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  • 1.
    Ageno, Walter
    et al.
    University of Insubria, Italy.
    Buller, Harry R.
    Academic Medical Centre, Netherlands.
    Falanga, Anna
    Hospital Papa Giovanni XXIII, Italy; Hospital Papa Giovanni XXIII, Italy.
    Hacke, Werner
    Heidelberg University, Germany.
    Hendriks, Jeroen
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Adelaide, Australia.
    Lobban, Trudie
    Arrhythmia Alliance and AF Assoc, England.
    Merino, Jose
    University of La Paz, Spain.
    Milojevic, Ivan S.
    Gen Hospital Cuprija, Serbia.
    Moya, Francisco
    Vithas Xanit Int Hospital, Spain.
    Bart van der Worp, H.
    University of Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Randall, Gary
    SAFE, England.
    Tsioufis, Konstantinos
    University of Athens, Greece.
    Verhamme, Peter
    University of Leuven, Belgium.
    John Camm, A.
    St Georges University of London, England; Imperial Coll, England.
    Managing reversal of direct oral anticoagulants in emergency situations Anticoagulation Education Task Force White Paper2016In: Thrombosis and Haemostasis, ISSN 0340-6245, Vol. 116, no 6, 1003-1010 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anticoagulation is the cornerstone of prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). However, the mechanisms by which anticoagulants confer therapeutic benefit also increase the risk of bleeding. As such, reversal strategies are critical. Until recently, the direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban lacked a specific reversal agent. This report is based on findings from the Anticoagulation Education Task Force, which brought together patient groups and professionals representing different medical specialties with an interest in patient safety and expertise in AF, VTE, stroke, anticoagulation, and reversal agents, to discuss the current status of anticoagulation reversal and fundamental changes in management of bleeding associated with DOACs occasioned by the approval of idarucizumab, a specific reversal agent for dabigatran, as well as recent clinical data on specific reversal agents for factor Xa inhibitors. Recommendations are given for when there is a definite need for a reversal agent (e.g. in cases of life-threatening bleeding, bleeding into a closed space or organ, persistent bleeding despite local haemostatic measures, and need for urgent interventions and/or interventions that carry a high risk for bleeding), when reversal agents may be helpful, and when a reversal agent is generally not needed. Key stakeholders who require 24-7/around-the-clock access to these agents vary among hospitals; however, from a practical perspective the emergency department is recommended as an appropriate location for these agents. Clearly, the advent of new agents requires standardised protocols for treating bleeding on an institutional level.

  • 2.
    Agren, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Presentation av post-doctoral mentorship2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Agren, Susanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Luttik, ML
    Caregiving tasks and caregiver burden over time: effects of an intervention for patients with post-operative heart failure and their partners.2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Agvall, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Central County.
    Paulsson, Thomas
    Global Health Economics and Outcomes Research, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Belgium.
    Foldevi, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Central County.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Resource use and cost implications of implementing a heart failure program for patients with systolic heart failure in Swedish primary health care2014In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 176, 731-738 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Heart failure (HF) is a common but serious condition which involves a significant economic burden on the health care economy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate cost and quality of life (QoL) implications of implementing a HF management program (HFMP) in primary health care (PHC).

    Methods and results: This was a prospective randomized open-label study including 160 patientswith a diagnosis of HF from five PHC centers in south-eastern Sweden. Patients randomized to the intervention group received information about HF from HF nurses and from a validated computer-based awareness program. HF nurses and physicians followed the patients intensely in order to optimize HF treatment according to current guidelines. The patients in the control group were followed by their regular general practitioner (GP) and received standard treatment according to local management routines. No significant changes were observed in NYHA class and quality-adjusted life years (QALY), implying that functional class and QoL were preserved. However, costs for hospital care (HC) and PHC were reduced by EUR 2167, or 33%. The total cost was EUR 4471 in the intervention group and EUR 6638 in the control group.

    Conclusions: Introducing HFMP in Swedish PHC in patients with HF entails a significant reduction in resource utilization and costs, and maintains QoL. Based on these results, a broader implementation of HFMP in PHC may be recommended. However, results should be confirmed with extended follow-up to verify  long-term effects.

  • 5.
    Ahlander, Britt-Marie
    et al.
    Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Maret, Eva
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Development and validation of a questionnaire evaluating patient anxiety during Magnetic Resonance Imaging: the Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Anxiety Questionnaire (MRI-AQ)2016In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 72, no 6, 1368-1380 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. To develop and validate a new instrument measuring patient anxiety during Magnetic Resonance Imaging examinations, Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Anxiety Questionnaire. Background. Questionnaires measuring patients anxiety during Magnetic Resonance Imaging examinations have been the same as used in a wide range of conditions. To learn about patients experience during examination and to evaluate interventions, a specific questionnaire measuring patient anxiety during Magnetic Resonance Imaging is needed. Design. Psychometric cross-sectional study with test-retest design. Methods. A new questionnaire, Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Anxiety Questionnaire, was designed from patient expressions of anxiety in Magnetic Resonance Imaging-scanners. The sample was recruited between October 2012-October 2014. Factor structure was evaluated with exploratory factor analysis and internal consistency with Cronbachs alpha. Criterion-related validity, known-group validity and test-retest was calculated. Results. Patients referred for Magnetic Resonance Imaging of either the spine or the heart, were invited to participate. The development and validation of Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Anxiety Questionnaire resulted in 15 items consisting of two factors. Cronbachs alpha was found to be high. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Anxiety Questionnaire correlated higher with instruments measuring anxiety than with depression scales. Known-group validity demonstrated a higher level of anxiety for patients undergoing Magnetic Resonance Imaging scan of the heart than for those examining the spine. Test-retest reliability demonstrated acceptable level for the scale. Conclusion. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Anxiety Questionnaire bridges a gap among existing questionnaires, making it a simple and useful tool for measuring patient anxiety during Magnetic Resonance Imaging examinations.

  • 6.
    Ahlberg, M
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Bäckman, C
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Jones, C
    Musculoskeletal Biologu, Institute of Ageing & Chronic Disease, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK.
    Walther, S
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Moving forward in life after being an on-looker in intensive care partner's experience of group-communication2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Partners have a burdensome time during and after their partners’ intensive care period. They may appear to be coping well

    outwardly but inside feel vulnerable and lost. Evaluated interventions for partners on this aspect are limited.

    Aim: The aim of this study was to describe the experience of participating in group communication with other partners of former intensive

    care patients.

    Design: The study has a descriptive intervention-based design where group communication for partners of former, surviving intensive care

    unit (ICU) patients was evaluated.

    Methods: A strategic selection was made of adult partners to former adult intensive care patients (n=15), 5 men and 10 women, aged

    37–89 years. Two group communication sessions lasting 2 h were held at monthly intervals with three to five partners. The partners later wrote,

    in a notebook, about their feelings of participating in group communications. To deepen the understanding of the impact of the sessions, six of

    the partners were interviewed. Content analysis was used to analyse the notebooks and the interviews.

    Findings: Three categories were identified: (1) Emotional impact, the partners felt togetherness and experienced worries and gratitude, (2)

    Confirmation, consciousness through insight and reflection and (3) The meeting design, group constellation and recommendation to participate

    in group communication.

    Conclusion: Partners of an intensive care patient are on a journey, constantly trying to adapt to the new situation and find new strategies

    to ever-changing circumstances. Group communications contributed to togetherness and confirmation. To share experiences with others is one

    way for partners to be able to move forward in life.

    Relevance to clinical practice: Group communication with other patients’ partners eases the process of going through the burden of

    being a partner to an intensive care patient. Group communications needs to be further developed and evaluated to obtain consensus and

    evidence for the best practice.

    Key words: Communication • Content analysis • Intensive care • Nursing • Partners

  • 7. Ahlberg, M
    et al.
    Bäckman, C
    Jones, C
    walther, S
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Moving forward in life after being an unlocker in intensive care - partners' experience of group communication2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8. Ahlberg, M
    et al.
    Bäckman, Carl
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jones, C
    Walther, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Group communication confirm feelings among partners of former intensive care patients2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Ahlberg, Mona
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Bäckman, Carl
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Jones, Christina
    Musculoskeletal Biology, Institute of Ageing & Chronic Disease, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK.
    Walther, Sten
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center.
    Moving on in life after intensive care - partners' experience of group communication2015In: Nursing in Critical Care, ISSN 1362-1017, E-ISSN 1478-5153, Vol. 20, no 5, 256-263 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:Partners have a burdensome time during and after their partners’ intensive care period. They may appear to be coping welloutwardly but inside feel vulnerable and lost. Evaluated interventions for partners on this aspect are limited.

    Aim:The aim of this study was to describe the experience of participating in group communication with other partners of former intensivecare patients.

    Design:The study has a descriptive intervention-based design where group communication for partners of former, surviving intensive careunit (ICU) patients was evaluated.

    Methods:A strategic selection was made of adult partners to former adult intensive care patients (n=15), 5 men and 10 women, aged37–89 years. Two group communication sessions lasting 2 h were held at monthly intervals with three to five partners. The partners later wrote,in a notebook, about their feelings of participating in group communications. To deepen the understanding of the impact of the sessions, six ofthe partners were interviewed. Content analysis was used to analyse the notebooks and the interviews.

    Findings:Three categories were identified: (1) Emotional impact, the partners felt togetherness and experienced worries and gratitude, (2)Confirmation, consciousness through insight and reflection and (3) The meeting design, group constellation and recommendation to participatein group communication.

    Conclusion:Partners of an intensive care patient are on a journey, constantly trying to adapt to the new situation and find new strategiesto ever-changing circumstances. Group communications contributed to togetherness and confirmation. To share experiences with others is oneway for partners to be able to move forward in life.

    Relevance to clinical practice:Group communication with other patients’ partners eases the process of going through the burden ofbeing a partner to an intensive care patient. Group communications needs to be further developed and evaluated to obtain consensus andevidence for the best practice.

  • 10.
    Ahldén, Maria KC
    et al.
    Oslo University, Norway.
    Helén, Rönning
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Jönköping University.
    Agren, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Facing the unexpected - A content analysis of how dyads face the challenges of postoperative heart failure2014In: Clinical Nursing Studies, ISSN 2324-7940, Vol. 2, no 2, 74-83 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to identify the challenges, strategies and needs of dyads who are dealing with postoperative heart failure.

    Background: An increasing number of patients with postoperative heart failure are living with their partner as primary caregiver. Heart failure is known to reduce quality of life but little is known about the strategies dyads use to cope with postoperative heart failure or what kind of support they need.

    Methods: Data were collected through semi-structured dialogue guides. Content analysis was performed to derive the main themes and categories of the data.

    Results: Three main themes were derived from the data; Everyday challenges, Strategies to deal with everyday challenges and Factors facilitating everyday life.

    Conclusions: Dyads living with postoperative heart failure find the change in everyday life challenging, but have strategies to handle the situation and know what kind of help they need. With the right help from health care, quality of life and self-care can be improved.

  • 11.
    Aidemark, Jan
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Askenas, Linda
    Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Martensson, Jan
    Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Challenges for Heart Failure Patients Self-Care Systems Analysis of Patients Needs2014In: CENTERIS 2014 - CONFERENCE ON ENTERPRISE INFORMATION SYSTEMS / PROJMAN 2014 - INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PROJECT MANAGEMENT / HCIST 2014 - INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON HEALTH AND SOCIAL CARE INFORMATION SYSTEMS AND TECHNOLOGIES, ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV , 2014, Vol. 16, 1256-1264 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-care is important for heart failure patients. However, what are the views of patients on their situation when it comes to realizing self-care? The aim of the paper is to investigate the self-care needs of HF patients, by understanding the issues they embrace in their self-care processes. In this paper we make a review of 17 interviews and make a classification of what the needs are for possible information technology support systems. Based on the analysis of these interviews, we identify the diversity of needs in support of activities related to different background conditions and the dynamics of change of learning and changes in the heart failure condition. The contribution of the paper is a framework for understanding the diversity of needs and the specific situations of this group of patients.

  • 12.
    Aidemark, Jan
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Askenas, Linda
    Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Nygardh, Anette
    Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    User involvement in the co-design of self-care support systems for heart failure patients2015In: CONFERENCE ON ENTERPRISE INFORMATION SYSTEMS/INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PROJECT MANAGEMENT/CONFERENCE ON HEALTH AND SOCIAL CARE INFORMATION SYSTEMS AND TECHNOLOGIES, CENTERIS/PROJMAN / HCIST 2015, ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV , 2015, Vol. 64, 118-124 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper the nature of user involvement in a co-design process will be explored. The outlines of a research project aiming at developing support systems for self-care inpatients suffering from chronic heart failure will be presented. The project is planned to perform a co-design effort where users (patients and healthcare professionals) will be given the opportunity to influence the development of support systems. We will discuss a number of possibilities and challenges that lie in the design of this kind of project and also some findings from its early stages. This report presents the experiences of users input, which are discussed in the context of previous research on benefits of user contributions in systems development. (C) 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  • 13.
    Akesson, Karin
    et al.
    Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden; Jonköping County Council, Sweden; University of Jonköping, Sweden.
    Hanberger, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    The influence of age, gender, insulin dose, BMI, and blood pressure on metabolic control in young patients with type 1 diabetes2015In: Pediatric Diabetes, ISSN 1399-543X, E-ISSN 1399-5448, Vol. 16, no 8, 581-586 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ObjectiveTo explore the relationship between certain clinical variables and metabolic HbA1c at diagnosis correlated to HbA1c at follow-up (p less than 0.001). There was a clear gender difference regarding HbA1c. Girls had higher values both at diagnosis and at follow-up (p less than 0.001). Girls also had lower BMI and pH at diagnosis than boys (p less than 0.001). In contrast, girls with the highest body mass index (BMI) at follow-up had higher mean HbA1c at follow-up in 2010 (p less than 0.001). Having a mother and/or a father with high BMI implied higher HbA1c at diagnosis (p less than 0.003). ConclusionsHbA1c at diagnosis seems to predict metabolic control years later. There is a gender difference at diagnosis as female patients have higher HbA1c than males at diagnosis as well as at follow up. As metabolic control is very much correlated to complications there is a need to early identify patients at risk of poor metabolic control. Even though we do not know whether a high HbA1c level is mainly due to severity of the disease or to behavioral patterns, new ways to treat and support these children, especially girls, are needed.

  • 14.
    Alehagen, Siw
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Chamberlain Wilmoth, Margaret
    School of Nursing, College of Health and Human Services, UNC Charlotte, Charlotte, North Carolina, USA.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Defining and Clarifying Sexual Health: A Simultaneous Concept analysis2012In: Advances in Medicine and Biology vol 28 / [ed] Leon V. Berhardt, Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2012, 177-198 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The concepts of health and sexuality are complex and the discussion of how to clarify them seems to be ongoing. This continuing work is essential also according to the joined concept sexual health as it is central in national and international public health programs. Hence, the aim of this paper was to clarify the concept of sexual health by making a simultaneous concept analysis of sexuality and health.

    Methods: A qualitative content analysis defined the meanings, the major concepts and the components of the superior concepts Sexuality and Health, respectively. The data for this analysis were dictionaries, definitions, reports, guidelines, books and articles. Next, a simultaneous concept analysis (SCA) was chosen in order to answer the research questions and develop a process model of sexual health.

    Findings: The definitions of the processed concepts and the developing outcome from sexual health were: Prime mover, Interconnectedness, Interdependence, Norms, Completeness, Functional physiology, Insight, Relatedness, Adaptiveness and Contentedness. These outcomes are presented in a process model.

    Conclusions: This study adds a theoretical perspective clarifying the concept sexual health. The clarifications of this study contribute with knowledge, which can be used in practise, enabling health care professionals promoting sexual health and develop sexual health issues in further research.

  • 15.
    Allemann, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sund-Levander, Märta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nurses' actions in response to nursing assistants' observations of signs and symptoms of infections among nursing home residents2015In: Nursing Open, ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 2, no 3, 97-104 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims

    To describe what nurses do during episodes of suspected infection in elderly nursing home residents and if these actions are linked to who is initiating an episode and whether the episode is considered an infection or not.

    Design

    Prospective descriptive study. Data were collected in 2008–2010.

    Methods

    Summarized and categorized documentation by nursing assistants and nurses was used for summative content analysis.

    Results

    Nurses' actions seem to be related to who initiated the episode and if the episodes are categorized as ‘non-infection’, ‘possible infection’ or ‘infection’. Actions could be ‘observation’, ‘screenings’, ‘engaged in waiting’, ‘follow-ups’, ‘nurse-prescribed actions’, ‘diagnosing’, ‘contacting the physician’, ‘carrying out an action prescribed by the physician’, ‘contacting an ambulance or arranging an emergency visit to the hospital’ and ‘prescribing screening’. As NAs often initiate episodes of suspected infection by observing changed conditions, it seems important to include the NA in the decision-making process as these observations could detect possible early signs and symptoms of infections.

  • 16.
    Andersson, Elenor
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science.
    Johansson, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science.
    "Jag var där och jag var närvarande": Förstagångspappors erfarenheter av delaktighet i samband med förlossnings- och BB-vistelsen2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund: Idag uppmuntras pappor att vara närvarande och aktiva under graviditet och förlossning, något som påverkar hela familjen positivt. Delaktighet kan upplevas och uttryckas på olika sätt. Studier har visat att pappor inte varit så delaktiga som de önskat och haft svårt att hitta sin roll. Syfte: Identifiera och beskriva förstagångspappors erfarenheter av delaktighet under normal förlossning och BB-vistelse. Metod: En kvalitativ studie med induktiv ansats valdes. Fjorton intervjuer utfördes där materialet analyserades utifrån tematisk analys enligt Braun & Clarke. Fynd: Två huvudteman och sju underteman identifierades. Första huvudtemat var aktivt agerande med undertemana praktisk och verbalt agerande, rollen som ställföreträdare, involveras till handling. Andra huvudtemat var aktiv närvaro med undertemana finnas med, känslomässigt deltagande, deltagande i en livshändelse, bli sedd och bekräftad. Papporna vill vara delaktiga och upplever det positivt att bli involverade av barnmorskan till att delta aktivt. Delaktigheten stärks av att papporna blir sedda och bekräftade av barnmorskorna som blivande och nyblivna pappor. Delaktigheten riskerar att utebli om papporna inte får den information de behöver eller då de inte själva efterfrågar den. Konklusion: Förstagångspappors erfarenheter av delaktighet kan innebära både ett aktivt agerande och en aktiv närvaro.

  • 17.
    Andersson, Elin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kroon, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nationell kartläggning av farmakologiska rutiner och information i samband med tonsilloperation av barn och ungdomar2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund: Tonsilloperation är den vanligaste kirurgin som utförs på barn och ungdomar. Operationen medför långvarig smärta samt hög frekvens av illamående. I Sverige år 2012 kontaktade nästan en fjärdedel av alla föräldrar till barn som genomgått tonsillkirurgi sjukvården p.g.a. ej acceptabel smärta.

    Syfte: Syftet var att i en nationell studie kartlägga farmakologiska rutiner och informationen i samband med tonsilloperation hos barn och ungdomar.

    Metod: Kvantitativ deskriptiv studie, vilket utfördes som en enkätstudie där populationen var 52 öron-näs hals-kliniker i Sverige. Respondenter var öronläkare, öronsjuksköterska, anestesiläkare och anestesisjuksköterska (totalt 163 enkäter).

    Resultat: Svarsfrekvensen var 88 % från totalt 47 kliniker. Till största del gavs informationen till barn och föräldrar muntligt och skriftligt. Webbsidan Tonsilloperation.se utnyttjades som informationsmedel hos mindre än 50 % av klinikerna. Vanligast var intravenös anestesiinduktion och inhalationsanestesi som underhåll. Steroider användes för att förebygga illamående. Drygt 40 % av klinikerna hade skriftliga riktlinjer för postoperativ smärtbehandling till inneliggande patienter och till hemmet. Den farmkologiska behandlingen bestod huvudsakligen av paracetamol (70 % doserade enligt FASS) och NSAID. Åttio procent av klinikerna använde Citodon®, få ordinerade klonidin (11 %) och opioider (12 %).

    Konklusion: Resultaten visar på behov av evidensbaserade riktlinjer av farmakologisk behandling i samband med tonsilloperation. Utökat teamarbete gällande perioperativt omhändertagande i samband med tonsilloperation skulle höja vårdkvalitén.

  • 18.
    Andersson, Elin
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Kroon, Anna
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Nationell kartläggning av farmakologiska rutiner och information i samband med tonsilloperation2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Studien är en del i ett större nationellt projekt med syfte att kartlägga smärtbehandling vid tonsillkirurgi i samband med utformning av nationella farmakologiska riktlinjer. De vanligaste postoperativa komplikationerna vid tonsillkirurgi är postoperativt illamående och kräkningar (PONV), smärta, blödning och dehydrering. Tonsillkirurgin utförs idag antingen som dagkirurgiskt ingrepp eller som slutenvårdsingrepp med en vårdtid på ca ett dygn. Därmed sker den postoperativa vården i hemmet. Ett flertal studier har beskrivit patienternas upplevelse av höggradig smärta efter tonsillkirurgi. Obehandlad smärta leder till svårigheter att svälja och därmed otillräckligt dryckes- och matintag, vilket leder till dehydrering, ökad blödningsbenägenhet, sämre läkningsförmåga samt negativa  postoperativa beteendeförändringar hos barnet.

    Syftet var att i en nationell studie kartlägga farmakologiska rutiner och informationen i samband med tonsilloperation hos barn och ungdomar.

  • 19.
    Andersson, Elin
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Kroon, Anna
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Nationell kartläggning av farmakologiska rutiner och information i samband med tonsilloperation2013In: Ventilen, ISSN 0348-6257, Vol. 4, no 48, 16-17 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Studien är en del i ett större nationellt projekt med syfte att kartlägga smärtbehandling vid tonsillkirurgi i samband med utformning av nationella farmakologiska riktlinjer. De vanligaste postoperativa komplikationerna vid tonsillkirurgi är postoperativt illamående och kräkningar (PONV), smärta, blödning och dehydrering. Tonsillkirurgin utförs idag antingen som dagkirurgiskt ingrepp eller som slutenvårdsingrepp med en vårdtid på ca ett dygn. Därmed sker den postoperativa vården i hemmet. Ett flertal studier har beskrivit patienternas upplevelse av höggradig smärta efter tonsillkirurgi. Obehandlad smärta leder till svårigheter att svälja och därmed otillräckligt dryckes- och matintag, vilket leder till dehydrering, ökad blödningsbenägenhet, sämre läkningsförmåga samt negativa  postoperativa beteendeförändringar hos barnet.

    Syftet var att i en nationell studie kartlägga farmakologiska rutiner och informationen i samband med tonsilloperation hos barn och ungdomar.

  • 20.
    Andersson, Elin
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Kroon, Anna
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Nationell kartläggning av farmakologiska rutiner och information i samband med tonsilloperation2012In: Nationellt kvalitetsregister Öron-, Näs- och Halssjukvård: Årsrapport 2012, Nationellt kvalitetsregister för Öron-, Näs- och Halssjukvård. , 2012, 77-81 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Studien är en del i ett större nationellt projekt med syfte att kartlägga smärtbehandling vid tonsillkirurgi i samband med utformning av nationella farmakologiska riktlinjer. De vanligaste postoperativa komplikationerna vid tonsillkirurgi är postoperativt illamående och kräkningar (PONV), smärta, blödning och dehydrering. Tonsillkirurgin utförs idag antingen som dagkirurgiskt ingrepp eller som slutenvårdsingrepp med en vårdtid på ca ett dygn. Därmed sker den postoperativa vården i hemmet. Ett flertal studier har beskrivit patienternas upplevelse av höggradig smärta efter tonsillkirurgi. Obehandlad smärta leder till svårigheter att svälja och därmed otillräckligt dryckes- och matintag, vilket leder till dehydrering, ökad blödningsbenägenhet, sämre läkningsförmåga samt negativa  postoperativa beteendeförändringar hos barnet.

    Syftet var att i en nationell studie kartlägga farmakologiska rutiner och informationen i samband med tonsilloperation hos barn och ungdomar.

  • 21.
    Andersson, Frieda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Patient safety in nursing homes in Sweden: nurses´views on safety and their role2017In: Journal of Health Services Research and Policy, ISSN 1355-8196, E-ISSN 1758-1060, Vol. 22, no 4, 204-210 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Knowledge about patient safety in nursing homes is limited. The aim of this study was to describe what patient safety means to nurses working in nursing homes for the elderly and how these nurses address patient safety. Method: Qualitative study of semi-structured interviews with 15 nurses aged 27-62 years. Qualitative content analysis was applied. Results: Nurses describe the meaning of patient safety in terms of proper care and treatment, and a sense of security. Based on nurses' description of patient safety, several factors were identified as prerequisites to achieve safe health care: competence; clear information transfer between health care organizations; continuity of care and appropriate environment. Barriers to patient safety were described as lack of sufficient resources; lack of communication and negative attitudes to incident reporting. To a great extent, nurses' work for patient safety consists of efforts to compensate for defects and ensure good health care in their daily work, since work with patient safety is not a management priority. Conclusion: Patient safety needs to be clarified and prioritized in nursing homes, and there is a need to understand nurses' role among other care givers and the need for shared routines among care givers

  • 22.
    Andersson, Madelene
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science.
    Samuelsson, Kristian
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science.
    Kärlek till droger eller begär efter kärlek: En litteraturstudie om erfarenheter av omvårdnad hos patienter med en beroendesjukdom2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: 425 000 people are today living with a substance-related addictive disorder in Sweden. A large percentage of these people also live with concurrent somatic diseases which means that this group of people often encounter the somatic health-care system.

    Aim: The study aimed to highlight the experience of nursing in somatic care in patients with a substance-related addictive disorder.

    Design: The study was conducted as a literature review with a systematic approach.

    Method: The literature search was conducted through three databases: CINAHL, PsycINFO and PubMed, which resulted in eleven articles, all with a qualitative approach. The articles were checked for accuracy and the material was analyzed with inspiration from Graneheim and Lundmans (2004) concept analysis.

    Findings: Three themes were identified: disrespectful treatment, care on different terms and good nursing relationship. Main findings revealed that the patients experienced nursing staff as suspicious, blaming and showing a lack of dedication. The result demonstrates that the patients with a substance-related addictive disorder received inferior care than other inpatients in the nursing wards. Good experiences were manifested by the staff showing concern, confirmation and maintained a person-centered care.

    Conclusion: Inpatients with a substance-related addictive disorder tend to experience disrespected treatment and discrimination compared to other inpatients. Enhanced awareness is needed among health professionals to erase the stereotypical perceptions and by that create conditions for a good caring relationship.

  • 23.
    Andersson, Sten-Ove
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Centre for Defence Medicine, Swedish Armed Forces, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Lundberg, Lars
    Centre for Defence Medicine, Swedish Armed Forces, Göteborg, Sweden/Borås University, School of Health Sciences,Borås Sweden.
    Jonsson, Anders
    Centre for Defence Medicine, Swedish Armed Forces, Göteborg, Sweden/Borås University, School of Health Sciences,Borås Sweden.
    Tingström, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Doctors’ and Nurses’ Perceptions of Military Pre-hospital Emergency Care2014Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to identify physicians’ and nurses’ perceptions of military prehospital emergency care before and after an international mission. A qualitative empirical study with a phenomenographic approach was used. The aim is to identify the area of knowledge, pre-hospital care in a military environment, in terms of expressions from doctors and nurses focussing on the variation in how learning of pre-hospital care is perceived. The result of the study is a set of descriptive categories on a collective level, showing the variation in how doctors and nurses perceived the phenomenon of military pre-hospital emergency care. The results after predeployment training can be categorized as (1) to learn military medicine, (2) to take care of the casualty and (3) to have safety awareness. The results after an international mission can be categorized as (1) to collaborate with others, (2) to deliver general health care, and (3) to improve competence in military medicine. Possible implications of the results from the present study are the following; (I) better conditions for doctors and nurses to provide appropriate military medical care by clarification and better understanding of professions in the mission area (doctors, nurses, officers), since they may have different goals for their actions, (II) to pay attention to all aspects of military health care during predeployment training, including general health care in the mission area, (III) to implement new knowledge in military medicine in the predeployment training, and (IV) to train for the reality all doctors and nurses are about to meet. These results indicate  that the training should be developed in order to optimize the prepare physicians and nurses for international assignments. This may result in increased safety for the provider of care, while at the same time minimizing suffering and enhancing the possibility of survival of the injured.

  • 24.
    Andersson, Sten-Ove
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Sweden, Swedish Armed Forces, V Frölunda, Sweden.
    Lundberg, Lars
    Försvarsmakten, Centrum för Försvarsmedicin, Sweden, Borås University, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Anders
    Borås University, Sweden.
    Tingström, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Doctors' and nurses' perceptions of military pre-hospital emergency care - When training becomes reality2017In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 32, 70-77 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to identify physicians' and nurses' perceptions of military pre-hospital emergency care before and after an international mission. A qualitative empirical study with a phenomenographic approach was used. The results after pre-deployment traing can be categorised as 1) learning about military medicine and 2) taking care of the casualty. The results after an international mission can be categorised as 1) collaborating with others 2) providing general health care and 3) improving competence in military medicine. The results indicate that the training should be developed in order to optimise pre-deployment training for physicians and nurses. This may result in increased safety for the provider of care, while at the same time minimising suffering and enhancing the possibility of survival of the injured.

  • 25.
    Andersson, Sten-Ove
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Centre for Defence Medicine, Swedish Armed Forces, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Lundberg, Lars
    Centre for Defence Medicine, Swedish Armed Forces, Göteborg, Sweden/Borås University, School of Health Sciences,Borås Sweden.
    Jonsson, Anders
    Centre for Defence Medicine, Swedish Armed Forces, Göteborg, Sweden/Borås University, School of Health Sciences,Borås Sweden.
    Tingström, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fixing the Wounded or Keeping Lead in the Air: Tactical Officers’ Views of Emergency Care on the Battlefield2015In: Military medicine, ISSN 0026-4075, Vol. 180, no 2, 224-229 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to identify tactical officers’ views of pre-hospital emergency care in the field before an international mission. A qualitative study with a phenomenographic approach based on interviews was used. The result of this study is a set of descriptive categories on a collective level, showing the variation in how the tactical officers perceived the phenomenon of emergency care in the battlefield. The result can be viewed as (1) noncombat oriented including being able to do one’s specialist task, being able to talk with local people and being able to give first aid, (2) combat oriented including soldiers’ skills and roles in the unit, being able to act in the unit and being able to lead the care of  injured These findings are important for officers’ preparation for international missions. The interaction between military and medical knowledge on-site care should be developed between the tactical officer and the medical personnel in order to minimize suffering and to enhance the possibility for survival of the casualty.

  • 26.
    Andersson, Sten-Ove
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Centre for Defence Medicine, Swedish Armed Forces, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Lundberg, Lars
    Centre for Defence Medicine, Swedish Armed Forces, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Anders
    Centre for Defence Medicine, Swedish Armed Forces, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Tingström, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Interaction, action, and reflection: how medics learn medical care in the Swedish armed forces2013In: Military medicine, ISSN 0026-4075, Vol. 178, no 8, 861-866 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study is to examine how medics within the Swedish Armed Forces perceive their learning outcome following military prehospital training. A qualitative study with a phenomenographic approach was used to investigate how leaming is perceived among military medics. At meta level, the results can be viewed as an interaction, i.e., being able to collaborate in the medical platoon, including the ability to interact within the group and being able to lead; an action, i.e., being able to assess and treat casualties, including the ability to communicate with the casualty, to prioritize, and to be able to act; and a reflection, i.e., having confidence in one's own ability in first aid, including being prepared and feeling confident. Interaction during the period of education is important for learning. Action, being able to act in the field, is based on a drill in which the subject progresses from simple to complex procedures. Reflection, leaming to help others, is important for confidence, which in turn creates preparedness, thereby making the knowledge meaningful.

  • 27.
    Andersson, Thomas
    et al.
    Department of Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bjerså, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Falk, Kristin
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Olsén, Monika Fagevik
    Department of Surgery and Department of Physical Therapy, Sahlgrenska University Hospital; Department of Gastrosurgical Research and Education, Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Effects of chewing gum against postoperative ileus after pancreaticoduodenectomy: a randomized controlled trial2015In: BMC Research Notes, ISSN 1756-0500, E-ISSN 1756-0500, Vol. 8, no 37, 25886536Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Postoperative ileus is common after surgery. One non-pharmacological intervention that has shown promising results in reducing the duration of postoperative ileus is chewing gum after surgery. However, this has not been investigated in upper gastrointestinal surgery such as pancreatic surgery. Hence the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of chewing gum treatment on patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy ad modum whipple due to pancreatic or periampullary cancer.

    METHODS: This study was conducted as a phase III trial that was terminated early. Patients diagnosed with pancreatic tumours scheduled for pancreaticoduodenectomy ad modum whipple were included. The treatment group received chewing gum postoperatively and standard care. Controls received glucose solution and standard care. Chewing gum and glucose were used four times a day during the whole hospital stay. Time to first flatus and stool was defined as the primary outcome. The secondary outcome was start with clear liquids, start with liquid diet and length of hospital stay.

    RESULTS: No statistically significant differences could be observed between the chewing gum intervention group and the control group. However, a numerical difference in mean time was observed in first flatus, first stool, start of clear fluids, and start of liquid diet and length of hospital stay in favour of the intervention group.

    CONCLUSIONS: Although this study did not find statistically significant differences favouring the use of chewing gum for postoperative ileus, a positive trend was observed of a reduction of the impact of postoperative ileus among patients after pancreatic surgery. It also contributes valuable methodological experience that is important for future studies of chewing gum interventions during recovery after pancreatic surgery.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02319512 , publication date 2014-12-17.

  • 28.
    Anderzen, Johan
    et al.
    Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden.
    Samuelsson, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Gudbjornsdottir, Soffia
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hanberger, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Akesson, Karin
    Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden; Futurum, Australia; Jonköping Academic Improvement Health and Welf, Germany.
    Teenagers with poor metabolic control already have a higher risk of microvascular complications as young adults2016In: Journal of diabetes and its complications, ISSN 1056-8727, E-ISSN 1873-460X, Vol. 30, no 3, 533-536 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To evaluate how HbA1c in adolescents with type 1 diabetes affects microvascular complications in young adults. Methods: All individuals registered in the Swedish paediatric diabetes quality registry (SWEDIABKIDS) 13-18 years of age, and as adults registered in the Swedish National Diabetes Registry (NDR) in both the years 2011 and 2012 were included, in total 4250 individuals. Results: Of the individuals with mean HbA1c >78 mmol/mol in SWEDIABKIDS 83.4% had retinopathy, 15.8% had microalbuminuria and 4.9% had macroalbuminuria in NDR. The logistic regression analysis showed that the OR to develop macroalbuminuria as a young adult was significantly higher in the group with mean HbA1c >78 mmol/mol in SWEDIABKIDS (p < 0.05). Among the patients with mean HbA1c above 78 mmol/mol in both registries there was a significantly higher proportion that had retinopathy, microalbuminuria (p < 0.001) and/or macroalbuminuria (p < 0.01) compared to the group with HbA1c below 57 mmol/mol in both registries. Only 6.5% of the persons in this study were over 30 years of age. Conclusions: Paediatric diabetes teams working with teenagers must be aware of the impact of good metabolic control during adolescence, and should intensify the care during this vulnerable period of life to reduce the risk of microvascular complications in young adults.

  • 29.
    Andreae, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The relationship between physical activity and appetite in heart failure – A cross sectional study2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Physical activity and appetite are important for maintaining physical health. Yet, sedentary lifestyle and poor appetite are frequently observed in the heart failure (HF) population. However, the relationships between these phenomena are not yet clearly understood. 

    Purpose: To investigate the relationship between physical activity and appetite in patients with stable HF.

    Methods: In this cross sectional study, a consecutive sample of 186 patients with confirmed HF with NYHA class II-IV (median age 72y, 70% men, NYHA class II 61%) participated in the study. Patients were recruited from three HF outpatient clinics in central Sweden. Physical activity measures included total energy expenditure (TEE), active energy expenditure (AEE) above 3 METs, average daily METs and number of steps per day during four days using a validated multi-sensor wearable armband (SenseWear®, Body Monitoring System). Patients also self-reported their physical activity on a ten point numeric rating scale, from extremely low (1) to extremely high (10). Self-reported appetite was measured by Council on Nutrition Appetite Questionnaire (CNAQ), an 8-item instrument (score range 8-40) where CNAQ ≤28 indicate poor appetite. Associations between physical activity and appetite were analyzed by Spearman correlation while differences in physical activity between poor vs good appetite were analyzed using Mann Whitney U test.

    Results: There was a significant positive relationship between physical activity and appetite assessed by TEE (rs=.184, p=.012), AEE of moderate intensity >3 METs (rs=.262, p=.000), number of steps (rs=.292, p=.000), average METs intensity (rs=.249, p=.001), and self- reported physical activity (rs=.191, p =.009). Levels of physical activity in the low appetite group differed significantly from the group with better appetite, this was seen in all physical dimensions, TEE (U=3225, z=-2.26, p=.024), AEE (U=2902, z=-3.178, p=.001), number of steps (U=2706, z=-3.734, p=.000), average METs intensity (U=3128, z=-2.541, p=.011), levels of self-reported physical activity (U=3185, z=-2.47, p=.013).

    Conclusion: This study shows that physical activity is associated with appetite and that levels of physical activity differs between patients with poor and good appetite. These findings has implications for both research and practice and underlines the importance in monitoring both physical activity and appetite. Further research is needed to determine whether interventions targeting physical activity also improve appetite and vice versa in the HF population.

  • 30.
    Andreae, Christina
    et al.
    Division of Nursing Science, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Uppsala University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Chung, Misook L
    College of Nursing, University of Kentucky, Lexington.
    Hjelm, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Kalmar County Hospital, Kalmar Sweden.
    Depressive Symptoms Moderate the Association Between Appetite and Health Status in Patients With Heart Failure.2017In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Decreased appetite and depressive symptoms are clinical problems in patients with heart failure. Both may result in impaired health status.

    OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to investigate the association between appetite and health status in patients with heart failure and to explore whether depressive symptoms moderate this association.

    METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, patients with heart failure (n = 186; mean age, 71 years), New York Heart Association class II to IV, participated. Data on appetite (Council of Nutrition Appetite Questionnaire), depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire-9), and health status (EQ-5D 3-level scale [EQ-5D-3L] descriptive system, EQ-5D-3L index, and EQ Visual Analog Scale) were collected by self-rating questionnaires. Pearson correlation was used to investigate the association between appetite and health status. Multiple regression was performed to examine whether depressive symptoms moderate the association between appetite and health status.

    RESULTS: There was a significant association between appetite and health status for EQ-5D-3L descriptive system, mobility (P < .001), pain/discomfort (P < .001), and anxiety/depression (P < .001). This association was also shown in EQ-5D-3L index (P < .001) and EQ Visual Analog Scale (P < .001). Simple slope analysis showed that the association between appetite and health status was only significant for patients without depressive symptoms (B = 0.32, t = 4.66, P < .001).

    CONCLUSIONS: Higher level of appetite was associated with better health status. In moderation analysis, the association was presented for patients without depressive symptoms. Decreased appetite is an important sign of poor health status. To improve health status, health professionals should have greater attention on appetite, as well on signs of depressive symptoms.

  • 31.
    Andreae, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Chung, Misook
    College of Nursing, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USA.
    Lennie, Terry
    College of Nursing, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USA.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Depressive symptoms as a moderator and mediator of the relationship between physical activity, appetite and perceived health among patients with heart failure2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Depressive symptoms have been shown to directly influence perceived health among persons with heart failure (HF). Decreased physical activity and appetite may also be predictive of poor perceived health.The purposes of this study were to determine whether appetite and physical activity predicted perceived health, and to determine whether depressive symptoms mediated or moderated their relationship with perceived health.

    Methods: A total of 184 patients with mild to severe HF were included. Appetite, depressive symptoms and perceived health were measured by self-report questionnaires (Council on Nutrition Appetite Questionnaire, Patient Health Questionnaire and EuroQol 5D index). Physical activity was measured by SenceWearTM for 6 days. A separate series of multiple linear regression analyses were run to determine whether depressive symptoms mediated or moderated the relationship between physical activity and perceived health, and between appetite and perceived health.

    Results: Higher physical activity predicted better perceived health (ß=0.202, p=.006) but the strength of the association decreased (ß=0.13, p=.048) when depressive symptoms were included in the model. There was a significant mediation effect for depressive symptoms on perceived health (sobel=2.03, p=.041) (Fig 1). Appetite was a significant predictor of perceived health. Examination of this association among those with and without depressive symptoms, however showed positive association between appetite and perceived health remained only for patients without depressive symptoms demonstrating a moderating effect (p<.001) (Fig 2).

    Conclusion: Identifying and treating depression simultaneously while addressing appetite and physical activity may be key to improving perceived health among persons with HF.

  • 32.
    Andreae, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Sawatzky, Richard
    Trinity Western University, Canada; Centre Health Evaluat and Outcome Science, Canada.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Correction: Psychometric Evaluation of Two Appetite Questionnaires in Patients With Heart Failure (vol 21, pg 954, 2015)2016In: Journal of Cardiac Failure, ISSN 1071-9164, E-ISSN 1532-8414, Vol. 22, no 3, 245-245 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 33.
    Andreae, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Sawatzky, Richard
    Trinity Western University, Canada; Providence Health Care Research Institute, Canada.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Psychometric Evaluation of Two Appetite Questionnaires in Patients With Heart Failure2015In: Journal of Cardiac Failure, ISSN 1071-9164, E-ISSN 1532-8414, Vol. 21, no 12, 954-958 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Decreased appetite in heart failure (HF) may lead to undemutrition which could negatively influence prognosis. Appetite is a complex clinical issue that is often best measured with the use of self-report instruments. However, there is a lack of self-rated appetite instruments. The Council on Nutrition Appetite Questionnaire (CNAQ) and the Simplified Nutritional Appetite Questionnaire (SNAQ) are validated instruments developed primarily for elderly people. Yet, the psychometric properties have not been evaluated in HF populations. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of CNAQ and SNAQ in patients with HE Methods and Results: A total of 186 outpatients with reduced ejection fraction and New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional classifications II-IV were included (median age 72 y; 70% men). Data were collected with the use of a questionnaire that included the CNAQ and SNAQ. The psychometric evaluation included data quality, factor structure, construct validity, known-group validity, and internal consistency. Unidimensionality was supported by means of parallel analysis and confirmatory factor analyses (CFAs). The CFA results indicated sufficient model fit. Both construct validity and known-group validity were supported. Internal consistency reliability was acceptable, with ordinal coefficient alpha estimates of 0.82 for CNAQ and 0.77 for SNAQ. Conclusions: CNAQ and SNAQ demonstrated sound psychometric properties and can be used to measure appetite in patients with HF.

  • 34.
    Andreae, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Caring for appetite among patients with chronic heart failure - the extent of appetite and associated factors in outpatient clinic settings2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Andreae, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Factors associated with appetite among patients with symptomatic heart failure2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Andreae, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Institutionen för hälso- och vårdvetenskap, Linnéuniversitetet, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Predictors for appetite among patients with chronic heart failure2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Andreae, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Prevalence and associated factors for decreased appetite among patients with stable heart failure2016In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 25, no 11-12, 1703-1712 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectivesTo explore the prevalence of decreased appetite and factors associated with appetite among patients with stable heart failure. BackgroundDecreased appetite is an important factor for the development of undernutrition among patients with heart failure, but there are knowledge gaps about prevalence and the factors related to appetite in this patient group. DesignObservational, cross-sectional study. MethodsA total of 186 patients with mild to severe heart failure were consecutively recruited from three heart failure outpatient clinics. Data were obtained from medical records (heart failure diagnosis, comorbidity and medical treatment) and self-rated questionnaires (demographics, appetite, self-perceived health, symptoms of depression and sleep). Blood samples were taken to determine myocardial stress and nutrition status. Heart failure symptoms and cognitive function were assessed by clinical examinations. The Council on Nutrition Appetite Questionnaire was used to assess self-reported appetite. Bivariate correlations and multivariate linear regression analyses were conducted to explore factors associated with appetite. ResultsSeventy-one patients (38%) experienced a loss of appetite with a significant risk of developing weight loss. The final multiple regression model showed that age, symptoms of depression, insomnia, cognitive function and pharmacological treatment were associated with appetite, explaining 27% of the total variance. ConclusionIn this cross-sectional study, a large share of patients with heart failure was affected by decreased appetite, associated with demographic, psychosocial and medical factors. Relevance to clinical practiceLoss of appetite is a prevalent problem among patients with heart failure that may lead to undernutrition. Health care professionals should routinely assess appetite and discuss patients experiences of appetite, nutrition intake and body weight and give appropriate nutritional advice with respect to individual needs.

  • 38.
    Andregård, Anna-Carin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jangland, Eva
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    The tortuous journey of introducing the Nurse Practitioner as a new member of the healthcare team: a meta-synthesis2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 29, no 1Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore the obstacles to and the opportunities for achieving optimal interprofessional team collaboration with the introduction of the nurse practitioner (NP). A team approach can contribute importantly to sustainable and safe patient care, and NPs have been added to the healthcare team in many countries. Following the international trend towards the development of the acute care NP, the role has recently been initiated in surgical care in Sweden. The introduction of an advanced nursing role into existing organisations raises questions about how the role will be developed and what its effects will be on collaboration between the different professions. We conducted a systematic review of qualitative studies using the meta-ethnographic approach developed by Noblit and Hare. Literature in the field of nursing was searched on PubMed and CINAHL, and empirical qualitative studies from outpatient and inpatient care in seven countries were included. The studies were appraised according to national guidelines and templates and were analysed and synthesised according to the meta-ethnographic approach. A total of 26 studies were included in the synthesis. The analysis revealed four themes: (i) a threat to professional boundaries, (ii) a resource for the team, (iii) the quest for autonomy and control, and (iv) necessary properties of a developing interprofessional collaboration. Based on these themes, the synthesis was created and presented as a metaphorical journey. The implementation of a new nursing role in a traditional healthcare team is a complex process influenced by many factors and can be described as a tortuous journey towards a partially unknown destination. The synthesised obstacles and opportunities drawn from international studies may help healthcare organisations and new NPs prepare for, and optimise, the implementation of a new nursing role.

  • 39.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Edéll-Gustafsson, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mörelius, Evalotte
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Parental mood when staying overnight at hospital with their sick child2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Parental mood when staying overnight at hospital with their sick child

    Objective

    to describe mood in parents, staying with their sick children overnight at the hospital.

    Methodology

    A descriptive design, including 75 parents staying overnight at hospital with their sick child, was used. The parents filled out Mood-scale the morning after staying overnight at the hospital. The Mood-scale is a validated and reliable self-administered instrument measuring six dimensions of mood; control, calmness, social orientation, pleasantness, activation, and extraversion (Sjöberg L, 1979). The study is a part of a larger project, with focus on mood, stress and sleep in parents staying with their sick children overnight at the hospital.

    Results

    The result will describe how parents report their total mood and how they report the different dimensions when they stay with their sick children overnight at the hospital. A comparison will be made between the parent´s mood and gender and the child´s age. Data is under analysis and will be presented as preliminary data.

     

    Conclusion

    According to UNICEF Convention on the Rights of the Child, children in hospital have the right to have their parents with them at all times and parents should be offered accommodation and be encouraged to stay. However, the hospital environment, in combination with having a sick child, might affect the parent´s mood, which in turn might affect the ability to handle the situation and the child´s care. Therefore it is of importance to study parental mood and find ways to help the families during their hospital stay.

  • 40.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Edéll-Gustafsson, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mörelius, Evalotte
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Parents' perception of circumstances influencing their own sleep when living with a child enrolled in hospital-based home care services2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 41. Angelhoff, Charlotte
    et al.
    Edéll-Gustafsson, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mörelius, Evalotte
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping. Region Östergötland.
    Perceptions of sleep by parents of children in hospital organized home-care2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 42. Angelhoff, Charlotte
    et al.
    Edéll-Gustafsson, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mörelius, Evalotte
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Perceptions of sleep quality and stress by parents of children enrolled in hospital organized home-care2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Edéll-Gustafsson, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mörelius, Evalotte
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Perceptions of sleep quality and stress by parents of children enrolled in hospital organized home-care2013In: Nordic Advances in Health Care Sciences Research, Lund, 2013: Abstract book / [ed] Gerd Ahlström, Lena von Koch, 2013, 56-56 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Caring for a sick child creates much greater demands for parents than those associated with raising a healthy child. Parents of chronically ill children reports higher levels of parental stress as a consequence of the substantial social, emotional and personal demands associated with caring. Sleep quality is an important aspect of wellbeing and is strongly related to stress and quality of life. In some Swedish counties families are offered hospital organized home-care for sick children. Caring for a child at home gives the family the opportunity to be together in an environment they know well and where they can feel comfortable and secure. On the other hand it includes several sleep disturbances during the night which affects the ability to handle the situation and support their child. No other study is found about how parents sleep when their child is enrolled in hospital organized home-care.

     

    Aim

    To explore parents’ perceptions of sleep quality and stress when they sleep at home with a child enrolled in hospital organized home-care.

     

    Material

    Fifteen parents (11 mothers and 4 fathers) with children enrolled in hospital organized home-care from one university hospital and one general hospital in South-eastern Sweden were included. The children ranged in age 0-12 years.

     

    Method

    Parents were interviewed with open-ended questions. Data was analysed with a phenomenographic method according to Marton and Both.

     

    Results

    Four descriptive categories in the phenomenon of parents’ perceptions of sleep quality and stress when they sleep at home with a child enrolled in hospital organized home-care were identified; Routines helps to manage the situation, Time for oneself and the partner, Feelings of isolation and Need of support

     

    Conclusion

    Sleep is important for the parents in several aspects. They are in a stressful situation with high demands both from the society and from themselves and there is often a lack of support from relatives and friends. Nurses need to acknowledge and promote parents’ sleep when they care for their sick children at home and support them in the caregiving.

  • 44.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care.
    Edéll-Gustfsson, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mörelius, Evalotte
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Sleep of Parents Living With a Child Receiving Hospital-Based Home Care: A Phenomenographical Study.2015In: Nursing Research, ISSN 0029-6562, E-ISSN 1538-9847, Vol. 64, no 5, 372-380 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Caring for an ill child at home gives the family the chance to be together in a familiar environment. However, this involves several nocturnal sleep disturbances, such as frequent awakenings and bad sleep quality, which may affect parents' ability to take care of the child and themselves.

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to describe parents' perceptions of circumstances influencing their own sleep when living with a child enrolled in hospital-based home care (HBHC) services.

    Method: This is a phenomenographical study with an inductive, exploratory design. Fifteen parents (11 mothers and 4 fathers) with children enrolled in HBHC services were interviewed. Data were analyzed to discover content-related categories describing differences in ways parents experienced sleep when caring for their children receiving HBHC.

    Results: Four descriptive categories were detected: sleep influences mood and mood influences sleep; support influences safeness and safeness influences sleep; the child's needs influence routines and routines influence sleep; and "me time" influences sleep.

    Discussion: Sleep does not affect only the parents' well-being but also the child's care. Symptoms of stress may limit the parents' capacity to meet the child's needs. Support, me time, and physical activity were perceived as essential sources for recovery and sleep. It is important for nurses to acknowledge parental sleep in the child's nursing care plan and help the parents perform self-care to promote sleep and maintain life, health, and well-being.

  • 45. Aronsson, M
    et al.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Walfridsson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Walfridsson, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cost-effectivesness of catheter ablation as first-line treatment for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Aronsson, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Walfridsson, Håkan
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Walfridsson, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nielsen, Jens Cosedis
    Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
    Hansen, Peter Steen
    Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
    Johannessen, Arne
    Gentofte University Hospital, Denmark.
    Raatikainen, Pekka
    Tampere University Hospital, Finland.
    Hindricks, Gerhard
    Leipzig University Hospital, Germany.
    Kongstad, Ole
    Lund University Hospital, Sweden.
    Pehrson, Steen
    Rigshospitalet, Denmark.
    Englund, Anders
    University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Hartikainen, Juha
    Kuopio University Hospital, Finland.
    Mortensen, Leif Spange
    Danish Information Technology Centre for Education and Research, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The cost-effectiveness of radiofrequency catheter ablation as first-line treatment for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation: results from a MANTRA-PAF substudy.2015In: Europace, ISSN 1099-5129, E-ISSN 1532-2092, Vol. 17, no 1, 48-55 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The aim of this prospective substudy was to estimate the cost-effectiveness of treating paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF) with radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFA) compared with antiarrhythmic drugs (AADs) as first-line treatment.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: A decision-analytic Markov model, based on MANTRA-PAF (Medical Antiarrhythmic Treatment or Radiofrequency Ablation in Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation) study data, was developed to study long-term effects and costs of RFA compared with AADs as first-line treatment. Positive clinical effects were found in the overall population, a gain of an average 0.06 quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) to an incremental cost of €3033, resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of €50 570/QALY. However, the result of the subgroup analyses showed that RFA was less costly and more effective in younger patients. This implied an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of €3434/QALY in ≤50-year-old patients respectively €108 937/QALY in >50-year-old patients.

    CONCLUSION: Radiofrequency catheter ablation as first-line treatment is a cost-effective strategy for younger patients with paroxysmal AF. However, the cost-effectiveness of using RFA as first-line therapy in older patients is uncertain, and in most of these AADs should be attempted before RFA (MANTRA-PAF ClinicalTrials.gov number; NCT00133211).

  • 47.
    Arvidsson, Susann
    et al.
    Research and Development Centre, Spenshult Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Oskarström, Sweden.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Research and Development Centre, Spenshult Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Oskarström, Sweden.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    Research and Development Centre, Spenshult Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Oskarström, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Tingström, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Effects of a self-care promoting problem-based learning programme in people with rheumatic diseases: a randomized controlled study2013In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 69, no 7, 1500-1514 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    To evaluate the effects of a self-care promoting problem-based learning programme for people with rheumatic diseases in terms of health-related quality of life, empowerment, and self-care ability.

    Background

    Individuals with rheumatoid arthritis express a great need for education and support in adapting to the disease, but the average qualities of studies about patient education interventions are not high. There is no evidence of long-term benefits of patient education.

    Design

    Randomized controlled trial.

    Methods

    A randomized controlled design was selected with test at baseline, 1-week and 6-month post-interventions after completed the 1-year programme. The tests consisted of validity and reliability tested instruments. The participants were randomly assigned in spring 2009 to either the experimental group (n = 54) or the control group (n = 148). The programme was running alongside the standard care the participants received at a rheumatology unit. Parametric and non-parametric tests were used in the analyses.

    Results

    The participants in the experimental group had statistically significant stronger empowerment after participation in the self-care promoting problem-based learning programme compared with the control group, at the 6-month post-intervention. Approximately, two-thirds of the participants in the experimental group stated that they had implemented lifestyle changes due to the programme.

    Conclusion

    The self-care promoting problem-based learning programme enabled people with rheumatic diseases to improve their empowerment compared with the control group. It is important to continue to develop problem-based learning in patient education to find the very best way to use this pedagogical method in rheumatology care.

  • 48.
    Avander, Karin
    et al.
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Heikki, Anna
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Bjerså, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Engstrom, My
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Trauma Nurses Experience of Workplace Violence and Threats: Short- and Long-Term Consequences in a Swedish Setting2016In: JOURNAL OF TRAUMA NURSING, ISSN 1078-7496, Vol. 23, no 2, 51-57 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Violence in health care is increasing globally and Sweden is no exception. Still, this topic is sparsely studied in the Swedish trauma care setting. This focus group study examined nurses experience of violence and threats, and their consequences. The content analysis revealed two main categories, threatening situations and consequences, which led to a change in priorities in nursing care in order to avoid a potential violent situation. Furthermore, negative stress among the staff and greater vigilance and unwillingness to be near the patient resulted in altered communication and, in the end, a decreased quality of nursing care.

  • 49.
    Aviles, Paula
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science.
    Ljungberg, Isabella
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science.
    Naturbaserad terapi och dess betydelse för personer med psykisk ohälsa: En litteraturstudie om naturen som en resurs inom vård och behandling2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The positive impact of nature on health has been highlighted since ancient times. The scientific research about nature-based therapy has increased during the last decades and has presented positive effects for patients with different diagnoses. More than one third of the European Union population suffers from some kind of mental illness and many lack adequate treatment. Nursing care of mental illness should according to guidelines include a person-centered approach and knowledge about the significance of the care environment.

    Aim: To describe the impact of nature-based therapy for people with mental illness.

    Method: A general literature study with a systematic approach was conducted. The search for articles was made in PubMed, Cinahl, AMED, PsykInfo and Scopus. The quality of the selected articles were examined and analyed using qualitative content analysis.

    Results: Nature-based therapy had a positive impact on health for people with mental illness. The result was based on 17 articles and four categories were identified: nature as a refuge, the importance of social context, altered view of life situation and improvement of symptoms and its consequences.

    Conclusion: The findings conclude that nature-based therapy can have an impact on recovery and daily function for persons with mental illness. The study also revealed that nursing care with a salutogenic approach in a therapeutic nature environment leads to an increased mental health.

  • 50. Back, Christina
    et al.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Interpretativ fenomenologisk analys2015In: Handbok i kvalitativ analys / [ed] Andreas Fejes och Robert Thornberg, Stockholm: Liber, 2015, 2, 148-161 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
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