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  • 1.
    Andersson, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, RC - Rekonstruktionscentrum, ÖNH - Öron- Näsa- Halskliniken.
    Jacobsson, Stellan
    ENT-Clinic, Sahlgrens University Hospital Mölndal, Sweden.
    Evaluation of OAE-recording as a complementary test method for adults with moderate to profound mental retardation2000In: Scandinavian Audiology, ISSN 0105-0397, E-ISSN 1940-2872, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 120-126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recording of otoacoustic emissions (OAE) was evaluated as a complementary test method for adults with moderate to profound mental retardation (MR). A portable apparatus, ILO 288 Echoport linked to a Compaq LTE 5100 notebook with software ILO 88 V 4.2, was used. Otoscopy and tympanometry were also performed. Criteria for emissions were S/N 3 dB or more and reproducibility 60% or more for at least three frequency-bands. The criteria for partial emissions were the same, but for only one or two frequencies. Two examiners were needed: one to keep the tested person calm and quiet and the other to handle the keyboard. Thirty-eight people with different degrees of MR in connection with other disabilities were included. They had all exhibited incomplete results in a previous hearing screening of more than 1000 adults with MR. Reproducible transiently evoked OAEs (TEOAE) were recorded from II ears (7 people), partial TEOAEs from 6 ears (4 people) and no emissions from 15 ears (10 people). Registration from 24 ears (13 people) could not be evaluated because of too much external and internal noise. Eight people rejected the examination. Only four people showed emissions in both ears. Accordingly, 34 people (89.5%) had to be re-tested or referred for further investigation, 21 of them (55%) because of noisy recordings or no co-operation. It is concluded that the TEOAE-test in its present form cannot fulfil the demands for a functioning test method for this population. In single cases, however, TEOAE-recording can complement other audiological tests.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Ulf
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognitive Psychology.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    Phonological deterioration in adults with an acquired severe hearing impairment: A deterioration in long-term or working memory?1999In: Scandinavian Audiology, ISSN 0105-0397, E-ISSN 1940-2872, Vol. 28, p. 241-247Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Arlinger, Stig
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Billermark, Erica
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hellgren, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Clinical trial of a digital hearing aid1998In: Scandinavian Audiology, ISSN 0105-0397, E-ISSN 1940-2872, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 51-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A clinical trial of Oticon DigiFocus hearing aid was performed. The test aid was evaluated on 33 subjects with several years' experience as users of modern analog hearing aids. These aids were used as reference for the 1-month-long trial. The Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit (APHAB) showed a mean difference in benefit with superior ratings for the test aid concerning ease of communication, speech in reverberation and speech in background noise. The subjects' own aids were rated somewhat better concerning aversiveness of sounds, but this difference was not statistically significant. The Gothenburg Profile showed a statistically significant difference between the test aid and the reference aids in favour of the test aid. The difference was not most evident with regard to speech communication and the effects of hearing loss on social interactions. Sound quality ratings concerning clearness were significantly higher for the test aid. Speech recognition thresholds in noise were on average 0.7 dB better for the test aids when tested at speech levels 60 and 75 dB. The difference was statistically significant only at 75 dB. There was significant interaction between general preference and hearing aid type, indicating that overall sound quality was an important factor affecting the general preference for either the test aid or the reference aid. Twenty-three subjects generally preferred the test aid, six preferred their own aid and four stated no difference.

  • 4.
    Arlinger, Stig
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, RC - Rekonstruktionscentrum, ÖNH - Öron- Näsa- Halskliniken.
    Lyregaard, Poul-Erik
    Billermark, Erica
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, RC - Rekonstruktionscentrum, ÖNH - Öron- Näsa- Halskliniken.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, RC - Rekonstruktionscentrum, ÖNH - Öron- Näsa- Halskliniken.
    Fitting hearing aids to first-time users2000In: Scandinavian Audiology, ISSN 0105-0397, E-ISSN 1940-2872, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 150-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clinical experience indicates that first-time hearing aid users prefer less gain and lower maximum output levels than experienced users. This hypothesis was tested on 20 subjects being fitted with their first aids. The study was double blinded by using a programmable hearing aid, set to either the standard setting according to the manufacturer's software or to reduced gain and maximum output. Half of the subjects started with one hearing aid and half with the other, changing to the other hearing aid after 3 days trial with each setting. At the end of the study, subjects stated preference in specified situations and overall. No significant differences in APHAB, sound quality, estimated communication ability or perceived loudness scores were seen for the two settings. Nine subjects preferred the standard setting, seven the reduced setting and four were undecided. No correlation could be found between preference and audiological variables.

  • 5.
    Arlinger, Stig
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Communication in the profoundly hearing impaired and deaf: From signal to dialogue.1998In: Scandinavian Audiology, ISSN 0105-0397, E-ISSN 1940-2872, Vol. 27, no 49Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6. Borg, Erik
    et al.
    Samuelsson, E
    Wästlund, Helena
    IVO Örebro universitet.
    Danermark, Berth
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Communication in an audiological perspective: Theory and application to university level students1999In: Scandinavian Audiology, ISSN 0105-0397, E-ISSN 1940-2872, Vol. 28, no 50Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Johansson, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Dichotic speech tests1999In: Scandinavian Audiology, ISSN 0105-0397, E-ISSN 1940-2872, Vol. 27, no Suppl. 49, p. 35-39Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8. Johansson, K.
    et al.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    Contrasting subjective judgement and objective tests in the severely hearingimpaired.1991In: Scandinavian Audiology, ISSN 0105-0397, E-ISSN 1940-2872, Vol. 20, p. 91-99Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A method for evaluating temporal, spectral and combined temporal-spectral resolution of hearing1998In: Scandinavian Audiology, ISSN 0105-0397, E-ISSN 1940-2872, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 3-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A method for evaluating the spectral, temporal and combined spectral temporal resolution of hearing is presented; it was used to obtain masked hearing thresholds using the fixed frequency Békéy technique. The masking noise was a broadband random noise with a 3 dB/octave roll off (pink noise). Spectral resolution was assessed by introducing a spectral gap in the masking noise centered at the test tone frequency. Temporal resolution was assessed by introducing temporal gaps, the centre of which coincided in time with the centre of the test tone-pulses. The spectral and temporal gaps were used either separately or simultaneously. Release of masking values were calculated from masked hearing thresholds. One test group comprised 16 normal-hearing subjects, a second group 16 elderly (age 55-75 years) subjects with normal hearing for their age. Temporal gaps were 20, 50 and 100 ms long. Spectral gaps had a bandwidth of 1/10, 1/3, and 1 octave. Each gap or combination of gaps was tested at the frequencies 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 kHz. Release of masking increased with increasing temporal or spectral gaps. If a temporal gap and a spectral gap were combined, the release of masking increased further. Maximum release of masking was obtained with the 100 ms temporal gap combined with the 1 octave notch filter. The overall difference in release of masking between the young and elderly normal-hearing group was 2 dB.

  • 10.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    Cognitive skill, ecological work-place noise and work performance1999In: Scandinavian Audiology, ISSN 0105-0397, E-ISSN 1940-2872Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Lyxell, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    The effects of background noise and working memory capacity on spechreading performance.1993In: Scandinavian Audiology, ISSN 0105-0397, E-ISSN 1940-2872, Vol. 22, p. 67-70Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Lyxell, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    The relationship between verbal ability and sentence-based speechreading.1992In: Scandinavian Audiology, ISSN 0105-0397, E-ISSN 1940-2872, Vol. 21, p. 67-72Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Lyxell, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Linderoth, E
    Andersson, Jan
    Vibrotactile support: Initial effects on visual speech perception.1993In: Scandinavian Audiology, ISSN 0105-0397, E-ISSN 1940-2872, Vol. 22, p. 179-183Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Lyxell, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Teaching and Learning in School, Teacher Education and other Educational Settings.
    Internal speech functioning and speechreading in deafened adults and normal hearing1994In: Scandinavian Audiology, ISSN 0105-0397, E-ISSN 1940-2872, Vol. 23, p. 179-185Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Borg, E
    A review and evaluation of research on the deaf-blind from perceptual, communicative, social and rehabilitative perspectives2001In: Scandinavian Audiology, ISSN 0105-0397, E-ISSN 1940-2872, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 67-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reviews research on deaf-blind individuals, primarily from behavioral and communicative points of view. Inclusion in the population of deaf-blind is qualified by describing a variety of subgroups and genetically based syndromes associated with deaf-blindness. Sensory assessment procedures - based primarily on residual capacities - are appraised. Consequences for everyday life are described briefly. Non-sensory, alternative classificatory schemes and procedures are presented and the results from behavior modification procedures used for correcting maladaptive behaviors are summarized. Methods for communicating tactilely are described and evaluated. Attention is also drawn to some suggestions regarding learning of alphabetic codes and sign acquisition. Finally, suggestions for future research are proposed.

  • 16.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Samuelsson, E
    Borg, E
    Visual cognitive tests, central auditory function and auditory communication2000In: Scandinavian Audiology, ISSN 0105-0397, E-ISSN 1940-2872, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 196-206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A cognitive, text-based test battery, presented as text on a computer screen (TIPS), was used to assess properties of central cognitive processing relevant for visual and audiovisual speech comprehension. TIPS was compared and contrasted with another, purely auditory, battery, ACE, aimed at assessing afferent (A), central (C) and efferent (E) auditory communicative functions. The results show that there is no overlap with the 'A' component, but some overlap between TIPS parameters and the 'C' component, especially when the auditory-language tests are used in the C estimate. However, the TIPS parameters show high correlations with the 'E' component (i.e. measuring output and phonological parameters), suggesting that the efferent component may be composed of an interesting central feature. TIPS parameters do not fare as well in the predictions of the auditory ecological test performances, but the ACE parameters do, especially when organized according to a cognitive complexity parameter. In order to optimize the conceptual and practical benefit of the TIPS and ACE concepts, TIPS needs to be adapted auditorily and ACE tests need to be audiovisual. These developments will become important for ecological audiology.

  • 17.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Teaching and Learning in School, Teacher Education and other Educational Settings.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Lipreading with auditory low-frequency information: Contextual constraints1996In: Scandinavian Audiology, ISSN 0105-0397, E-ISSN 1940-2872, Vol. 25, p. 127-132Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Öhngren, G
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    Linguistic abstraction and hearing handicap.1987In: Scandinavian Audiology, ISSN 0105-0397, E-ISSN 1940-2872, Vol. 16, p. 95-99Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Öhngren, G
    Nilsson, L-G
    Hearing deficiency, speechreading and memory functions.1982In: Scandinavian Audiology, ISSN 0105-0397, E-ISSN 1940-2872, Vol. 11, p. 261-268Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Öhngren, G
    Nilsson, L-G
    Speechreading performance evaluated by means of TV and real-life presentation: A comparison between normally hearing, moderately impaired and profoundly hearing-impaired group.1983In: Scandinavian Audiology, ISSN 0105-0397, E-ISSN 1940-2872, Vol. 12, p. 71-77Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    et al.
    Chalmers University Technology.
    Håkansson, B
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Jönsson, R
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Granström, G
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    A bone-anchored hearing aid for patients with pure sensorineural hearing impairment: A pilot study2000In: Scandinavian Audiology, ISSN 0105-0397, E-ISSN 1940-2872, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 175-185Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This pilot study assesses the potential benefits of an optimized bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA) for patients with a mild to moderate purl sensorineural high frequency hearing impairment. The evaluation was conducted with eight first-time hearing aid users by means of psyche-acoustic sound field measurements and a questionnaire on subjective experience; all of the patients benefited from the BAHA. On average, the eight patients showed improvement in PTA threshold of 3.4 dB and in speech intelligibility in noise of 14%. Seven of the subjects, also fitted with present standard air conduction hearing aids (ACHA) found the ACHA thresholds to be improved more than the BAHA ones. In speech tests, the ACHA was only slightly better; these patients chose between their different hearing aids according to the sound environment. Although the BAHA was preferred for wearing and sound comfort, it cannot be used as the sole aid for patients with pure sensorineural impairment.

  • 22.
    Stenfelt, Stefan PY
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Håkansson, Bo EV
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    A miniaturized artificial mastoid using a skull simulator1998In: Scandinavian Audiology, ISSN 0105-0397, E-ISSN 1940-2872, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 67-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A miniaturized artificial mastoid of size and weight that allow calibration and measurement of bone conduction hearing aids in a conventional audiometric soundproof box has been developed. Its level of mechanical impedance corresponds to the standard IEC 373 (1990) within the frequency range 250 Hz to 8 kHz. The miniaturized artificial mastoid consists of three parts: coupler, skull simulator (TU-1000), and an external electrical correction filter. The soupier is a highly damped mass-spring system designed to give the miniaturized artificial mastoid mechanical impedance in accordance with the standard IEC 373 (1990). It was found that the miniaturized artificial mastoid yielded results that are in correspondence with results obtained with the Bruel and Kjaer type 4930 artificial mastoid for frequencies above 350 Hz. Thus, at these frequencies, the miniaturized artificial mastoid can be used for audiometer calibration as well as measurement of bone conduction hearing aids.

  • 23.
    Stenfelt, Stefan PY
    et al.
    Chalmers University Technology.
    Håkansson, Bo EV
    Chalmers University Technology.
    Sensitivity to bone-conducted sound: excitation of the mastoid vs the teeth1999In: Scandinavian Audiology, ISSN 0105-0397, E-ISSN 1940-2872, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 190-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The sensitivity of nine subjects to bone-conducted sound was measured at three positions: osseointegrated percutaneous titanium implants in the temporal bone, the skin-covered mastoid and the teeth. Voltage levels supplied to a bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA) transducer and to an Oticon bone-transducer were measured and the thresholds obtained at the three positions were compared. Using the mechanical impedance of the teeth, the parameters of a first order model for the vibration transmission through the teeth was calculated. Also, the equivalent force thresholds were calculated from the voltage threshold levels. The sensitivity to bone-conducted sound, for both voltage and force thresholds, conformed fairly well at the three positions for frequencies below 1 kHz; however, above 1 M-Iz, bone-conducted sound applied at the titanium implant becomes mole sensitive than at the two other positions investigated. It was concluded that the teeth can be used for the application of bone-conducted sound, in particular for pre-operative assessment of a BAHA and to facilitate service and quality control of such a hearing device.

  • 24. Tillberg, I
    et al.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Svärd, I
    Ahlner, B
    Audio-visual tests in a group of hearing-aid users: the effects of onset age, handicap age, and degree of hearing loss.1996In: Scandinavian Audiology, ISSN 0105-0397, E-ISSN 1940-2872, Vol. 25, p. 267-272Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Ödkvist, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University. Departments of Otolaryngology, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University. Audiology, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Edling, Christer
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting. Occupational Medicine, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University. Departments of Otolaryngology, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Bergholtz, Lars
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting. Audiology, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Audiological and vestibulo-oculomotor findings in workers exposed to solvents and jet fuel1987In: Scandinavian Audiology, ISSN 0105-0397, E-ISSN 1940-2872, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 75-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Three groups of subjects with long-term (5-41 years) occupational exposure to industrial solvents have been evaluated with extensive audiological and vestibular test batteries. Group A comprised 16 subjects with a confirmed diagnosis of psycho-organic syndrome (POS), while group B consisted of 7 subjects with suspected POS. Both groups had been exposed to mixtures of aliphatic and aromatic solvents. Eight subjects with long-term exposure to jet fuel constituted group C. In the audiological test battery, discrimination of interrupted speech and evoked cortical potentials in response to frequency glides were the tests that yielded significantly abnormal results. In the vestibular test battery, considerable pathology was seen in electronystagmography, and in addition, visual suppression test and saccade test indicated CNS disturbance. In general, when a test yielded pathological results, the incidence of pathology was highest in group A and lowest in group C.

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