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  • 1.
    Aaltonen, Kristina E.
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Rosendahl, Ann H.
    Lund University, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Olsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Malmstrom, Per
    Lund University, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Hartman, Linda
    Lund University, Sweden; Regional Cancer Centre South, Sweden.
    Ferno, Marten
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Association between insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) negativity and poor prognosis in a cohort of women with primary breast cancer2014In: BMC Cancer, ISSN 1471-2407, E-ISSN 1471-2407, Vol. 14, no 794Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Resistance towards endocrine therapy is a great concern in breast cancer treatment and may partly be explained by the activation of compensatory signaling pathways. The aim of the present study was to investigate if the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) signaling pathway was activated or deregulated in breast cancer patients and to explore if any of the markers were prognostic, with or without adjuvant tamoxifen. This signaling pathway has been suggested to cause estrogen independent cell growth and thus contribute to resistance to endocrine treatment in estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer. Methods: The protein expression of IGF1R, phosphorylated Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (p-mTOR) and phosphorylated S6 ribosomal protein (p-S6rp) were investigated by immunohistochemistry using tissue microarrays in two patient cohorts. Cohort I (N = 264) consisted of mainly postmenopausal women with stage II breast cancer treated with tamoxifen for 2 years irrespective of ER status. Cohort II (N = 206) consisted of mainly medically untreated, premenopausal patients with node-negative breast cancer. Distant disease-free survival (DDFS) at 5 years was used as end-point for survival analyses. Results: We found that lower IGF1R expression was associated with worse prognosis for tamoxifen treated, postmenopausal women (HR = 0.70, 95% CI = 0.52 - 0.94, p = 0.016). The effect was seen mainly in ER-negative patients where the prognostic effect was retained after adjustment for other prognostic markers (adjusted HR = 0.49, 95% CI = 0.29 - 0.82, p = 0.007). Expression of IGF1R was associated with ER positivity (p less than 0.001) in the same patient cohort. Conclusions: Our results support previous studies indicating that IGF1R positivity reflects a well differentiated tumor with low metastatic capacity. An association between lack of IGF1R expression and worse prognosis was mainly seen in the ER-negative part of Cohort I. The lack of co-activation of downstream markers (p-mTOR and p-S6rp) in the IGF1R pathway suggested that the prognostic effect was not due to complete activation of this pathway. Thus, no evidence could be found for a compensatory function of IGF1R signaling in the investigated cohorts.

  • 2.
    Abelius, Martina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Enke, Uta
    University Hospital Jena, Germany.
    Varosi, Frauke
    University Hospital Jena, Germany.
    Hoyer, Heike
    University Hospital Jena, Germany.
    Schleussner, Ekkehard
    University Hospital Jena, Germany.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Markert, Udo R.
    University Hospital Jena, Germany.
    Placental immune response to apple allergen in allergic mothers2014In: Journal of Reproductive Immunology, ISSN 0165-0378, E-ISSN 1872-7603, Vol. 106, 100-109 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The immunological milieu in the placenta may be crucial for priming the developing foetal immune system. Early imbalances may promote the establishment of immune-mediated diseases in later life, including allergies. The initial exposure to allergens seems to occur in utero, but little is known about allergen-induced placental cytokine and chemokine release. The release of several cytokines and chemokines from placenta tissue after exposure to mast cell degranulator compound 48/80 or apple allergen in placentas from allergic and healthy mothers was to be analysed. Four placentas from women with apple allergy and three controls were applied in a placental perfusion model with two separate cotyledons simultaneously perfused with and without apple allergen (Mal d 1). Two control placentas were perfused with compound 48/80. In outflow, histamine was quantified spectrophotofluorometrically, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, TNF and IFN-gamma by a cytometric multiplex bead array and IL-13 and CXCL10, CXCL11, CCL17 and CCL22 with an in-house multiplex Luminex assay. Compound 48/80 induced a rapid release of histamine, CXCL10, CXCL11, CCL17 and CCL22, but not of the other factors. Apple allergen induced a time-dependent release of IL-6 and TNF, but not of histamine, in placentas of women with apple allergy compared with the unstimulated cotyledon. CCL17 levels were slightly increased after allergen stimulation in control placentas. Allergens can induce placental cytokines and chemokines distinctly in allergic and healthy mothers. These mediators may affect the prenatal development of the immune system and modify the risk of diseases related to immune disorders in childhood such as allergies.

  • 3.
    Abelius, Martina S
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Janefjord, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Matthiesen, Leif
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Duchén, Karel
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gene expression in placenta, peripheral and cord blood mononuclear cells from allergic and non-allergic women2014Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The influence of maternal allergy on the development of immune responses and allergy in the offspring is not understood.

    Objective: To investigate (i) if maternal allergy influences the gene expression locally in placenta, systemically in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and fetally in cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMC), (ii) if the gene expression in the placenta and PBMC influences the gene expression in CBMC and (iii) how the gene expression at birth relates to allergy development during  childhood.

    Methods: A real-time PCR array was used to quantify forty immune regulatory genes in placenta, PBMC (gestational week 39) and in CBMC from 7 allergic and 12 non-allergic women and their offspring. Furthermore, quantitative real-time PCR was used to measure mRNA expression of Tbx21, GATA-3, Foxp3, RORC and CCL22 in CBMC, selected based on present PCR array results and previous protein findings in cord blood, in 13 children who developed and 11 children who did not develop allergy during childhood.

    Results: The gene expression profile in the placenta revealed a T-helper (Th) 2-/anti-inflammatory environment as compared with gene expression systemically, in PBMC. Maternal allergy was associated with increased expression of p35 in PBMC and CBMC and p40 in placenta. Placental p35 expression correlated with fetal Tbx21 expression (Rho=-0.88, p<0.001) and maternal IL-5 expression in PBMC with fetal Galectin-1 (Rho=0.91, p<0.001) expression. Allergy development in the children was preceded by high mRNA expression of the Th2-associated chemokine CCL22 at birth.

    Conclusion and clinical relevance: Gene expression locally and systemically during pregnancy influenced the offspring’s gene expression at birth, indicating an interplay between maternal and fetal immunity. Children developing allergy during childhood had an increased expression of the Th2-associated chemokine CCL22 at birth, indicating a Th2 skewing before disease onset. Maternal allergy was not associated with a Th2-dominance in placenta, PBMC or CBMC.

  • 4.
    Abelius, Martina S
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lempinen, Esma
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindblad, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Matthiesen, Leif
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Th2-like chemokine levels are increased in allergic children and influenced by maternal immunity during pregnancy2014In: Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, ISSN 0905-6157, E-ISSN 1399-3038, Vol. 25, no 4, 387-393 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The influence of the intra-uterine environment on the immunity and allergy development in the offspring is unclear. We aimed to investigate (i) whether the pregnancy magnifies the Th2 immunity in allergic and non-allergic women, (ii) whether the maternal chemokine levels during pregnancy influenced the offspring’s chemokine levels during childhood and (iii) the relationship between circulating Th1/Th2-associated chemokines and allergy in mothers and children.

    Methods: The Th1-associated chemokines CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL11, and the Th2- associated chemokines CCL17, CCL18 and CCL22 were quantified by Luminex and ELISA in 20 women with and 36 women without allergic symptoms at gestational week (gw) 10–12, 15–16, 25, 35, 39 and 2 and 12 months post-partum and in their children at birth, 6, 12, 24 months and 6 yr of age. Total IgE levels were measured using ImmunoCAP Technology.

    Results: The levels of the Th2-like chemokines were not magnified by pregnancy. Instead decreased levels were shown during pregnancy (irrespectively of maternal allergy status) as compared to post-partum. In the whole group, the Th1-like chemokine levels were higher at gw 39 than during the first and second trimester and post-partum. Maternal CXCL11, CCL18 and CCL22 levels during and after pregnancy correlated with the corresponding chemokines in the offspring during childhood. Increased CCL22 and decreased CXCL10 levels in the children were associated with sensitisation and increased CCL17 levels with allergic symptoms during childhood. Maternal chemokine levels were not associated with maternal allergic disease.

    Conclusions: Allergic symptoms and sensitisation were associated with decreased Th1-and increased Th2-associated chemokine levels during childhood, indicating a Th2 shift in the allergic children, possibly influenced by the maternal immunity during pregnancy.

  • 5.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Jakobsson, H.E.
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andersson, A.F.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Björksten, B.
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Örebro University, Sweden .
    Engstrand, L.
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Low gut microbiota diversity in early infancy precedes asthma at school age2014In: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, ISSN 0954-7894, E-ISSN 1365-2222, Vol. 44, no 6, 842-850 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Low total diversity of the gut microbiota during the first year of life is associated with allergic diseases in infancy, but little is known how early microbial diversity is related to allergic disease later in school age.

    OBJECTIVE:

    To assess microbial diversity and characterize the dominant bacteria in stool during the first year of life in relation to the prevalence of different allergic diseases in school age, such as asthma, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (ARC) and eczema.

    METHODS:

    The microbial diversity and composition was analysed with barcoded 16S rDNA 454 pyrosequencing in stool samples at 1 week, 1 month and 12 months of age in 47 infants which were subsequently assessed for allergic disease and skin prick test reactivity at 7 years of age (ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT01285830).

    RESULTS:

    Children developing asthma (n = 8) had a lower diversity of the total microbiota than non-asthmatic children at 1 week (P = 0.04) and 1 month (P = 0.003) of age, whereas allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (n = 13), eczema (n = 12) and positive skin prick reactivity (n = 14) at 7 years of age did not associate with the gut microbiota diversity. Neither was asthma associated with the microbiota composition later in infancy (at 12 months). Children having IgE-associated eczema in infancy and subsequently developing asthma had lower microbial diversity than those that did not. There were no significant differences, however, in relative abundance of bacterial phyla and genera between children with or without allergic disease.

    CONCLUSION AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE:

    Low total diversity of the gut microbiota during the first month of life was associated with asthma but not ARC in children at 7 years of age. Measures affecting microbial colonization of the infant during the first month of life may impact asthma development in childhood.

  • 6.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Jakobsson, Ted
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Björksten, Bengt
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Oldaeus, Göran
    County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    No effect of probiotics on respiratory allergies: a seven-year follow-up of a randomized controlled trial in infancy2013In: Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, ISSN 0905-6157, E-ISSN 1399-3038, Vol. 24, no 6, 556-561 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Supplementation with the probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri reduced the incidence of IgE-associated allergic disease in infancy. This treatment might therefore also reduce the risk of asthma and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in school age.

    Objective

    To evaluate whether perinatal and infant supplementation with L. reuteri reduced the prevalence of respiratory allergic disease in school age and to explore whether this supplementation was associated with any long-term side effects.

    Methods

    A randomized, placebo-controlled trial with oral supplementation with Lreuteri ATCC 55730 (1 × 108 CFU) during the last month of gestation and through the first year of life comprising 232 families with allergic disease, of whom 184 completed a 7-yr follow-up. The primary outcomes at 7 yr of age were allergic disease and skin prick test reactivity (ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT01285830).

    Results

    The prevalence of asthma (15% in the probiotic vs. 16% in placebo group), allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (27% vs. 20%), eczema (21% vs. 19%) and skin prick test reactivity (29% vs. 26%) was similar in the probiotic and placebo group. Growth indices and gastrointestinal symptoms were similar in the two groups. No severe adverse events were reported.

    Conclusion

    The effect of L. reuteri on sensitization and IgE-associated eczema in infancy did not lead to a lower prevalence of respiratory allergic disease in school age. Thus, the effect of L. reuteri on the immune system seems to be transient. Administration of L. reuteri during the last weeks of gestation and in infancy was not associated with any long-term side effects.

  • 7.
    Abuzeid, Nadir
    et al.
    Medical and Aromat Plants Research Institute, Sudan; Omdurman Islamic University, Sudan.
    Kalsum, Sadaf
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Koshy, Richin John
    Larsson, Marie C
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Glader, Mikaela
    Andersson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Raffetseder, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Pienaar, Elsje
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eklund, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Alhassan, Muddathir S.
    Medical and Aromat Plants Research Institute, Sudan.
    AlGadir, Haidar A.
    Medical and Aromat Plants Research Institute, Sudan.
    Koko, Waleed S.
    Medical and Aromat Plants Research Institute, Sudan.
    Schon, Thomas
    Kalmar County Hospital, Sweden.
    Ahmed Mesaik, M.
    University of Kebangsaan Malaysia, Malaysia; University of Karachi, Pakistan.
    Abdalla, Omer M.
    University of Karachi, Pakistan.
    Khalid, Asaad
    Medical and Aromat Plants Research Institute, Sudan.
    Lerm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Antimycobacterial activity of selected medicinal plants traditionally used in Sudan to treat infectious diseases2014In: Journal of Ethnopharmacology, ISSN 0378-8741, E-ISSN 1872-7573, Vol. 157, 134-139 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ethnopharmacological relevance: The emergence of multidrug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis underscores the need for continuous development of new and efficient methods to determine the susceptibility of isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the search for novel antimycobacterial agents. Natural products constitute an important source of new drugs, and design and implementation of antimycobacterial susceptibility testing methods are necessary to evaluate the different extracts and compounds. In this study we have explored the antimycobacterial properties of 50 ethanolic extracts from different parts of 46 selected medicinal plants traditionally used in Sudan to treat infectious diseases. Materials and methods: Plants were harvested and ethanolic extracts were prepared. For selected extracts, fractionation with hydrophilic and hydrophobic solvents was undertaken. A luminometry-based assay was used for determination of mycobacterial growth in broth cultures and inside primary human macrophages in the presence or absence of plant extracts and fractions of extracts. Cytotoxicity was also assessed for active fractions of plant extracts. Results: Of the tested extracts, three exhibited a significant inhibitory effect on an avirulent strain of Mycobacterium tubercluosis (H37Ra) at the initial screening doses (125 and 6.25 mu g/ml). These were bark and leaf extracts of Khaya senegalensis and the leaf extract of Rosmarinus officinalis L. Further fractions of these plant extracts were prepared with n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, n-butanol, ethanol and water, and the activity of these extracts was retained in hydrophobic fractions. Cytotoxicity assays revealed that the chloroform fraction of Khaya senegalensis bark was non-toxic to human monocyte-derived macrophages and other cell types at the concentrations used and hence, further analysis, including assessment of IC50 and intracellular activity was done with this fraction. Conclusion: These results encourage further investigations to identify the active compound(s) within the chloroform fraction of Khaya senegalensis bark. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 8.
    Agholme, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Macias, Brandon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hamang, Matt
    Lilly Research Labs, IN USA .
    Lucchesi, Jonathan
    Lilly Research Labs, IN USA .
    Adrian, Mary D.
    Lilly Research Labs, IN USA .
    Kuhstoss, Stuart
    Lilly Research Labs, IN USA .
    Harvey, Anita
    Lilly Research Labs, IN USA .
    Sato, Masahiko
    Lilly Research Labs, IN USA .
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Efficacy of a Sclerostin Antibody Compared to a Low Dose of PTH on Metaphyseal Bone Healing2014In: Journal of Orthopaedic Research, ISSN 0736-0266, E-ISSN 1554-527X, Vol. 32, no 3, 471-476 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We compared the effect of a sclerostin antibody to that of a clinically relevant dose of parathyroid hormone (PTH) in a rat model for metaphyseal bone healing. Screws of steel or poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA) were inserted bilaterally into the proximal tibia of young male rats. During 4 weeks the animals then received injections of either phosphate buffered saline (control), sclerostin antibody (25mg/kg, twice weekly) or PTH (5 mu g/kg, daily). The healing response around the screws was then assessed by mechanical testing and X-ray microtomography (mu CT). To distinguish between effects on healing and general effects on the skeleton, other untraumatized bone sites and serum biomarkers were also assessed. After 4 weeks of treatment, PTH yielded a 48% increase in screw pull-out force compared to control (p=0.03), while the antibody had no significant effect. In contrast, the antibody increased femoral cortical and vertebral strength where PTH had no significant effect. mu CT showed only slight changes that were statistically significant for the antibody mainly at cortical sites. The results suggest that a relatively low dose of PTH stimulates metaphyseal repair (screw fixation) specifically, whereas the sclerostin antibody has wide-spread effects, mainly on cortical bone, with less influence on metaphyseal healing.

  • 9.
    Agholme, Lotta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hallbeck, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Getting rid of intracellular Aβ- loss of cellular degradation leads to transfer between connected neurons2014In: Current pharmaceutical design, ISSN 1381-6128, E-ISSN 1873-4286, Vol. 20, no 15, 2458-2468 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The sporadic, late onset form of Alzheimers disease (AD) shares pathological hallmarks with the familial form; however, no clear reason for increased beta-amyloid (A beta) generation has been found in the former. It has long been speculated that the late onset form of AD is caused by reduced degradation and/or clearance of A beta. Indeed, both intracellular degradation systems, the proteasomal and lysosomal systems, have been shown to be defective in AD. Reduced proteasome activity increases levels of intracellular and secreted A beta. Furthermore, accumulation of improperly degraded A beta in the lysosomes causes lysosomal disruption and cell death. We recently showed that oligomeric A beta can be transmitted from one neuron to another, which causes neurotoxicity. In both the donating and receiving cells, A beta accumulates in the endo-lysosomal compartment. It is possible that ineffective degradation of A beta causes its transfer to neighboring neurons, thereby spreading AD pathology. This review summarizes the data underlying the idea of reduced A beta clearance and subsequent A beta spread in AD, and also suggests new therapeutic methods, which are aimed at targeting the degradation systems and synaptic transfer. By enhancing degradation of intracellular accumulated A beta, it can be possible to remove it and avoid A beta-induced neurodegeneration without disturbing the endogenously important pool of secreted A beta. Additionally, drugs targeted to inhibit the spread of intracellular toxic A beta aggregates may also be useful in stopping the progression of pathology, without affecting the level of A beta that normally occurs in the brain.

  • 10.
    Ahlstrand, I
    et al.
    Jönköping University.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Falkmer, T
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Björk, M
    OP0209-HPR Less Pain and Activity Limitations in Today's Early RA Patients Compared with Patients Diagnosed 10 Years Earlier (The Swedish Tira-Project)2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Over the last decades the RA-treatment strategies have changed considerably. Routines for early RA diagnosis and instituted disease modifying anti rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) have been established. In the early 2000s biologic agents also became available for treatment purposes. Despite these altered and improved strategies RA patients continue to report pain and activity limitations; women more so than men.Objectives: To study differences regarding pain and activity limitations during the first three years after diagnosis of RA in today's patients compared with patients diagnosed 10 years earlier from a gender perspective.Methods: This study was based on patients recruited to the project “early interventions in RA” (TIRA). In the first cohort (TIRA-1) 320 patients were included during 1996-1998. In the second cohort (TIRA-2) 463 patients were included during 2006-2008. Disease activity score 28 joint count (DAS-28) and medication were registered. Pain intensity (VAS), bodily pain (BP) in Short Form36 (SF-36) and activity limitation (Health Assessment Questionnaire, HAQ) were reported at inclusion and at follow-ups after one, two and three years.Results: Disease activity did not differ between cohorts at inclusion, but was significant lower at the follow ups in the TIRA-2 cohort compared with the TIRA-1 cohort. Patients in TIRA2 were prescribed traditional DMARD:s and biologic agents more frequent than in TIRA-1. The TIRA-2 patients reported significantly higher pain intensity and activity limitations at inclusion but lower pain intensity and activity limitations at all follow-ups than TIRA-1 patients. There were no significant differences between cohorts regarding bodily pain at inclusion, but thereafter the TIRA-2 patients showed significant lower bodily pain than the TIRA-1 patients. Men reported lower activity limitation than women in TIRA-1; otherwise there were no gender differences in TIRA-1. In TIRA-2, there were no significant gender differences regarding pain at inclusion. However, men reported lower pain than women at all follow-ups. Women, in turn, reported significantly higher activity limitations at all time points in TIRA-2. Pain and activity limitations were significantly reduced from inclusion to the one year follow-up but remained stable thereafter.Conclusions: Both women and men in today's early RA patient cohort report lower pain and less activity limitations at the follow ups after diagnosis of RA compared to 10 years earlier. However, both activity limitations and bodily pain are still pronounced.Disclosure of Interest: None declared

  • 11.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Clayton, Tim
    London School Hyg and Trop Med, England.
    Damman, Peter
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Fox, Keith A. A.
    Royal Infirm, Scotland.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lagerqvist, Bo
    Department of Cardiology, Cardiothoracic Centre, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wallentin, Lars
    Department of Cardiology, Cardiothoracic Centre, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    de Winter, Robbert J.
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Impact of an invasive strategy on 5 years outcome in men and women with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes2014In: American Heart Journal, ISSN 0002-8703, E-ISSN 1097-6744, Vol. 168, no 4, 522-529 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background A routine invasive (RI) strategy in non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE ACS) has been associated with better outcome compared with a selective invasive (SI) strategy in men, but results in women have yielded disparate results. The aim of this study was to assess gender differences in long-term outcome with an SI compared with an RI strategy in NSTE ACS. Methods Individual patient data were obtained from the FRISC II trial, ICTUS trial, and RITA 3 trial for a collaborative meta-analysis. Results Men treated with an RI strategy had significantly lower rate of the primary outcome 5-year cardiovascular (CV) death/myocardial infarction (MI) compared with men treated with an SI strategy (15.6% vs 19.8%, P = .001); risk-adjusted hazards ratio (HR) 0.73 (95% CI 0.63-0.86). In contrast, there was little impact of an RI compared with an SI strategy on the primary outcome among women (16.5% vs 15.1%, P = .324); risk-adjusted HR 1.13 (95% CI 0.89-1.43), interaction P = .01. For the individual components of the primary outcome, a similar pattern was seen with lower rate of MI (adjusted HR 0.69, 95% CI 0.57-0.83) and CV death (adjusted HR 0.71, 95% CI 0.56-0.89) in men but without obvious difference in women in MI (adjusted HR 1.13, 95% CI 0.85-1.50) or CV death (adjusted HR 0.97, 95% CI 0.68-1.39). Conclusions In this meta-analysis comparing an SI and RI strategy, benefit from an RI strategy during long-term follow-up was confirmed in men. Conversely, in women, there was no evidence of benefit.

  • 12.
    Almer, Sven
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tysk, Curt
    Sektionen för gastroenterologi, medicinska kliniken, Universitetssjukhuset, Örebro .
    Andersson, Magnus V.
    Kirurgiska kliniken, Universitetssjukhuset, Örebro.
    Befrits, Ragnar
    Gastrocentrum medicin, Karolinska universitetssjukhuset, Solna.
    Hertervig, Erik
    VO gastroenterologi och nutrition, Universitetssjukhuset , Lund.
    Kilander, Anders
    Sektionen för gastroenterologi, Sahlgrenska universitetsjukhuset, Göteborg.
    Lindgren, Stefan
    Sektionen för gastroenterologi, Universitetssjukhuset MAS, Malmö.
    Suhr, Ole
    Sektionen för gastroenterologi, Norrlands universitetssjukhus, Umeå.
    Handläggning av svårt skov av ulcerös kolit. In: Löfberg R (ed): Inflammatorisk tarmsjukdom.2010In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 106, no 45, 62-75 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Patienter med svårt skov av ulcerös kolit bör vårdas på sjukhus och handläggas av gastroenterolog och kolorektal kirurg i nära samarbete.

    Skovets svårighetsgrad kan underskattas, varför noggrann bedömning av inflammationens utbredning och svårighetsgrad enligt validerade kriterier är viktigt.

    Intravenös behandling med kortikosteroider är en av hörn­stenarna i den akuta behandlingen.

    Patienter som inte förbättras på denna behandling, bör erbjudas medicinsk »rescue-behandling« eller kolektomi.

    Infliximab har visats vara en effektiv rescue-behandling och kan minska behovet av kol­ektomi inom de första 3 månaderna och upp till 3 år.

  • 13.
    Andersson, Manne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden .
    Rubér, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekerfelt, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Björnsson, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olaison, Gunnar
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Andersson, Roland
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Can New Inflammatory Markers Improve the Diagnosis of Acute Appendicitis?2014In: World Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0364-2313, E-ISSN 1432-2323, Vol. 38, no 11, 2777-2783 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The diagnosis of appendicitis is difficult and resource consuming. New inflammatory markers have been proposed for the diagnosis of appendicitis, but their utility in combination with traditional diagnostic variables has not been tested. Our objective is to explore the potential of new inflammatory markers for improving the diagnosis of appendicitis. The diagnostic properties of the six most promising out of 21 new inflammatory markers (interleukin [IL]-6, chemokine ligand [CXCL]-8, chemokine C-C motif ligand [CCL]-2, serum amyloid A [SAA], matrix metalloproteinase [MMP]-9, and myeloperoxidase [MPO]) were compared with traditional diagnostic variables included in the Appendicitis Inflammatory Response (AIR) score (right iliac fossa pain, vomiting, rebound tenderness, guarding, white blood cell [WBC] count, proportion neutrophils, C-reactive protein and body temperature) in 432 patients with suspected appendicitis by uni- and multivariable regression models. Of the new inflammatory variables, SAA, MPO, and MMP9 were the strongest discriminators for all appendicitis (receiver operating characteristics [ROC] 0.71) and SAA was the strongest discriminator for advanced appendicitis (ROC 0.80) compared with defence or rebound tenderness, which were the strongest traditional discriminators for all appendicitis (ROC 0.84) and the WBC count for advanced appendicitis (ROC 0.89). CCL2 was the strongest independent discriminator beside the AIR score variables in a multivariable model. The AIR score had an ROC area of 0.91 and could correctly classify 58.3 % of the patients, with an accuracy of 92.9 %. This was not improved by inclusion of the new inflammatory markers. The conventional diagnostic variables for appendicitis, as combined in the AIR score, is an efficient screening instrument for classifying patients as low-, indeterminate-, or high-risk for appendicitis. The addition of the new inflammatory variables did not improve diagnostic performance further.

  • 14.
    Annerbäck, Eva-Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Centre for Clinical Research in Sörmland, Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Sahlqvist, Lota
    Centre for Clinical Research in Sörmland, Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Wingren, Gun
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A cross-sectional study of victimisation of bullying among schoolchildren in Sweden: Background factors and self-reported health complaints2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 42, no 3, 270-277 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM:

    To examine background factors for bullying and associations between bullying victimisation and health problems.

    METHODS:

    A cross-sectional study on all pupils in grades 7 and 9 in a Swedish county was conducted in 2011 (n=5248). Data have been analysed with bi- and multivariate models.

    RESULTS:

    14% of the children reported that they had been bullied during the past 2 months. Background factors for bullying were: gender (girls more often); age (younger students more often); disability/disease; high body mass index, and having parents born abroad. There were strong associations between being bullied and poor health and self-harm. Associations with poor general health for boys and girls and mental health problems for girls showed stronger associations with higher frequency of bullying than with lower. For boys, physical bullying had stronger correlations with poor general health than written-verbal bullying.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Bullying is a serious public health problem among young people and healthcare professionals have an important task in identifying exposed children. Children who are "different" are more exposed to bullying, which implies that school personnel, parents, and other adults in these children's social networks can play an important role in paying attention to and preventing the risk of bullying.

    .

  • 15.
    Appelqvist, Frida
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Yhr, Maria
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Erlandson, Anna
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Martinsson, Tommy
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Enerbäck, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology.
    Deletion of the MGMT gene in familial melanoma2014In: Genes, Chromosomes and Cancer, ISSN 1045-2257, E-ISSN 1098-2264, Vol. 53, no 8, 703-711 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The DNA repair gene MGMT (O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase) is important for maintaining normal cell physiology and genomic stability. Alterations in MGMT play a critical role in the development of several types of cancer, including glioblastoma, lung cancer, and colorectal cancer. The purpose of this study was to explore the function of genetic alterations in MGMT and their connection with familial melanoma (FM). Using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, we identified a deletion that included the MGMT gene in one of 64 families with a melanoma predisposition living in western Sweden. The mutation segregated with the disease as a heterozygous deletion in blood-derived DNA, but a homozygous deletion including the promoter region and exon 1 was seen in tumor tissue based on Affymetrix 500K and 6.0 arrays. By sequence analysis of the MGMT gene in the other 63 families with FM from western Sweden, we identified four common polymorphisms, nonfunctional, as predominantly described in previous studies. We conclude that inherited alterations in the MGMT gene might be a rare cause of FM, and we suggest that MGMT contributes to melanoma predisposition.

  • 16.
    Appelqvist, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wäster, Petra
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Ida
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rosdahl, Inger
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology.
    Öllinger, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Lysosomal exocytosis and caspase-8-mediated apoptosis in UVA-irradiated keratinocytes2013In: Journal of Cell Science, ISSN 0021-9533, E-ISSN 1477-9137, Vol. 126, no 24, 5578-5584 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation is a major environmental carcinogen involved in the development of skin cancer. To elucidate the initial signaling during UV-induced damage in human keratinocytes, we investigated lysosomal exocytosis and apoptosis induction. UVA, but not UVB, induced plasma membrane damage, which was repaired by Ca2+-dependent lysosomal exocytosis. The lysosomal exocytosis resulted in extracellular release of cathepsin D and acid sphingomyelinase (aSMase). Two hours after UVA irradiation, we detected activation of caspase-8, which was reduced by addition of anti-aSMAse. Furthermore, caspase-8 activation and apoptosis was reduced by prevention of endocytosis and by the use of cathepsin inhibitors. We conclude that lysosomal exocytosis is part of the keratinocyte response to UVA and is followed by cathepsin-dependent activation of caspase-8. The findings have implications for the understanding of UV-induced skin damage and emphasize that UVA and UVB initiate apoptosis through different signaling pathways in keratinocytes.

  • 17.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Örebro University, Sweden; Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Granlund, Mats
    Örebro University, Sweden; Jönköping University, Sweden .
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Thyberg, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Örebro University, Sweden.
    Important aspects of participation and participation restrictions in people with a mild intellectual disability2014In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 36, no 15, 1264-1272 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This study explored a possibility to assess the concepts of participation and participation restrictions in the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) by combining self-ratings of the perceived importance with the actual performance of different everyday activities in people with a mild intellectual disability. Method: Structured interviews regarding 68 items from the ICF activity/participation domain were conducted (n = 69). The items were ranked by perceived importance, performance and by combined measures. Furthermore, the measures were related to a single question about subjective general well-being. Results: Rankings of performance highlighted about the same items as "important participation", while rankings of low performance addressed quite different items compared with "important participation restriction". Significant correlations were found between subjective general well-being and high performance (r = 0.56), high performance/high importance (important participation) (r = 0.56), low performance (r = -0.56) and low performance/high importance (important participation restriction; r -0.55). Conclusions: The results support the clinical relevance of the ICF and the studied selection of 68 items. Although performance only may sometimes be a relevant aspect, knowledge about the relationship between the perceived importance and the actual performance is essential for clinical interventions and for research aiming to understand specific needs regarding participation.

  • 18.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Alendronate-eluting polyglucose-lignol composite (POGLICO): A new biomaterial for fracture fixating implants2014In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 85, no 6, 687-690 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose - Due to the known drawbacks of metal implants, new biomaterials for internal fracture fixation are attracting increasing interest, among them poly(lactic-coglucolic) acids (PLGAs) and the recently developed silk-tenoin derived materials (STDMs). In accordance with the new philosophy of bio-derived biomaterials (BIODERIBIOs), I describe a novel innovative technology for use in fracture fixation. Patients and methods - Screws (2 mm dia.) were manufactured from cylindrical bars of polyglucose-lignol composite (POGLICO) in the form of birch toothpicks from the hospital canteen, dip-coated with alendronate (1 mg/mL, n = 6) or saline (n = 6), and inserted in the proximal tibias of rats for 4 weeks. Fixation was evaluated by mechanical pullout testing. POGLICO nails were inserted in the contralateral tibia for microCT and histology. Results - All POGLICO implants remained fixed in the bone (p less than 0.001) with a mean pullout force of 37 (SD 5.5) N. MicroCT showed that the control nails were surrounded by a thin layer of new bone, while all bisphosphonate-treated implants were surrounded by a thick layer of cancellous bone. Bisphosphonates more than doubled the bone density around the nails (p = 0.004). Interpretation - POGLICO is biocompatible, remains in situ, and appears to provide a higher resistance to pullout forces than bulk silk protein. The material is light, strong, and bio-derived. BIODERIBIO-POGLICO can be sterilized by autoclaving, and has a porous surface that can serve for slow release of drugs applied by simple dip-coating, as demonstrated by the effect of the alendronate treatment. As the raw material for the screws is readily available from the toothpick industry, I believe that the possibilities for commercial development of the material for fracture fixation are promising.

  • 19.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Benvävnad och frakturläkning2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Benvävnaden är utmärkande för ryggsträngsdjuren. Innan benet fanns, hade våra maskliknande förfäder en broskliknande ryggsträng, som möjliggjorde effektiva ringlande rörelser, som gjorde att de kunde simma som en fisk, något som en mask utan ryggsträng inte kan. Hos dessa djur uppstod redan under Cambrium, för 500 miljoner år sedan, förmågan att kontrollera utfällning av hydroxylapatit i bindväv, först som primitiva tänder och - för att undvika att bli biten - hudpansar. Emalj och dentin har alltså funnits lite längre på jorden, men snart nog uppstod benet, som förstärkningar i käkarna och som hudsköldar. Det inre skelettet, ryggraden, bestod då fortfarande av brosk.

  • 20.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hur läker senor och ledband?2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Vad händer när man stukar foten? Går ledbandet av eller töjs det ut? Hur lång tid tar det innan det är läkt? Blir det fullt återställt?

    Man kan tycka att svaren på dessa frågor borde vara grundläggande kunskap bland läkare och sjukgymnaster, men så är det inte. Frågorna är bara skenbart enkla; egentligen kan vi inte svara bestämt på någon av dem. Men nu ska vi ändå försöka. I det följande kommer jag att skriva senor ibland och ledband ibland, men det mesta gäller både och. Senor kan vara olika och även så ledband. I grova drag kan vi dock dra allihop över en kam, om vi utesluter det specialfall som fingrarnas böjsenor utgör.

  • 21.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Letter: Platelet concentrates and achilles tendon healing2013In: Journal of Orthopaedic Research, ISSN 0736-0266, E-ISSN 1554-527X, Vol. 31, no 9, 1500-1500 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 22.
    Aspenberg, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Sandberg, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Distal radial fractures heal by direct woven bone formation2013In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 84, no 3, 297-300 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Descriptions of fracture healing almost exclusively deal with shaft fractures and they often emphasize endochondral bone formation. In reality, most fractures occur in metaphyseal cancellous bone. Apart from a study of vertebral fractures, we have not found any histological description of cancellous bone healing in humans.

    Patients and methods We studied histological biopsies from the central part of 12 distal radial fractures obtained during surgery 6–28 days after the injury, using routine hematoxylin and eosin staining.

    Results New bone formation was seen in 6 cases. It was always in the form of fetal-like, disorganized woven bone. It seldom had contact with old trabeculae and appeared to have formed directly in the marrow. Cartilage was scarce or absent. The samples without bone formation showed only necrosis, scar, or old cancellous bone.

    Interpretation The histology suggests that cells in the midst of the marrow respond to the trauma by direct formation of bone, independently of trabecular surfaces.

  • 23.
    Backteman, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    T Cells and NK Cells in Coronary Artery Disease: Longitudinal and methodological studies in humans2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of death worldwide and most often due to atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory process that involves the arteries, inclouding those that supply blood to the heart muscle. Although inflammation is an important contributing factor to atherosclerosis, the mechanisms are not fully understood. One mechanism contributing to atherogenesis may involve some infectious microorganisms such as cytomegalovirus (CMV). In atherosclerosis, the arterial wall becomes infiltrated with lipids followed by different types of leukocytes and inflammatory mediators (atherogenesis). Leukocytes recirculate continuously between the blood and lymphoid organs, such as lymph nodes, where the adaptive immune response is started and regulated.

    The general aim of this thesis was to increase the understanding of associations between lymphocyte populations and different conditions of CAD (unstable and stable). To assess changes over time, a longitudinal follow up design was mostly used. Therefore, also perspectives of longitudinal variation were included in the thesis.

    Paper I showed that flow cytometric evaluation of lymphocyte populations is a robust technique that can be used in longitudinal studies, both in clinical and research settings. It was also shown that the time of sampling over the year did not have a major impact on the findings.

    In paper II, thoracic lymph nodes were investigated to assess whether CAD-associated changes were more prominent in comparison with blood. As expected, there were several major differences in lymphocyte composition between lymph nodes and blood. However, the analysis of thoracic lymph nodes did not reveal any further changes that were not detected in blood. Thus, blood is still the most reliable compartment for studies of lymphocyte populations in CAD since it is not possible to examine the local findings in the artery wall.

    Natural killer (NK) cells are innate lymphocytes with both regulatory and effector functions. In paper II and III we confirmed previous findings that CAD patients have lower proportions of NK cells in blood. However, the NK subtype and cytokine profile (paper III, measured by subtype markers and intra-cellular cytokine staining) did not differ between patients and controls. During a 12-month follow-up, the proportions of NK cells increased, although not in all patients. Failure to reconstitute NK cell levels was associated with several components of the metabolic syndrome and with a persistent low-grade inflammation as measured by plasma IL-6 levels. The findings support the notion of a protective role for NK cells in inflammation.

    CD4+ but not CD8+ T cells were significantly increased in patients with both unstable and stable conditions compared with healthy individuals (paper IV). Subpopulations of CD4+ T cells (CD4+CD28null) have previously been associated with CAD. However, we show that CD28null and CD28null57+ cells within the CD4+ and CD8+ T cell populations were similar in CAD patients and healthy controls. Instead, CMV seropositivity was the major determinant of expanded CD28null and CD57+ T cell fractions in both patients and healthy individuals. During the 1 year follow up the proportion of CD4+CD28null and CD8+CD28null cells increased in patients, which may reflect an accelerated immunological ageing occurring after the cardiac event.

    List of papers
    1. Biological and methodological variation of lymphocyte subsets in blood of human adults
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biological and methodological variation of lymphocyte subsets in blood of human adults
    2007 (English)In: JIM - Journal of Immunological Methods, ISSN 0022-1759, E-ISSN 1872-7905, Vol. 322, no 1-2, 20-27 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Although lymphocyte populations are often monitored over time, information about the biological variation over time is limited. Three-colour-flow cytometry was used to investigate the biological and methodological variation of lymphocyte populations in blood. Fifteen healthy individuals (11 females and 4 males) were longitudinally monitored for 2-8 years. Blood samples were drawn monthly when possible. In total, 493 observations were included. Absolute counts and proportions were determined for T-cells (CD3+), T-helper cells (CD3+ CD4+), cytolytic T-cells (CD3+ CD8+), B-cells (CD3- CD19+) and NK-cells (CD3- CD16+/56+). As to variation over the year, ANOVA testing showed only a minor monthly variation for absolute counts of the CD8+ population (p < 0.05) for October compared with June and July, whereas no significant differences were found for the other populations or in the proportions of lymphocyte subsets. Although lower than the longitudinal variation, the methodological variation, expressed as coefficient of variation (CV %), was in a similar range as the variation over time, indicating that the normal biological variation should not be overestimated, while the methodological inter-assay should be taken into consideration in longitudinal studies or monitoring of patients. © 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-41169 (URN)10.1016/j.jim.2007.01.021 (DOI)55291 (Local ID)55291 (Archive number)55291 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    2. Lymphocyte Subpopulations in Lymph Nodes and Peripheral Blood: A Comparison between Patients with Stable Angina and Acute Coronary Syndrome
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lymphocyte Subpopulations in Lymph Nodes and Peripheral Blood: A Comparison between Patients with Stable Angina and Acute Coronary Syndrome
    2012 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 3Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Atherosclerosis is characterized by a chronic inflammatory response involving activated T cells and impairment of natural killer (NK) cells. An increased T cell activity has been associated with plaque instability and risk of acute cardiac events. Lymphocyte analyses in blood are widely used to evaluate the immune status. However, peripheral blood contains only a minor proportion of lymphocytes. In this study, we hypothesized that thoracic lymph nodes from patients with stable angina (SA) and acute coronary syndrome (ACS) might add information to peripheral blood analyses. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods: Peripheral blood and lymph nodes were collected during coronary by-pass surgery in 13 patients with SA and 13 patients with ACS. Lymphocyte subpopulations were assessed by flow cytometry using antibodies against CD3, CD4, CD8, CD19, CD16/56, CD25, Foxp3, CD69, HLA-DR, IL-18 receptor (R) and CCR4. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: Lymph nodes revealed a lymphocyte subpopulation profile substantially differing from that in blood including a higher proportion of B cells, lower proportions of CD8(+) T cells and NK cells and a 2-fold higher CD4/CD8 ratio. CD4(+)CD69(+) cells as well as Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells were markedly enriched in lymph nodes (p andlt; 0.001) while T helper 1-like (CD4(+)IL-18R(+)) cells were more frequent in blood (p andlt; 0.001). The only significant differences between ACS and SA patients involved NK cells that were reduced in the ACS group. However, despite being reduced, the NK cell fraction in ACS patients contained a significantly higher proportion of IL-18R(+) cells compared with SA patients (p andlt; 0.05). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion: There were several differences in lymphocyte subpopulations between blood and lymph nodes. However, the lymphocyte perturbations in peripheral blood of ACS patients compared with SA patients were not mirrored in lymph nodes. The findings indicate that lymph node analyses in multivessel coronary artery disease may not reveal any major changes in the immune response that are not detectable in blood.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Public Library of Science, 2012
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-77542 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0032691 (DOI)000303005000033 ()
    Note
    Funding Agencies|Swedish Heart-Lung Foundation|20090489|Swedish Research Council|2008-2282|Available from: 2012-05-25 Created: 2012-05-22 Last updated: 2017-12-07
    3. Natural killer (NK) cell deficit in coronary artery disease: no aberrations in phenotype but sustained reduction of NK cells is associated with low-grade inflammation
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Natural killer (NK) cell deficit in coronary artery disease: no aberrations in phenotype but sustained reduction of NK cells is associated with low-grade inflammation
    2014 (English)In: Clinical and Experimental Immunology, ISSN 0009-9104, E-ISSN 1365-2249, Vol. 175, no 1, 104-112 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Although reduced natural killer (NK) cell levels have been reported consistently in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), the clinical significance and persistence of this immune perturbation is not clarified. In this study we characterized the NK cell deficit further by determining (i) differentiation surface markers and cytokine profile of NK cell subsets and (ii) ability to reconstitute NK cell levels over time. Flow cytometry was used to analyse NK cell subsets and the intracellular cytokine profile in 31 patients with non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (non-STEMI), 34 patients with stable angina (SA) and 37 healthy controls. In blood collected prior to coronary angiography, the proportions of NK cells were reduced significantly in non-STEMI and SA patients compared with controls, whereas NK cell subset analyses or cytokine profile measurements did not reveal any differences across groups. During a 12-month follow-up, the proportions of NK cells increased, although not in all patients. Failure to reconstitute NK cell levels was associated with several components of metabolic syndrome. Moreover, interleukin (IL)-6 levels remained high in patients with sustained NK cell deficit, whereas a decline in IL-6 (P < 0·001) was seen in patients with a pronounced increase in NK cells. In conclusion, we found no evidence that reduction of NK cells in CAD patients was associated with aberrations in NK cell phenotype at any clinical stage of the disease. Conversely, failure to reconstitute NK cell levels was associated with a persistent low-grade inflammation, suggesting a protective role of NK cells in CAD.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wiley-Blackwell, 2014
    Keyword
    coronary artery disease; cytokines; inflammation; leukocytes; natural killer cell
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-103363 (URN)10.1111/cei.12210 (DOI)000329165400012 ()24298947 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2014-01-17 Created: 2014-01-17 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
    4. Cytomegalovirus seropositivity is a major determinant of CD28null T cell expansion in patients with coronary artery disease
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cytomegalovirus seropositivity is a major determinant of CD28null T cell expansion in patients with coronary artery disease
    2014 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Accumulation of CD4+28null cells, with a proinflammatory and senescent phenotype, has been associated with unstable conditions of coronary artery disease (CAD). Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is known to exert profound effects on T cells, including loss of CD28. Here, we longitudinally assessed the proportions of CD28null and CD28nullCD57+ cells in CD4+ and CD8+ T cell populations of patients with CAD and related the findings to HCMV seropositivity.

    Methods: HCMV antibody levels and expression of CD28 and CD57 on CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were analysed in 31 patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS), 34 patients with stable angina (SA) and 37 healthy controls. Samples were taken prior to 34 coronary angiography and after 3 and 12 months. In a subsample, HCMV-specific IFN-γ and  TNF production was assessed ex vivo.

    Results: Increased proportions of CD4+CD28null, but not CD8+CD28null cells, were significantly associated with presence of CAD. Significant increases in CD28null 37 and CD28nullCD57+ cells occurred within CD4+ and CD8+ T cell compartments in both ACS and SA patients during 12-month follow-up. HCMV was the major determinant of CD28null and CD28nullCD57+ T cell levels in both patients and controls (p <0.001). There were no obvious signs of CMV reactivation in patients.

    Conclusion: HCMV was a major determinant of the presence of CD28null and CD28nullCD57+ T cells in patients with CAD, independent of clinical stage. Findings also indicate that HCMV might have a large impact on the T cell aging process that occurred in patients after a cardiac event.

    Keyword
    Coronary artery disease, acute coronary syndrome, CD28null T cells, CD57+ 49 T cells, Human cytomegalovirus
    National Category
    Clinical Medicine Immunology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-111049 (URN)
    Available from: 2014-10-06 Created: 2014-10-06 Last updated: 2015-03-25Bibliographically approved
  • 24.
    Backteman, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Cytomegalovirus seropositivity is a major determinant of CD28null T cell expansion in patients with coronary artery disease2014Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Accumulation of CD4+28null cells, with a proinflammatory and senescent phenotype, has been associated with unstable conditions of coronary artery disease (CAD). Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is known to exert profound effects on T cells, including loss of CD28. Here, we longitudinally assessed the proportions of CD28null and CD28nullCD57+ cells in CD4+ and CD8+ T cell populations of patients with CAD and related the findings to HCMV seropositivity.

    Methods: HCMV antibody levels and expression of CD28 and CD57 on CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were analysed in 31 patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS), 34 patients with stable angina (SA) and 37 healthy controls. Samples were taken prior to 34 coronary angiography and after 3 and 12 months. In a subsample, HCMV-specific IFN-γ and  TNF production was assessed ex vivo.

    Results: Increased proportions of CD4+CD28null, but not CD8+CD28null cells, were significantly associated with presence of CAD. Significant increases in CD28null 37 and CD28nullCD57+ cells occurred within CD4+ and CD8+ T cell compartments in both ACS and SA patients during 12-month follow-up. HCMV was the major determinant of CD28null and CD28nullCD57+ T cell levels in both patients and controls (p <0.001). There were no obvious signs of CMV reactivation in patients.

    Conclusion: HCMV was a major determinant of the presence of CD28null and CD28nullCD57+ T cells in patients with CAD, independent of clinical stage. Findings also indicate that HCMV might have a large impact on the T cell aging process that occurred in patients after a cardiac event.

  • 25.
    Backteman, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Natural killer (NK) cell deficit in coronary artery disease: no aberrations in phenotype but sustained reduction of NK cells is associated with low-grade inflammation2014In: Clinical and Experimental Immunology, ISSN 0009-9104, E-ISSN 1365-2249, Vol. 175, no 1, 104-112 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although reduced natural killer (NK) cell levels have been reported consistently in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), the clinical significance and persistence of this immune perturbation is not clarified. In this study we characterized the NK cell deficit further by determining (i) differentiation surface markers and cytokine profile of NK cell subsets and (ii) ability to reconstitute NK cell levels over time. Flow cytometry was used to analyse NK cell subsets and the intracellular cytokine profile in 31 patients with non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (non-STEMI), 34 patients with stable angina (SA) and 37 healthy controls. In blood collected prior to coronary angiography, the proportions of NK cells were reduced significantly in non-STEMI and SA patients compared with controls, whereas NK cell subset analyses or cytokine profile measurements did not reveal any differences across groups. During a 12-month follow-up, the proportions of NK cells increased, although not in all patients. Failure to reconstitute NK cell levels was associated with several components of metabolic syndrome. Moreover, interleukin (IL)-6 levels remained high in patients with sustained NK cell deficit, whereas a decline in IL-6 (P < 0·001) was seen in patients with a pronounced increase in NK cells. In conclusion, we found no evidence that reduction of NK cells in CAD patients was associated with aberrations in NK cell phenotype at any clinical stage of the disease. Conversely, failure to reconstitute NK cell levels was associated with a persistent low-grade inflammation, suggesting a protective role of NK cells in CAD.

  • 26.
    Bednarska, Olga
    et al.
    Oskarshamn Hospital, Sweden.
    Ignatova, Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Ström, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Intraepithelial lymphocyte distribution differs between the bulb and the second part of duodenum2013In: BMC Gastroenterology, ISSN 1471-230X, E-ISSN 1471-230X, Vol. 13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Evaluation of intraepithelial duodenal lymphocytosis (IDL) is important in celiac disease (CD). There is no established cut-off value for increased number of IELs in the bulb.

    We therefore investigated the relation between IEL counts in the bulb and duodenal specimens in non-celiac subjects.

    Methods

    The number of CD3+ IELs was determined in specimens from the second part of the duodenum and from the bulb in 34 non-celiac subjects. The numbers of IELs in the villus tip and sides were counted and the quotient tip/side was calculated. HLA DQ2/DQ8 and serum antibodies against transglutaminase were analysed.

    Results

    The mean number of IELs per 100 enterocytes (95% CI) in specimens was 14.7 (11.8-17.6) in the bulb, and 21.2 (17.0-25.5) in the second part of the duodenum (p<0.01). There was no difference in IEL count or distribution comparing patients carrying or lacking HLA DQ2/DQ8.

    Conclusions

    IEL count in non-celiac, HLA DQ2/DQ8 positive or negative patients is significantly lower in the bulb than in the second part of the duodenum. These findings implicate that the site of biopsy should be taken into account when considering duodenal lymphocytosis.

  • 27.
    Bengner, Malin
    et al.
    Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden .
    Beziat, Vivien
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Nilsson, Bengt-Olof
    Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden .
    Lofgren, Sture
    Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden .
    Wikby, Anders
    Jonköping University, Sweden .
    Johan Malmberg, Karl
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden Oslo University Hospital, Norway University of Oslo, Norway .
    Strindhall, Jan
    Jonköping University, Sweden .
    Independent skewing of the T cell and NK cell compartments associated with cytomegalovirus infection suggests division of labor between innate and adaptive immunity2014In: Age (Omaha), ISSN 0161-9152, E-ISSN 1574-4647, Vol. 36, no 2, 571-582 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection induces profound changes in different subsets of the cellular immune system. We have previously identified an immune risk profile (IRP) where CMV-associated changes in the T cell compartment, defined as a CD4/CD8 ratio less than 1, are associated with increased mortality in elderly people. Since natural killer (NK) cells have an important role in the defense against viral infections, we examined whether the expansion of CD8 + T cells seen in individuals with CD4/CD8 ratio less than 1 is coupled to a parallel skewing of the NK cell compartment. A number of 151 subjects were examined with CMV serology and a flow cytometry panel for assessment of T cell and NK cell subsets. CMV-seropositive individuals had higher frequencies of CD57 + and NKG2C + NK cells and lower frequencies of NKG2A + NK cells, in line with a more differentiated NK cell compartment. Intriguingly, however, there was no correlation between CD4/CD8 ratio and NK cell repertoires among CMV-seropositive donors, despite the profound skewing of the T cell compartment in the group with CD4/CD8 ratio less than 1. Conversely, donors with profound expansion of NK cells, defined as NKG2C + NK cells with high expression of CD57 and ILT-2, did not display more common changes in their T cell repertoire, suggesting that NK cell expansion is independent of the T cell-defined IRP. Altogether, these results indicate that the effect of CMV on CD8 T cells and NK cells is largely nonoverlapping and independent.

  • 28.
    Bergfors, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hermansson, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Nyström Kronander, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Falk, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology.
    Valter, Lars
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Trollfors, Birger
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital-East, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    How common are long-lasting, intensely itching vaccination granulomas and contact allergy to aluminium induced by currently used pediatric vaccines? A prospective cohort study2014In: European Journal of Pediatrics, ISSN 0340-6199, E-ISSN 1432-1076, Vol. 173, no 10, 1297-1307 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The frequency of long-lasting, intensely itching subcutaneous nodules at the injection site for aluminium (Al)-adsorbed vaccines (vaccination granulomas) was investigated in a prospective cohort study comprising 4,758 children who received either a diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis-polio-Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine (Infanrix®, Pentavac®) alone or concomitant with a pneumococcal conjugate (Prevenar). Both vaccines were adsorbed to an Al adjuvant. Altogether 38 children (0.83 %) with itching granulomas were identified, epicutaneously tested for Al sensitisation and followed yearly. Contact allergy to Al was verified in 85 %. The median duration of symptoms was 22 months in those hitherto recovered. The frequency of granulomas induced by Infanrix® was >0.66 % and by Prevenar >0.35 %. The risk for granulomas increased from 0.63 to 1.18 % when a second Al-adsorbed vaccine was added to the schedule. Conclusion: Long-lasting itching vaccination granulomas are poorly understood but more frequent than previously known after infant vaccination with commonly used diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis-polio-Haemophilus influenzae type b and pneumococcal conjugate vaccines. The risk increases with the number of vaccines given. Most children with itching granulomas become contact allergic to aluminium. Itching vaccination granulomas are benign but may be troublesome and should be recognised early in primary health care to avoid unnecessary investigations, anxiety and mistrust.

  • 29.
    Bergfors, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Lundmark, Katarzyna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Nyström Kronander, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Allergy Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    A child with a long-standing, intensely itching subcutaneous nodule on a thigh: an uncommon (?) reaction to commonly used vaccines2013In: BMJ Case Reports, ISSN 1757-790XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A 2-year-old girl presented with an intensely itching subcutaneous nodule on the front of a thigh. The nodule persisted for 10 months until it was excised. Subsequent investigation for malignancy and systemic disease showed no pathological findings. The diagnosis, persistent itching vaccination granuloma, was revealed by hazard almost 2 years after the onset of symptoms. Persistent itching subcutaneous nodules at the injection site for aluminium containing vaccines (mostly diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis combination vaccines for primary immunisation of infants) may appear with a long delay after the vaccination (months), cause prolonged itching (years) and are often associated with contact allergy to aluminium. The condition is poorly recognised in Health Care which may lead to prolonged symptoms and unnecessary investigations.

  • 30.
    Bergström, Ida
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jönsson, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Särndahl, Eva
    Department of Clinical Medicine, School of Health and Medical Sciences, and iRiSC - Inflammatory 18 Response and Infection Susceptibility Centre, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Annexin A1 expression in blood mononuclear cells: a potential marker of glucocorticoid activity in patients with coronary artery disease2014Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    An imbalance between pro- and anti-inflammatory actions is believed to drive progression of atherosclerosis. Annexin A1 (AnxA1) is a key player in resolution of inflammation and a mediator of anti-inflammatory effects of glucocorticoids. Here, we investigated whether expression of AnxA1 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was altered in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and also related findings to glucocorticoid sensitivity ex vivo.

    We included 57 patients 6-12 months after acute coronary syndrome (ACS), 10 patients with ACS, and healthy controls. AnxA1 mRNA was measured in PBMCs and AnxA1 protein was assessed in monocytes and lymphocyte subsets by flow cytometry. In post-ACS patients and controls, glucocorticoid sensitivity was determined by measuring inhibitory effects of dexamethasone on LPS46 induced cytokine secretion.

    AnxA1 mRNA levels in PBMCs were higher in patients compared with controls, although most pronounced in ACS patients. AnxA1 protein was most abundant in the monocyte fraction. ACS patients exhibited the highest levels of cell surface-associated AnxA1 protein while levels in post-ACS patients and controls were similar. Ex vivo assays showed that PBMCs from post-ACS patients were more prone to release IL-6. Glucocorticoid sensitivity correlated with cell surface-associated AnxA1 protein in peripheral monocytes. Dexamethasone also induced upregulation of AnxA1 mRNA.

    AnxA1 expression in PBMCs is closely associated with glucocorticoid actions and cell surface associated AnxA1 appears to be a marker of glucocorticoid sensitivity. Although still speculative, a “normal” expression of cell surface-associated AnxA1 in post-ACS patients may suggest that glucocorticoid actions in vivo are insufficient to provide adequate anti-inflammatory effects in these patients.

  • 31.
    Bergström, Ida
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Reutelingsperger, Chris
    Department of Biochemistry, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht, Maastricht University, The Netherlands.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Särndahl, Eva
    Department of Clinical Medicine, School of Health and Medical Sciences, and iRiSC - Inflammatory 18 Response and Infection Susceptibility Centre, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Higher expression of annexin A1 in 1 CD56+ than in CD56-T cells: Potential implications for coronary artery disease2014Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Increased proportions of circulating proinflammatory CD56+ T cells have been reported in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Yet, little is known about regulation of these cells. In the present study, we investigated the expression and potential role of the glucocorticoid-mediated protein annexin A1 (AnxA1) in CD56+ and CD56-T cell subsets, with focus on CAD.

    Methods and Results: We included totally 52 healthy individuals, 28 patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and 57 patients with a history of ACS. AnxA1 mRNA expression was assessed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. AnxA1 protein expression (total and cell surface-associated) was measured by whole blood flow cytometry in circulating CD56+ and CD56- T cell subsets. Furthermore, inhibitory effects of dexamethasone and/or recombinant AnxA1 on cytokine secretion by CD56+ and CD56- T cells were explored in vitro. We found that CD56+ T cells (the majority CD8+), expressed higher levels of AnxA1 mRNA and protein than did CD56- T cells. When comparing CAD patients with healthy controls, significantly higher levels of cell surface-associated AnxA1 expression were seen in patients, most pronounced in ACS patients. In vitro, dexamethasone reduced cytokine secretion by CD56+ T cells, whereas AnxA1 alone had no effect, and AnxA1 combined with dexamethasone abolished the dexamethasone-induced suppressive effects.

    Conclusion: AnxA1 was expressed more abundantly in proinflammatory CD56+ T cells. Patients with ACS exhibited increased levels of cell surface-associated AnxA1, thus indicating increased activation of the AnxA1 pathway. Our data further suggested that AnxA1 might counteract glucocorticoid mediated anti-inflammatory effects in T cells.

  • 32.
    Berkius, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Västervik County Hospital, Västervik, Sweden.
    Engerström, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Orwelius, Lotti
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordlund, Peter
    Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Ryhov Hospital, Jönköping,.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Walther, Sten M
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A prospective longitudinal multicentre study of health related quality of life in ICU survivors with COPD2013In: Critical Care, ISSN 1364-8535, E-ISSN 1466-609X, Vol. 17, no 5, R211- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Mortality amongst COPD patients treated on the ICU is high. Health-related quality of life (HRQL) after intensive care is a relevant concern for COPD patients, their families and providers of health care. Still, there are few HRQL studies after intensive care of this patient group. Our hypothesis was that HRQL of COPD patients treated on the ICU declines rapidly with time.

    METHODS: Fifty-one COPD patients (COPD-ICU group) with an ICU stay longer than 24 hours received a questionnaire at 6, 12 and 24 months after discharge from ICU. HRQL was measured using two generic instruments: the EuroQoL instrument (EQ-5D and EQ-VAS) and the Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36). The results were compared to HRQL of two reference groups from the general population; an age- and sex-adjusted reference population (Non-COPD reference) and a reference group with COPD (COPD reference).

    RESULTS: HRQL of the COPD-ICU group at 6 months after discharge from ICU was lower compared to the COPD reference group: Median EQ-5D was 0.66 vs. 0.73, P=0.08 and median EQ-VAS was 50 vs.55, P<0.05. There were no significant differences in the SF-36 dimensions between the COPD-ICU and COPD-reference groups, although the difference in physical functioning (PF) approached statistical significance (P=0.059). Patients in the COPD-ICU group who were lost to follow-up after 6 months had low HRQL scores at 6 months. Scores for patients who died were generally lower compared to patients who failed to respond to the questionnaire. The PF and social functioning (SF) scores in those who died were significantly lower compared to patients with a complete follow up. HRQL of patients in the COPD-ICU group that survived a complete 24 months follow up was low but stable with no statistically significant decline from 6 to 24 months after ICU discharge. Their HRQL at 24 months was not significantly different from HRQL in the COPD reference group.

    CONCLUSIONS: HRQL in COPD survivors after intensive care was low but did not decline from 6 to 24 months after discharge from ICU. Furthermore, HRQL at 24 months was similar to patients with COPD who had not received ICU treatment.

  • 33.
    Bivik, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Verma, Deepti
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Winge, Marten C.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Lieden, Agne
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Bradley, Maria
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Rosdahl, Inger
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Letter: Genetic Variation in the Inflammasome and Atopic Dermatitis Susceptibility2013In: Journal of Investigative Dermatology, ISSN 0022-202X, E-ISSN 1523-1747, Vol. 133, no 10, 2486-2489 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 34.
    Björnsson Hallgren, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Holmgren, Theresa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Adolfsson, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    A specific exercise strategy reduced the need for surgery in subacromial pain patients2014In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 48, no 19, 1431-1436 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose A programme based on eccentric exercises for treating subacromial pain was in a previous study found effective at 3-month follow-up. The purposes of the present study were to investigate whether the results were maintained after 1 year and whether the baseline Constant-Murley score, rotator cuff status and radiological findings influenced the outcome. Patients and methods 97 patients on the waiting list for arthroscopic subacromial decompression had been randomised to a specific exercise programme or unspecific exercises (controls). After 3 months of exercises, the patients were asked whether they still wanted surgery and this option was available until a 1-year follow-up. 1 year after inclusion or 1 year after surgery, the number of patients who decided to have surgery in each group was compared. The choice of surgery was related to the baseline Constant-Murley score, ultrasound and radiographs taken at inclusion. Results All patients had improved significantly (pless than0.0001) in the Constant-Murley score at the 1-year follow-up. Significantly more patients in the control group decided to have surgery (63%) than those in the specific exercise group (24%; pless than0.0001). Patients who decided to have surgery had a significantly lower baseline Constant-Murley score and more often a full-thickness tear. Patients with partial tears did not differ from those with intact tendons. Interpretation The positive short-term results of specific exercises were maintained after 1 year, and this exercise strategy reduces the need for surgery. Full-thickness tear and a low baseline Constant-Murley score appear to be a predictive marker for a less good outcome.

  • 35.
    Bolin, Karin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Sandling, Johanna K.
    Uppsala University, Sweden Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Zickert, Agneta
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Jonsen, Andreas
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Sjöwall, Christoffer
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Svenungsson, Elisabet
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Bengtsson, Anders A.
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Eloranta, Maija-Leena
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Ronnblom, Lars
    Uppsala University, Sweden Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Syvanen, Ann-Christine
    Uppsala University, Sweden Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Gunnarsson, Iva
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Nordmark, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Association of STAT4 Polymorphism with Severe Renal Insufficiency in Lupus Nephritis2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 12, 84450- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lupus nephritis is a cause of significant morbidity in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and its genetic background has not been completely clarified. The aim of this investigation was to analyze single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for association with lupus nephritis, its severe form proliferative nephritis and renal outcome, in two Swedish cohorts. Cohort I (n = 567 SLE cases, n = 512 controls) was previously genotyped for 5676 SNPs and cohort II (n = 145 SLE cases, n = 619 controls) was genotyped for SNPs in STAT4, IRF5, TNIP1 and BLK. Case-control and case-only association analyses for patients with lupus nephritis, proliferative nephritis and severe renal insufficiency were performed. In the case-control analysis of cohort I, four highly linked SNPs in STAT4 were associated with lupus nephritis with genome wide significance with p = 3.7x10(-9), OR 2.20 for the best SNP rs11889341. Strong signals of association between IRF5 and an HLA-DR3 SNP marker were also detected in the lupus nephritis case versus healthy control analysis (pless than0.0001). An additional six genes showed an association with lupus nephritis with pless than0.001 (PMS2, TNIP1, CARD11, ITGAM, BLK and IRAK1). In the case-only meta-analysis of the two cohorts, the STAT4 SNP rs7582694 was associated with severe renal insufficiency with p = 1.6x10(-3) and OR 2.22. We conclude that genetic variations in STAT4 predispose to lupus nephritis and a worse outcome with severe renal insufficiency.

  • 36.
    Bostner, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Elin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bivik, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Perez-Tenorio, Gizeh
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Franzén, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Konstantinell, Aelita
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fornander, Tommy
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden .
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    S6 kinase signaling and tamoxifen response in breast cancer cells and in two randomized breast cancer cohorts2013Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Detecting signals in the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and the estrogen receptor (ER) pathways for prediction of treatment response may be a future clinical tool in primary breast cancer. Here, we investigated the validity and value of the mTOR targets p70-S6 kinase (S6K) 1 and 2 as biomarkers for tamoxifen sensitivity in vitro and in two independent tamoxifen randomized postmenopausal breast cancer cohorts. In addition, the prognostic value of the S6Ks was evaluated. A simultaneous knockdown of the S6Ks in ER-positive breast cancer cells resulted in G1 arrest, and tamoxifen-induced G1 arrest was in part S6K1+S6K2 dependent, suggesting separate roles in proliferation and in tamoxifen response. We found S6K1 to correlate with HER2 and cytoplasmic Akt activity, whereas S6K2 and phosphorylated S6K were closer connected with ER positivity, low proliferation and nucleic p-Akt. Treatment prediction and prognosis were evaluated by immunohistochemical staining. Nuclear accumulation of S6K1 was indicative of a reduced tamoxifen treatment effect, compared with a significant benefit from tamoxifen treatment in patients without tumor S6K1 nuclear accumulation. Patients with a combination of S6K1 nuclear accumulation and S6K2 cytoplasmic accumulation in the tumor cells had no tamoxifen benefit. Also, S6K1 and S6K2 activation, indicated by p-S6K-t389 expression, was associated with low benefit from tamoxifen compared with untreated patients. In addition, high protein expression of S6K1, independent of localization, predicted worse prognosis. This was not evident for variations in S6K2 or p-S6K-t389 expression.

    In conclusion, the mTOR targeted kinases S6K1 and S6K2 interfere with proliferation and response to tamoxifen. Monitoring their activity andintracellular localization may provide biomarkers for breast cancer treatment, allowing for identification of a group of patients less likely tobenefit from tamoxifen and thus in need of an alternative or additional treatment.

  • 37.
    Bragde, Hanna
    et al.
    Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden.
    Jansson, Ulf
    Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Grodzinsky, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Soederman, Jan
    Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden.
    Potential blood-based markers of celiac disease2014In: BMC Gastroenterology, ISSN 1471-230X, E-ISSN 1471-230X, Vol. 14, no 176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Blood-based diagnostics has the potential to simplify the process of diagnosing celiac disease (CD). Although high levels of autoantibodies against tissue transglutaminase (anti-TG2) are strongly indicative of active CD, several other scenarios involve a need for additional blood-based CD markers. Methods: We investigated the levels of messenger RNA (mRNA) in whole blood (n = 49) and protein in plasma (n = 22) from cases with active CD (n = 20), with confirmed CD and normalized histology (n = 15), and without a CD diagnosis (n = 14). Group differences were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance by ranks. We also investigated correlations between levels of potential markers, histopathology according to the modified Marsh scale, and CD risk gradient based on HLA type, using Spearman rank correlation. The relation between HLA-DQ2 gene dose effect and the expression levels of selected blood-based markers was investigated using the Mann-Whitney U test. Finally, the diagnostic performance of anti-TG2, potential blood-based CD markers, and logistic regression models of combined markers was evaluated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Results: CXCL11 protein levels and TNFRSF9 and TNFSF13B mRNA levels were identified as potential CD markers. These are all affected by or involved in the regulation of the NF-kappa B complex. CXCL11 protein levels and IL21 and IL15 mRNA levels were correlated with histopathology according to the modified Marsh scale, as were the established CD markers. HLA genotype risk and HLA-DQ2 gene dose effect did not show any significant relations with either the potential CD markers or the established CD markers. ROC curve analysis revealed a slight, non-significant increase in the area under the curve for the combined use of anti-TG2 and different constellations of potential blood-based CD markers compared to anti-TG2 alone. Conclusions: The CD markers identified in this study further emphasize the significance of components related to NF-kappa B regulation in relation to CD. However, the relevance of CXCL11, TNFSF13B, TNFRSF9, and other NF-kappa B interacting proteins recognized by pathway analysis, needs to be further investigated in relation to diagnosis and monitoring of CD.

  • 38.
    Brohede, Sabina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wingren, Gun
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Validation of the Body Dysmorphic Disorder Questionnaire in a community sample of Swedish women2013In: Psychiatry Research, ISSN 0165-1781, E-ISSN 1872-7123, Vol. 210, no 2, 647-652 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD) is characterized by a distressing and impairing preoccupation with a nonexistent or slight defect in appearance. Patients with the disorder present to both psychiatric and non-psychiatric physicians. A few studies have assessed BDD prevalence in the general population and have shown that the disorder is relatively common. To date, no BDD assessment instruments have been validated in the general population. Our aim was to validate a brief self-screening instrument, the Body Dysmorphic Disorder Questionnaire (BDDQ), in a female community sample. The BDDQ was translated into Swedish and filled out by 2891 women from a randomly selected community sample. The questionnaire was validated in a subsample of 88 women, using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID) together with clinical assessment as the gold standard. In the validation subsample, the BDDQ showed good concurrent validity, with a sensitivity of 94%, a specificity of 90% and a likelihood ratio of 9.4. The questionnaire can therefore be of value when screening for BDD in female populations.

  • 39.
    Burisch, J.
    et al.
    Herlev University Hospital, Denmark .
    Pedersen, N.
    Herlev University Hospital, Denmark .
    Cukovic-Cavka, S.
    University of Zagreb, Croatia .
    Brinar, M.
    University of Zagreb, Croatia .
    Kaimakliotis, I.
    Nicosia Private Practice, Cyprus .
    Duricova, D.
    Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic .
    Shonova, O.
    Hospital Ceske Budejovice, Czech Republic .
    Vind, I.
    Amager Hospital, Denmark .
    Avnstrom, S.
    Amager Hospital, Denmark .
    Thorsgaard, N.
    Herning Central Hospital, Denmark .
    Andersen, V.
    Viborg Regional Hospital, Denmark Hospital Southern Jutland, Denmark University of Southern Denmark, Denmark .
    Krabbe, S.
    Viborg Regional Hospital, Viborg, Denmark.
    Dahlerup, J.F.
    Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark .
    Salupere, R.
    Tartu University Hospital, Estonia .
    Nielsen, K.R.
    National Hospital Faroe Isl, Denmark .
    Olsen, J.
    National Hospital Faroe Isl, Denmark .
    Manninen, P.
    Tampere University Hospital, Finland .
    Collin, P.
    Tampere University Hospital, Finland .
    Tsianos, E.V.
    University Hospital, Greece University Hospital, Greece .
    Katsanos, K.H.
    University Hospital, Greece University Hospital, Greece .
    Ladefoged, K.
    Dronning Ingrids Hospital, Greenland .
    Lakatos, L.
    Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary.
    Bjornsson, E.
    National University Hospital Reykjavik, Iceland .
    Ragnarsson, G.
    National University Hospital Reykjavik, Iceland .
    Bailey, Y.
    ACD, Ireland .
    Odes, S.
    Ben Gurion University of Negev, Israel Ben Gurion University of Negev, Israel .
    Schwartz, D.
    Ben Gurion University of Negev, Israel Ben Gurion University of Negev, Israel .
    Martinato, M.
    University of Padua, Italy .
    Lupinacci, G.
    UO Gastroenterol Endoscopia Digest, Italy .
    Milla, M.
    Careggi Hospital, Italy .
    De Padova, A.
    Osped Morgagni Pierantoni, Italy .
    D'lnca, R.
    Azienda Ospedaliera—Università di Padova, Padova, Italy.
    Beltrami, M.
    Azienda Osped Arcispedale S Maria Nuova, Italy .
    Kupcinskas, L.
    Az Osped Osped Cremona, Italy Lithuanian University of Health Science, Lithuania .
    Kiudelis, G.
    Lithuanian University of Health Science, Lithuania .
    Turcan, S.
    State University of Medicine and Pharmacy of the Republic of Moldova, Chisinau, Republic of Moldova.
    Tighineanu, O.
    Centre Mother and Child, Moldova .
    Mihu, I.
    Centre Mother and Child, Moldova .
    Magro, F.
    Hospital Sao Joao, Portugal Oporto Medical Sch, Portugal University of Porto, Portugal .
    Barros, L.F.
    Hospital Vale Sousa, Portugal .
    Goldis, A.
    University of Medical Victor Babes, Romania .
    Lazar, D.
    University of Medical Victor Babes, Romania .
    Belousova, E.
    Moscow Regional Research Clin Institute, Russia .
    Nikulina, I.
    Moscow Regional Research Clin Institute, Russia .
    Hernandez, V.
    Complexo Hospital University of Vigo, Spain .
    Martinez-Ares, D.
    Complexo Hospital University of Vigo, Spain .
    Almer, Sven
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Zhulina, Y.
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden .
    Halfvarson, J.
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden Rebro University, Sweden .
    Arebi, N.
    University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England .
    Sebastian, S.
    Hull and E Yorkshire NHS Trust and Hull and York, England .
    Lakatos, P.L.
    Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary.
    Langholz, E.
    Gentofte University Hospital, Denmark .
    Munkholm, P.
    Herlev University Hospital, Denmark .
    East-West gradient in the incidence of inflammatory bowel disease in Europe: the ECCO-EpiCom inception cohort2014In: Gut, ISSN 0017-5749, E-ISSN 1468-3288, Vol. 63, no 4, 588-597 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective The incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasing in Eastern Europe. The reasons for these changes remain unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate whether an East–West gradient in the incidence of IBD in Europe exists.

    Design A prospective, uniformly diagnosed, population based inception cohort of IBD patients in 31 centres from 14 Western and eight Eastern European countries covering a total background population of approximately 10.1 million people was created. One-third of the centres had previous experience with inception cohorts. Patients were entered into a low cost, web based epidemiological database, making participation possible regardless of socioeconomic status and prior experience.

    Results 1515 patients aged 15 years or older were included, of whom 535 (35%) were diagnosed with Crohn's disease (CD), 813 (54%) with ulcerative colitis (UC) and 167 (11%) with IBD unclassified (IBDU). The overall incidence rate ratios in all Western European centres were 1.9 (95% CI 1.5 to 2.4) for CD and 2.1 (95% CI 1.8 to 2.6) for UC compared with Eastern European centres. The median crude annual incidence rates per 100 000 in 2010 for CD were 6.5 (range 0–10.7) in Western European centres and 3.1 (range 0.4–11.5) in Eastern European centres, for UC 10.8 (range 2.9–31.5) and 4.1 (range 2.4–10.3), respectively, and for IBDU 1.9 (range 0–39.4) and 0 (range 0–1.2), respectively. In Western Europe, 92% of CD, 78% of UC and 74% of IBDU patients had a colonoscopy performed as the diagnostic procedure compared with 90%, 100% and 96%, respectively, in Eastern Europe. 8% of CD and 1% of UC patients in both regions underwent surgery within the first 3 months of the onset of disease. 7% of CD patients and 3% of UC patients from Western Europe received biological treatment as rescue therapy. Of all European CD patients, 20% received only 5-aminosalicylates as induction therapy.

    Conclusions An East–West gradient in IBD incidence exists in Europe. Among this inception cohort—including indolent and aggressive cases—international guidelines for diagnosis and initial treatment are not being followed uniformly by physicians.

  • 40.
    Buse, Eberhard
    et al.
    Covance Laboratories, Münster, Germany.
    Häeger, Jan-Dirk
    Department of Anatomy, University of Veterinary Medicine, Hannover, Germany.
    Svensson-Arvelund, Judit
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Markert, Udo R
    Placenta-Labor, Department of Obstetrics, University Hospital, Jena, Germany.
    Faas, Marijke M
    University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Dixon, Darlene
    NIEHS, NTP, Molecular Pathogenesis, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA.
    Cline, J Mark
    Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA.
    Pfarrer, Christiane
    Department of Anatomy, University of Veterinary Medicine, Hannover, Germany.
    The placenta in toxicology. Part I: Animal models in toxicology2014In: Toxicologic pathology (Print), ISSN 0192-6233, E-ISSN 1533-1601, Vol. 42, no 2, 314-326 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The immune system represents a key defense mechanism against potential pathogens and adverse non-self materials. During pregnancy, the placenta is the point of contact between the maternal organism and non-self proteins of the fetal allograft and hence undoubtedly fulfils immune functions. In the placenta bacteria, foreign (non-self) proteins and proteins that might be introduced in toxicological studies or by medication are barred from reaching the progeny, and the maternal immune system is primed for acceptance of non-maternal fetal protein. Both immunologic protection of the fetus and acceptance of the fetus by the mother require effective mechanisms to prevent an immunologic fetomaternal conflict and to keep both organisms in balance. This is why the placenta requires toxicological consideration in view of its immune organ function. The following articles deal with placenta immune-, control-, and tolerance mechanisms in view of both fetal and maternal aspects. Furthermore, models for experimental access to placental immune function are addressed and the pathological evaluation is elucidated. "The Placenta as an Immune Organ and Its Relevance in Toxicological Studies" was subject of a continuing education course at the 2012 Society of Toxicologic Pathology meeting held in Boston, MA.

  • 41.
    Cauvi, David M
    et al.
    Department of Surgery, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, No. 0739, La Jolla, CA 92093-0739, USA.
    Gabriel, Rodney
    Department of Molecular and Experimental Medicine, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.
    Kono, Dwight H
    Department of Immunology and Microbial Science, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Pollard, K Michael
    Department of Molecular and Experimental Medicine, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.
    A tandem repeat in decay accelerating factor 1 is associated with severity of murine mercury-induced autoimmunity2014In: Autoimmune Diseases, ISSN 2090-0422, E-ISSN 2090-0430, Vol. 2014, no 260613Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Decay accelerating factor (DAF), a complement-regulatory protein, protects cells from bystander complement-mediated lysis and negatively regulates T cells. Reduced expression of DAF occurs in several systemic autoimmune diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus, and DAF deficiency exacerbates disease in several autoimmune models, including murine mercury-induced autoimmunity (mHgIA). Daf1, located within Hmr1, a chromosome 1 locus associated in DBA/2 mice with resistance to mHgIA, could be a candidate. Here we show that reduced Daf1 transcription in lupus-prone mice was not associated with a reduction in the Daf1 transcription factor SP1. Studies of NZB mice congenic for the mHgIA-resistant DBA/2 Hmr1 locus suggested that Daf1 expression was controlled by the host genome and not the Hmr1 locus. A unique pentanucleotide repeat variant in the second intron of Daf1 in DBA/2 mice was identified and shown in F2 intercrosses to be associated with less severe disease; however, analysis of Hmr1 congenics indicated that this most likely reflected the presence of autoimmunity-predisposing genetic variants within the Hmr1 locus or that Daf1 expression is mediated by the tandem repeat in epistasis with other genetic variants present in autoimmune-prone mice. These studies argue that the effect of DAF on autoimmunity is complex and may require multiple genetic elements.

  • 42.
    Chalise, Jaya Prakash
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Narendra, Sudeep Chenna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Paudyal, Bhesh Raj
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Magnusson, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Interferon alpha inhibits antigen-specific production of proinflammatory cytokines and enhances antigen-specific transforming growth factor beta production in antigen-induced arthritis2013In: Arthritis Research and Therapy, ISSN 1478-6354, Vol. 15, no 5, R143- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Interferon alpha (IFN-α) has a complex role in autoimmunity, in that it may both enhance and prevent inflammation. We have previously shown that the presence of IFN-α at sensitization protects against subsequent antigen-triggered arthritis. To understand this tolerogenic mechanism, we performed a descriptive, hypothesis-generating study of cellular and humoral responses associated with IFN-α-mediated protection against arthritis.Methods: Arthritis was evaluated at day 28 in mice given a subcutaneous injection of methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA), together with Freund adjuvant and 0 to 5,000 U IFN-α at days 1 and 7, followed by intraarticular injection of mBSA alone at day 21. The effect of IFN-α on mBSA-specific IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b, IgA, and IgE was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Cytokines in circulation and in ex vivo cultures on mBSA restimulation was evaluated with ELISA and Luminex, and the identity of cytokine-producing cells by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis.Results: Administration of IFN-α protected mice from arthritis in a dose-dependent manner but had no effect on antigen-specific antibody levels. However, IFN-α did inhibit the initial increase of IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, and TNF, and the recall response induced by intraarticular mBSA challenge of IL-1β, IL-10, IL-12, TNF, IFN-γ, and IL-17 in serum. IFN-α decreased both macrophage and CD4+ T cell-derived IFN-γ production, whereas IL-17 was decreased only in CD4+ T cells. Ex vivo, in mBSA-restimulated spleen and lymph node cell cultures, the inhibitory effect of in vivo administration of IFN-α on proinflammatory cytokine production was clearly apparent, but had a time limit. An earlier macrophage-derived, and stronger activation of the antiinflammatory cytokine transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) was observed in IFN-α-treated animals, combined with an increase in CD4+ T cells producing TGF-β when arthritis was triggered by mBSA (day 21). Presence of IFN-α at immunizations also prevented the reduction in TGF-β production, which was induced by the intraarticular mBSA injection triggering arthritis in control animals.Conclusions: Administration of IFN-α has a profound effect on the cellular response to mBSA plus adjuvant, but does not affect antigen-specific Ig production. By including IFN-α at immunizations, spleen and lymph node cells inhibit their repertoire of antigen-induced proinflammatory cytokines while enhancing antiinflammatory TGF-β production, first in macrophages, and later also in CD4+ T cells. On intraarticular antigen challenge, this antiinflammatory state is reenforced, manifested as inhibition of proinflammatory recall responses and preservation of TGF-β levels. This may explain why IFN-α protects against antigen-induced arthritis. © 2013 Chalise et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  • 43.
    Chen, Michelle P
    et al.
    Asian Hospital And Medical Center, Muntinlupa.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Lowén, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Labus, Jennifer S.
    Brain Research Institute UCLA, Los Angeles, USA.
    Kilpatrick, Lisa A.
    American Academy of Physician Assistants, USA.
    Mayer, Emeran A.
    Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicin, Los Angeles, USA.
    Tillisch, Kirsten
    Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, USA.
    Irritable Bowel Syndrome Symptoms Are Related to the Resting Brain's Sensorimotor Network2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Cline, J Mark
    et al.
    Department of Pathology/Section on Comparative Medicine, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA.
    Dixon, Darlene
    National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Toxicology Program (NTP), Molecular Pathogenesis, NTP Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Faas, Marijke M
    Immunoendocrinology, Division of Medical Biology, Department of Pathology and Medical Biology, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Göhner, Claudia
    Placenta-Labor, Department of Obstetrics. University Hospital Jena, Jena, Germany.
    Häger, Jan-Dirk
    Department of Anatomy, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Hannover, Germany .
    Markert, Udo R
    Placenta-Labor, Department of Obstetrics. University Hospital Jena, Jena, Germany.
    Pfarrer, Christiane
    Department of Anatomy, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Hannover, Germany .
    Svensson-Arvelund, Judit
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Buse, Eberhard
    Covance Laboratories GmbH, Muenster, Germany .
    The placenta in toxicology. Part III: Pathologic assessment of the placenta2014In: Toxicologic pathology (Print), ISSN 0192-6233, E-ISSN 1533-1601, Vol. 42, no 2, 339-344 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This short review is derived from the peer-reviewed literature and the experience and case materials of the authors. Brief illustrated summaries are presented on the gross and histologic normal anatomy of rodent and macaque placentas, including typical organ weights, with comments on differences from the human placenta. Common incidental findings, background lesions, and induced toxic lesions are addressed, and a recommended strategy for pathologic evaluation of placentas is provided.

  • 45.
    Dahlén, Elsa M
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Clinchy, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, West County Primary Health Care.
    Abdominal Obesity and low grade Systemic Inflammation as Markers for Subclinical Organ Damage in type 2 diabetes2014In: Diabetes & Metabolism, ISSN 1262-3636, E-ISSN 1878-1780, Vol. 40, no 1, 76-81 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore associations between abdominal obesity, inflammatory markers, and subclinical organ damage in 740 patients with type 2 diabetes. Waist circumference (WC) and sagittal abdominal diameter (SAD) was measured. Blood samples were analyzed for; C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin (IL) -1β and IL-6. Carotid intimamedia thickness (IMT) was evaluated by ultrasonography. Aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) was measured with applanation tonometry.

    Abdominal obesity were significantly correlated with; IL-6, CRP (both p= <0.001, WC and SAD, respectively), IMT (WC p=0.012, SAD p=0.003) and PWV (p<0.001, for WC and SAD, respectively). In multiple linear regressions with IMT as dependent variable and age, sex, statins, systolic blood pressure (SBP), Body Mass Index (BMI), CRP and HbA1c, as independent variables, SAD (p=0.047) but not WC, remained associated with IMT. In stepwise linear regression, entering both SAD and WC, the association between SAD and PWV was stronger than the association between WC and PWV.

    We conclude that SAD and WC are feasible measures of obesity that provides information on inflammation, atherosclerosis and arterial stiffness in type 2 diabetes. However, SAD was slightly more robustly associated to subclinical organ damage, compared with WC.

  • 46.
    Domert, Jakob
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rao, Sahana Bhima
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Agholme, Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Brorsson, Ann-Christin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Marcusson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hallbeck, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Nath, Sangeeta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Spreading of Amyloid-β Peptides via Neuritic Cell-to-cell Transfer Is Dependent on Insufficient Cellular Clearance2014In: Neurobiology of Disease, ISSN 0969-9961, E-ISSN 1095-953X, Vol. 65, 82-92 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The spreading of pathology through neuronal pathways is likely to be the cause of the progressive cognitive loss observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other neurodegenerative diseases. We have recently shown the propagation of AD pathology via cell-to-cell transfer of oligomeric amyloid beta (Aβ) residues 1-42 (oAβ1-42) using our donor-acceptor 3-D co-culture model. We now show that different Aβ-isoforms (fluorescently labeled 1-42, 3(pE)-40, 1-40 and 11-42 oligomers) can transfer from one cell to another. Thus, transfer is not restricted to a specific Aβ-isoform. Although different Aβ isoforms can transfer, differences in the capacity to clear and/or degrade these aggregated isoforms result in vast differences in the net amounts ending up in the receiving cells and the net remaining Aβ can cause seeding and pathology in the receiving cells. This insufficient clearance and/or degradation by cells creates sizable intracellular accumulations of the aggregation-prone Aβ1-42 isoform, which further promotes cell-to-cell transfer; thus, oAβ1-42 is a potentially toxic isoform. Furthermore, cell-to-cell transfer is shown to be an early event that is seemingly independent of later appearances of cellular toxicity. This phenomenon could explain how seeds for the AD pathology could pass on to new brain areas and gradually induce AD pathology, even before the first cell starts to deteriorate, and how cell-to-cell transfer can act together with the factors that influence cellular clearance and/or degradation in the development of AD.

  • 47.
    Edström, Måns
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Regulation of immunity in Multiple Sclerosis: CD4+ T cells and the influence of natalizumab2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease targeting the central nervous system (CNS) and the most common neurological cause of disability in young adults. In most cases, the disease course is characterised by the cycling of relapses and remissions, so called relapsing-remitting MS (RR-MS). Although extensively studied, the underlying mechanisms are not fully elucidated, yet CD4+ T cells have been shown to be of importance in disease pathology. A range of treatments are available; the most effective to date being natalizumab, a monoclonal antibody directed against the adhesion molecule VLA-4 on the lymphocyte surface, thereby preventing entry into the CNS.

    The aim of this thesis was to assess the nature of lymphocyte populations in MS. This was achieved by studying CD4+ T helper cells (TH) and regulatory T cells (TREG) in peripheral blood. In addition, the influence of natalizumab was also investigated, both regarding the effect of the drug on the composition of the peripheral lymphocyte compartment as well as its effects on CD4+ T cells in vitro.

    We showed an imbalance in the mRNA expression of CD4+ T helper cell lineage specific transcription factors in peripheral blood. While TH1 and TH17 associated TBX21 and RORC expression was comparable in MS and healthy individuals, the TH2 and TREG associated GATA3 and FOXP3 expression was decreased in RR-MS. Given the reciprocally inhibitory nature of TH subsets, this might imply not only diminished function of TH2 and TREG cells but also a permissive state of harmful TH1 and TH17 cells. The size of the peripheral TREG population was unaltered in RR-MS. When analysed in detail, activated and resting TREG were distinguished, showing clear differences in FOXP3 and CD39 expression. Furthermore, when investigating these subpopulations functionally, the ability of activated TREG to suppress proliferation of responder T cells was found to be decreased in RR-MS patients compared to controls. To further investigate this defect, the global gene expression of TREG was compared between patients and controls. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed an enrichment (over-expression) of chemokine receptor signalling genes in RR-MS TREG, possibly suggesting a role for  chemokines in TREG function.

    A sizable effect of natalizumab treatment was seen in the composition of peripheral lymphocyte populations after one year of treatment. While the number of lymphocytes increased over all, the largest increase was seen in the NK and B cell compartments. Furthermore, T cells from patients with MS displayed decreased responsiveness towards antigens and mitogens in vitro. Natalizumab treatment was able to normalise the responsiveness in blood, an effect not solely dependent on the increased number of cells.

    The importance of CD4+ T cells in human disease, including MS, was shown by a systems biology approach; using GWAS data, genes associated with CD4+ T cell differentiation were enriched for many, not only immunerelated, diseases. Furthermore, global CD4+ T cell gene expression (by microarray) could discriminate between patients and controls. Lastly, using in vitro treated CD4+ T cells, we could show that natalizumab perturbated gene expression differently in patients responding to the drug compared to those not responding.

    In conclusion, our results demonstrate an imbalance of peripheral CD4+ T cells in MS, along with a functional deficiency in the case of TREG. Taken together, these aberrations might result in differentiation and activation of harmful TH1 and TH17 cells, resulting in CNS tissue damage. The importance of CD4+ T cells was further demonstrated by the finding that genes associated with CD4+ T cell differentiation constitute a pleiotropic module common to a number of diseases. Investigation of natalizumab revealed drastic changes in the peripheral lymphocyte compartment caused by treatment. It also appears as treatment might influence the responsiveness of peripheral T cells to antigens. In addition, by using CD4+ T cell transcriptomics after in vitro drug exposure, prediction of treatment outcome may be possible.

    List of papers
    1. Transcriptional characteristics of CD4+ T cells in multiple sclerosis: relative lack of suppressive populations in blood
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Transcriptional characteristics of CD4+ T cells in multiple sclerosis: relative lack of suppressive populations in blood
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    2011 (English)In: Multiple Sclerosis, ISSN 1352-4585, E-ISSN 1477-0970, Vol. 17, no 1, 57-66 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background:Multiple sclerosis (MS) is hypothetically caused by autoreactive Th1 and Th17 cells, whereas Th2 and regulatory T cells may confer protection. The development of Th subpopulations is dependant on the expression of lineage-specific transcription factors.

    Objective:The aim of this study was to assess the balance of CD4+T cell populations in relapsing-remitting MS.

    Methods:Blood mRNA expression of TBX21, GATA3, RORC, FOXP3 and EBI3 was assessed in 33 patients with relapsing-remitting MS and 20 healthy controls. In addition, flow cytometry was performed to assess T lymphocyte numbers.

    Results:In relapsing-remitting MS, diminished expression of FOXP3 (Treg) was found (p < 0.05), despite normal numbers of CD4+CD25hiTreg. Immunoregulatory EBI3 and Th2-associated GATA3 ([a-z]+) was also decreased in MS (p < 0.005 and p < 0.05, respectively). Expression of TBX21 (Th1) and RORC (Th17) did not differ between patients and controls. Similar changes were observed when analysing beta-interferon treated (n = 12) or untreated (n = 21) patients. Analysis of transcription factor ratios, comparing TBX21/GATA3 and RORC/FOXP3, revealed an increase in the RORC/FOXP3 ratio in patients with relapsing-remitting MS (p < 0.005).

    Conclusion:Our findings indicate systemic defects at the mRNA level, involving downregulation of beneficial CD4+phenotypes. This might play a role in disease development by permitting activation of harmful T cell populations.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Sage Publications, 2011
    Keyword
    EBI3, FOXP3, multiple sclerosis, RORC, T cells, transcription factors
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-64758 (URN)10.1177/1352458510381256 (DOI)000285867200006 ()20847001 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2011-02-04 Created: 2011-02-04 Last updated: 2017-12-11
    2. Regulatory T cells in Multiple Sclerosis – Indications of impaired function of suppressive capacity and a role for chemokines
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Regulatory T cells in Multiple Sclerosis – Indications of impaired function of suppressive capacity and a role for chemokines
    Show others...
    2014 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND Regulatory T cells (Treg) are critical for immune regulation and homeostasis. In multiple sclerosis (MS), the function of these cells has been shown to be impaired, although the underlying mechanism has yet to be shown. In the current study, we aimed to characterize and assess the phenotypical, functional and transcriptional characteristics of memory and naïve Treg in MS patients and controls.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS 27 patients with relapsing-remitting disease were included, along with 29 healthy controls. Flow cytometry was used for detailed phenotyping of Treg subpopulations CD4+CD45RA+/- and CD4dimCD25++ and their expression of FOXP3, CD39 and HELIOS. CFSE (proliferation marker) and CD69 (activation marker) were used to investigate the functional capacity of Treg. A microarray was employed for genome-wide transcriptional characterization of isolated Treg.

    RESULTS CD4+CD45RA–CD25++ activated Treg displayed a higher expression of FOXP3 and CD39 than resting CD4+CD45RA+CD25+ Treg, while no significant phenotypical differences were observed in Treg subpopulations between patients and controls. However, a lower anti-proliferative capacity was observed in activated Treg of MS patients compared with those of controls (p<0.05), while suppression of activation was similar to controls. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) of microarray data revealed enrichment for the GO gene set ‘chemokine receptor binding’ in MS Treg.

    CONCLUSION Although numerical phenotypical assessment of resting and activated Tregs did not reveal any significant difference between patients and controls, functional co-culturing experiments showed an impaired function in activated Treg of MS patients. Furthermore, GSEA revealed immune-related gene sets overexpressed in Treg of MS patients, possibly containing clues to the functional impairment. In particular over-activity in chemokine signalling in Treg would be of interest for further investigation.

    Keyword
    EBI3, FOXP3, multiple sclerosis, RORC, T cells, transcription factors
    National Category
    Clinical Medicine Basic Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-108908 (URN)
    Available from: 2014-07-11 Created: 2014-07-11 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
    3. An Increase in B cell and Cytotoxic NK cell Proportions and Increased T cell Responsiveness in Blood of Natalizumab-treated Multiple Sclerosis Patients
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>An Increase in B cell and Cytotoxic NK cell Proportions and Increased T cell Responsiveness in Blood of Natalizumab-treated Multiple Sclerosis Patients
    Show others...
    2013 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 12, e81685Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Changes in the peripheral blood lymphocyte composition probably both mediate and reflect the effects of natalizumab treatment in multiple sclerosis, with implications for treatment benefits and risks.

    Objectives

    To assess changes in circulating lymphocyte subpopulation compositions and T-cell responses during natalizumab treatment.

    Material and methods

    A broad panel of markers for blood lymphocyte populations, including states of activation and co-stimulation as well as T-cell responses to recall antigens and mitogens, was assessed by flow cytometry in 40 patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis before and after one-year natalizumab treatment.

    Results

    Absolute numbers of all major populations of lymphocytes increased after treatment, most markedly for NK- and B-cells. The fraction of both memory and presumed regulatory B-cell subsets increased, as did CD3-CD56dim cytotoxic NK-cells, whereas CD3-CD56bright regulatory NK-cells decreased. Treatment was also associated with a restored T-cell responsiveness to recall antigens and mitogens.

    Conclusions

    Our data confirms that natalizumab treatment increases the number of lymphocytes in blood, likely mirroring the expression of VLA-4 being highest on NK- and B-cells. This supports reduction of lymphocyte extravasation as a main mode of action, although the differential composition of lymphocyte subpopulations suggests cell-signalling effects may also be operative. The systemic increase in T-cell responsiveness reflects the increase in numbers, and while augmenting anti-infectious responses systemically, localized responses become correspondingly decreased.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    San Francisco, USA: Public Library of Science, 2013
    Keyword
    Multiple sclerosis, natalizumab, flow cytometry, T-cells, NK-cells, B-cells, lymphocyte proliferation
    National Category
    Neurology Immunology in the medical area
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-84268 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0081685 (DOI)000327944500088 ()24312575 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84891420120 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2012-10-03 Created: 2012-10-03 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
    4. Integrated genomic and prospective clinical studies show the importance of modular pleiotropy for disease susceptibility, diagnosis and treatment
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Integrated genomic and prospective clinical studies show the importance of modular pleiotropy for disease susceptibility, diagnosis and treatment
    Show others...
    2014 (English)In: Genome Medicine, ISSN 1756-994X, E-ISSN 1756-994X, Vol. 6, no 17Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Translational research typically aims to identify and functionally validate individual, disease-specific genes. However, reaching this aim is complicated by the involvement of thousands of genes in common diseases, and that many of those genes are pleiotropic, that is, shared by several diseases. Methods: We integrated genomic meta-analyses with prospective clinical studies to systematically investigate the pathogenic, diagnostic and therapeutic roles of pleiotropic genes. In a novel approach, we first used pathway analysis of all published genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to find a cell type common to many diseases. Results: The analysis showed over-representation of the T helper cell differentiation pathway, which is expressed in T cells. This led us to focus on expression profiling of CD4(+) T cells from highly diverse inflammatory and malignant diseases. We found that pleiotropic genes were highly interconnected and formed a pleiotropic module, which was enriched for inflammatory, metabolic and proliferative pathways. The general relevance of this module was supported by highly significant enrichment of genetic variants identified by all GWAS and cancer studies, as well as known diagnostic and therapeutic targets. Prospective clinical studies of multiple sclerosis and allergy showed the importance of both pleiotropic and disease specific modules for clinical stratification. Conclusions: In summary, this translational genomics study identified a pleiotropic module, which has key pathogenic, diagnostic and therapeutic roles.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    BioMed Central, 2014
    National Category
    Clinical Medicine Basic Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-106873 (URN)10.1186/gm534 (DOI)000334631300002 ()
    Available from: 2014-05-28 Created: 2014-05-23 Last updated: 2018-01-11
  • 48.
    Edström, Måns
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Gustafsson, Mika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Benson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping. Huddinge University Hospital.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Regulatory T cells in Multiple Sclerosis – Indications of impaired function of suppressive capacity and a role for chemokines2014Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND Regulatory T cells (Treg) are critical for immune regulation and homeostasis. In multiple sclerosis (MS), the function of these cells has been shown to be impaired, although the underlying mechanism has yet to be shown. In the current study, we aimed to characterize and assess the phenotypical, functional and transcriptional characteristics of memory and naïve Treg in MS patients and controls.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS 27 patients with relapsing-remitting disease were included, along with 29 healthy controls. Flow cytometry was used for detailed phenotyping of Treg subpopulations CD4+CD45RA+/- and CD4dimCD25++ and their expression of FOXP3, CD39 and HELIOS. CFSE (proliferation marker) and CD69 (activation marker) were used to investigate the functional capacity of Treg. A microarray was employed for genome-wide transcriptional characterization of isolated Treg.

    RESULTS CD4+CD45RA–CD25++ activated Treg displayed a higher expression of FOXP3 and CD39 than resting CD4+CD45RA+CD25+ Treg, while no significant phenotypical differences were observed in Treg subpopulations between patients and controls. However, a lower anti-proliferative capacity was observed in activated Treg of MS patients compared with those of controls (p<0.05), while suppression of activation was similar to controls. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) of microarray data revealed enrichment for the GO gene set ‘chemokine receptor binding’ in MS Treg.

    CONCLUSION Although numerical phenotypical assessment of resting and activated Tregs did not reveal any significant difference between patients and controls, functional co-culturing experiments showed an impaired function in activated Treg of MS patients. Furthermore, GSEA revealed immune-related gene sets overexpressed in Treg of MS patients, possibly containing clues to the functional impairment. In particular over-activity in chemokine signalling in Treg would be of interest for further investigation.

  • 49.
    Eklund, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Welin, Amanda
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andersson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Verma, Deepti
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Stendahl, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Särndahl, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lerm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Human gene variants linked to enhanced NLRP3 activity limit intramacrophage growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis2014In: The Journal of infectious diseases, ISSN 1537-6613, Vol. 209, no 5, 749-753 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and subsequent generation of IL-1β is initiated in macrophages upon recognition of several stimuli. In the present work, we show that gain-of-function gene variants of inflammasome components known to predispose individuals to inflammatory disorders have a host-protective role during infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. By isolation of macrophages from patients and healthy blood donors with genetic variants in NLRP3 and CARD8 and subsequently infecting the cells by virulent M. tuberculosis, we show that these gene variants, combined, are associated with increased control of bacterial growth in human macrophages.

  • 50.
    Ekman, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sigurdardottir, Gunnthorunn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carlström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kartul, Natalja
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Enerbäck, Charlotta
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Systemically elevated Th1-, Th2- and Th17-associated chemokines in psoriasis vulgaris before and after ultraviolet B treatment2013In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 93, no 5, 527-531 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chemokines may contribute to the systemic inflammation that is linked to the increased risk of co-morbidities in patients with psoriasis. The aim of this study was to investigate circulating chemokines in patients with psoriasis and their relationship to disease severity. Analysis of plasma levels of chemokines in patients with psoriasis before narrowband ultraviolet B (UVB) therapy revealed increased expression of Th1-associated CXCL9 and -10, Th2-associated CCL17 and CCL22, and Th17-associated CCL20. CCL20 correlated with disease severity. UVB therapy reduced skin symptoms, but did not affect the chemokine levels in plasma. Anti-CD3 and anti-CD28-mediated activation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) caused a higher secretion of Th2 cytokine interleukin (IL)-13 by PBMCs from patients with psoriasis than from healthy controls. The sustained high expression of inflammatory chemokines is a potential link to systemic inflammation in psoriasis. UVB therapy may be a more effective treatment of local rather than systemic inflammation.

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