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  • 1.
    Björk, Mathilda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy.
    Thyberg, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Valtersson, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Katz, Patricia
    University of California, San Francisco, USA.
    Validation and internal consistency of the Swedish version of the Valued Life Activities scale.2016In: Clinical Rehabilitation, ISSN 0269-2155, E-ISSN 1477-0873, Vol. 30, no 12, p. 1211-1219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The objective was to create a linguistically and culturally validated Swedish version of the Valued Life Activities scale. The aim was also to describe its content and concurrent validity and its internal consistency in persons with rheumatoid arthritis.

    METHODS: The Valued Life Activities scale was translated to Swedish and culturally adapted. In order to describe the content validity, both the Swedish and original Valued Life Activities scale were linked to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. The concurrent validity and internal consistency were evaluated in 737 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. To establish concurrent validity, the scale was correlated to disease activity, activity limitations, and life satisfaction. Internal consistency was assessed with Cronbach's alpha.

    RESULTS: The equivalence of meaning between the Swedish and the original Valued Life Activities scale was ensured by harmonization review. Content validity was high when linked to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Concurrent validity showed a strong correlation with the activity limitations (r = 0.87), moderate with life satisfaction (r = -0.61), and weak with disease activity (r = 0.38). Internal consistency was excellent (Cronbach's alpha = 0.97).

    CONCLUSIONS: The Swedish Valued Life Activities scale has been tested in a large and well-characterized sample and found to be a linguistically valid and culturally adapted self-reported measure of participation. Content validity of the Valued Life Activities scale was excellent, concurrent validity strong, and the internal consistency excellent. Since both individual preferences and International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health concepts of disability are taken into account, the Swedish Valued Life Activities scale appears to be a promising new scale addressing important aspects of participation.

  • 2.
    Hermansen, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Cleland, Joshua A.
    Franklin Pierce University, NH USA .
    Kammerlind, Ann-Sofi
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Peolsson, L.C.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Evaluation of Physical Function in Individuals 11 to 14 Years after AnteriorCervical Decompression and Fusion Surgery: A Comparison betweenPatients and Healthy Reference Samples and Between 2 Surgical Techniques2014In: Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, ISSN 0161-4754, E-ISSN 1532-6586, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 87-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate neck-related physical function in individuals 11 to 14 years after anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF) surgery for degenerative cervical disk disease and to compare the long-term outcome of 2 surgical techniques, including the Cloward procedure and cervical intervertebral fusion cage. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 51 individuals, 11 years or more after ACDF, underwent testing of cervical active range of motion, hand-grip strength, static and dynamic balance, neck muscle endurance, and completed pain ratings. The participants values were compared with values of age-and sex-matched healthy individuals to evaluate impairments. Correlations between different test scores and pain were performed. Group differences were analyzed between the 2 surgical techniques. Results: Sixty-five percent and 82% exhibited impairment in ventral and dorsal neck muscle endurance, respectively. Impairment rates of 18% to 39% for cervical active range of motion, 27% to 43% for hand-grip strength, 37% for standing balance, and 35% for dynamic balance were recorded. Twenty-nine percent of the participants had impairment (greater than30 mm visual analog scale) in pain. There were no significant differences in physical function between the 2 surgical treatment groups (Cloward procedure or cervical intervertebral fusion cage) (P = .10-.92). Conclusions: In those studied, a large percentage of patients who had anterior cervical decompression and fusion surgery have impairments in neck-related physical function when compared 11 to 14 years after surgery with age-and sex-matched healthy reference individuals. Neck-specific function, but not balance, was statistically correlated to pain. Neck muscle endurance was most affected, and balance impairments were also present in one-third of the individuals. There were no differences in long-term physical function between the 2 surgical techniques.

  • 3.
    Hermansen, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Hedlund, Rune
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Vavruch, Ludek
    Ryhov Hospital.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A Comparison Between the Carbon Fiber Cage and the Cloward Procedure in Cervical Spine Surgery A Ten- to Thirteen-Year Follow-Up of a Prospective Randomized Study2011In: SPINE, ISSN 0362-2436, Vol. 36, no 12, p. 919-925Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Study Design. Ten- to 13-year follow-up of a prospective randomized study. Objective. To compare the 10- to 13-year outcomes of anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF) with a cervical intervertebral fusion cage (CIFC), and the Cloward procedure (CP) using a broad clinical and patient-centered assessment. Summary of Background Data. There are few prospective studies and none with a follow-up of 10 years or more. Methods. Patient questionnaires completed 10 years or more after ACDF. Seventy-three patients (77%) responded. Radiographs were obtained at 2 years. Results. Apart from greater fulfillment of preoperative expectation (P = 0.01) and less headache (P = 0.005) in the CIFC group compared with the CP group, there were no significant differences in the outcomes of the two surgical methods. Pain intensity improved in comparison with preoperative levels in both the CIFC and CP groups (P andlt; 0.0001), but the Neck Disability Index (NDI) only improved in the CIFC group (P = 0.04). Only those with a healed fusion benefited from an improved NDI (P = 0.02). There was no deterioration in pain intensity or NDI after the 2-year follow-up. Conclusion. The outcomes of the two surgical methods, with a few exceptions, were equal at 10- to 13-year follow-up, and there was no deterioration in outcome after the 2-year follow-up. Pain intensity improved more than disability, which may indicate that further improvement of physical function requires early more extensive postoperative rehabilitation. Despite persisting disability, repeat surgery was relatively uncommon.

  • 4.
    Hermansen, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Hedlund, Rune
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden .
    Vavruch, Ludek
    Ryhov Hospital, Sweden .
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Positive predictive factors and subgroup analysis of clinically relevant improvement after anterior cervical decompression and fusion for cervical disc disease: a 10-to 13-year follow-up of a prospective randomized study Clinical article2013In: Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine, ISSN 1547-5654, E-ISSN 1547-5646, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 403-411Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Object. The main purpose of this 10- to 13-year follow-up of a prospective randomized study was to identify preoperative factors that predicted good long-term outcome after anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF) with the Cloward procedure or the cervical intervertebral fusion cage. A second purpose was to investigate subgroup differences at the 10-year follow-up between patients with and without clinically relevant improvement (CRI) and between men and women. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods. To evaluate clinically meaningful outcomes, good outcome was defined as CRI in neck-related pain intensity (andgt;= 30-mm improvement on a visual analog scale), and CRI in neck-specific disability (andgt;= 20% improvement in the neck disability index [NUT]) from preoperative measurements to the 10-year follow-up. A total of 73 patients (77% of the original study sample) completed questionnaires at least 10 years after ACDF. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults. High preoperative neck-related pain intensity and preoperative nonsmoking status were predictors of CRI in neck-related pain intensity, and male sex was a predictor of CRI in neck-specific disability; however, no additional predictive factors were identified for good outcome after ACDF. The surgical procedure, number of operated levels, and radiological factors such as healing status did not influence the prediction models. Individuals without CRI in neck-specific disability (75%) and pain intensity (43%) reported a worse outcome for several psychosocial outcome variables compared with those with CRI. At the 10-year follow-up, women reported significantly greater neck- and arm-related pain intensity than men, and women also reported more disability and worse psychosocial status. Women reported CRI on the NDI less frequently than men (p = 0.01). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions. Preoperative predictive factors of good outcome 10-13 years after ACDF included initial high neck-related pain intensity, nonsmoking status at the time of surgery, and male sex. There were greater improvements in pain intensity than in neck-specific disability, and the latter showed a greater association with psychosocial factors. These results suggest the need for multimodal postoperative rehabilitation for patients who do not have a satisfactory outcome after ACDF.

  • 5.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    et al.
    Division of Social Work, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Valtersson, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Rehabilitation Center. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy.
    Sverker, Annette
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.
    The Use of Avoidance, Adjustment, Interaction and Acceptance Strategies to Handle Participation Restrictions Among Swedish Men with Early Rheumatoid Arthritis.2016In: Musculoskeletal Care, ISSN 1478-2189, E-ISSN 1557-0681, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 206-218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Living with a chronic disease means learning to live under new circumstances and involves a continuous adaptation to new ways of living. There is increasing knowledge about how people cope with stressful life events and adapt to new life situations. Approximately a third of patients diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are men; however, few studies have described the needs and experiences of men living with RA. The aim of the present study was to explore men's strategies for handling challenges related to participation in everyday life.

    METHODS: The present study was associated with the prospective Swedish multicentre early arthritis project (given the Swedish acronym TIRA), which, in 2006-2009, included patients with early RA, contemporarily treated, with a mean disease duration of three years. From this cohort, 25 men, aged 20-63 years, were recruited consecutively. Data were collected in individual interviews, using the critical incident technique. The strategies for dealing with the challenges of RA in everyday life were analysed and categorized using content analysis.

    RESULTS: Men with RA described four types of strategy for dealing with participation restrictions in everyday life: (i) Adjustment strategies - adjust behaviour, movements, medication, equipment and clothing to find new ways to conduct tasks or activities; (ii) Avoidance strategies - avoid activities, movements, social contacts and sometimes medication; (iii) Interaction strategies - say no, ask for help and work together to handle participation restrictions; and (iv) Acceptance strategies - learn to accept RA, with the pain, the slower work pace and the extended time needed.

    CONCLUSIONS: According to men's lived experiences, a combination of strategies was used to deal with RA, depending on the situation and the experienced restriction. The results provided an understanding of how men with RA manage their disease, to reduce physical, social and emotional challenges. This knowledge may be used further to develop multi-professional interventions and patient education tailored to men with RA.

1 - 5 of 5
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