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  • 1.
    Abdollahi, Farzaneh Zamiri
    et al.
    Univ Social Welf & Rehabil Sci, Iran.
    Ahmadi, Tayebeh
    Univ Social Welf & Rehabil Sci, Iran.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA; Audiol India, India.
    Lotfi, Yones
    Univ Social Welf & Rehabil Sci, Iran.
    Auditory Brainstem Response Improvements in Hyperbillirubinemic Infants2016Inngår i: JOURNAL OF AUDIOLOGY AND OTOLOGY, ISSN 2384-1621, Vol. 20, nr 1, s. 13-16Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Objectives: Hyperbillirubinemia in infants have been associated with neuronal damage including in the auditory system. Some researchers have suggested that the bilirubin-induced auditory neuronal damages may be temporary and reversible. This study was aimed at investigating the auditory neuropathy and reversibility of auditory abnormalities in hyperbillirubinemic infants. Subjects and Methods: The study participants included 41 full term hyperbilirubinemic infants (mean age 39.24 days) with normal birth weight (3,2003,700 grams) that admitted in hospital for hyperbillirubinemia and 39 normal infants (mean age 35.54 days) without any hyperbillirubinemia or other hearing loss risk factors for ruling out maturational changes. All infants in hyperbilirubinemic group had serum bilirubin level more than 20 milligram per deciliter and undergone one blood exchange transfusion. Hearing evaluation for each infant was conducted twice: the first one after hyperbilirubinemia treatment and before leaving hospital and the second one three months after the first hearing evaluation. Hearing evaluations included transient evoked otoacoustic emission (TEOAE) screening and auditory brainstem response (ABR) threshold tracing. Results: The TEOAE and ABR results of control group and TEOAE results of the hyperbilirubinemic group did not change significantly from the first to the second evaluation. However, the ABR results of the hyperbilirubinemic group improved significantly from the first to the second assessment (p=0.025). Conclusions: The results suggest that the bilirubin induced auditory neuronal damage can be reversible over time so we suggest that infants with hyperbilirubinemia who fail the first hearing tests should be reevaluated after 3 months of treatment.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    Ahlstrand, I.
    et al.
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Reumatologiska kliniken i Östergötland.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum. School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden; School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, CHIRI, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Björk, Mathilda
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Rehabenheten. School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Pain and activity limitations in women and men with contemporary treated early RA compared to 10 years ago: the Swedish TIRA project2015Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 44, nr 4, s. 259-264Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To study differences regarding pain and activity limitations during the 3 years following diagnosis in women and men with contemporary treated early RA compared with their counterparts who were diagnosed 10 years earlier. Method: This study was based on patients recruited to the Early Intervention in RA (TIRA) project. In the first cohort (TIRA-1) 320 patients were included in time for diagnosis during 1996-1998 and 463 patients were included in the second cohort (TIRA-2) during 2006-2009. Disease activity, pain intensity (Visual Analogue Scale, VAS), bodily pain (BP) in the 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), activity limitations (Health Assessment Questionnaire, HAQ), and medication were reported at inclusion and at follow-up after 1, 2, and 3 years. Results: Disease activity, pain, and activity limitations were pronounced at inclusion across both genders and in both cohorts, with some improvement observed during the first year after diagnosis. Disease activity did not differ between cohorts at inclusion but was significantly lower at the follow-ups in the TIRA-2 cohort, in which the patients were prescribed traditional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and biological agents more frequently. In TIRA-2, patients reported significantly lower pain and activity limitations at all follow-ups, with men reporting lower pain than women. Women reported significantly higher activity limitations at all time points in TIRA-2. Conclusions: Pain and activity limitations were still pronounced in the contemporary treated early RA cohort compared with their counterparts diagnosed 10 years earlier and both of these factors need to be addressed in clinical settings.

  • 3.
    Ahmad, Awais
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för inflammation och infektion. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Diagnostikcentrum, Klinisk immunologi och transfusionsmedicin.
    Brylid, Andre
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för inflammation och infektion. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Diagnostikcentrum, Klinisk immunologi och transfusionsmedicin.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för inflammation och infektion. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Diagnostikcentrum, Klinisk immunologi och transfusionsmedicin.
    Saleh, Muna Atallah
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för inflammation och infektion. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Medicincentrum, Reumatologiska kliniken i Östergötland.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Enocsson, Helena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för inflammation och infektion. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Medicincentrum, Reumatologiska kliniken i Östergötland.
    Sjöwall, Christopher
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för inflammation och infektion. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Medicincentrum, Reumatologiska kliniken i Östergötland.
    Doubtful Clinical Value of Subtyping Anti-U1-RNP Antibodies Regarding the RNP-70 kDa Antigen in Sera of Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus2023Inngår i: International Journal of Molecular Sciences, ISSN 1661-6596, E-ISSN 1422-0067, Vol. 24, nr 12, artikkel-id 10398Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The detection of antinuclear antibodies is central to the diagnosis and prognosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), primary Sjogrens syndrome (pSS) and mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD). Anti-U1-RNP and anti-RNP70 antibodies were assayed in the sera of patients with SLE (n = 114), pSS (n = 54) and MCTD (n = 12). In the SLE group, 34/114 (30%) were anti-U1-RNP positive, and 21/114 (18%) were both anti-RNP70 positive and anti-U1-RNP positive. In the MCTD group, 10/12 (83%) were anti-U1-RNP positive, and 9/12 (75%) were anti-RNP70 positive. Only one individual with pSS was antibody positive (for both anti-U1-RNP and anti-RNP70). All anti-RNP70-positive samples were also anti-U1-RNP positive. Anti-U1-RNP-positive subjects with SLE were younger (p < 0.0001); showed lower concentrations of complement protein 3 (p = 0.03); had lower eosinophil (p = 0.0005), lymphocyte (p = 0.006) and monocyte (p = 0.03) counts; and had accrued less organ damage (p = 0.006) than the anti-U1-RNP-negative SLE patients. However, we observed no significant clinical or laboratory parameter differences between the anti-U1-RNP-positive individuals with/without anti-RNP70 in the SLE group. In conclusion, anti-RNP70 antibodies are not exclusive to MCTD but are rarely detected in pSS and healthy individuals. In SLE, anti-U1-RNP antibodies are associated with a clinical phenotype that resembles MCTD, with hematologic involvement and less damage accrual. Based on our results, the clinical value of subtyping anti-RNP70 in anti-U1-RNP-positive sera appears to be of limited value.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 4.
    Ahrenberg, Lars
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för datavetenskap, Interaktiva och kognitiva system. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Bengtsson, Staffan
    The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Arvå, Hampus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för datavetenskap, Interaktiva och kognitiva system. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Holme, Lotta
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Pedagogik och didaktik. Linköpings universitet, Utbildningsvetenskap.
    Jönsson, Arne
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för datavetenskap, Interaktiva och kognitiva system. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Studying Disability Related Terms with Swe-Clarin Resources2019Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In Swedish, as in other languages, the words used to refer to disabilities and people with disabilities are manifold. Recommendations as to which terms to use have been changed several times over the last hundred years. In this exploratory paper we have used textual resources provided by Swe-Clarin to study such changes quantitatively. We demonstrate that old and new recommendations co-exist for long periods of time, and that usage sometimes converges.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    Introduction to proceedings
    Fulltekst (pdf)
    Article in full text
  • 5.
    Alfandari, Defne
    et al.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Vriend, Chris
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands; Amsterdam Neurosci, Netherlands.
    Heslenfeld, Dirk J.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Versfeld, Niek J.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Kramer, Sophia E.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Brain Volume Differences Associated With Hearing Impairment in Adults2018Inngår i: TRENDS IN HEARING, ISSN 2331-2165, Vol. 22, artikkel-id 2331216518763689Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Speech comprehension depends on the successful operation of a network of brain regions. Processing of degraded speech is associated with different patterns of brain activity in comparison with that of high-quality speech. In this exploratory study, we studied whether processing degraded auditory input in daily life because of hearing impairment is associated with differences in brain volume. We compared TI-weighted structural magnetic resonance images of 17 hearing-impaired (HI) adults with those of 17 normal-hearing (NH) controls using a voxel-based morphometry analysis. HI adults were individually matched with NH adults based on age and educational level. Gray and white matter brain volumes were compared between the groups by region-of-interest analyses in structures associated with speech processing, and by whole-brain analyses. The results suggest increased gray matter volume in the right angular gyrus and decreased white matter volume in the left fusiform gyrus in HI listeners as compared with NH ones. In the HI group, there was a significant correlation between hearing acuity and cluster volume of the gray matter cluster in the right angular gyrus. This correlation supports the link between partial hearing loss and altered brain volume. The alterations in volume may reflect the operation of compensatory mechanisms that are related to decoding meaning from degraded auditory input.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 6.
    Alickovic, Emina
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för systemteknik, Reglerteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, 20 Rortangvej, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Gustafsson, Fredrik
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för systemteknik, Reglerteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    A System Identification Approach to Determining Listening Attention from EEG Signals2016Inngår i: 2016 24TH EUROPEAN SIGNAL PROCESSING CONFERENCE (EUSIPCO), IEEE , 2016, s. 31-35Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    We still have very little knowledge about how ourbrains decouple different sound sources, which is known assolving the cocktail party problem. Several approaches; includingERP, time-frequency analysis and, more recently, regression andstimulus reconstruction approaches; have been suggested forsolving this problem. In this work, we study the problem ofcorrelating of EEG signals to different sets of sound sources withthe goal of identifying the single source to which the listener isattending. Here, we propose a method for finding the number ofparameters needed in a regression model to avoid overlearning,which is necessary for determining the attended sound sourcewith high confidence in order to solve the cocktail party problem.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 7.
    Alickovic, Emina
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för systemteknik, Reglerteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten. Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för systemteknik, Reglerteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Oticon AS, Denmark; Tech Univ Denmark, Denmark.
    Gustafsson, Fredrik
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för systemteknik, Reglerteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Ljung, Lennart
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för systemteknik, Reglerteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    A Tutorial on Auditory Attention Identification Methods2019Inngår i: Frontiers in Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-4548, E-ISSN 1662-453X, Vol. 13, artikkel-id 153Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Auditory attention identification methods attempt to identify the sound source of a listeners interest by analyzing measurements of electrophysiological data. We present a tutorial on the numerous techniques that have been developed in recent decades, and we present an overview of current trends in multivariate correlation-based and model-based learning frameworks. The focus is on the use of linear relations between electrophysiological and audio data. The way in which these relations are computed differs. For example, canonical correlation analysis (CCA) finds a linear subset of electrophysiological data that best correlates to audio data and a similar subset of audio data that best correlates to electrophysiological data. Model-based (encoding and decoding) approaches focus on either of these two sets. We investigate the similarities and differences between these linear model philosophies. We focus on (1) correlation-based approaches (CCA), (2) encoding/decoding models based on dense estimation, and (3) (adaptive) encoding/decoding models based on sparse estimation. The specific focus is on sparsity-driven adaptive encoding models and comparing the methodology in state-of-the-art models found in the auditory literature. Furthermore, we outline the main signal processing pipeline for how to identify the attended sound source in a cocktail party environment from the raw electrophysiological data with all the necessary steps, complemented with the necessary MATLAB code and the relevant references for each step. Our main aim is to compare the methodology of the available methods, and provide numerical illustrations to some of them to get a feeling for their potential. A thorough performance comparison is outside the scope of this tutorial.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 8.
    Alickovic, Emina
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för systemteknik, Reglerteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten. Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för systemteknik, Reglerteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Tech Univ Denmark, Denmark.
    Wendt, Dorothea
    Tech Univ Denmark, Denmark.
    Fiedler, Lorenz
    Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Hietkamp, Renskje
    Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Ng, Hoi Ning Elaine
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Graversen, Carina
    Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Neural Representation Enhanced for Speech and Reduced for Background Noise With a Hearing Aid Noise Reduction Scheme During a Selective Attention Task2020Inngår i: Frontiers in Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-4548, E-ISSN 1662-453X, Vol. 14, artikkel-id 846Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives Selectively attending to a target talker while ignoring multiple interferers (competing talkers and background noise) is more difficult for hearing-impaired (HI) individuals compared to normal-hearing (NH) listeners. Such tasks also become more difficult as background noise levels increase. To overcome these difficulties, hearing aids (HAs) offer noise reduction (NR) schemes. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of NR processing (inactive, where the NR feature was switched off,vs.active, where the NR feature was switched on) on the neural representation of speech envelopes across two different background noise levels [+3 dB signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and +8 dB SNR] by using a stimulus reconstruction (SR) method. Design To explore how NR processing supports the listeners selective auditory attention, we recruited 22 HI participants fitted with HAs. To investigate the interplay between NR schemes, background noise, and neural representation of the speech envelopes, we used electroencephalography (EEG). The participants were instructed to listen to a target talker in front while ignoring a competing talker in front in the presence of multi-talker background babble noise. Results The results show that the neural representation of the attended speech envelope was enhanced by the active NR scheme for both background noise levels. The neural representation of the attended speech envelope at lower (+3 dB) SNR was shifted, approximately by 5 dB, toward the higher (+8 dB) SNR when the NR scheme was turned on. The neural representation of the ignored speech envelope was modulated by the NR scheme and was mostly enhanced in the conditions with more background noise. The neural representation of the background noise was modulated (i.e., reduced) by the NR scheme and was significantly reduced in the conditions with more background noise. The neural representation of the net sum of the ignored acoustic scene (ignored talker and background babble) was not modulated by the NR scheme but was significantly reduced in the conditions with a reduced level of background noise. Taken together, we showed that the active NR scheme enhanced the neural representation of both the attended and the ignored speakers and reduced the neural representation of background noise, while the net sum of the ignored acoustic scene was not enhanced. Conclusion Altogether our results support the hypothesis that the NR schemes in HAs serve to enhance the neural representation of speech and reduce the neural representation of background noise during a selective attention task. We contend that these results provide a neural index that could be useful for assessing the effects of HAs on auditory and cognitive processing in HI populations.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 9.
    Alickovic, Emina
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för systemteknik, Reglerteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten. Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Ng, Hoi Ning, Elaine
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Fiedler, Lorenz
    Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Santurette, Sebastien
    Oticon AS, Denmark; Tech Univ Denmark, Denmark.
    Innes-Brown, Hamish
    Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Graversen, Carina
    Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Effects of Hearing Aid Noise Reduction on Early and Late Cortical Representations of Competing Talkers in Noise2021Inngår i: Frontiers in Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-4548, E-ISSN 1662-453X, Vol. 15, artikkel-id 636060Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives Previous research using non-invasive (magnetoencephalography, MEG) and invasive (electrocorticography, ECoG) neural recordings has demonstrated the progressive and hierarchical representation and processing of complex multi-talker auditory scenes in the auditory cortex. Early responses (<85 ms) in primary-like areas appear to represent the individual talkers with almost equal fidelity and are independent of attention in normal-hearing (NH) listeners. However, late responses (>85 ms) in higher-order non-primary areas selectively represent the attended talker with significantly higher fidelity than unattended talkers in NH and hearing-impaired (HI) listeners. Motivated by these findings, the objective of this study was to investigate the effect of a noise reduction scheme (NR) in a commercial hearing aid (HA) on the representation of complex multi-talker auditory scenes in distinct hierarchical stages of the auditory cortex by using high-density electroencephalography (EEG). Design We addressed this issue by investigating early (<85 ms) and late (>85 ms) EEG responses recorded in 34 HI subjects fitted with HAs. The HA noise reduction (NR) was either on or off while the participants listened to a complex auditory scene. Participants were instructed to attend to one of two simultaneous talkers in the foreground while multi-talker babble noise played in the background (+3 dB SNR). After each trial, a two-choice question about the content of the attended speech was presented. Results Using a stimulus reconstruction approach, our results suggest that the attention-related enhancement of neural representations of target and masker talkers located in the foreground, as well as suppression of the background noise in distinct hierarchical stages is significantly affected by the NR scheme. We found that the NR scheme contributed to the enhancement of the foreground and of the entire acoustic scene in the early responses, and that this enhancement was driven by better representation of the target speech. We found that the target talker in HI listeners was selectively represented in late responses. We found that use of the NR scheme resulted in enhanced representations of the target and masker speech in the foreground and a suppressed representation of the noise in the background in late responses. We found a significant effect of EEG time window on the strengths of the cortical representation of the target and masker. Conclusion Together, our analyses of the early and late responses obtained from HI listeners support the existing view of hierarchical processing in the auditory cortex. Our findings demonstrate the benefits of a NR scheme on the representation of complex multi-talker auditory scenes in different areas of the auditory cortex in HI listeners.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 10.
    Andersen Helland, Wenche
    et al.
    Stord Hospital, Norway; University of Bergen, Norway.
    Lundervold, Astri
    University of Bergen, Norway.
    Heimann, Mikael
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Posserud, Maj-Britt
    Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
    Stable associations between behavioral problems and language impairments across childhood - the importance of pragmatic language problems2014Inngår i: Research in Developmental Disabilities, ISSN 0891-4222, E-ISSN 1873-3379, Vol. 35, nr 5, s. 943-951Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated language function associated with behavior problems, focusing on pragmatics. Scores on the Children’s Communication Checklist Second Edition (CCC-2) in a group of 40 adolescents (12–15 years) identified with externalizing behavior problems (BP) in childhood was compared to the CCC-2 scores in a typically developing comparison group (n=37). Behavioral, emotional and language problems were assessed by the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) and 4 language items, when the children in the BP group were 7–9 years (T1). They were then assessed with the SDQ and the CCC-2 when they were 12–15 years (T2). The BP group obtained poorer scores on 9/10 subscales on the CCC-2, and 70% showed language impairments in the clinical range. Language, emotional and peer problems at T1 were strongly correlated with pragmatic language impairments in adolescence. The findings indicate that assessment of language, especially pragmatics, is vital for follow-up and treatment of behavioral problems in children and adolescents.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    Stable associations between behavioral problems and language impairments across childhood - the importance of pragmatic language problems
  • 11.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cuijpers, Pim
    VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Carlbring, Per
    University of Stockholm, Sweden.
    Riper, Heleen
    VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Leuphana University, Lünebrug, Germany.
    Hedman, Erik
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Guided Internet-based vs. face-to-face cognitive behavior therapy for psychiatric and somatic disorders: a systematic review and meta-analysis2014Inngår i: World Psychiatry, ISSN 1723-8617, E-ISSN 2051-5545, Vol. 13, nr 3, s. 288-295Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy (ICBT) has been tested in many research trials, but to a lesser extent directly compared to face-to-face delivered cognitive behavior therapy (CBT). We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of trials in which guided ICBT was directly compared to face-to-face CBT. Studies on psychiatric and somatic conditions were included. Systematic searches resulted in 13 studies (total N=1053) that met all criteria and were included in the review. There were three studies on social anxiety disorder, three on panic disorder, two on depressive symptoms, two on body dissatisfaction, one on tinnitus, one on male sexual dysfunction, and one on spider phobia. Face-to-face CBT was either in the individual format (n=6) or in the group format (n=7). We also assessed quality and risk of bias. Results showed a pooled effect size (Hedges' g) at post-treatment of -0.01 (95% CI: -0.13 to 0.12), indicating that guided ICBT and face-to-face treatment produce equivalent overall effects. Study quality did not affect outcomes. While the overall results indicate equivalence, there are still few studies for each psychiatric and somatic condition and many conditions for which guided ICBT has not been compared to face-to-face treatment. Thus, more research is needed to establish equivalence of the two treatment formats.

  • 12.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Gustafsson, Tore
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Lundén, Charlotte
    Landstinget Dalarna.
    Henriksson, Oskar
    Psykologifabriken AB.
    Fattahi, Kidjan
    Psykologpartners , Linköping.
    Zetterqvist Westin, Vendela
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande. Linköpings universitet, Utbildningsvetenskap.
    Carlbring, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Hesser, Hugo
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Internet-based Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for tinnitus patients2011Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 13.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Hesser, Hugo
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Hummerdal, Daniel
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Bergman Nordgren, Lise
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Carlbring, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Department of Psychology , Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    A 3.5-year follow-up of Internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy for major depression2013Inngår i: Journal of Mental Health, ISSN 0963-8237, E-ISSN 1360-0567, Vol. 22, nr 2, s. 155-164Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundInternet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy (ICBT) for major depression has been tested in several trials, but only with follow-ups up to 1.5 years.

    AimThe aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of ICBT 3.5 years after treatment completion.Methods

    A total of 88 people with major depression were randomized to either guided self-help or e-mail therapy in the original trial. One-third was initially on a waiting-list. Treatment was provided for eight weeks and in this report long-term follow-up data were collected. Also included were data from post-treatment and six-month follow-up. A total of 58% (51/88) completed the 3.5-year follow-up. Analyses were performed using a random effects repeated measures piecewise growth model to estimate trajectory shape over time and account for missing data.

    ResultsResults showed continued lowered scores on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). No differences were found between the treatment conditions. A large proportion of participants (55%) had sought and received additional treatments in the follow-up period. A majority (56.9%) of participants had a BDI score lower than 10 at the 3.5-year follow-up.

    ConclusionsPeople with mild to moderate major depression may benefit from ICBT 3.5-years after treatment completion.

  • 14.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Oticon AS, Denmark; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Preminger, Jill E.
    University of Louisville, KY 40292 USA.
    Internet and Audiology: A Review of the First International Meeting2015Inngår i: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 24, nr 3, s. 269-270Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this research forum article is to describe the impetus for holding the First International Meeting on Internet and Audiology (October 2014) and to introduce the special research forum that arose from the meeting. Method: The rationale for the First International Meeting on Internet and Audiology is described. This is followed by a short description of the research sections and articles appearing in the special issue. Six articles consider the process of health care delivery over the Internet; this includes health care specific to hearing, tinnitus, and balance. Four articles discuss the development of effective Internet-based treatment programs. Six articles describe and evaluate Internet-based interventions specific to adult hearing aid users. Conclusion: The fledgling field of Internet and audiology is remarkably broad. The Second International Meeting on Internet and Audiology ocurred in September 2015.

  • 15.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Sarkohi, Ali
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Karlsson, Johan
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Bjärehed, Jonas
    Department of Psychology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Hesser, Hugo
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Effects of Two Forms of Internet-Delivered Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for Depression on Future Thinking2013Inngår i: Cognitive Therapy and Research, ISSN 0147-5916, E-ISSN 1573-2819, Vol. 37, nr 1, s. 29-34Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate if future thinking would change following two forms of Internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy (ICBT) for major depression. A second aim was to study the association between pre-post changes in future thinking and prepost changes in depressive symptoms.

    Background: Effects of psychological treatments are most often tested with self-report inventories and seldom with tests of cognitive function.

    Method: We included data from 47 persons diagnosed with major depression who received either e-mail therapy or guided self-help during 8 weeks. Participants completed the future thinking task (FTT), in which they were asked to generate positive and negative events that they thought were going to happen in the future and rated the events in terms of emotion and likelihood. The FTT was completed before and after treatment. Data on depressive symptoms were also collected.

    Results: FTT index scores for negative events were reduced after  treatment. There was no increase for the positive events. Change scores for the FTT negative events and depression symptoms were significantly correlated.

    Conclusions: We conclude that ICBT may lead to decreased negative future thinking and that changes in depression symptoms correlate to some extent with reductions in negative future thinking.

  • 16.
    Andersson, Jan
    et al.
    Totalförsvarets forskningsinstitut, Linköping.
    Helstrup, Tore
    University of Oslo.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Collaborative memory: how is our ability to remember affected by interaction with others?2007Inngår i: Everyday memory / [ed] Svein Magnussen, Tore Helstrup, Hove: Psychology Press, 2007, Vol. Sidorna 135-156, s. 135-156Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Socialization with relatives, friends and colleagues is often regarded as one of the main ingredients of life. Our thoughts, beliefs and ways of life ar affected by socialization. The question to be discussed in this chapter is how social interaction affects our mental processes, especially our memory processes.

  • 17.
    Andersson, Ulf
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Lidestam, Björn
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Bottom-up driven speechreading in a speechreading expert: The case of AA (JK023)2005Inngår i: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 26, nr 2, s. 214-224Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This case study tested the threshold hypothesis (Rönnberg et al., 1998), which states that superior speechreading skill is possible only if high-order cognitive functions, such as capacious verbal working memory, enable efficient strategies. Design: In a case study, a speechreading expert (AA) was tested on a number of speechreading and cognitive tasks and compared with control groups (z scores). Sentence-based speechreading tests, a word-decoding test, and a phoneme identification task were used to assess speechreading skill at different analytical levels. The cognitive test battery used included tasks of working memory (e.g., reading span), inference-making, phonological processing (e.g., rhyme-judgment), and central-executive functions (verbal fluency, Stroop task). Results: Contrary to previous cases of extreme speechreading skill, AA excels on both low-order (phoneme identification: z = +2.83) and high-order (sentence-based: z = +8.12 and word-decoding: z = +4.21) speechreading tasks. AA does not display superior verbal inference-making ability (sentence-completion task: z = -0.36). Neither does he possess a superior working memory (reading span: z = +0.80). However, AA outperforms the controls on two measures of executive retrieval functions, the semantic (z = +3.77) and phonological verbal fluency tasks (z = +3.55). Conclusions: The performance profile is inconsistent with the threshold hypothesis. Extreme speechreading accuracy can be obtained in ways other than via well-developed high-order cognitive functions. It is suggested that AA's extreme speechreading skill, which capitalizes on low-order functions in combination with efficient central executive functions, is due to early onset of hearing impairment. Copyright © 2005 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

  • 18.
    Andersson, Ulf
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Lyxnell, Björn
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Rekonstruktionscentrum, Öronkliniken US.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Spens, Karl-Erik
    Cognitive correlates of visual speech understanding in hearing impaired individuals2001Inngår i: Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education, ISSN 1081-4159, Vol. 6, nr 2, s. 103-116Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined the extent to which different measures ofspeechreading performance correlated with particular cognitiveabilities in a population of hearing-impaired people. Althoughthe three speechreading tasks (isolated word identification,sentence comprehension, and text tracking) were highly intercorrelated,they tapped different cognitive skills. In this population,younger participants were better speechreaders, and, when agewas taken into account, speech tracking correlated primarilywith (written) lexical decision speed. In contrast, speechreadingfor sentence comprehension correlated most strongly with performanceon a phonological processing task (written pseudohomophone detection)but also on a span measure that may have utilized visual, nonverbalmemory for letters. We discuss the implications of this pattern.

  • 19.
    Andin, Josefine
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Biologisk nivå2021Inngår i: Att leva som andra: biopsykosociala perspektiv på funktionsnedsättning och funktionshinder / [ed] Lisa Kilman, Josefine Andin, Håkan Hua, Jerker Rönnberg, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2021, s. 39-66Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 20. Bestill onlineKjøp publikasjonen >>
    Andin, Josefine
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Dealing with Digits: Arithmetic, Memory and Phonology in Deaf Signers2014Doktoravhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Deafness has been associated with poor abilities to deal with digits in the context of arithmetic and memory, and language modality-specific differences in the phonological similarity of digits have been shown to influence short-term memory (STM). Therefore, the overall aim of the present thesis was to find out whether language modality-specific differences in phonological processing between sign and speech can explain why deaf signers perform at lower levels than hearing peers when dealing with digits. To explore this aim, the role of phonological processing in digit-based arithmetic and memory tasks was investigated, using both behavioural and neuroimaging methods, in adult deaf signers and hearing non-signers, carefully matched on age, sex, education and non-verbal intelligence. To make task demands as equal as possible for both groups, and to control for material effects, arithmetic, phonological processing, STM and working memory (WM) were all assessed using the same presentation and response mode for both groups. The results suggested that in digit-based STM, phonological similarity of manual numerals causes deaf signers to perform more poorly than hearing non-signers. However, for  digit-based WM there was no difference between the groups, possibly due to differences in allocation of resources during WM. This indicates that similar WM for the two groups can be generalized from lexical items to digits. Further, we found that in the present work deaf signers performed better than expected and on a par with hearing peers on all arithmetic tasks, except for multiplication, possibly because the groups studied here were very carefully matched. However, the neural networks recruited for arithmetic and phonology differed between groups. During multiplication tasks, deaf signers showed an increased  reliance on cortex of the right parietal lobe complemented by the left inferior frontal gyrus. In contrast, hearing non-signers relied on cortex of the left frontal and parietal lobes during multiplication. This suggests that while hearing non-signers recruit phonology-dependent arithmetic fact retrieval processes for multiplication, deaf signers recruit non-verbal magnitude manipulation processes. For phonology, the hearing non-signers engaged left lateralized frontal and parietal areas within the classical perisylvian language network. In deaf signers, however, phonological processing was limited to cortex of the left occipital lobe, suggesting that sign-based phonological processing does not necessarily activate the classical language network. In conclusion, the findings of the present thesis suggest that language modality-specific differences between sign and speech in different ways can explain why deaf signers perform at lower levels than hearing non-signers on tasks that include dealing with digits.

    Delarbeid
    1. Similar digit-based working memory in deaf signers and hearing non-signers despite digit span differences
    Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Similar digit-based working memory in deaf signers and hearing non-signers despite digit span differences
    Vise andre…
    2013 (engelsk)Inngår i: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 4, nr 942Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Similar working memory (WM) for lexical items has been demonstrated for signers and non-signers while short-term memory (STM) is regularly poorer in deaf than hearing individuals. In the present study, we investigated digit-based WM and STM in Swedish and British deaf signers and hearing non-signers. To maintain good experimental control we used printed stimuli throughout and held response mode constant across groups. We showed that deaf signers have similar digit-based WM performance, despite shorter digit spans, compared to well-matched hearing non-signers. We found no difference between signers and non-signers on STM span for letters chosen to minimize phonological similarity or in the effects of recall direction. This set of findings indicates that similar WM for signers and non-signers can be generalized from lexical items to digits and suggests that poorer STM in deaf signers compared to hearing non-signers may be due to differences in phonological similarity across the language modalities of sign and speech.

    Emneord
    deaf signers, working memory, short term memory, phonological similarity, Cross-cultural
    HSV kategori
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-102262 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2013.00942 (DOI)000331572800002 ()
    Forskningsfinansiär
    Swedish Research Council, 20051353Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2008-0846Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, P2008-0481:1-E
    Tilgjengelig fra: 2013-12-04 Laget: 2013-12-04 Sist oppdatert: 2023-12-28bibliografisk kontrollert
    2. Deaf signers use phonology to do arithmetic
    Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Deaf signers use phonology to do arithmetic
    2014 (engelsk)Inngår i: Learning and individual differences, ISSN 1041-6080, E-ISSN 1873-3425, Vol. 32, s. 246-253Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Deaf students generally lag several years behind hearing peers in arithmetic, but little is known about the mechanisms behind this. In the present study we investigated how phonological skills interact with arithmetic. Eighteen deaf signers and eighteen hearing non-signers took part in an experiment that manipulated arithmetic and phonological knowledge in the language modalities of sign and speech. Independent tests of alphabetical and native language phonological skills were also administered. There was no difference in performance between groups on subtraction, but hearing non-signers performed better than deaf signers on multiplication. For the deaf signers but not the hearing non-signers, multiplicative reasoning was associated with both alphabetical and phonological skills. This indicates that deaf signing adults rely on language processes to solve multiplication tasks, possibly because automatization of multiplication is less well established in deaf adults.

    sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
    Elsevier, 2014
    Emneord
    Deaf signers; Arithmetic; Phonology
    HSV kategori
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-108812 (URN)10.1016/j.lindif.2014.03.015 (DOI)000336820400028 ()
    Tilgjengelig fra: 2014-07-07 Laget: 2014-07-06 Sist oppdatert: 2023-12-28
    3. Phonology and arithmetic in the language-calculation network
    Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Phonology and arithmetic in the language-calculation network
    2015 (engelsk)Inngår i: Brain and Language, ISSN 0093-934X, E-ISSN 1090-2155, Vol. 143, s. 97-105Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Arithmetic and language processing involve similar neural networks, but the relative engagement remains unclear. In the present study we used fMRI to compare activation for phonological, multiplication and subtraction tasks, keeping the stimulus material constant, within a predefined language-calculation network including left inferior frontal gyrus and angular gyrus (AG) as well as superior parietal lobule and the intraparietal sulcus bilaterally. Results revealed a generally left lateralized activation pattern within the language-calculation network for phonology and a bilateral activation pattern for arithmetic, and suggested regional differences between tasks. In particular, we found a more prominent role for phonology than arithmetic in pars opercularis of the left inferior frontal gyrus but domain generality in pars triangularis. Parietal activation patterns demonstrated greater engagement of the visual and quantity systems for calculation than language. This set of findings supports the notion of a common, but regionally differentiated, language-calculation network. (C) 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc.

    sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
    Elsevier, 2015
    Emneord
    Phonology; Arithmetic; Brain imaging; Perisylvian language network
    HSV kategori
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-117794 (URN)10.1016/j.bandl.2015.02.004 (DOI)000352659600010 ()25797099 (PubMedID)
    Merknad

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council [2005-1353].

    The previous status of this article was Manuscript and the working title was Phonological but not arithmetic processing engages left posterior inferior frontal gyrus.

    Tilgjengelig fra: 2015-05-11 Laget: 2015-05-08 Sist oppdatert: 2023-12-28bibliografisk kontrollert
    4. Deaf signers use magnitude manipulatioin strategies for mulitplication: fMRI evidence
    Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Deaf signers use magnitude manipulatioin strategies for mulitplication: fMRI evidence
    Vise andre…
    2014 (engelsk)Manuskript (preprint) (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Evidence suggests that the lag reported in mathematics for deaf signers derives from difficulties related to the verbal system of number processing as described in the triple code model. For hearing individuals the verbal system has been shown to be recruited for both arithmetic and language tasks. In the present study we investigate for the first time neuronal representations of arithmetic in deaf signers. We examine if the neural network supporting arithmetic and language, including the horizontal portion of the intraparietal sulcus (HIPS), the superior parietal lobule (SPL) bilaterally, the left angular gyrus (AG), pars opercularis (POPE) and pars triangularis (PTRI) of the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), is differently recruited for deaf and hearing individuals. Imaging data were collected from 16 deaf signers and 16 well-matched hearing nonsigners, using the same stimulus material for all tasks, but with different cues. During multiplication, deaf signers recruited rHIPS more than hearing non-signers, suggesting greater involvement of magnitude manipulation processes related to the quantity system, whereas there was no evidence that the verbal system was recruited. Further, there was no support for the notion of a common representation of phonology for sign and speech as previously suggested.

    Emneord
    Arithmetic; phonology; fMRI; deaf; sign language; magnitude manipulation
    HSV kategori
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-111560 (URN)
    Tilgjengelig fra: 2014-10-24 Laget: 2014-10-24 Sist oppdatert: 2023-12-28bibliografisk kontrollert
    Fulltekst (pdf)
    Dealing with Digits: Arithmetic, Memory and Phonology in Deaf Signers
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  • 21.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Elwér, Åsa
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Pedagogik och didaktik. Linköpings universitet, Utbildningsvetenskap.
    Maki-Torkko, Elina
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Arithmetic in the adult deaf signing brain2020Inngår i: Journal of Neuroscience Research, ISSN 0360-4012, E-ISSN 1097-4547, Vol. 98, nr 4, s. 643-654Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    We have previously shown that deaf signers recruit partially different brain regions during simple arithmetic compared to a group of hearing non-signers, despite similar performance. Specifically, hearing individuals show more widespread activation in brain areas that have been related to the verbal system of numerical processing, i.e., the left angular and inferior frontal gyrus, whereas deaf individuals engaged brain areas that have been related to the quantity system of numerical processing, i.e., the right horizontal intraparietal sulcus. This indicates that compared to hearing non-signers, deaf signers can successfully make use of processes located in partially different brain areas during simple arithmetic. In this study, which is a conceptual replication and extension of the above-presented study, the main aim is to understand similarities and differences in neural correlates supporting arithmetic in deaf compared to hearing individuals. The primary objective is to investigate the role of the right horizontal intraparietal gyrus, the left inferior frontal gyrus, the hippocampus, and the left angular gyrus during simple and difficult arithmetic and how these regions are connected to each other. A second objective is to explore what other brain regions support arithmetic in deaf signers. Up to 34 adult deaf signers and the same amount of hearing non-signers will be enrolled in an functional magnetic resonance imaging study that will include simple and difficult subtraction and multiplication. Brain imaging data will be analyzed using whole-brain analysis, region of interest analysis and connectivity analysis. This is the first study to investigate neural underpinnings of arithmetic of different difficulties in deaf individuals.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 22.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Fransson, Peter
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Deaf signers and hearing non-signers recruit similar networks for arithmetic and phonological tasks2013Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Profoundly deaf individuals sometimes have difficulty with arithmetic and phonological tasks. In the present study we investigate if these differences can be attributed to differences in recruitment of neurobiological networks. Seventeen hearing non-signers (HN) and sixteen deaf signers (DS) matched on age, gender and non-verbal intelligence took part in an fMRI study. In the scanner three digit/letter pairs were visually presented and the participants performed six different blocked tasks tapping processing of digit and letter order, multiplication, subtraction and phonological ability. Data were analysed using two 2x2x2 ANOVAs; process (arithmetic, language) x level (high, low) x group (DS, HN). A main effect of process revealed language networks in the left inferior frontal gryus, supramarginal gyrus, fusiform gyrus and insula. Arithmetic networks included left middle orbital gyrus and superior medial gyrus. A main effect of level revealed low level processing (digit/letter order) in the right middle occipital gyrus and the right precuneus and high level processing (subtraction/multiplication/phonological ability) in left inferior frontal gyrus. There was no main effect of group but a significant task x group interaction in the right temporal pole which in DS (but not HN) was activated more for arithmetic than language processing (pfwe = .022) when multiplication was included in the analysis. This region is implicated in conceptual representation. These results suggest that both arithmetic and language are processed similarly by DS and HN with possible between-group differences in the use of conceptual representation in arithmetic and language tasks.

  • 23.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Fransson, Peter
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Deaf signers use magnitude manipulatioin strategies for mulitplication: fMRI evidence2014Manuskript (preprint) (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Evidence suggests that the lag reported in mathematics for deaf signers derives from difficulties related to the verbal system of number processing as described in the triple code model. For hearing individuals the verbal system has been shown to be recruited for both arithmetic and language tasks. In the present study we investigate for the first time neuronal representations of arithmetic in deaf signers. We examine if the neural network supporting arithmetic and language, including the horizontal portion of the intraparietal sulcus (HIPS), the superior parietal lobule (SPL) bilaterally, the left angular gyrus (AG), pars opercularis (POPE) and pars triangularis (PTRI) of the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), is differently recruited for deaf and hearing individuals. Imaging data were collected from 16 deaf signers and 16 well-matched hearing nonsigners, using the same stimulus material for all tasks, but with different cues. During multiplication, deaf signers recruited rHIPS more than hearing non-signers, suggesting greater involvement of magnitude manipulation processes related to the quantity system, whereas there was no evidence that the verbal system was recruited. Further, there was no support for the notion of a common representation of phonology for sign and speech as previously suggested.

  • 24.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Fransson, Peter
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    The neural basis of arithmetic and phonology in deaf signing individuals2019Inngår i: Language, Cognition and Neuroscience, ISSN 2327-3798, E-ISSN 2327-3801, Vol. 34, nr 7, s. 813-825Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Deafness is generally associated with poor mental arithmetic, possibly due to neuronal differences in arithmetic processing across language modalities. Here, we investigated for the first time the neuronal networks supporting arithmetic processing in adult deaf signers. Deaf signing adults and hearing non-signing peers performed arithmetic and phonological tasks during fMRI scanning. At whole brain level, activation patterns were similar across groups. Region of interest analyses showed that although both groups activated phonological processing regions in the left inferior frontal gyrus to a similar extent during both phonological and multiplication tasks, deaf signers showed significantly more activation in the right horizontal portion of the inferior parietal sulcus. This region is associated with magnitude manipulation along the mental number line. This pattern of results suggests that deaf signers rely more on magnitude manipulation than hearing non-signers during multiplication, but that phonological involvement does not differ significantly between groups.Abbreviations: AAL: Automated Anatomy Labelling; fMRI: functional magnetic resonance imaging; HIPS: horizontal portion of the intraparietal sulcus; lAG: left angular gyrus; lIFG: left inferior frontal gyrus; rHIPS: right horizontal portion of the intraparietal sulcus

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 25.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Fransson, Peter
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ingvar, Martin
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Phonological processing during arithmetic processing across language modalities2011Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 26.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Fransson, Peter
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Ingvar, Martin
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Phonological recruitment during arithmetic processing across language modalities2011Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 27.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Fransson, Peter
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    fMRI Evidence of Magnitude Manipulation during Numerical Order Processing in Congenitally Deaf Signers2018Inngår i: Neural Plasticity, ISSN 2090-5904, E-ISSN 1687-5443, artikkel-id 2576047Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Congenital deafness is often compensated by early sign language use leading to typical language development with corresponding neural underpinnings. However, deaf individuals are frequently reported to have poorer numerical abilities than hearing individuals and it is not known whether the underlying neuronal networks differ between groups. In the present study, adult deaf signers and hearing nonsigners performed a digit and letter order tasks, during functional magnetic resonance imaging. We found the neuronal networks recruited in the two tasks to be generally similar across groups, with significant activation in the dorsal visual stream for the letter order task, suggesting letter identification and position encoding. For the digit order task, no significant activation was found for either of the two groups. Region of interest analyses on parietal numerical processing regions revealed different patterns of activation across groups. Importantly, deaf signers showed significant activation in the right horizontal portion of the intraparietal sulcus for the digit order task, suggesting engagement of magnitude manipulation during numerical order processing in this group.

  • 28.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Fransson, Peter
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Phonology and arithmetic in the language-calculation network2015Inngår i: Brain and Language, ISSN 0093-934X, E-ISSN 1090-2155, Vol. 143, s. 97-105Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Arithmetic and language processing involve similar neural networks, but the relative engagement remains unclear. In the present study we used fMRI to compare activation for phonological, multiplication and subtraction tasks, keeping the stimulus material constant, within a predefined language-calculation network including left inferior frontal gyrus and angular gyrus (AG) as well as superior parietal lobule and the intraparietal sulcus bilaterally. Results revealed a generally left lateralized activation pattern within the language-calculation network for phonology and a bilateral activation pattern for arithmetic, and suggested regional differences between tasks. In particular, we found a more prominent role for phonology than arithmetic in pars opercularis of the left inferior frontal gyrus but domain generality in pars triangularis. Parietal activation patterns demonstrated greater engagement of the visual and quantity systems for calculation than language. This set of findings supports the notion of a common, but regionally differentiated, language-calculation network. (C) 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 29.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Avdelningen för kognition, utveckling och handikapp (CDD).
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Avdelningen för kognition, utveckling och handikapp (CDD).
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap.
    Arithmetic and phonological processes in deaf native signers2008Inngår i: The first meeting of the federation of the European societies of neuropsychology,2008, 2008Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 30.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Arithmetic and phonological processes in deaf signers and hearing non-signers - a cognitive study2008Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 31.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Avdelningen för kognition, utveckling och handikapp (CDD).
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Avdelningen för kognition, utveckling och handikapp (CDD).
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap.
    Arithmetic and phonological processing in deaf native signers and hearing non-signers2008Inngår i: First European Congress of Neuropsychology,2008, 2008Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 32.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Complex symbol precessing in deaf native signers and hearing non-signers2009Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 33.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Deaf signers use phonology to do arithmetic2014Inngår i: Learning and individual differences, ISSN 1041-6080, E-ISSN 1873-3425, Vol. 32, s. 246-253Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Deaf students generally lag several years behind hearing peers in arithmetic, but little is known about the mechanisms behind this. In the present study we investigated how phonological skills interact with arithmetic. Eighteen deaf signers and eighteen hearing non-signers took part in an experiment that manipulated arithmetic and phonological knowledge in the language modalities of sign and speech. Independent tests of alphabetical and native language phonological skills were also administered. There was no difference in performance between groups on subtraction, but hearing non-signers performed better than deaf signers on multiplication. For the deaf signers but not the hearing non-signers, multiplicative reasoning was associated with both alphabetical and phonological skills. This indicates that deaf signing adults rely on language processes to solve multiplication tasks, possibly because automatization of multiplication is less well established in deaf adults.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    Fulltext
  • 34.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Dealing with digits: short-term memory differences in deaf signers and hearing non-signers2011Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 35.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Language modality specific affects on simple spans in deaf signers and hearing non-signers2010Inngår i: Second European Congress of Neuropsychology, September, Amsterdam, 2010Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 36.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Language modality specific effects on simple spans in deaf signers and hearing non-signers2010Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 37.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Phonological similarity and sensory memory traces modulate span size in deaf signers and hearing non-signers2010Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 38.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rhyme and Reason - do deaf signers use phonology to do arithmetic?2010Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 39.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Avdelningen för kognition, utveckling och handikapp (CDD). Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Avdelningen för kognition, utveckling och handikapp (CDD). Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Simple spans in deaf signers and hearing non-signers2010Inngår i: BEHAVIOURAL NEUROLOGY, ISSN 0953-4180, Vol. 23, nr 4, s. 207-208Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 40.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Simple spans in deaf signers and hearing nonsigners2010Inngår i: Behavioural Neurology, ISSN 0953-4180, E-ISSN 1875-8584, Vol. 23, nr 4, s. 207-208Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 41.
    Andraos, Rama
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för inflammation och infektion. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Medicincentrum, Reumatologiska kliniken i Östergötland.
    Ahmad, Awais
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för inflammation och infektion. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Diagnostikcentrum, Klinisk immunologi och transfusionsmedicin.
    Eriksson, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för inflammation och infektion. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Medicincentrum, Reumatologiska kliniken i Östergötland.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Wirestam, Lina
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för inflammation och infektion. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Medicincentrum, Reumatologiska kliniken i Östergötland.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för inflammation och infektion. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Diagnostikcentrum, Klinisk immunologi och transfusionsmedicin.
    Hesselstrand, Roger
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Bengtsson, Anders A.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Jonsen, Andreas
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Andreasson, Kristofer
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Sjöwall, Christopher
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för inflammation och infektion. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Medicincentrum, Reumatologiska kliniken i Östergötland.
    Autoantibodies associated with systemic sclerosis in three autoimmune diseases imprinted by type I interferon gene dysregulation: a comparison across SLE, primary Sjogrens syndrome and systemic sclerosis2022Inngår i: Lupus Science and Medicine, E-ISSN 2053-8790, Vol. 9, nr 1, artikkel-id e000732Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    ObjectiveSLE, primary Sjogrens syndrome (pSS) and systemic sclerosis (SSc) are heterogeneous autoimmune diseases with a dysregulated type I interferon (IFN) system. The diseases often show overlapping clinical manifestations, which may result in diagnostic challenges. We asked to which extent SSc-associated autoantibodies are present in SLE and pSS, and whether these link to serum IFN-alpha, clinical phenotypes and sex. Samples with clinical data from patients with SSc and healthy blood donors (HBDs) served as controls. Finally, the diagnostic performance of SSc-associated autoantibodies was evaluated.MethodsSamples from well-characterised subjects with SLE (n=510), pSS (n=116), SSc (n=57) and HBDs (n=236) were analysed using a commercially available immunoassay (EuroLine Systemic Sclerosis Profile (IgG)). IFN-alpha was quantified by ELISA. Self-reported data on Raynauds phenomenon (RP) were available.ResultsWith exceptions for anti-Ro52/SSA and anti-Th/To, SSc-associated autoantibodies were more frequent in SSc than in SLE, pSS and HBDs regardless of sex. IFN-alpha levels correlated with the number of positive SSc-associated autoantibodies (r=0.29, p<0.0001) and associated with Ro52/SSA positivity (p<0.0001). By using data from SLE, SSc and HBDs, RP was significantly associated with topoisomerase I, centromere protein (CENP)-B, RNA polymerase III 11 kDa, RNA polymerase III 155 kDa and PM-Scl100 whereas Ro52/SSA associated inversely with RP. In SLE, CENP-A was associated with immunological disorder, CENP-B with serositis and Ku with lupus nephritis. By combining analysis of ANA (immunofluorescence) with SSc-associated autoantibodies, the diagnostic sensitivity reached 98% and the specificity 33%.ConclusionsThe 13 specificities included in the EuroLine immunoassay are commonly detected in SSc, but they are also frequent among individuals with other diseases imprinted by type I IFNs. These findings are valuable when interpreting serological data on patients with suspected SSc, especially as patients may present with disease manifestations overlapping different rheumatological diseases. In SLE, we observed associations between manifestations and SSc-associated autoantibodies which have not previously been reported.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 42.
    Andreassen, Maria
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för samhälls- och välfärdsstudier, Avdelningen för arbetsterapi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Boman, I-L
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Danderyd University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet Stockholm, Sweden.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för samhälls- och välfärdsstudier, Avdelningen för arbetsterapi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Digital Support for Persons with Cognitive Impairment2017Inngår i: Harnessing the Power of Technology to Improve Lives / [ed] Cudd P.,de Witte L., IOS Press, 2017, Vol. 242, s. 5-8Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Cognitive impairment may cause difficulties in planning and initiating daily activities, as well as remembering to do what is scheduled. This study investigates the effectiveness of an interactive web-based mobile reminder calendar that sends text messages to the users mobile phone as support in everyday life, for persons with cognitive impairment due to neurological injury/diagnoses. The study has a randomised controlled trail design with data collection at baseline and at follow-up sessions after two and four months. Data collection started in August 2016 and continues until December 2017. The interactive web-based mobile reminder calendar may give the needed support to remind the person and thus increase the ability to perform activities and to be independence in everyday life. Preliminary results will be presented regarding what effect the interactive web-based mobile reminder calendar have for the participants performance of everyday life activities as well as perceived quality of life.

  • 43.
    Andreassen, Maria
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för omvårdnad och reproduktiv hälsa. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    An interactive digital calendar with mobile phone reminders (RemindMe) for people with cognitive impairment: a pilot randomized controlled trial2022Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 29, nr 4, s. 270-281Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background People with cognitive impairment often need support to perform everyday-life activities. Interventions are available, but evidence-based interventions are lacking. Aim This pilot RCT aimed to investigate use of an intervention with an interactive digital calendar with mobile phone reminders (RemindMe) in relation to change in outcomes and impact on occupational performance, independence, health-related quality of life, and psychosocial impact of the support for people with cognitive impairment. Method The study design was a multi-centre parallel-group pilot RCT [ClinicalTrails.gov, identifier: NCT04470219]. Fifteen participants from primary rehabilitation centres in Sweden were recruited and randomly assigned to intervention group (n = 8) receiving the intervention with RemindMe, or control group (n = 7) receiving usual treatment by an occupational therapist. Data were collected at baseline, after two- and four months, and analysed using descriptive and non-parametric statistics. Result The Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM), and the Functional Independence Measure (FIM item n-r) showed significant differences. There were no significant differences in health-related quality of life nor in the psychosocial impact of the used support. Conclusion Plausible changes in outcome measures were found in COPM and FIM (items n-r). These instruments indicate change in outcome measures and impact on occupational performance and independence.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 44.
    Andreassen, Maria
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Boman, Inga-Lill
    Danderyd Hosp, Sweden.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för omvårdnad och reproduktiv hälsa. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Feasibility of an Intervention for Patients with Cognitive Impairment Using an Interactive Digital Calendar with Mobile Phone Reminders (RemindMe) to Improve the Performance of Activities in Everyday Life2020Inngår i: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 17, nr 7, artikkel-id 2222Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to increase evidence-based interventions by investigating the feasibility of an intervention using an interactive digital calendar with mobile phone reminders (RemindMe) as support in everyday life. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected from participating patients (n = 8) and occupational therapists (n = 7) from three rehabilitation clinics in Sweden. The intervention consisted of delivering the interactive digital calendar RemindMe, receiving an individualized introduction, a written manual, and individual weekly conversations for two months with follow-up assessments after two and four months. Feasibility areas of acceptability, demand, implementation, practicality, and integration were examined. Patients expressed their interest and intention to use RemindMe and reported a need for reminders and individualized support. By using reminders in activities in everyday life their autonomy was supported. The study also demonstrated the importance of confirming reminders and the possible role of habit-forming. Occupational therapists perceived the intervention to be useful at the rehabilitation clinics and the weekly support conversations enabled successful implementation. This study confirmed the importance of basing and tailoring the intervention to patients needs and thus being person-centered.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 45.
    Arehart, Kathryn
    et al.
    University of Colorado, CO 80309 USA.
    Souza, Pamela
    Northwestern University, IL USA.
    Kates, James
    University of Colorado, CO 80309 USA.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Syskind Pedersen, Michael
    Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Relationship Among Signal Fidelity, Hearing Loss, and Working Memory for Digital Noise Suppression2015Inngår i: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 36, nr 5, s. 505-516Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: This study considered speech modified by additive babble combined with noise-suppression processing. The purpose was to determine the relative importance of the signal modifications, individual peripheral hearing loss, and individual cognitive capacity on speech intelligibility and speech quality. Design: The participant group consisted of 31 individuals with moderate high-frequency hearing loss ranging in age from 51 to 89 years (mean = 69.6 years). Speech intelligibility and speech quality were measured using low-context sentences presented in babble at several signal-to-noise ratios. Speech stimuli were processed with a binary mask noise-suppression strategy with systematic manipulations of two parameters (error rate and attenuation values). The cumulative effects of signal modification produced by babble and signal processing were quantified using an envelope-distortion metric. Working memory capacity was assessed with a reading span test. Analysis of variance was used to determine the effects of signal processing parameters on perceptual scores. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to determine the role of degree of hearing loss and working memory capacity in individual listener response to the processed noisy speech. The model also considered improvements in envelope fidelity caused by the binary mask and the degradations to envelope caused by error and noise. Results: The participants showed significant benefits in terms of intelligibility scores and quality ratings for noisy speech processed by the ideal binary mask noise-suppression strategy. This benefit was observed across a range of signal-to-noise ratios and persisted when up to a 30% error rate was introduced into the processing. Average intelligibility scores and average quality ratings were well predicted by an objective metric of envelope fidelity. Degree of hearing loss and working memory capacity were significant factors in explaining individual listeners intelligibility scores for binary mask processing applied to speech in babble. Degree of hearing loss and working memory capacity did not predict listeners quality ratings. Conclusions: The results indicate that envelope fidelity is a primary factor in determining the combined effects of noise and binary mask processing for intelligibility and quality of speech presented in babble noise. Degree of hearing loss and working memory capacity are significant factors in explaining variability in listeners speech intelligibility scores but not in quality ratings.

  • 46.
    Arehart, Kathryn
    et al.
    University of Colorado, UCB 409, Boulder, Departmen of Speech , Language and Hearing Sciences.
    Souza, Pamela
    Northwestern University, Roxelyn and Richard Pepper Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, United States.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Syskin Pedersen, Michael
    Oticon.
    James M, Kate
    University of Colorado at Boulder , Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences (SLHS), Electrical Engineering..
    Relationship between distortion and working memory for digital noise-reduction processing in hearing aids2014Inngår i: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, ISSN 0001-4966, Vol. 133, nr 5Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Several recent studies have shown a relationship between working memory and the ability of older adults to benefit from specific advanced signal processing algorithms in hearing aids. In this study, we quantify tradeoffs between benefit due to noise reduction and the perceptual costs associated with distortion caused by the noise reduction algorithm. We also investigate the relationship between these tradeoffs and working memory abilities. Speech intelligibility, speech quality, and perceived listening effort were measured in a cohort of elderly adults with hearing loss. Test materials were low-context sentences presented in fluctuating noise conditions at several signal-to-noise ratios. Speech stimuli were processed with a binary mask noise-reduction strategy. The amount of distortion produced by the noise reduction algorithm was parametrically varied by manipulating two binary mask parameters, error rate, and attenuation rate. Working memory was assessed with a reading span test. Results will be discussed in terms of the extent to which intelligibility, quality, and effort ratings are explained by the amount of distortion and/or noise and by working memory ability. [Funded by NIH, Oticon, and GN ReSound.].

  • 47.
    Arlinger, Stig
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Teknisk audiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Sternäng, Ola
    Stockholm University.
    Wahlin, Åke
    Psykologiska institutionen, Stockholms universitet.
    Nilsson, L-G
    Auditory deficits are related to episodic long-term memory deficits2009Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 48.
    Arthur, Jonathan
    et al.
    Royal Glamorgan Hosp, Wales; Swansea Univ, Wales.
    Watts, Tessa
    Swansea Univ, Wales.
    Davies, Ruth
    Swansea Univ, Wales.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA; Audiol India, India.
    Slater, Julie
    Swansea Univ, Wales.
    An exploratory study identifying a possible response shift phenmena of the Glassglow hearing aid benifit profile2016Inngår i: Audiology Research, ISSN 2039-4330, E-ISSN 2039-4349, Vol. 6, nr 2, s. 44-48Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    A then test technique was used to investigate the possibility of a response shift in the Glasgow hearing aid benefit profile (GHABP). Following completion of part 1 of the GHABP, 16 adults were invited for hearing-aid follow up appointments. In accordance with then-test technique, participants were asked to think back to before they had their hearing-aids fitted and the GHABP part 1 was completed again to re-establish the disability and handicap scores. These scores were then compared with the initial GHABP part I scores. Paired T testing and Wilcoxon Rank tests were carried out to investigate the statistical significance of the response shift effect. Statistically significant differences were seen between initial and retrospective GHABP (disability) scores using t test. No significant differences could be seen between the initial and retrospective handicap scores. Results suggest participants may have demonstrated a possible response shift phenomenon with the disability construct of the GHABP questionnaire, related to a possible re-calibration effect or a denial of disability effect. This exploratory study suggests that the GHABP questionnaire may be subject to a response shift phenomena. We suggest that further more robust studies are completed to verify this and recommend that this could have psychological impact on participants when explaining the results of the outcome measure and may affect hearing aid use. There is also potential for this phenomenon to affect global GHABP scores specifically when demonstrating to stakeholders the overall success of an audiology service.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 49.
    Arvola, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för datavetenskap, Interaktiva och kognitiva system. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Forsblad (Kristiansson), Mattias
    Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Avdelningen för funktionsnedsättning och samhälle.
    Autonomous Vehicles for Children with Mild Intellectual Disability: Perplexity, Curiosity, Surprise, and Confusion2023Inngår i: Proceedings of the European Conference on Cognitive Ergonomics 2023: Responsible Technology Community, Culture, and Sustainability / [ed] Alan Dix, Irene Reppa, Carina Westling, Harry Witchel, Stéphane Safin, Gerrit van der Veer, Joseph MacInnes, Harry Witchel, Raymond Bond, New York, NY, USA: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2023, s. 1-8, artikkel-id 25Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-driving buses will be part of the public transportation system of the future, and they must therefore be accessible to all. The study reported in this paper examines the user experiences of 16 children with mild intellectual disability riding a self-driving bus. The qualitative analysis, performed by iterative affinity diagramming, of interviews, observations, and a co-design session with five of the children, suggests that familiar situations were characterized by contemplation and curiosity, while unfamiliar ones were characterized by surprise or confusion. The temporal structure of past, present, and future situations in the field of attention played a significant role in the children’s experiences. This leads to design considerations for an explainable interior of self-driving buses.

  • 50.
    Asker-Árnason, Lena
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Ibertsson, Tina
    Lunds universitet.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Wengelin, Åsa
    Lunds universitet.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Lunds universitet.
    Narrative writing assessed with keystroke-logging in children with CI2007Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
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