, no 6, p. 417-423Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: By extending the indication criteria for cochlear implants (CI), the population of CI candidates increased in age, as well as range and type of hearing loss. This qualitative study identified factors that contributed to seek CI treatment in single-sided deaf individuals and gained insights how single-sided deafness (SSD) and hearing with a CI affect their lives. Design: An open-ended questionnaire and a standardised inventory (IOI-HA) were used. Qualitative data reflecting the reasons to seek CI treatment and the individual experiences after CI switch-on were collected. Study sample: A total of 19 postlingually deafened single-sided deaf CI users. Results: Participants use their CI daily and stated that their life satisfaction increased since CI activation. The analysis of the qualitative data revealed four core categories: sound localisation, tinnitus and noise sensitivity, fear to lose the second ear and quality of life. Conclusions: Our results show how strongly and diversely quality of hearing and quality of life is affected by acquired SSD and improved after CI activation. Our data suggest that the fear of hearing loss (HL) on the normal hearing (NH) ear is an important but so far neglected reason to seek treatment with a CI in individuals with postlingual SSD.

  • 23.
    Granberg, Sarah
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital / Örebro University, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Jennie
    Örebro University Hospital / Örebro University, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University Hospital / Örebro University, Sweden.
    Kähäri, Kim
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Danermark, Berth
    Örebro University Hospital / Örebro University, Sweden.
    The ICF Core Sets for hearing loss - researcher perspective. Part I: Systematic review of outcome measures identified in audiological research2014In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 53, no 2, p. 65-76Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To review the literature in order to identify outcome measures used in research on adults with hearing loss (HL) as part of the ICF Core Sets development project, and to describe study and population characteristics of the reviewed studies. Design: A systematic review methodology was applied using multiple databases. A comprehensive search was conducted and two search pools were created, pool I and pool II. Study sample: The study population included adults (greater than= 18 years of age) with HL and oral language as the primary mode of communication. Results: 122 studies were included. Outcome measures were distinguished by instrument type, and 10 types were identified. In total, 246 (pool I) and 122 (pool II) different measures were identified, and only approximately 20% were extracted twice or more. Most measures were related to speech recognition. Fifty-one different questionnaires were identified. Many studies used small sample sizes, and the sex of participants was not revealed in several studies. Conclusion: The low prevalence of identified measures reflects a lack of consensus regarding the optimal outcome measures to use in audiology. Reflections and discussions are made in relation to small sample sizes and the lack of sex differentiation/descriptions within the included articles.

  • 24.
    Granberg, Sarah
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital / Örebro University, Sweden .
    Möller, Kerstin
    Örebro University Hospital / Örebro University, Sweden .
    Skagerstrand, Åsa
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital / Örebro University, Sweden .
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University Hospital / Örebro University, Sweden .
    Danermark, Berth
    Örebro University Hospital / Örebro University, Sweden .
    The ICF Core Sets for hearing loss: researcher perspective, Part II: Linking outcome measures to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF)2014In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 53, no 2, p. 77-87Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To link outcome measures used in audiological research to the ICF classification and thereby describe audiological research from the ICF perspective. Design: Through a peer-reviewed or a joint linking procedure, link outcome measures to the ICF classification system using standardized ICF linking rules. Additional linking rules were developed in combination with the established rules to overcome difficulties when connecting audiological data to ICF. Absolute and relative frequencies of ICF categories were reported. Study sample: The identified outcome measures from the previous study (Part I) constituted the empirical material. Results: In total, 285 ICF categories were identified. The most prevalent categories were related to listening, hearing functions, auditory perceptions, emotions and the physical environment, such as noise and hearing aids. Categories related to communication showed lower relative frequencies, as did categories related to the social and attitudinal environment. Conclusions: Based on the linked outcome measures, communication as a research topic is subordinated to other research topics. The same conclusion can be drawn for research targeting the social and attitudinal environment of adults with HL. Difficulties in the linking procedure were highlighted and discussed, and suggestions for future revisions of the ICF from the audiological perspective were described.

  • 25.
    Granberg, Sarah
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Örebro University Hospital / University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Pronk, Marieke
    VU University Medical Center, EMGO, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Swanepoel, De Wet
    University of Pretoria, South Africa; University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Australia; Ear Science Institute Australia, Subiaco, Australia.
    Kramer, Sophia E.
    VU University Medical Center, EMGO, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Hagsten, Hanna
    Örebro University Hospital / Swedish Institute for Disability Research, University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Hjaldahl, Jennie
    Örebro University Hospital / Swedish Institute for Disability Research, University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University Hospital / Swedish Institute for Disability Research, University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Danermark, Berth
    Örebro University Hospital / Swedish Institute for Disability Research, University of Örebro, Sweden.
    The ICF core sets for hearing loss project: Functioning and disability from the patient perspective2014In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 53, no 11, p. 777-786Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To explore areas of functioning, disability, and environmental factors of adults with hearing loss (HL) by using the ICF classification as a tool to determine and document each element. Design: A qualitative study applying mainly focus-group methodology was applied. Study sample: Thirty-six Dutch and South African adults (greater than= 18 years of age) with HL (20-95 dB HL) who used oral communication as first communication. Summative content analysis was performed on the transcripts by linkage to appropriate ICF categories. Results: 143 ICF categories were identified, most of which belonged to the Activities and Participation (d) component, closely followed by the Environmental factors component. Participants specifically mentioned categories related to oral communication and interaction. Assistive technology (such as hearing aids), noise, and support by and attitudes of others in the environment of the participants were considered highly influential for functioning and disability. Conclusions: The present study illustrates the complex and encompassing nature of aspects involved in functioning and disability of adults with HL. Findings highlight the necessity of using a multidimensional tool, such as the ICF, to map functioning and disability with hearing loss, allowing consideration and evaluation of aspects that are both internal and external.

  • 26.
    Grenness, Caitlin
    et al.
    HEARing Cooperative Research Centre, Melbourne, Australia.
    Hickson, Louise
    HEARing Cooperative Research Centre, Melbourne, Australia.
    Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Davidson, Bronwyn
    University of Melbourne, Carlton, Australia.
    Patient-centred audiological rehabilitation: Perspectives of older adults who own hearing aids2014In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 53, no S1, p. S68-S75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Patient-centred care is a term frequently associated with quality health care. Despite extensive literature from a range of health-care professions that provide description and measurement of patient-centred care, a definition of patient-centredness in audiological rehabilitation is lacking. The current study aimed to define patient-centred care specific to audiological rehabilitation from the perspective of older adults who have owned hearing aids for at least one year. Design: Research interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of older adults concerning their perceptions of patient-centredness in audiological rehabilitation, and qualitative content analysis was undertaken. Study sample: The participant sample included ten adults over the age of 60 years who had owned hearing aids for at least one year. Results: Data analysis revealed three dimensions to patient-centred audiological rehabilitation: the therapeutic relationship, the players (audiologist and patient), and clinical processes. Individualised care was seen as an overarching theme linking each of these dimensions. Conclusions: This study reported two models: the first model describes what older adults with hearing aids believe constitutes patient-centred audiological rehabilitation. The second provides a guide to operationalised patient-centred care. Further research is required to address questions pertaining to the presence, nature, and impact of patient-centred audiological rehabilitation.

  • 27.
    Grenness, Caitlin
    et al.
    HEARing Cooperative Research Centre, Melbourne, Australia.
    Hickson, Louise
    HEARing Cooperative Research Centre, Melbourne, Australia.
    Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Davidson, Bronwyn
    University of Melbourne, Australia.
    Patient-centred care: A review for rehabilitative audiologists2014In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 53, no S1, p. S60-S67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This discussion paper aims to synthesise the literature on patient-centred care from a range of health professions and to relate this to the field of rehabilitative audiology. Through review of the literature, this paper addresses five questions: What is patient-centred care? How is patient-centred care measured? What are the outcomes of patient-centred care? What are the factors contributing to patient-centred care? What are the implications for audiological rehabilitation? Design: Literature review and synthesis. Study sample: Publications were identified by structured searches in PubMed, Cinahl, Web of Knowledge, and PsychInfo, and by inspecting the reference lists of relevant articles. Results: Few publications from within the audiology profession address this topic and consequently a review and synthesis of literature from other areas of health were used to answer the proposed questions. Conclusion: This paper concludes that patient-centred care is in line with the aims and scope of practice for audiological rehabilitation. However, there is emerging evidence that we still need to inform the conceptualisation of patient-centred audiological rehabilitation. A definition of patient-centred audiological rehabilitation is needed to facilitate studies into the nature and outcomes of it in audiological rehabilitation practice.

  • 28.
    Hall, Deborah A.
    et al.
    Natl Inst Hlth Res NIHR, England; Univ Nottingham, England.
    Domingo, Silvia Zaragoza
    Neuropsychol Res Org, Spain.
    Hamdache, Leila Z.
    Carlton Acad, England.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Lamar State Univ, TX USA; Manipal Univ, India; All India Inst Speech and Hearing, India.
    Thammaiah, Spoorthi
    All India Inst Speech and Hearing, India.
    Evans, Chris
    Univ Roehampton, England.
    Wong, Lena L. N.
    Univ Hong Kong, Peoples R China.
    A good practice guide for translating and adapting hearing-related questionnaires for different languages and cultures2018In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 57, no 3, p. 161-175Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To raise awareness and propose a good practice guide for translating and adapting any hearing-related questionnaire to be used for comparisons across populations divided by language or culture, and to encourage investigators to publish detailed steps. Design: From a synthesis of existing guidelines, we propose important considerations for getting started, followed by six early steps: (1) Preparation, (2, 3) Translation steps, (4) Committee Review, (5) Field testing and (6) Reviewing and finalising the translation. Study sample: Not applicable. Results: Across these six steps, 22 different items are specified for creating a questionnaire that promotes equivalence to the original by accounting for any cultural differences. Published examples illustrate how these steps have been implemented and reported, with shared experiences from the authors, members of the International Collegium of Rehabilitative Audiology and TINnitus research NETwork. Conclusions: A checklist of the preferred reporting items is included to help researchers and clinicians make informed choices about conducting or omitting any items. We also recommend using the checklist to document these decisions in any resulting report or publication. Following this step-by-step guide would promote quality assurance in multinational trials and outcome evaluations but, to confirm functional equivalence, large-scale evaluation of psychometric properties should follow.

  • 29.
    Hannula, Samuli
    et al.
    University of Oulu.
    Bloigu, Risto
    University of Oulu.
    Majamaa, Kari
    University of Oulu.
    Sorri, Martti
    University of Oulu.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Audiogram configurations among older adults: Prevalence and relation to self-reported hearing problems2011In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 50, no 11, p. 793-801Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective : There are only a few population-based epidemiological studies on audiogram configurations among adults. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of different audiogram configurations among older adults. In addition, audiogram configurations among subjects reporting hearing problems were examined. Design : Cross-sectional, population-based, unscreened epidemiological study among older adults. Study sample : The subjects (850), aged 54-66 years, were randomly sampled from the population register. A questionnaire survey, an otological examination, and pure-tone audiometry were performed. Results : The most prevalent audiogram configuration among men was high-frequency steeply sloping (65.3% left ear, 51.2% right ear) and among women, high-frequency gently sloping (33.0% left ear, 31.5% right ear). There were significantly more flat configurations among women than among men. Unclassified audiograms were common especially among women (17.5%). Subjects reporting hearing difficulties, difficulties in following conversation in noise, or tinnitus, more often had a high-frequency steeply sloping configuration than those not reporting. Conclusions : High-frequency sloping audiogram configurations were common among older adults, and a high-frequency steeply sloping configuration was common among those reporting hearing problems.

  • 30.
    Hannula, Samuli
    et al.
    University of Oulu, Finland .
    Bloigu, Risto
    University of Oulu, Finland .
    Majamaa, Kari
    University of Oulu, Finland .
    Sorri, Martti
    University of Oulu, Finland .
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ear diseases and other risk factors for hearing impairment among adults: An epidemiological study2012In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 51, no 11, p. 833-840Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate the prevalence of ear diseases, other otological risk factors potentially affecting hearing, and noise exposure among adults. Furthermore, subject-related factors possibly associated with hearing impairment (HI), i.e. handedness, eye color, and susceptibility to sunburn, were studied. Design: A cross-sectional, unscreened, population-based, epidemiological study among adults. Study sample: The subjects (n = 850), aged 54-66 years, were randomly sampled from the population register. A questionnaire survey, an otological examination, and pure-tone audiometry were performed. Results: Chronic middle-ear disease (both active and inactive) was the most common ear disease with a prevalence of 5.3%, while the prevalence of otosclerosis was 1.3%, and that of Menieres disease, 0.7%. Noise exposure was reported by 46% of the subjects, and it had no effect on hearing among those with no ear disease or other otological risk factors for HI. Dark eye color and non-susceptibility to sunburn were associated with HI among noise-exposed subjects. Conclusions: Common ear diseases and other otological risk factors constitute a major part of the etiologies of HI among adults. Contrary to previous studies, noise exposure turned out to have only marginal effect on hearing among those with no otological risk factors.

  • 31.
    Hergils, Leif
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Center for Medical Technology Assessment. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Analysis of measurements from the first Swedish universal neonatal hearing screening program2007In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 46, no 11, p. 680-685Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study analyses results from the first Swedish UNHS program. It includes over 33 000 measurement files from 14 287 children at two maternity wards. The screening program uses a two-stage TEOAE test procedure. A database was created in MedLog after data transformation in Word and Excel. The coverage rate was 99.1%. Bilateral pass rate after retesting was 97.0%. A unilateral pass criterion would have resulted in 1268 fewer children (9.0% of target group) for retesting and 231 fewer children (1.6% of target group) for diagnostic evaluation. When the first test was performed on the day the child was born, the pass rate was 64.8%, the pass rate increased to 89.2% when testing≥3 days after birth. High coverage rates and pass rates were found to be possible, independent of the number of children born at the maternity ward. Learning curves were observed in the program with improvements distributed over time. Test performance was clearly better when the children were tested day two after birth or later. © 2007 British Society of Audiology, International Society of Audiology, and Nordic Audiological Society.

  • 32.
    Hua, Hakan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Swedish Institute Disabil Research, Sweden .
    Karlsson, Jan
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden .
    Widen, Stephen
    Swedish Institute Disabil Research, Sweden .
    Moller, Claes
    Swedish Institute Disabil Research, Sweden .
    Lyxell, Bjorn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Swedish Institute Disabil Research, Sweden .
    Quality of life, effort and disturbance perceived in noise: A comparison between employees with aided hearing impairment and normal hearing2013In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 52, no 9, p. 642-649Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aims were to compare health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and hearing handicap between two groups of employees with normal hearing and aided hearing impairment (HI). HRQOL was also compared to a normative population. The second aim was to compare perceived effort (PE) and disturbance after completing a task in office noise between the two study groups. Design: A Swedish version of the short form-36 (SF-36) and the hearing handicap inventory for adults (HHIA) was used to determine HRQOL and hearing handicap. The Borg-CR 10 scale was used to measure PE and disturbance. Study sample: Hearing impaired (n = 20) and normally hearing (n = 20) participants. The normative sample comprised of 597 matched respondents. Results: Hearing-impaired employees report relatively good HRQOL in relation to the normative population, but significantly lower physical functioning and higher PE than their normally-hearing peers in noise. Results from the HHIA showed mild self-perceived hearing handicap. Conclusions: The current results demonstrate that physical health status can be negatively affected even at a mild-moderate severity of HI, and that a higher PE is reported from this group when performing a task in noise, despite the regular use of hearing aids.

  • 33.
    Hua, Håkan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Anderzen-Carlsson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Widen, Stephen
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Moller, Claes
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Örebro University, Sweden; Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Conceptions of working life among employees with mild-moderate aided hearing impairment: A phenomenographic study2015In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 54, no 11, p. 873-880Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim was to explore the conceptions of working life among employees with mild-moderate aided hearing impairment (HI). Design: This study has a descriptive design, in which data was collected by means of semi-structured interviews. All interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. The text was analysed in accordance with the phenomenographic approach. Study sample: Fifteen participants with mild-moderate aided HI were recruited to the current study. Results: The analysis of the interviews resulted in four main categories describing the participants conceptions of working life: (1) diffiiculties in daily work, (2) communication strategies, (3) facilitating factors in work environment, and (4) impact on daily life. The four identified descriptive categories show that the effects of HI on the lives of working adults generate far-reaching psychosocial consequences for the individual. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that difficulties and impact of having a HI interact with strategies used by the individual and contextual facilitators made in the work environment. We argue that there is a need for extensive services in aural rehabilitation for this population. This includes identifying the need of assistive listening devices, teaching the individual with HI about communication strategies and informing stakeholders about the consequence of having a HI.

  • 34.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    A Swedish version of the Hearing In Noise Test (HINT) for measurement of speech recognition2006In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 227-237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A Swedish Hearing In Noise Test (HINT), consisting of everyday sentences to be used in an adaptive procedure to estimate the speech recognition thresholds in noise and quiet, has been developed. The material consists of 250 sentences, with a length of five to nine syllables, normalized for naturalness, difficulty and reliability. The sentences were recorded with a female speaker. From the sentences, 25 phonemically balanced lists were created. All lists fluctuate less than 1 dB of the overall mean. The standard deviation of the test-retest difference is 0.94 dB when testing with one list, and decreases to 0.68 dB and 0.56 dB for two and three lists, respectively. The average speech recognition thresholds in noise for the Swedish sentences were -3.0 dB signal/noise ratio (SD = 1.1 dB). The present study has resulted in a well-defined and internationally comparable set of sentences, which can be used in Swedish audiological rehabilitation and research to measure speech recognition in noise and quiet. © 2006 British Society of Audiology, International Society of Audiology, and Nordic Audiological Society.

  • 35.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Speech understanding in quiet and noise, with and without hearing aids2005In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 44, no 10, p. 574-583Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Speech recognition and cognitive functions important for speech understanding were evaluated by objective measures and by scores of perceived effort, with and without hearing aids. The tests were performed in silence, and with background conditions of speech spectrum random noise and ordinary speech. One young and one elderly group of twelve hearing-impaired subjects each participated. Hearing aid use improved speech recognition in silence (7 dB) and in the condition with speech as background (2.5 dB S/N), but did not change the perceived effort scores. In the cognitive tests no hearing aid benefit was seen in objective measures, while there was an effect of hearing aid use in scores of perceived effort, subjects reported less effort. There were no age effects on hearing aid benefit. In conclusion, hearing aid use may result in reduced effort in listening tasks that is not associated with improvement in objective scores. © 2005 British Society of Audiology, International Society of Audiology, and Nordic Audiological Society.

  • 36.
    Ingo, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Brännström, K Jonas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Department of Logopedics, Phoniatrics and Audiology, Lund University, Sweden.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon a/S, Denmark.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon a/S, Denmark.
    Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon a/S, Denmark.
    Measuring motivation using the transtheoretical (stages of change) model: A follow-up study of people who failed an online hearing screening.2016In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 55, no Suppl 3, p. S52-S58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Acceptance and readiness to seek professional help have shown to be important factors for favourable audiological rehabilitation outcomes. Theories from health psychology such as the transtheoretical (stages-of-change) model could help understand behavioural change in people with hearing impairment. In recent studies, the University of Rhode Island change assessment (URICA) has been found to have good predictive validity.

    DESIGN: In a previous study, 224 Swedish adults who had failed an online hearing screening completed URICA and two other measures of stages of change. This follow-up aimed to: (1) determine prevalence of help-seeking at a hearing clinic and hearing aid uptake, and (2) explore the predictive validity of the stages of change measures by a follow-up on the 224 participants who had failed a hearing screening 18 months previously.

    STUDY SAMPLE: A total of 122 people (54%) completed the follow-up online questionnaire, including the three measures and questions regarding experience with hearing help-seeking and hearing aid uptake.

    RESULTS: Since failing the online hearing screening, 61% of participants had sought help. A good predictive validity for a one-item measure of stages of change was reported.

    CONCLUSIONS: The Staging algorithm was the stages of change measure with the best ability to predict help-seeking 18 months later.

  • 37.
    Ingo, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Brännström, K. Jonas
    Department of logopedics, phoniatrics and audiology, Lund University, Sweden and Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV), The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Stages of change in audiology: comparison of three self-assessment measures2017In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 56, no 7, p. 516-520Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: In a clinical setting, theories of health behaviour change could help audiologists and other hearing health care professionals understand the barriers that prevent people with hearing problems to seek audiological help. The transtheoretical (stages of change) model of health behaviour change is one of these theories. It describes a persons journey towards health behaviour change (e.g. seeking help or taking up rehabilitation) in separate stages: precontemplation, contemplation, preparation, action, and, finally, maintenance. A short self-assessment measure of stages of change may guide the clinician and facilitate first appointments. This article describes correlations between three stages of change measures of different lengths, one 24-item and two one-item. Design: Participants were recruited through an online hearing screening study. Adults who failed the speech-in-noise recognition screening test and who had never undergone a hearing aid fitting were invited to complete further questionnaires online, including the three stages of change measures. Study sample: In total, 224 adults completed the three measures. Results: A majority of the participants were categorised as being in one of the information- and help-seeking stage of change (contemplation or preparation). The three stages of change measures were significantly correlated. Conclusions Our results support further investigating the use of a one-item measure to determine stages of change in people with hearing impairment.

  • 38.
    Jiang, Wen
    et al.
    Affiliated Hospital Xuzhou Medical Coll, Peoples R China.
    Zhao, Fei
    Cardiff Metropolitan University, Wales; Sun Yat Sen University, Peoples R China.
    Guderley, Nicola
    Guys and St Thomas Hospital, England.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Lamar University, TX 77710 USA; Audiol India, India.
    Daily music exposure dose and hearing problems using personal listening devices in adolescents and young adults: A systematic review2016In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 55, no 4, p. 197-205Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This systematic review aimed to explore the evidence on whether the preferred listening levels (PLLs) and durations of music listening through personal listening devices (PLDs) in adolescents and young adults exceed the current recommended 100% daily noise dose; together with the impact on hearing and possible influential factors of such listening behaviours. Design: A systematic search was conducted using multiple online bibliographic databases. Study sample: The 26 studies were included on the basis of the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Results: The results showed that up to 58.2% of participants exceeded the 100% daily noise dose, particularly in the presence of background noise. Significantly positive correlations were found among background noise levels and mean PLLs, as well as the proportion of participants exceeding the 100% daily noise dose. Moreover, significantly worse hearing thresholds were found in PLD users using audiometry, and significantly poor results in otoacoustic emission (OAE), even in the participants with self-reported normal hearing. Conclusion: It is crucial to develop appropriate standards and safe recommendations for daily music exposure dose in future studies. Providing an essential guide and effective education to adolescents and young adults will help raise awareness, increase knowledge, and consequently change attitudes and listening habits.

  • 39.
    Johansson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery.
    Binaural masking level difference for speech signals in noise2002In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 41, no 5, p. 279-284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the binaural masking level difference in both detection and recognition of speech embedded in noise when the signal is phasc-shifted 180░ between the left and the right ear. Swedish spondaic words masked by noise were presented binaurally to 10 normally hearing subjects. The results are presented in terms of speech detection threshold, speech recognition threshold, a psychometric function of speech recognition versus signal-to-noise ratio, and speech intelligibility as a function of binaural intelligibility level difference. Both specch detection threshold and speech intelligibility improved when the speech signal was phase-shifted 180░. The binaural intelligibility level difference ranged from 5.7 to 7.7 dB.

  • 40.
    Jonsson, J.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bohman, A
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Shekhawat, G. S.
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Kobayashi, K.
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Searchfield, G. D.
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    An evaluation of the Reltus ear massager for short-term tinnitus relief2016In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 55, no 1, p. 38-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Auditory stimulation has been shown to suppress the loudness of tinnitus (residual inhibition, RI). Somatosensory manipulations have also been shown to sometimes decrease tinnitus perception. An ear-massaging device, the Reltus (www.reltus.com), has been marketed as a tinnitus treatment device. This study was undertaken to evaluate its short-term effectiveness and mode of effect. Design: The research was undertaken in two phases. Phase 1 measured the change in tinnitus perception after one minute of auditory stimulation through headphones and after application of a vibrating device to four different stimulation points around the pinna for one minute each. Phase 2 evaluated if it was the vibrations that were responsible for the effect on tinnitus perception, or sound produced by the vibrator. Study sample: Twenty-three participants completed phase 1 and 10 participants participated in the second phase. Results: RI to auditory stimulation was found in 87% of participants and to tactile stimulation in 83%. No significant differences were found in the effectiveness between the four vibration stimulation points, or between the left and right ear of the participants. The Reltus produced a sound that resulted in RI. Conclusions: It is the auditory artifact of the Reltus that was responsible for short-term tinnitus suppression.

  • 41.
    Juris, Linda
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Christian Larsen, Hans
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Psychiatric comorbidity and personality traits in patients with hyperacusis2013In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 52, no 4, p. 230-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Hyperacusis, defined as unusual intolerance of ordinary environmental sounds, is a common problem. In spite of this, there is limited understanding of the underlying mechanisms. We hypothesized that individuals with hyperacusis would be prone to suffer from psychiatric disorders, related in particular to anxiety. Therefore, psychiatric morbidity and personality traits were investigated, along with different sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. Design: Patients were assessed with a clinical interview related to symptoms of hyperacusis, the Mini-international neuropsychiatric interview (MINI), and the Swedish Universities scales of Personality (SSP) to study psychiatric disorders and personality traits. Study sample: A group of 62 Swedish patients with hyperacusis between 18 and 61 years (mean 40.2, SD 12.2) was included. Results: Altogether 56% of the patients had at least one psychiatric disorder, and 47% had an anxiety disorder. Also, personality traits related to neuroticism were over-represented. A majority, 79%, suffered from comorbid tinnitus, and a similar proportion used measures to avoid noisy environments. Conclusions: The over-representation of anxiety disorders and anxiety-related personality traits in patients with hyperacusis suggests common or cooperating mechanisms. Cognitive behavioural treatment strategies, proven efficient in treating anxiety, may be indicated and are suggested for further studies.

  • 42.
    Keceli, Sumru
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Speech language pathology, Audiology and Otorhinolaryngology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Speech language pathology, Audiology and Otorhinolaryngology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Measurements of bone conduction auditory brainstem response with the new audiometric bone conduction transducer Radioear B812018In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 57, no 8, p. 577-583Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To compare recordings of bone conduction (BC) stimulated auditory brainstem response (ABR) obtained using the newer BC transducer Radioear B81 and the conventional BC transducer Radioear B71. Balanced electromagnetic separation transducer (BEST) design found in the B81 may influence the ABR magnitudes and latencies, as well as electrical artefacts. Design: ABRs to tone burst stimuli of 500 Hz, 2000 Hz, 4000 Hz, click stimulation, and broad-band chirp stimulation at 20 and 50dB nHL were recorded. For each device, stimulus and intensity level, the ABR Jewett wave V amplitude and latency were obtained. The device-related electrical stimulus artefacts on the ABR recordings were also analysed by calculating the Hilbert envelope of the peri-stimulus recording segments. Study sample: Twenty-three healthy adults with normal hearing were included in the study. Results: The ABRs obtained by the B81 were similar to that of the B71 in terms of ABR wave V amplitude and latency. However, the B81 produced smaller electrical artefacts than B71 and this difference was statistically significant. Conclusions: The BC transducer Radioear B81 provides ABRs comparable to Radioear B71 while causing smaller artefacts.

    The full text will be freely available from 2019-06-18 11:10
  • 43.
    Keidser, Gitte
    et al.
    National Acoust Labs, Australia.
    Seeto, Mark
    National Acoust Labs, Australia.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Hygge, Staffan
    University of Gavle, Sweden.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    On the relationship between functional hearing and depression2015In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 54, no 10, p. 653-664Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To establish the effect of self-rated and measured functional hearing on depression, taking age and gender into account. Additionally, the study investigates if hearing-aid usage mitigates the effect, and if other physical health problems and social engagement confound it. Design: Cross-sectional data from the UK Biobank resource, including subjective and behavioural measures of functional hearing and multifactorial measures of depressive episodes and symptoms, were accessed and analysed using multi-regression analyses. Study sample: Over 100 000 community-dwelling, 39-70 year-old volunteers. Results: Irrespective of measurement method, poor functional hearing was significantly (p &lt; 0.001) associated with higher levels of depressive episodes ( 0.16 factor scores) and depressive symptoms ( 0.30 factor scores) when controlling for age and gender. Associations were stronger for subjective reports, for depressive symptoms, and the younger participants. Females generally reported higher levels of depression. Hearing-aid usage did not show a mitigating effect on the associations. Other physical health problems particularly partially confounded the effects. Conclusion: Data support an association between functional hearing and depression that is stronger in the younger participants (40-49 years old) and for milder depression. The association was not alleviated by hearing-aid usage, but was partially confounded by other physical health problems.

  • 44. Kiessling, J
    et al.
    Pichora-Fuller, MK
    Gatehouse, S
    Stephens, D
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery .
    Chisolm, T
    Davis, AC
    Erber, NP
    Hickson, L
    Holmes, A
    Rosenhall, U
    von Wedel, H
    Candidature for and delivery of audiological services: special needs of older people2003In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 42, p. S92-S101Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Kleinstaeuber, Maria
    et al.
    Univ Auckland, New Zealand; Philipps Univ, Germany.
    Weise, Cornelia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Univ Auckland, New Zealand.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Probst, Thomas
    Donau Univ, Austria.
    Personality traits predict and moderate the outcome of Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy for chronic tinnitus2018In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 57, no 7, p. 538-544Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study is to investigate whether the Big Five personality traits predict the outcome of Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (ICBT) and whether they moderate the outcome between ICBT and face-to-face group cognitive behavioural therapy (GCBT). Design: This study investigated the Big Five personality traits as predictors and moderators of the outcome (tinnitus handicap) in a trial comparing ICBT and GCBT for chronic tinnitus. Study sample: N= 84 patients with chronic tinnitus were randomised to either ICBT (n = 41) or GCBT (n = 43). Results: A multilevel model for discontinuous change was performed. Higher scores on the "openness" scale of the Big Five Personality inventory (BFI-10) predicted a lower tinnitus handicap (Tinnitus Handicap Inventory, THI) at post-treatment in ICBT (p amp;lt;0.05). Openness moderated the outcome at post-treatment in favour of ICBT (p amp;lt;0.05). Higher scores on the BFI-10 "conscientiousness" scale predicted a more favourable outcome in ICBT at 6-month (p amp;lt;0.05) and 12-month follow-up (pamp;lt; 0.05), but the BFI-10 "conscientiousness" scale was positively associated with the THI at baseline (pamp;lt;0.05). Conclusions: ICBT might be the preferred treatment choice for tinnitus patients being open towards new experiences. Moreover, ICBT requires autonomous work and self-motivation by the patient in order to have an impact.

  • 46.
    Knudsen, Line V
    et al.
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Laplante-Levesque, Ariane
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Jones, Lesley
    University of York, UK.
    Preminger, Jill E
    University of Louisville, USA.
    Nielsen, Claus
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Hickson, Louise
    University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Naylor, Graham
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Kramer, Sophia E
    VU University Medical Center, EMGO+ Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Conducting qualitative research in audiology: A tutorial2012In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 51, no 2, p. 83-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    Qualitative research methodologies are being used more frequently in audiology as it allows for a better understanding of the perspectives of people with hearing impairment. This article describes why and how international interdisciplinary qualitative research can be conducted.

    DESIGN:

    This paper is based on a literature review and our recent experience with the conduction of an international interdisciplinary qualitative study in audiology.

    RESULTS:

    We describe some available qualitative methods for sampling, data collection, and analysis and we discuss the rationale for choosing particular methods. The focus is on four approaches which have all previously been applied to audiologic research: grounded theory, interpretative phenomenological analysis, conversational analysis, and qualitative content analysis.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    This article provides a review of methodological issues useful for those designing qualitative research projects in audiology or needing assistance in the interpretation of qualitative literature.

  • 47.
    Kollmeier, Birger
    et al.
    Carl von Ossietzky University of Oldenburg, Germany; Hor Technical gGmbH, Germany.
    Akeroyd, Michael A.
    MRC Institute Hearing Research, England.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bentler, Ruth A.
    University of Iowa, IA 52242 USA.
    Boothroyd, Arthur
    San Diego State University, CA 92182 USA.
    Dillier, Norbert
    University of Zurich, Switzerland.
    Dreschler, Wouter A.
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Gagne, Jean-Pierre
    University of Montreal, Canada.
    Lutman, Mark E.
    University of Southampton, England.
    Wouters, Jan
    Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Wong, Lena
    University of Hong Kong, Peoples R China.
    Letter: Reply to the Comment on International Collegium of Rehabilitative Audiology (ICRA) recommendations for the constructor of multilingual speech test by Akeroyd et al by Cas Smits in INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF AUDIOLOGY, vol 55, issue 4, pp 269-2712016In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 55, no 4, p. 269-271Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 48.
    Laplante-Levesque, Ariane
    et al.
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Knudsen, Line V
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Preminger, Jill E
    University of Louisville, USA.
    Jones, Lesley
    University of York, UK.
    Nielsen, Claus
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Hickson, Louise
    University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Naylor, Graham
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Kramer, Sophia E
    VU University Medical Center, EMGO+ Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Hearing help-seeking and rehabilitation: Perspectives of adults with hearing impairment2012In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 51, no 2, p. 93-102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    This study investigated the perspectives of adults with hearing impairment on hearing help-seeking and rehabilitation.

    DESIGN:

    Individual semi-structured interviews were completed.

    STUDY SAMPLE:

    In total, 34 adults with hearing impairment in four countries (Australia, Denmark, UK, and USA) participated. Participants had a range of experience with hearing help-seeking and rehabilitation, from never having sought help to being satisfied hearing-aid users.

    RESULTS:

    Qualitative content analysis identified four main categories ('perceiving my hearing impairment', 'seeking hearing help', 'using my hearing aids', and 'perspectives and knowledge') and, at the next level, 25 categories. This article reports on the densest categories: they are described, exemplified with interview quotes, and discussed.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    People largely described hearing help-seeking and rehabilitation in the context of their daily lives. Adults with hearing impairment rarely described clinical encounters towards hearing help-seeking and rehabilitation as a connected process. They portrayed interactions with clinicians as isolated events rather than chronologically-ordered steps relating to a common goal. Clinical implications of the findings are discussed.

  • 49.
    Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Brännström, K Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Quality and readability of English-language internet information for adults with hearing impairment and their significant others2012In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 51, no 8, p. 618-626Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study evaluated the quality and readability of English-language internet information for adults with hearing impairment and their significant others. Design: Two keyword pairs (hearing loss and hearing aids) were entered into five country-specific versions of the most commonly used internet search engine in May 2011. Sample: For each of the 10 searches, the first 10 relevant websites were included. After removing duplicates, a total of 66 websites were assessed. Their origin (commercial, non-profit organization, or government), date of last update, quality (Health On the Net (HON) certification and DISCERN scores), and readability (Flesch Reading Ease Score, Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level Formula, and Simple Measure Of Gobbledygook) were assessed. Results: Most websites were of commercial origin and had been updated within the last 18 months. Their quality and readability was highly variable. Only 14% of the websites had HON certification. Websites that were of non-profit organization origin had significantly higher DISCERN scores. Readability measures show that on average, only people with at least 11-12 years of education could read and understand the internet information presented. Conclusions: Based on these results, this article provides a list of recommendations for website developers and clinicians wishing to incorporate internet information into their practice.

  • 50.
    Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane
    et al.
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Hickson, Louise
    HEARing Cooperative Research Centre, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
    Grenness, Caitlin
    HEARing Cooperative Research Centre, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
    An Australian survey of audiologists’ preferences for patient-centredness2014In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 53, no S1, p. S76-S82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Patient-centredness is becoming a core value of health services worldwide, however it remains largely unexplored in audiology. This study investigated audiologists’ preferences for patient-centredness and identified factors that explain audiologists’ preferences for patient-centredness. Design: All members of the Audiological Society of Australia received two questionnaires: (1) a descriptive questionnaire (e.g. age, gender, place of residence, years in practice, employment characteristics), and (2) a modified patient-practitioner orientation scale (PPOS; Krupat et al, 2000) which measures preferences for two aspects of patient-centredness, sharing and caring. Study sample: In total 663 (46%) audiologists returned both questionnaires fully completed. Results: Mean PPOS scores indicated that audiologists prefer patient-centredness. Linear regression modelling identified that older audiologists, that had practiced longer, and who worked in community education, industrial audiology, or teaching had a signifi cantly greater preference for patient-centredness than their peers. In contrast, audiologists who practiced in a private environment and who worked in the area of assessment of adults had a significantly lesser preference for patient-centredness than their peers. Conclusions: Audiologists prefer client-centredness and age, years of experience, and employment characteristics can partly explain preferences for patient-centredness. Future research should explore the relationships between patient-centredness and intervention outcomes in audiology.

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