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  • 1.
    Aagaard, Kirsten
    et al.
    VIA University College, Denmark.
    Andersson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Halttunen, Timo
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Hansen, Brian Benjamin
    VIA University College, Denmark.
    Nistrup, Ulla
    VIA University College, Denmark.
    Quality in Validation of Prior Learning: Experiences in researching the practice of the Nordic Model for Quality in Validation of Prior Learning2017In: The Learner at the Centre: Validation of Prior Learning strengthens lifelong learning for all / [ed] Ruud Duvekot, Dermot Coughlan and Kirsten Aagaard, Houten/Aarhus: European Centre Valuation of Prior Learning/ VIA University College , 2017, 89-102 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter presents findings from a study of quality work in validation (recognition of prior learning) in three cases in Denmark, Finland, and Sweden. The quality work is based on a Nordic model for quality in validation and the study has an interactive approach.

  • 2.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    "Becoming" a professional :: an interdisciplinary analysis of professional learning2011Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ‘Becoming’ is used in this interdisciplinary work as an emergent, iterative concept of professional identity formation. The conceptual framework of ‘becoming’, as well as the arguments in the book are intended to encourage professionals—and those engaged in their education—to reflect on what it means to be a ‘professional’ in the twenty-first century, an era dominated by the discourses of globalisation, ‘new mangerialism’, multiculturalism and deprofessionalisation. We live in a world where not only scholars, but also a better educated client base informed by technological innovations, have issued unprecedented challenges to the traditional professional ideal. The once paradigmatic identity of the superiority of the Anglo-American professional, grounded in an exclusive knowledge-base and an altruistic ‘public-service’ principle, are no longer tenable.

    The book will generate dialogue about the nature of professionalism through a multidisciplinary lens in chapters on medicine, nursing and teaching and in reference to social work, the clergy and engineering. Here, becoming a professional is a lifelong, extended process that constructs an individual’s professional identity through formal education, workplace interactions and popular culture. It advocates the ‘ongoing’ modality of developing a professional self throughout one’s professional life. What emerges from this work is a concept of becoming a professional that is quite different from the isolated, rugged, individualistic approach to traditional professional practice as represented in popular culture. It is a book for the reflective professional.

  • 3.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning.
    Torget, Kliniken och Meritagenturen: Didaktik för vuxna i praktiken2008 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Human resources are the social capital of a firm or business, based on trust as well as on expertise, values, and cultural diversity. This calls for cross-cultural knowledge — an understanding of gender issues and individual differences in the social capital of the firm and society. The dialogue between women entrepreneurship and social capital theory/ research strengthens the fragmented voice of women entrepreneurship, providing the landscape for women entrepreneurs as creators of, and created by, social capital. It indicates how women entrepreneurs appear to have a special position in forming, developing, and reorganizing the social capital in the business world. This book explores social capital in the multiple relationships between gender, management, and entrepreneurship. Twenty-six researchers, representing a variety of disciplines from different parts of the world, provide findings on diverse aspects of the dialogue between women entrepreneurship and social capital. As a consequence, the central concepts — social capital, entrepreneurship, and gender — are given a variety of meanings. Women entrepreneurs and business owners — regardless of their cultural context, branch, and education — provide interesting ideas to the global debate on equality and social capital.

  • 4.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning.
    Bjuremark, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning.
    Reshaping doctoral education :: international approaches and pedagogies2012Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The number of doctorates being awarded around the world has almost doubled over the last ten years. The authors contribute to a previously under-represented focus of theorising the emerging practices of doctoral education & the shape of change in this arena.

  • 5.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Dahlberg, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Foreman, Dawn
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Emerging criteria for assessment of interprofessional conference. Straddling the contexts of professional education and clinical practice2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dyrdal Solbrekke, Tone
    Oslo universitet, Norway.
    Karseth, Berit
    Oslo Universitet, Norway.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    From university to professional practice: Students as journeymen between cultures of education and work2014In: International handbook of research in professional and practice-based learning, Volume 1 / [ed] Stephen Billett, Christian Harteis, Hans Gruber, Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands, 2014, 1, 461-484 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The overarching research problem addressed in this chapter is the relationship between professional/higher education and professional work. The chapter will discuss the relevance of university education for professional practice with a particular focus on professional identity formation and formation of professional responsibility. We deiscuss how different professional programs and their traditions and culturs shape different curricula structures that have an impact on students professional identity formation and transition to work. We will also discuss ecperiences with and learning of professional responsibility in the web of commitments within educational settings and how new multiple expectations emerge and lead to new learning experiencies when entering work life. The argument of the chapter is based on the rationale and findings from an extensive international research program, conducted between 2001-2008.

  • 7.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning.
    Grosjean, Garnet
    University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
    Lee, Alison
    University of Technology, Sydney, Australia.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning.
    The Graduate School in the Sky: Emerging pedagogies for an international network for doctoral education and research2011In: Reshaping Doctoral Education: international approaches and pedagogies / [ed] Alison Lee & Susan Danby, London: Routledge , 2011, 1, 173-186 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A brief narrative description of the journal article, document, or resource.The number of doctorates being awarded around the world has almost doubled over the last ten years, propelling it from a small elite enterprise into a large and ever growing international market. Within the context of increasing numbers of doctoral students this book examines the new doctorate environment and the challenges it is starting to face. Drawing on research from around the world the individual authors contribute to a previously under-represented focus of theorising the emerging practices of doctoral education and the shape of change in this arena. Key aspects, expertly discussed by contributors from the UK, USA, Australia, New Zealand, China, South Africa, Sweden and Denmark include: (1) the changing nature of doctoral education; (2) the need for systematic and principled accounts of doctoral pedagogies; (3) the importance of disciplinary specificity; (4) the relationship between pedagogy and knowledge generation; and (5) issues of transdisciplinarity. "Reshaping Doctoral Education" provides rich accounts of traditional and more innovative pedagogical practices within a range of doctoral systems in different disciplines, professional fields and geographical locations, providing the reader with a trustworthy and scholarly platform from which to design the doctoral experience. It will prove an essential resource for anyone involved in doctorate studies, whether as students, supervisors, researchers, administrators, teachers or mentors. After an introduction, this book is divided into three parts. Part I, Old Basics/New Basics?, contains the following: (2) Framing Doctoral Pedagogy As Design and Action, Susan Danby and Alison Lee; (3) Writing as Craft and Practice in the Doctoral Curriculum (Claire Aitchison and Anthony Pare); (4) Learning from the Literature: Some Pedagogies (David Boote); (5) "Team" Supervision: New Positionings in Doctoral Education Pedagogies (Catherine Manathunga); (6) The Seminar as Enacted Doctoral Pedagogy (Madeleine Abrandt Dahlgren and Anna Bjuremark); (7) Taking a Break: Doctoral Summer Schools as Transformative Pedagogies (Miriam Zukas and Linda Lundgaard Andersen); and (8) "What's Going on Here?" The Pedagogy of a Data Analysis Session (Harris, J., Theobald, M., Danby, S., Reynolds, E., Rintel, E.S., and Members The Transcript Analysis Group (Tag)). Part II, Disciplinary and Transdisciplinary Pedagogies, contains the following: (9) Designing (In) the PhD in Architecture: Knowledge, Discipline, Pedagogy (Charles Rice and Linda Matthews); (10) Pedagogies for Creativity in Science Doctorates (Liezel Frick); (11) Creative Tensions: Negotiating the Multiple Dimensions of a Transdisciplinary Doctorate (Juliet Willetts, Cynthia Mitchell, Ku mi Absurdity and Dena Fame; (12) Cognitive Apprenticeship: The Making of a Scientist (Barbara J. Gabey's and Alina Bletch); and (13) Pedagogies of Industry Partnership (Barbara Adkins, Jennifer Summer ville, Susan Dan by and Judy Matthews). Part III, Inter-National and Intercultural Pedagogical Spaces, contains the following: (14) The Graduate School in the Sky: Emerging Pedagogies for An International Network for Doctoral Education and Research (Madeleine Brandt-Walgreen, Sofia Nostrum, Garnet Grossman and Alison Lee); (15) Ignorance and Pedagogies of Generative Equality: Internationalizing Australian Doctoral Education Programs and Pedagogies through Engaging Chinese Theoretical Tools (Michael Sing and Fang Chen); and (16) Expanding Pedagogical Boundaries: Indigenous Students Undertaking Doctoral Education (Liz McKinley and Barbara Grant). [Foreword by Erica McWilliam.]

  • 8.
    Ahlstrand, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Teaching and Learning in School, Teacher Education and other Educational Settings. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning.
    Lärares samarbete över professionsgränser2007In: Forskning om lärares arbete i klassrummet / [ed] Kjell Granström, Stockholm: Myndigheten för skolutveckling , 2007, 127-138 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Varje dag går en miljon elever och lärare till arbete i den svenska skolan. De allra flesta arbetar engagerat och når goda resultat. Eleverna lär sig, med stöd från sina lärare, läsa, skriva och räkna. De skaffar sig kunskap om sociala och naturvetenskapliga fenomen. De utvecklar kreativitet och estetisk kompetens. Naturligtvis finns både elever och lärare som upplever svårigheter i detta arbete, men de allra flesta får uppleva att arbetet fortskrider på önskat sätt. Den här boken handlar om elevernas och lärarnas arbete i klassrummet när det gäller skolans primära uppgift; att ge möjlighet till lärande och utveckling. Den handlar om arbetet med grundläggande färdigheter och lärande, om läraren som arbetsledare och ansvarig för val av arbetsformer, läxor, möblering liksom deras arbete med värdefrågor, genusfrågor och konfliktlösning. Den handlar också om lärares inbördes samarbete. Kort sagt en bok som handlar om lärarens breda uppdrag. Boken är skriven av forskare som alla arbetar med lärarutbildning och som själva har erfarenheter från arbete i skolan.

  • 9.
    Ahn, Song Ee
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    A good learning opportunity, but is it for me?: A study of Swedish students' attitudes towards exchange studies in higher education2014In: Journal of Research in International Education, ISSN 1475-2409, E-ISSN 1741-2943, Vol. 13, no 2, 106-118 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article describes students’ involvement and interest in exchange programmes in Swedish higher education. Law and Engineering bachelor’s programmes were chosen to exemplify an over-represented and under-represented group respectively in terms of international mobility in this context. The study combines interview and survey data. The author argues that the different institutional practices in educational programmes impact on students’ experienced involvement in exchange studies.

  • 10.
    Ahn, Song Ee
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Teaching future mobile professionals2012In: ProPEL Conference  Programme Book 2012, 2012, 12-13 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Students are on the move. An increasing number of students move abroad for education, both as part of exchange programs and as “free movers”. In the field of higher education, increasing the international mobility of the student population has been a top priority. Studying abroad is often described as valuable educational and cultural experiences. In addition to the educational merits, cultural experiences and personal development, it is also argued that internationally mobile students are set to enjoy an advantage in employability and mobility in a supposed future international and intercultural labour market. Increasing demands have been placed on universities as social institutions to produce internationally mobile professionals.

    Evaluations of exchange programmes, for example ERASMUS, show that there may be some truth to the claim that international education provides an advantage in the labour market. However, the results of the studies are often cautiously positive.  

    While the discussion of international education and mobility is attracting more and more attention, it is often pointed out that it is difficult to define “international education”, and that it is better understood as aspects of transnational work. 

    This paper investigates how international education is translated and performed by Swedish educational programs. It deals with questions such as what makes a student internationally mobile and what it means for an educator to teach an international education and provide students and graduates with international competences. The empirical materials are interviews with teachers in Swedish higher education, working in three different international fields: a PhD with teaching experiences in courses in an international master program, a director of studies in international master program with additional experience in a national program and a director of studies in a national program with an international focus. 

    Drawing upon the sociomaterial perspective on mobility and education, the paper aims at tracing the different entities that enable student and graduate mobility and in which way international educations are performed. The paper discusses various entities such as policy documents, degrees, language, incoming and outgoing students as well as the labor market, and how they contribute to create a space for anticipation and limits of “international education” and “international mobility”. 

  • 11.
    Ahn, Song Ee
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Unequal opportunities: considering student mobility as an effect of institutional practice2013In: Mobility as a tool to acquire and develop competences from childhood to seniority / [ed] M. Mendel & A. Atlas, Warszawa: Fundacja Rozwoju systemu Edukacji , 2013, 365-373 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Ahn, Song Ee
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Sociomateriella perspektiv på vuxen pedagogik2013In: Lärandets mångfald: Om vuxenpedagogik och folkbildning / [ed] Andreas Fejes, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2013, 299-316 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13.
    Ahn, Song Ee
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Rimpilainen, Sanna
    University of Stirling, UK.
    Performing multiple realities: a study of action and agency in technology-enhanced simulation in medical education2013In: Book of Abstracts: 7th European Research Conference, 2013, 3- p.Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing upon Actor network theory (ANT), the paper discusses the issue of agency in simulation training in medical education. Data is generated through observing technology-enhanced simulations in health care education where a mid-fidelity simulator (SimMan) is used. In the teaching session described in the paper, the students work and learn together in a-30 minutes emergency simulation with the SimMan as a patient called Sofia. The paper illustrates different examples of how the SimMan transforms from a "mannequin" and a "piece of technology" to a "female patient Sofia" as an effect of an assemblage of heterogeneous actors and how rapidly the transformation reverses back to a "mannequin", "piece of technology" when the assemblage fails to hold together. By drawing upon ANT, the paper argues that agency is not just a capacity of the students and teachers, but in webs of relations of human actors, materials, a scenario, techniques and the mannequin.

  • 14.
    Ahn, Song Ee
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Rimpilainen, Sanna
    University of Stirling, UK.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fenwick, Tara
    University of Stirling, UK.
    Interprofessional training in technology-enhanced medical simulation: Locations and knowings2013In: Conference Programme Book: 8th International Conference on Researching Work and Learning 2013, 2013, 15-16 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper take an actor-network theory perspective on the use of medical simulators in professional education as a means of training students in medical education and nursing in handling acute emergency situations in health care.  The main aim of the study is to investigate what activities are performed in what material arrangements in a full cycle of simulation, i.e  the briefing, the simulation in the emergency room, the observations in the control room and the debriefing and what knowing is produced as an effect of these arrangements.

     The use of simulators has become a common teaching strategy in medical education. An ageing population, declining financial resources and lack of trained health care personnel are global trends that call for changing the system of health care practice as well as for professional education in the sector.  To build more effective health services, professionals are required to work more collaboratively and in partnership with health care consumers (WHO 2008; 2010). Recently, leading medical experts have also criticised the training of health personnel for not adequately preparing for cooperation and inter-professional communication (Frenk et al, 2010). In health care, this concern situations demanding effective communication for making prompt decisions that are of critical importance in emergency situations. Training of students and professionals by means of full-scale simulators is a response to accommodate for these needs.  Education in simulation-based environments is seen to offer opportunities to address the needs for training interprofessional collaboration by focusing on communication, situation awareness, decision making and coping with stress (Arafeh et al 2010; Östergaard et al,2011). Cook et al has shown in a meta analysis of more than 600 research articles, that in comparison with no intervention, technology-enhanced simulation is consistently associated with large effects for outcomes of knowledge, skills, and behaviors but moderate effects for patient-related outcomes (Cook et al 2011). A majority of the studies are effect studies with quantitative designs. The authors argue that there is a need for rigorous, theory based qualitative studies in order to clarify how and when to effectively use technology enhanced simulations in the training of health care professionals.

     The present study draws upon Actor-network theory (Latour, 2005).  This perspective which situates materiality as a part of the social practices, provides theoretical tools for observation and discussion of the relation between the material assemblages and human actors. Observations of full-scale simulations of acute trauma handling in the emergency room with ten groups of medical and nursing students make up the data for analysis. Preliminary findings indicate that the different locations and material arrangements of the simulation cycle produce different kinds of knowing and learning than the intended curriculum objectives. The findings can contribute to the theoretical knowledge of how to design simulation-based medical education.

     

     

     

     

     

  • 15.
    Ahn, Song Ee
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Rimpiläinen, Sanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Three locations of technology enhanced medical simulation training and their effect on learning and knowing2014In: Professional Matters: Materialities and virtualities of professional learning, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This qualitative study aims to address the identified gap in literature concerning  the lack of rigorous, theory-based, qualitative studies to clarify how and when to effectively use simulations to train health care professionals (Cook, et al, 2011). By drawing upon actor-network theory (ANT) (Latour, 2005) an approach that situates materiality as a part of the social practices, and provides theoretical tools for observation and discussion of the relation between the material assemblages and human actors, we have investigated how learning takes place during a simulation-based medical training. Knowing and learning, according to ANT, are not simply cognitive or social phenomena, but are seen as emerging as effects of the socio-material networks gathered together and being performed into being in particular locations (Law, 2004; Rimpiläinen, 2011).  In this study we have focussed on observing the socio-material arrangements that emerged in three locations involved in the simulation – the simulation room, the observation room and the reflection room - and analysing what kinds of knowing and learning they have produced through which socio-material arrangements. Data for analysis consists of observations of full-scale simulations of acute trauma handling in the emergency room with ten groups of medical and nursing students.  Preliminary findings indicate that the different locations and material arrangements of the simulation cycle produce different kinds of knowing and learning from the intended curriculum objectives. The findings can contribute to the theoretical knowledge of how to design simulation-based medical education.

  • 16.
    Ahn, Song-ee
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Aktör-nätverksteori2015In: Handbok i kvalitativ analys / [ed] Andreas Fejes och Robert Thornberg, Stockholm: Liber, 2015, 2, 115-130 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Ahn, Song-Ee
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Hallqvist, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Harlin, Eva-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Innovative folk high school programs2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Ahn, Song-Ee
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Harlin, Eva-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Hallqvist, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Innovative Program Development in Swedish Folk High Schools2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Ahn, Song-Ee
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Rimpiläinen, Sanna
    University of Gothenburg.
    Theodorsson, Annette
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Fenwick, Tara
    University of Stirling.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Learning in Technology-Enhanced Medical Simulation:Locations and Knowings2015In: Professions & Professionalism, ISSN 1893-1049, Vol. 5, no 2, 1-12 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This qualitative study focuses on how knowings and learning take place in full-scale simulation training of medical and nursing students, by drawing upon actor-network theory (ANT). ANT situates materiality as a part of the social practic-es. Knowing and learning, according to ANT, are not simply cognitive or social phenomena, but are seen as emerging as effects of the relation between material assemblages and human actors being performed into being in particular locations. Data consists of observations of simulations performed by ten groups of students. The analysis focuses on the emerging knowings in the socio-material—arrangements of three locations involved in the simulation—the simulation room, the observation room and the reflection room. The findings indicate that medical knowing, affective knowing and communicative knowing are produced in different ways in the different locations and material arrangements of the simulation cycle.

  • 20.
    Alphonce, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning.
    Workplace Learning Across Boundaries: An interview study on professional development and identity formation in intercultural work contexts2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In this thesis I discuss workplace learning during international assignments in a variety of work sectors. In addition to normal adjustments to a new workplace, foreign language acquisition and cultural adaptation are necessary. By collecting and analyzing narratives of a group of Swedish professionals with international work assignments, I have found some regularities and variations of workplace learning as well as some significant effects that these assignments had on their identity. Recommendations are given to providers of preparatory courses for international work assignments as well as sending organizations and employers.

    The main finding is that workplace learning for international workers follows a trajectory starting already long before departure and continues throughout different phases of the assignment. It also has effects on work life after the return to one’s home culture. The learning resulting from the work assignment affected all areas of life (not only work life) and contributed towards an intercultural identity. This kind of assignment often included networking with several organizations and groups of people of varying nationalities. Instead of working towards becoming full members of one work community, the participants in this study often found themselves in the peripheries of multiple ones. This peripheral albeit influential situation provided many opportunities for learning, both for the individual and the groups they work with. In this way, these international workers have the potential to be agents of change and development in all work communities they relate to. 

  • 21.
    Aman, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Bridging the gap to those who lack: intercultural education in the light of modernity and the shadow of coloniality2013In: Pedagogy, Culture & Society, ISSN 1468-1366, E-ISSN 1747-5104, Vol. 21, no 2, 279-297 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Academic courses on interculturality have become a rapidly growing discipline in the West, where supranational bodies such as the European Union and UNESCO promote intercultural education as a path towards improved global cultural relations. Through interviews with students who completed a university course on interculturality, this essay investigates the tenets of interculturality and problematises whether this discourse merely reproduces a classificatory logic embedded in modernity that insists on differences among cultures. The argument put forward is that in the analysed context, interculturality tends to reproduce the very colonial ideas that it seeks to oppose. In doing so, interculturality reinforces the collective ‘we’ as the location of modernity by deciding who is culturally different and who is in a position that must be bridged to the mainstream by engaging in intercultural dialogue.

  • 22.
    Aman, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Colonial Differences in Intercultural Education: On Interculturality in the Andes and the Decolonization of Intercultural Dialogue2017In: Comparative Education Review, ISSN 0010-4086, E-ISSN 1545-701X, Vol. 61, no 2, 103-120 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This essay seeks to wean interculturality from its comfort zone of flat substitutability across cultural differences by pushing for the possibility of other ways of thinking about the concept depending on where (the geopolitics of knowledge) and by whom (the bodypolitics of knowledge) it is being articulated. In order to make a case for the importance of always considering the geopolitical and bodypolitical dimension of knowledge production within interculturality, this essay shifts focus away from policies of the European Union and UNESCO to the Andean region of Latin America. In that part of the world the notion of interculturalidad – translation: interculturality – is not only a subject on the educational agenda, it has also become a core component among indigenous social movements in their push for decolonization. With reference points drawn from a decolonial perspective and the concept of “colonial difference”, this essay makes the case that interculturalidad, with its roots in the historical experience of colonialism and in the particular, rather than in assertions of universality, offers another perspective on interculturality bringing into the picture other epistemologies. It concludes by arguing for the requirement to start seeing interculturality as inter-epistemic rather than simply inter-cultural.

    The full text will be freely available from 2018-03-28 17:00
  • 23.
    Aman, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Construyendo ciudadanos europeos: la Unión Europea entre visiones interculturales y herencias coloniales2012In: Cuadernos Interculturales, ISSN 0718-0586, Vol. 10, no 19, 11-27 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present article focuses on problematizing the European Union’s claim that intercultural dialogue constitutes an advocated method of talking through cultural boundaries based on mutual empathy and non-domination. More precisely, the aim is to analyze who is being constructed as counterparts of the intercultural dialogue through the discourse produced by the EU. To answer the question, European policy documents on intercultural dialogue are analyzed drawing on a postcolonial perspective. As an interpretation, the EU appropriates historical symbols and colonial figures of thought to authorize its current objectives. Within the realm of the EU, Europeans are portrayed as having an a priori historical existence, while the ones excluded from this notion are evoked to demonstrate its difference in comparison to the European one. The results show that subjects not considered as Europeans serve as markers of the multicultural present of the space. Thus, intercultural dialogue seems to consolidate differences between European and Other - the ‘We’ and ‘Them’ in the dialogue - rather than, as in line with its purpose, bringing subjects together.

  • 24.
    Aman, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning.
    Decolonising Intercultural Education : Colonial Differences, the Geopolitics of Knowledge, and Inter-Epistemic Dialogue 2017 (ed. 1)Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    At the centre of Decolonising Intercultural Education is a simple yet fundamental question: is it possible to learn from the Other? This book argues that many recent efforts to theorise interculturality restrict themselves to a variety of interpretations within a Western framework of knowledge, which does not necessarily account for the epistemological diversity of the world.

    The book suggests an alternative definition of interculturality, framed not in terms of cultural differences, but in terms of colonial difference. It brings analysis of the Latin American concept of interculturalidad into the picture and explores the possibility of decentring the discourse of interculturality and its Eurocentric outlook, seeing interculturality as inter-epistemic rather than simply inter-cultural.

    Decolonising Intercultural Education will be of interest to educational practitioners, researchers and postgraduate students in in the areas of education, postcolonial studies, Latin American studies and social sciences.

  • 25.
    Aman, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Educating for decolonization: Interculturality in the Andes2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The thrust of this essay is to study how interculturality, as a path to decolonization, is being articulated and understood among indigenous alliances in the Andean region of Latin America. Empirically, the analysis is based upon interviews with students and teachers from local academic courses on interculturality in Bolivia, Ecuador and Peru. Although interculturality and intercultural education are common features also in Western educational rhetoric, the imposition to learn from indigenous movements have failed to attract any substantial interest in the West (cf. Deere & Leon 2003; Patrinos 2000). To illustrate this further, Robert Young (2012) argues that indigenous struggles seldom are regarded as a central issue even within postcolonial studies, a disjunction related to the use among indigenous movements of paradigms not easily translated to the Western theories and presuppositions commonly used in this scholarship (Young 2012). Given this picture, there are strong reasons for engaging seriously in a discussion about the proposition for interculturality to break out of the prison-house of colonial vocabulary – modernity, progress, salvation – as it lingers on in official memory; and there are also good reasons to problematize the universalizing claims that have characterized Western philosophy in the implicitly assumed epistemological hierarchies.

    In this paper, I will focus specifically on visions of decolonization in terms of retrieved languages, reinscribed histories, production of knowledge; beginning the essay with an elaboration of the logic of domination as rooted in the modern/colonial world – here referred to as coloniality. Shortly thereafter, with reference points drawn from the work of Walter Mignolo and his notion of delinking, I introduce the theoretical backdrop that guides my analysis. In the major part of the paper, I develop an argument for interculturality to be understood as inter-epistemic based on knowledge produced beyond the discursive order of Western educational systems.

  • 26.
    Aman, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Education and other modes of thinking in Latin America2015In: International Journal of Lifelong Education, ISSN 0260-1370, E-ISSN 1464-519X, Vol. 34, no 01, 1-8 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    If the production of knowledge in Latin America has long been subject to imperial designs and disseminated through educational systems, recent interventions —from liberation theology, popular education, participatory action research, alternative communication and critical literacy to postcolonial critique and decolonial options—have sought to shift the geography of reason. The central question to be addressed is how, in times of historical ruptures, political reconstructions and epistemic formations, the production of paradigms rooted in ‘other’ logics, cosmologies and realities may renegotiate and redefine concepts of education, learning and knowledge.

  • 27.
    Aman, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    En la lengua del Otro: la Unión Europea y el diálogointercultural como instrumento de exclusión2012In: Universitas, ISSN 1390-3837, Vol. 10, no 17, 51-68 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present article focuses on problematizing the European Union’s claim that intercultural dialogue cons- titutes an advocated method of talking through cultural boundaries based on mutual empathy and non-do- mination. More precisely, the aim is to analyze who is being constructed as counterparts of the intercultural dialogue through the discourse produced by the EU. To answer the question, European policy documents on intercultural dialogue are analyzed drawing on a postcolonial perspective. As an interpretation, the EU appropriates historical symbols and colonial figures of thought to authorize its current objectives. Within the realm of the EU, Europeans are portrayed as having an a priori historical existence, while the ones excluded from this notion are evoked to demonstrate its difference in comparison to the European one. The results show that subjects not considered as Europeans serve as markers of the multicultural present of the space. Thus, intercultural dialogue seems to consolidate differences between European and Other – the ‘We’ and ‘Them’ in the dialogue – rather than, as in line with its purpose, bringing subjects together.

  • 28.
    Aman, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Genuine Multiculturalism: The Tragedy and Comedy of Diversity2015In: Ethnic and Racial Studies, ISSN 0141-9870, E-ISSN 1466-4356, Vol. 38, no 13, 2390-2392 p.Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Aman, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Impossible Interculturality?: Education and the Colonial Difference in a Multicultural World2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    An increasing number of educational policies, academic studies, and university courses today propagate ‘interculturality’ as a method for approaching ‘the Other’ and reconciling universal values and cultural specificities. Based on a thorough discussion of Europe’s colonial past and the hierarchies of knowledge that colonialism established, this dissertation interrogates the definitions of intercultural knowledge put forth by EU policy discourse, academic textbooks on interculturality, and students who have completed a university course on the subject. Taking a decolonial approach that makes its central concern the ways in which differences are formed and sustained through references to cultural identities, this study shows that interculturality, as defined in these texts, runs the risk of affirming a singular European outlook on the world, and of elevating this outlook into a universal law. Contrary to its selfproclaimed goal of learning from the Other, interculturality may in fact contribute to the repression of the Other by silencing those who are already muted. The dissertation suggests an alternative definition of interculturality, which is not framed in terms of cultural differences but in terms of colonial difference. This argument is substantiated by an analysis of the Latin American concept of interculturalidad, which derives from the struggles for public and political recognition among indigenous social movements in Bolivia, Ecuador and Peru. By bringing interculturalidad into the picture, with its roots in the particular and with strong reverberations of the historical experience of colonialism, this study explores the possibility of decentring the discourse of interculturality and its Eurocentric outlook. In this way, the dissertation argues that an emancipation from colonial legacies requires that we start seeing interculturality as inter-epistemic rather than simply inter-cultural.

    List of papers
    1. The EU and the Recycling of Colonialism: Formation of Europeans through intercultural dialogue
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The EU and the Recycling of Colonialism: Formation of Europeans through intercultural dialogue
    2012 (English)In: Educational Philosophy and Theory, ISSN 0013-1857, E-ISSN 1469-5812, Vol. 44, no 9, 1010-1023 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The present essay focuses on problematizing the European Union’s claim that interculturaldialogue constitutes an advocated method of talking through cultural boundaries—inside as wellas outside the classroom—based on mutual empathy and non-domination. More precisely, theaim is to analyze who is being constructed as counterparts of the intercultural dialogue throughthe discourse produced by the EU in policies on education, culture and intercultural dialogue.Within the Union, Europeans are portrayed as having an a priori historical existence, whilethe ones excluded from this notion are evoked to demonstrate its difference in comparison to theEuropean one.The results show that subjects not considered as Europeans serve as markers of themulticultural present of the space. Thus, intercultural dialogue seems to consolidate differencesbetween European and Other—the‘We’ and ‘Them’ in the dialogue—rather than, as in line withits purpose, bringing subjects together.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wiley-Blackwell, 2012
    Keyword
    postcolonialism, European Union, EU, intercultural dialogue, intercultural education, multiculturalism, multicultural education
    National Category
    Educational Sciences Languages and Literature Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-76574 (URN)10.1111/j.1469-5812.2011.00839.x (DOI)000310474700009 ()
    Available from: 2012-04-11 Created: 2012-04-11 Last updated: 2014-04-30
    2. In the Name of Interculturality: On Colonial Legacies in Intercultural Education
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>In the Name of Interculturality: On Colonial Legacies in Intercultural Education
    2015 (English)In: British Educational Research Journal, ISSN 0141-1926, E-ISSN 1469-3518, Vol. 41, no 3, 520-534 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This paper scrutinises the ways in which students who have completed a university course on interculturality distinguish between sameness and otherness in attempts to integrate, relate to and build a bridge to those deemed culturally different. It makes use of interviews to analyse the factors that shape the interpretation of otherness and difference in the students’ definitions of interculturality, as well as their statements about the relationships between us and them, and descriptions of instances of learning and teaching that have taken place between parties in different parts of the world. Theoretically, the paper is based on a postcolonial framework, highlighting the continuing influence of colonialism and Eurocentric ways of reasoning inside as well as outside the classroom in today’s society. One of the main conclusions of the paper is that in the process of transferring knowledge, there is a risk that the history of modern Europe will be sanctioned as the historical trajectory for the rest of the world to follow, with the accompanying supposition that this can only be made possible by extending a helping hand to the Other.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    John Wiley & Sons, 2015
    National Category
    Educational Sciences Cultural Studies
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-106243 (URN)10.1002/berj.3153 (DOI)000356625000009 ()
    Note

    On the day fo the defence date, the status of this article was Manuscript.

    Available from: 2014-04-30 Created: 2014-04-30 Last updated: 2015-08-06Bibliographically approved
    3. Three Texts on Intercultural Education and a Critique of Border Drawing
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Three Texts on Intercultural Education and a Critique of Border Drawing
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This essay explores the ways in which boundaries of estrangement are produced in the academic literature assigned for courses on interculturality. As the existence of interculturality is dependent on the ascription of content to culture, since the notion, by definition, always involves more than one singular culture, this essay seeks to provide an answer to the question of what this literature implicitly defines in terms of sameness vis-à-vis otherness and thereby chart the conditions for becoming intercultural. This question is especially important because theself in interculturality has to be, in principle, generalizable: it should be such that it signifies a position available for occupation by anybody with proper training in this approach. Starting from the assumption that different experiences, languages and identities, under the name of culture already intersect, and are contaminated by, one another, and are therefore already intercultural before being subjected to study under the auspices of ‘interculturality’ as an educational topic, the essay goes on toproblematize the way in which interculturality tends to construe sameness and difference along national lines and does little to cater for multiple, as opposed to national, or other unified, identities.

    National Category
    Educational Sciences Cultural Studies
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-106244 (URN)
    Available from: 2014-04-30 Created: 2014-04-30 Last updated: 2014-04-30Bibliographically approved
    4. Why Interculturalidad is not Interculturality Colonial remains and paradoxes in translation between indigenous social movements and supranational bodies
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Why Interculturalidad is not Interculturality Colonial remains and paradoxes in translation between indigenous social movements and supranational bodies
    2015 (English)In: Cultural Studies, ISSN 0950-2386, E-ISSN 1466-4348, Vol. 29, no 2, 205-228 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Interculturality is a notion that has come to dominate the debate on cultural diversity among supranational bodies such as the European Union and UNESCO in recent years. The EU goes so far as to identify interculturality as a key cultural and linguistic characteristic of a union which, it argues, acts as an inspiration to other parts of the world. At the same time, the very notion of interculturality is a core component of indigenous movements in the Andean region of Latin America in their struggles for decolonization. Every bit as contingent as any other concept, it is apparent that several translations of interculturality are simultaneously in play. Through interviews with students and teachers in a course on interculturality run by indigenous alliances, my aim in this essay is to study how the notion is translated in the socio-political context of the Andes. With reference points drawn from the works of Walter Mignolo and the concept of delinking, I will engage in a discussion about the potential for interculturality to break out of the prison-house of colonial vocabulary – modernization, progress, salvation – that lingers on in official memory. Engagement in such an interchange of experiences, memories and significations provides not only recognition of other forms of subjectivity, knowledge systems and visions of the future but also a possible contribution to an understanding of how any attempt to invoke a universal reach for interculturality, as in the case of the EU and UNESCO, risks echoing the imperial order that the notion in another context attempts to overcome. 

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Routledge, 2015
    Keyword
    interculturality; indigenous movements; delinking; modernity; coloniality; European Union
    National Category
    Educational Sciences Cultural Studies
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-105523 (URN)10.1080/09502386.2014.899379 (DOI)000347522000006 ()
    Available from: 2014-03-26 Created: 2014-03-26 Last updated: 2015-03-02
  • 30.
    Aman, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    In the Name of Interculturality: On Colonial Legacies in Intercultural Education2015In: British Educational Research Journal, ISSN 0141-1926, E-ISSN 1469-3518, Vol. 41, no 3, 520-534 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper scrutinises the ways in which students who have completed a university course on interculturality distinguish between sameness and otherness in attempts to integrate, relate to and build a bridge to those deemed culturally different. It makes use of interviews to analyse the factors that shape the interpretation of otherness and difference in the students’ definitions of interculturality, as well as their statements about the relationships between us and them, and descriptions of instances of learning and teaching that have taken place between parties in different parts of the world. Theoretically, the paper is based on a postcolonial framework, highlighting the continuing influence of colonialism and Eurocentric ways of reasoning inside as well as outside the classroom in today’s society. One of the main conclusions of the paper is that in the process of transferring knowledge, there is a risk that the history of modern Europe will be sanctioned as the historical trajectory for the rest of the world to follow, with the accompanying supposition that this can only be made possible by extending a helping hand to the Other.

  • 31.
    Aman, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Interculturality for decolonization: Indigenous alliances in South America, Geopolitics of Knowledge and Subaltern Paradigms2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The thrust of this essay is to study how interculturality, as a path to decolonization, is being articulated and understood among indigenous alliances in the Andean region of Latin America. Empirically, the analysis is based upon interviews with students and teachers from local academic courses on interculturality in Bolivia, Ecuador and Peru. Although interculturality and intercultural education are common features also in Western educational rhetoric, the imposition to learn from indigenous movements have failed to attract any substantial interest in the West (cf. Deere & Leon 2003; Patrinos 2000). To illustrate this further, Robert Young (2012) argues that indigenous struggles seldom are regarded as a central issue even within postcolonial studies, a disjunction related to the use among indigenous movements of paradigms not easily translated to the Western theories and presuppositions commonly used in this scholarship (Young 2012). Given this picture, there are strong reasons for engaging seriously in a discussion about the proposition for interculturality to break out of the prison-house of colonial vocabulary – modernity, progress, salvation – as it lingers on in official memory; and there are also good reasons to problematize the universalizing claims that have characterized Western philosophy in the implicitly assumed epistemological hierarchies.

    In this paper, I will focus specifically on visions of decolonization in terms of retrieved languages, reinscribed histories, production of knowledge; beginning the essay with an elaboration of the logic of domination as rooted in the modern/colonial world – here referred to as coloniality. Shortly thereafter, with reference points drawn from the work of Walter Mignolo and his notion of delinking, I introduce the theoretical backdrop that guides my analysis. In the major part of the paper, I develop an argument for interculturality to be understood as inter-epistemic based on knowledge produced beyond the discursive order of Western educational systems.

  • 32.
    Aman, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Kista folkhögskola - den första muslimska folkhögskolan2011In: Mångfaldig (folk)bildning för det offentliga samtalet?: Tre minoriteters egna bildningsverksamheter / [ed] Robert Aman, Lisbeth Eriksson, Martin Lundberg, Thomas Winman, Stockholm: Folkbildningsrådet , 2011, 49-67 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna rapport är resultatet av ett ettårigt forskningsprojekt som Folkbildningsrådet finansierat. Projektet har genomförts av en grupp forskare vid Linköpings universitet: Lisbeth Eriksson, Martin Lundberg, Thomas Winman och Robert Aman.Forskarna undersöker hur olika religiösa och etniska gruppers skapande av “egna” folkbildande verksamheter kan förstås. I rapporten beskrivs de processer som lett fram till etablerandet av Kista folkhögskola, Agnesbergs folkhögskola, studieförbundet Ibn Rushd samt Samernas utbildningscentrum.

  • 33.
    Aman, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning.
    Moderniteten sedd underifrån: Kolonialitet, underordnade epistemologier och avlänkning hos Walter Mignolo2015In: Samtida politisk teori / [ed] Stefan Jonsson, Stockholm: Tankekraft förlag , 2015, 1, 265-289 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Aman, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Swedish Colonialism, Exotic Africans and Romantic Anti-Capitalism: Notes on the Comic Series Johan Vilde2016In: Third Text, ISSN 0952-8822, E-ISSN 1475-5297, Vol. 30, no 1-2, 60-75 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The award-winning Johan Vilde comic series deals with what has been referred to as a concealed part of Swedish history – namely Sweden’s involvement in the slave trade during the seventeenth century. The protagonist is a cabin boy on a Swedish merchant ship who is forced to escape after being accused of mutiny. After jumping ship, he floats ashore in Cabo Corso – located in modern-day Ghana – where he is eventually adopted by a local clan and grows up in an African kingdom. From there, he will go on to witness the harshness and brutality of the slave trade with his own eyes. Comprising four albums published between 1977 and 1982, the comic aligns itself with, and is a prime popular cultural example of, what can be classified in broad terms as a wave of international solidarity movements in Sweden. What this essay discusses is how the anti-colonial and anti-capitalist underpinnings of the Johan Vilde series rekindle a much older Romanticist position. This essay will argue that this well-intended ethically dimension of attempting to subvert the imperially established border between civilisation and where the wild things roam also relies on a position produced by colonial discourse. 

    The full text will be freely available from 2018-05-18 15:13
  • 35.
    Aman, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning.
    The Cultural Other: The Reproduction of Coloniality2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper scrutinizes how the discourse on interculturalism unfolds in the rapidly growing discipline on the subject by analyzing how it is produced in a local context – a university course. Interculturalism refers to interaction between cultures and the importance of fostering and guiding such relations, whereby educational courses on interculturalism becomes the primary instance to fulfill the ambition of governing bodies (e.g. EU, UNSECO) by shaping subjects with desired competences to enact in a culturally diverse world. Based on an empirical material comprised of semi-structured interviews with an ensemble of students who successfully have completed one of these courses on interculturalism, the paper develops a critical interrogation of those core ingredients, meanings and definitions which the students attaches to interculturalism. With interculturalism presupposing cultural diversity, I will illustrate the ambivalent nature of executing cultural boundaries and the risk of appropriating coloniality in the quest to rhetorically legitimize interventions in the name of modernization and social development.

  • 36.
    Aman, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    The Double Bind of Interculturality and the Implications for Education2015In: Journal of Intercultural Studies, ISSN 0725-6868, E-ISSN 1469-9540, Vol. 36, no 2, 149-165 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the ways in which boundaries of estrangement are produced in the academic literature assigned for courses on interculturality. As the existence of interculturality is dependent on the ascription of content to culture – since the notion, by definition, always involves more than one singular culture – this essay seeks to provide an answer to the question of what this literature, implicitly or otherwise, defines in terms of sameness vis-à-vis otherness, and thereby to chart the conditions for becoming intercultural. This question is especially important because the self in interculturality has to be, in principle, generalizable: it should signify a position available for occupation by anybody with proper training in this approach. Starting from the assumption that different experiences, languages and identities, already intersect and are indeed already intercultural before being subjected to study under the auspices of ‘interculturality’ as an educational topic, the essay goes on to problematize the way in which interculturality tends to construe sameness and difference along national lines and does little to cater for multiple, as opposed to national, or other unified, identities.

  • 37.
    Aman, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Three Texts on Intercultural Education and a Critique of Border DrawingManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This essay explores the ways in which boundaries of estrangement are produced in the academic literature assigned for courses on interculturality. As the existence of interculturality is dependent on the ascription of content to culture, since the notion, by definition, always involves more than one singular culture, this essay seeks to provide an answer to the question of what this literature implicitly defines in terms of sameness vis-à-vis otherness and thereby chart the conditions for becoming intercultural. This question is especially important because theself in interculturality has to be, in principle, generalizable: it should be such that it signifies a position available for occupation by anybody with proper training in this approach. Starting from the assumption that different experiences, languages and identities, under the name of culture already intersect, and are contaminated by, one another, and are therefore already intercultural before being subjected to study under the auspices of ‘interculturality’ as an educational topic, the essay goes on toproblematize the way in which interculturality tends to construe sameness and difference along national lines and does little to cater for multiple, as opposed to national, or other unified, identities.

  • 38.
    Aman, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Why Interculturalidad is not Interculturality Colonial remains and paradoxes in translation between indigenous social movements and supranational bodies2015In: Cultural Studies, ISSN 0950-2386, E-ISSN 1466-4348, Vol. 29, no 2, 205-228 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interculturality is a notion that has come to dominate the debate on cultural diversity among supranational bodies such as the European Union and UNESCO in recent years. The EU goes so far as to identify interculturality as a key cultural and linguistic characteristic of a union which, it argues, acts as an inspiration to other parts of the world. At the same time, the very notion of interculturality is a core component of indigenous movements in the Andean region of Latin America in their struggles for decolonization. Every bit as contingent as any other concept, it is apparent that several translations of interculturality are simultaneously in play. Through interviews with students and teachers in a course on interculturality run by indigenous alliances, my aim in this essay is to study how the notion is translated in the socio-political context of the Andes. With reference points drawn from the works of Walter Mignolo and the concept of delinking, I will engage in a discussion about the potential for interculturality to break out of the prison-house of colonial vocabulary – modernization, progress, salvation – that lingers on in official memory. Engagement in such an interchange of experiences, memories and significations provides not only recognition of other forms of subjectivity, knowledge systems and visions of the future but also a possible contribution to an understanding of how any attempt to invoke a universal reach for interculturality, as in the case of the EU and UNESCO, risks echoing the imperial order that the notion in another context attempts to overcome. 

  • 39.
    Aman, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Writing Interculturality, Reading Difference: A postcolonial analysis of literature on intercultural education2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Aman, Robert
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Ireland, TimothyFederal University of Paraiba, Brazil.
    Education and Other Modes of Thinking in Latin America2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    After long periods of military dictatorships, civil wars, and economic instability, Latin America has changed face, and become the foremost region for counter-hegemonic processes. This book seeks to address contemporary paradigms of education and learning in Latin America. Although the production of knowledge in the region has long been subject to imperial designs and disseminated through educational systems, recent interventions – from liberation theology, popular education, and critical literacy to postcolonial critique and decolonial options – have sought to shift the geography of reason.

    Over the last decades, several Latin American communities have countered this movement by forming some of the most dynamic and organised forms of resistance: from the landless movements in Brazil to the Zapatistas in the Chiapas region of Mexico, from the indigenous social movements in Bolivia to Venezuela’s Chavistas, to mention but a few. The central question to be addressed is how, in times of historical ruptures, political reconstructions, and epistemic formations, the production of paradigms rooted in ‘other’ logics, cosmologies, and realities may renegotiate and redefine concepts of education, learning, and knowledge. Consequently, this book transcends disciplinary, epistemological, and methodological boundaries in education and learning by engagement with ‘other’ paradigms. 

  • 41.
    Aman, Robert
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Lundberg, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Muslimska bildningsinitiativ, svenskhet och konturer av motstånd2013In: Lärandets mångfald: om vuxenpedagogik och folkbildning / [ed] Andreas Fejes, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2013, 1, 139-156 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Sverige har ett unikt system för vuxnas deltagande i arrangerat lärande inom ramen för kommunal vuxenutbildning, folkhögskola och studiecirklar. Dessa verksamheter står under ständig förändring i fråga om vem som deltar, hur de finansieras, vilket uppdrag de har och vilka pedagogiska ideal som råder.

    Lärandets mångfald ger en aktuell bild av olika sammanhang för vuxnas lärande med speciellt fokus på vuxenutbildning och folkbildning. Läs den också för att lära känna den forskning som idag finns om dessa områden. Ämnen är bland annat bokcirklarnas framväxt, framväxten av muslimska studieförbund och folkhögskolor, skönlitteraturens roll inom utbildning, politiska makthavares bildningsvägar, didaktiska perspektiv på undervisning av vuxna och yrkeslärares identiteter.

    Boken vänder sig till studerande vid lärarprogram, studie- och yrkesvägledarprogram, personalvetarprogram, kurser inom pedagogik, samt till yrkesverksamma lärare, folkbildare, studie- och yrkesvägledare, personalvetare och en intresserad allmänhet.

  • 42.
    Andersson, Eva
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Laginder, Ann-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Dimensions of power: The influence of study circles2013In: Popular education, power and democracy: Swedish experiences and contributions / [ed] Ann-Marie Laginder, Henrik Nordvall, Jim Crowther, NIACE - National Institute of Adult Continuing Education, 2013, 1, 99-121 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Popular education, a distinctive Swedish tradition of lifelong learning, has always concerned itself with the relationship between learning, power, and democracy in society, rather than having a purely individualistic and instrumental approach to learning for employability, which has dominated policy and practice. Through the themes of power and democracy, this book examines popular education's contribution to enhancing people's lives in communities. It reflects on the wider significance and explores the impact on the political culture of the state and the cultural politics of society within and outside Sweden, including the US, Japan, Canada, and Tanzania. As a comprehensive and unique collection, the book balances historical reflection, contemporary issues, and the international impact of popular education, combining theoretical analysis and empirical data.Show more Show less

  • 43.
    Andersson, Ingrid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Kagwesage, Anne Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Rusanganwa, Joseph
    Arts Media and Social Sciences, English, Butare, Rwanda.
    Negotiating meaning in multilingual group work: A case study of higher education in Rwanda2013In: International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism, ISSN 1367-0050, E-ISSN 1747-7522, Vol. 16, no 4, 436-450 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we investigate how students handle the linguistic diversity they are exposed to during group-work sessions at a university in Rwanda. The data consist of five audio-recorded group-work sessions initiated by a lecturer in a management course. The data were analysed drawing on theories relating to code-switching and learning in multilingual settings. Our findings show that active use of multiple languages, although time consuming, has great potential to facilitate learning, thus emphasizing the complementarities rather than exclusion of languages used in Rwanda.

  • 44.
    Andersson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Att bli och vara folkhögskollärare2014In: Årsbok om folkbildning: Forskning & utveckling 2013 / [ed] Stellan Boozon, Krister Hansson, Maj-Britt Imnander, Tove Bergquist, Stockholm: Föreningen för folkbildningsforskning , 2014, 73-89 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Artikeln sammanfattar resultat från två olika studier om att bli vuxenlärare och om att vara folkhögskollärare.

  • 45.
    Andersson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Att vara folkhögskollärare2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I detta paper presenteras en studie av folkhögskollärares arbete, med fokus på lärarnas tidsanvändning och deras inställning till arbetets förutsättningar, kompetensbehov, idégrund och huvudmän samt professionell utveckling. Studien visar att de heltidsarbetande lärare som deltog i tidsanvändningsundersökningen i snitt arbetade drygt 49 timmar under en vecka. Ungefär en fjärdedel av arbetstiden var förlagd till kvällstid och helger, och nästan var fjärde lärare arbetar på kvälls- eller helgtid varje dag i veckan måndag–söndag. Lärarna uppskattar den professionella friheten i arbetet, men samtidigt är arbetsbördan en belastning. Det mest tydligt uttryckta behovet av kompetensutveckling gäller att kunna upptäcka och stödja deltagare i behov av särskilt stöd, men även kunskap om folkhögskola och folkbildning beskrivs som viktigt, speciellt för lärare som saknar lärarutbildning för skolformen. Lärarnas engagemang för deltagarna kommer även till uttryck i hur man relaterar sig till idégrunden, där lärarnas fokus främst ligger på deltagarnas utveckling. Folkhögskollärare kan inte betraktas som en profession, men vissa tecken på professionell utveckling har identifierats.

  • 46.
    Andersson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Basic eligibility: Threshold or fork in the road to higher education?2013In: Journal of Adult and Continuing Education, ISSN 1477-9714, Vol. 19, no 2, 24-44 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden has a two-step selection process for admission to higher education. Eligibility is assessed to ensure that the candidates have the ability to take the course/programme. Selections are made based in part on other measures. The focus here is eligibility, particularly the 25:4 scheme, a measure introduced to widen access to higher education in the 1970s but since abandoned. An age of 25 and 4 years of work experience were the main criteria of basic eligibility under this scheme. This exploratory study identifies the characteristics of 25:4 applicants and compares them to applicants with other types of eligibility and comparable groups in the population. What were the characteristics of 25:4 applicants? In what ways did they differ from other applicants and from the population in general? Results illustrate the scheme's influence, which was stronger on application patterns and weaker on the admission patterns of traditional and nontraditional applicants/students.

  • 47.
    Andersson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Bedömning av vuxnas kunskap och kompetens2015In: KOM. Kommunikation mellan vuxenutbildare, Vol. 43, no 2, 34-34 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna artikel är en krönika kring bedömning och validering av vuxnas lärande.

  • 48.
    Andersson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Bedömning och betygssättning av yrkeskunskaper2014In: Lära till yrkeslärare / [ed] Susanne Köpsén, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2014, 1, 195-216 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Detta kapitel ger en översikt över centrala begrepp och företeelser inom området bedömning och betygsättning, med fokus på det som är centralt inom yrkesutbildning på gymnasienivå.

  • 49.
    Andersson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Endword: Research into practice?2014In: Handbook of the recognition of prior learning: research into practice / [ed] Judy Harris, Christine Wihak & Joy Van Kleef, Leicester: NIACE - National Institute of Adult Continuing Education, 2014, 1, 407-412 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This endword discusses the relation between research and practice in RPL.

  • 50.
    Andersson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Experience as the basis of eligibility for higher education2014In: The Power of VPL: Validation of Prior Learning as a multi-targeted approach for access to learning opportunities for all / [ed] R. Duvekot, B. Halba, K. Aagaard, S. Gabrscek & J. Murray, Vught, the Netherlands: Inholland University AS & European Centre Valuation Prior Learning , 2014, 39-55 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter presents results from a study of non-traditional applicants experiences of applying for higher education, namely applicants employing the Swedish 25:4 scheme, which granted eligibility for applicants who were at least 25 years old and had 4 years of work experience. 

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