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  • 1.
    McAllister, Anita
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Sjölander, Peta
    KTH Royal Institute Technology, Sweden .
    Children's Voice and Voice Disorders2013In: Seminars in Speech and Language, ISSN 0734-0478, E-ISSN 1098-9056, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 71-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses the differences between children's voices and adult voices. We give an overview of the anatomy in the head and neck and specifically the anatomy of the respiratory system and the larynx. We also describe the development of children's voices including different physiological measures and voice quality. The development and consequences for voice production and voice quality are addressed and related to gender differences in the growing child. We also discuss the prevalence of voice problems and hoarseness in children. Environmental and other factors contributing to voice problems in children are described, and finally, issues related to intervention and evidence-based practice are discussed.

  • 2.
    Müller, Nicole
    et al.
    Professor, Department of Communicative Disorders, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Lafayette, Louisiana.
    Guendouzi, Jacqueline A.
    Associate Professor, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Southeastern Louisiana University, Hammond, Louisiana.
    Discourses of dementia: A call for an ethnographic, action research approach to care in linguistically and culturally diverse environments2009In: Seminars in Speech and Language, ISSN 0734-0478, E-ISSN 1098-9056, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 198-206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The methods of ethnography and action research have much to offer to the field of speech-language pathology, particularly as our clinical populations are becoming increasingly diverse. We suggest that practicing speech-language pathologists and students, as well as researchers, will benefit from strategies that use the methods of participatory action research and ethnography as guiding principles to their work. Ethnography seeks to discover meaningful structures in a culture from the perspective of those whose culture it is. Action research, which shares a methodological basis with ethnography, is undertaken with the aim of improving the functioning of the social institution, practice, or structure investigated for the benefit of those most closely involved with that institution or practice. By way of illustration, we use data collected during fieldwork in Louisiana, involving persons with dementia from linguistically and culturally diverse backgrounds.

  • 3.
    Müller, Nicole
    et al.
    Department of Communicative Disorders, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Lafayette, Louisiana.
    Mok, Zaneta
    La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Applying Systemic Functional Linguistics to conversations with dementia: The linguistic construction of relationships between participants2012In: Seminars in Speech and Language, ISSN 0734-0478, E-ISSN 1098-9056, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 5-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social isolation in dementia is a growing concern as the incidence and prevalence of dementing conditions is on the rise in many societies. Positive social interactions, which foster the construction and enactment of positive interpersonal relationships and therefore positive discursive identities, make an important contribution to emotional well-being. In this article, we investigate how two women diagnosed with dementia of the Alzheimer's type use language to relate to each other and two visiting graduate students. We use Systemic Functional Linguistics as an analytical framework, specifically investigating the use of vocatives and naming, and conversational moves and exchanges.

  • 4.
    O’Halloran, Robyn
    et al.
    University of Queensland, Bundoora, Australia.
    Hersh, Deborah
    University of Queensland, Bundoora, Australia.
    Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane
    University of Queensland, Bundoora, Australia.
    Worrall, Linda
    University of Queensland, Bundoora, Australia.
    Person-Centeredness, Ethics, and Stories of Risk2010In: Seminars in Speech and Language, ISSN 0734-0478, E-ISSN 1098-9056, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 81-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Storytelling can be a powerful way to reflect on the ethical issues that emerge in clinical practice. This article uses two stories by speech-language pathologists to explore how notions of person-centered practice may influence speech-language pathology practice. Then these stories are examined in relation to definitions of personcentered practice and speech pathology code of ethics to discuss the ethical issues, challenges, and risks that these stories raise. Moving toward more person-centered ways of practicing will require speech-language pathologists to be open to the real lives of their clients with communication and swallowing disabilities. It may also require speech-language pathologists to be open to their own vulnerabilities as well.

1 - 4 of 4
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