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  • 1.
    Abbott, Allan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Schröder, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Enthoven, Paul
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Effectiveness of implementing a best practice primary healthcare model for low back pain (BetterBack) compared with current routine care in the Swedish context: an internal pilot study informed protocol for an effectiveness-implementation hybrid type 2 trial2018In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 8, no 4, article id e019906Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Low back pain (LBP) is a major health problem commonly requiring healthcare. In Sweden, there is a call from healthcare practitioners (HCPs) for the development, implementation and evaluation of a best practice primary healthcare model for LBP.

    Aims (1) To improve and understand the mechanisms underlying changes in HCP confidence, attitudes and beliefs for providing best practice coherent primary healthcare for patients with LBP; (2) to improve and understand the mechanisms underlying illness beliefs, self-care enablement, pain, disability and quality of life in patients with LBP; and (3) to evaluate a multifaceted and sustained implementation strategy and the cost-effectiveness of the BetterBack☺ model of care (MOC) for LBP from the perspective of the Swedish primary healthcare context.

    Methods This study is an effectiveness-implementation hybrid type 2 trial testing the hypothesised superiority of the BetterBack☺ MOC compared with current routine care. The trial involves simultaneous testing of MOC effects at the HCP, patient and implementation process levels. This involves a prospective cohort study investigating implementation at the HCP level and a patient-blinded, pragmatic, cluster, randomised controlled trial with longitudinal follow-up at 3, 6 and 12 months post baseline for effectiveness at the patient level. A parallel process and economic analysis from a healthcare sector perspective will also be performed. Patients will be allocated to routine care (control group) or the BetterBack☺ MOC (intervention group) according to a stepped cluster dogleg structure with two assessments in routine care. Experimental conditions will be compared and causal mediation analysis investigated. Qualitative HCP and patient experiences of the BetterBack☺ MOC will also be investigated.

    Dissemination The findings will be published in peer-reviewed journals and presented at national and international conferences. Further national dissemination and implementation in Sweden and associated national quality register data collection are potential future developments of the project.

  • 2.
    Abidi, L.
    et al.
    Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Oenema, A.
    Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Anderson, P.
    Maastricht University, Netherlands; Newcastle University, England.
    van de Mheen, D.
    Maastricht University, Netherlands; IVO Addict Research Institute, Netherlands; Erasmus MC, Netherlands.
    Strategies to Overcome Barriers to Implementation of Alcohol Screening and Brief Intervention in General Practice: a Delphi Study Among Healthcare Professionals and Addiction Prevention Experts2016In: Prevention Science, ISSN 1389-4986, E-ISSN 1573-6695, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 689-699Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the evidence base, alcohol screening and brief intervention (ASBI) have rarely been integrated into routine clinical practice. The aim of this study is to identify strategies that could tackle barriers to ASBI implementation in general practice by involving primary healthcare professionals and addiction prevention experts. A three-round online Delphi study was carried out in the Netherlands. The first-round questionnaire consisted of open-ended questions to generate ideas about strategies to overcome barriers. In the second round, participants were asked to indicate how applicable they found each strategy. Items without consensus were systematically fed back with group median ratings and interquartile range (IQR) scores in the third-round questionnaire. In total, 39 out of 69 (57 %) invited participants enrolled in the first round, 214 participants completed the second round, and 144 of these (67 %) completed the third-round questionnaire. Results show that participants reached consensus on 59 of 81 strategies, such as the following: (1) use of E-learning technology, (2) symptom-specific screening by general practitioners (GPs) and/or universal screening by practice nurses, (3) reimbursement incentives, (4) supportive materials, (5) clear guidelines, (6) service provision of addiction care centers, and (7) more publicity in the media. This exploratory study identified a broad set of strategies that could potentially be used for overcoming barriers to ASBI implementation in general practice and paves the way for future research to experimentally test the identified implementation strategies using multifaceted approaches.

  • 3.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    I takt med framtiden: Utveckling av ett nytt interprofessionellt curriculum vid Hälsouniversitetet i Linköping2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Hälso- och sjukvårdsutbildningarnas ansvar att utbilda professionella som kan samarbetaoch förstå varandras kompetens, för att utföra och utveckla patientsäker vård, betonas alltmer i den globala debatten om framtidens hälso- och sjukvård. Modern professionsutbildning inom hälso- och sjukvården måste idag därför innehålla moment av god kvalitet där studenter lär med, av och om varandra för att utveckla interprofessionell kompetens. Hälsouniversitetet i Linköping är pionjär, både nationellt och internationellt, när det gäller interprofessionellt lärande tack vare satsningen på integrerade utbildningsmoment som funnits med sedan från starten 1986. Den här rapporten är en sammanställning av den interna process som har genomförts för att initiera ett pedagogiskt utvecklingsprojekt med avsikt att revidera och utveckla dessa gemensamma utbildningsmoment inriktade mot interprofessionellt lärande. Texten är upplagd kronologiskt och inleds med det direktiv som fakultetsledningen gav för att en utvald grupp lärare skulle kunna utarbeta ett förslag på hur de interprofessionella lärandemomenten vid Hälsouniversitetet skulle kunna förbättras. Härefter följer den rapport som utredningsgruppen lämnade, och som sedan skickades på remiss till olika intressenter. Rapporten följs av en sammanställning och bearbetning av de inkomna remissvaren och till sist följer fakultetsstyrelsens beslut om hur curriculum för interprofessionell utbildning inom Hälsouniversitetet ska utvecklas eller förändras. Det är vår förhoppning att dokumentationen av processen för att förnya fakultetens interprofessionella utbildning ska ge inspiration för fortsatt förändrings- och utvecklingsarbete både inom och utom Linköpings universitet.

  • 4.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dyrdal Solbrekke, Tone
    Oslo universitet, Norway.
    Karseth, Berit
    Oslo Universitet, Norway.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    From university to professional practice: Students as journeymen between cultures of education and work2014In: International handbook of research in professional and practice-based learning, Volume 1 / [ed] Stephen Billett, Christian Harteis, Hans Gruber, Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands, 2014, 1, p. 461-484Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The overarching research problem addressed in this chapter is the relationship between professional/higher education and professional work. The chapter will discuss the relevance of university education for professional practice with a particular focus on professional identity formation and formation of professional responsibility. We deiscuss how different professional programs and their traditions and culturs shape different curricula structures that have an impact on students professional identity formation and transition to work. We will also discuss ecperiences with and learning of professional responsibility in the web of commitments within educational settings and how new multiple expectations emerge and lead to new learning experiencies when entering work life. The argument of the chapter is based on the rationale and findings from an extensive international research program, conducted between 2001-2008.

  • 5.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fenwick, Tara
    University of Stirling, Scotland.
    Hopwood, Nick
    University of Technology Sydney, Australia.
    Theorising simulation in higher education: difficulty for learners as an emergent phenomenon2016In: Teaching in Higher Education, ISSN 1356-2517, E-ISSN 1470-1294, Vol. 21, no 6, p. 613-627Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the widespread interest in using and researching simulation in higher education, little discussion has yet to address a key pedagogical concern: difficulty. A sociomaterial view of learning, explained in this paper, goes beyond cognitive considerations to highlight dimensions of material, situational, representational and relational difficulty confronted by students in experiential learning activities such as simulation. In this paper we explore these dimensions of difficulty through three contrasting scenarios of simulation education. The scenarios are drawn from studies conducted in three international contexts: Australia, Sweden and the UK, which illustrate diverse approaches to simulation and associated differences in the forms of difficulty being produced. For educators using simulation, the key implications are the importance of noting and understanding (1) the effects on students of interaction among multiple forms of difficulty; (2) the emergent and unpredictable nature of difficulty; and (3) the need to teach students strategies for managing emergent difficulty.

  • 6.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gustavsson, MariaLinköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Competence Centre.Fejes, AndreasLinköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Book of Abstracts: 3rd International ProPEL Conference 2017, 14-16 June 2017, Hosted by Linköping University, Sweden2017Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Aerts, Marc
    et al.
    Interuniversity Institute for Biostatistics and Statistical Bioinformatics.
    Minalu, Girma
    Interuniversity Institute for Biostatistics and Statistical Bioinformatics.
    Bösner, Stefan
    Department of General Practice and Family Medicine, Philipps University Marburg, Germany..
    Buntinx, Frank
    Department of Public Health and Primary Care, KU Leuven, Belgium; Department of General Practice, Maastricht University, The Netherlands..
    Burnand, Bernard
    Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine, Lausanne University Hospital, Switzerland..
    Haasenritter, Jörg
    Department of General Practice and Family Medicine, Philipps University Marburg, Germany..
    Herzig, Lilli
    Institute of Family Medicine, University of Lausanne, Switzerland..
    Knottnerus, J André
    Department of General Practice, Maastricht University, The Netherlands..
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Vikbolandet.
    Renier, Walter
    Department of Public Health and Primary Care, KU Leuven, Belgium.
    Sox, Carol
    Department of Community and Family Medicine, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, USA..
    Sox, Harold
    Department of Community and Family Medicine, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH , USA; Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, Washington, USA..
    Donner-Banzhoff, Norbert
    Department of General Practice and Family Medicine, Philipps University Marburg, Germany..
    Pooled individual patient data from five countries were used to derive a clinical prediction rule for coronary artery disease in primary care.2017In: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, ISSN 0895-4356, E-ISSN 1878-5921, Vol. 81, p. 120-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To construct a clinical prediction rule for coronary artery disease (CAD) presenting with chest pain in primary care.

    STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: Meta-Analysis using 3,099 patients from five studies. To identify candidate predictors, we used random forest trees, multiple imputation of missing values, and logistic regression within individual studies. To generate a prediction rule on the pooled data, we applied a regression model that took account of the differing standard data sets collected by the five studies.

    RESULTS: The most parsimonious rule included six equally weighted predictors: age ≥55 (males) or ≥65 (females) (+1); attending physician suspected a serious diagnosis (+1); history of CAD (+1); pain brought on by exertion (+1); pain feels like "pressure" (+1); pain reproducible by palpation (-1). CAD was considered absent if the prediction score is <2. The area under the ROC curve was 0.84. We applied this rule to a study setting with a CAD prevalence of 13.2% using a prediction score cutoff of <2 (i.e., -1, 0, or +1). When the score was <2, the probability of CAD was 2.1% (95% CI: 1.1-3.9%); when the score was ≥ 2, it was 43.0% (95% CI: 35.8-50.4%).

    CONCLUSIONS: Clinical prediction rules are a key strategy for individualizing care. Large data sets based on electronic health records from diverse sites create opportunities for improving their internal and external validity. Our patient-level meta-analysis from five primary care sites should improve external validity. Our strategy for addressing site-to-site systematic variation in missing data should improve internal validity. Using principles derived from decision theory, we also discuss the problem of setting the cutoff prediction score for taking action.

  • 8.
    Af Sandeberg, Margareta
    et al.
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Children's and Women's Health, Karolinska University Hospital.
    Wenemark, Marika
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Department of Health and Care Development.
    Bartholdson, Cecilia
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Children's and Women's Health, Karolinska University Hospital.
    Lützén, Kim
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet.
    Pergert, Pernilla
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Children's and Women's Health, Karolinska University Hospital.
    To change or not to change - translating and culturally adapting the paediatric version of the Moral Distress Scale-Revised (MDS-R)2017In: BMC Medical Ethics, ISSN 1472-6939, E-ISSN 1472-6939, Vol. 18, no 14, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Paediatric cancer care poses ethically difficult situations that can lead to value conflicts about what is best for the child, possibly resulting in moral distress. Research on moral distress is lacking in paediatric cancer care in Sweden and most questionnaires are developed in English. The Moral Distress Scale-Revised (MDS-R) is a questionnaire that measures moral distress in specific situations; respondents are asked to indicate both the frequency and the level of disturbance when the situation arises. The aims of this study were to translate and culturally adapt the questionnaire to the context of Swedish paediatric cancer care. In doing so we endeavoured to keep the content in the Swedish version as equivalent to the original as possible but to introduce modifications that improve the functional level and increase respondent satisfaction.

    METHODS: The procedure included linguistic translation and cultural adaptation of MDS-R's paediatric versions for Physicians, Nurses and Other Healthcare Providers to the context of Swedish paediatric cancer care. The process of adjustment included: preparation, translation procedure and respondent validation. The latter included focus group and cognitive interviews with healthcare professionals in paediatric cancer care.

    RESULTS: To achieve a Swedish version with a good functional level and high trustworthiness, some adjustments were made concerning design, language, cultural matters and content. Cognitive interviews revealed problems with stating the level of disturbance hypothetically and items with negations caused even more problems, after having stated that the situation never happens.

    CONCLUSIONS: Translation and cultural adaptation require the involvement of various types of specialist. It is difficult to combine the intention to keep the content as equivalent to the original as possible with the need for modifications that improve the functional level and increase respondent satisfaction. The translated and culturally adapted Swedish MDS-R seems to have equivalent content as well as improved functional level and respondent satisfaction. The adjustments were made to fit paediatric cancer care but it could be argued that the changes are relevant for most areas of paediatric care of seriously ill patients.

  • 9.
    Afrell, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Att leva med en kropp som värker: samtal med fysioterapeuten2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aim: Physiotherapists in primary care meet, assess and treat patients with long-standing benign musculoskeletal pain. As a clinical condition, long-standing pain is common but nonetheless it is quite complex. The aim of this thesis has been, from a bodily existential perspective, to investigate and conceptualise the experience of living with longstanding benign musculoskeletal pain, and from there, to work out a method for conversation and assessment within non-specialised physiotherapy.

    Methods: Our first study was an interview study where we applied a phenomenological approach and investigated the ways individuals suffering from long-standing pain experienced their body and their illness. Four aspects of body experience were described, and based on these aspects, four typologies of attitudes to pain were distinguished. In the second study, we made two group interviews with six physiotherapists about their experiences of using, in their clinical work, questions from the interview guide in study I that had given particularly rich responses. Transcripts were analysed using phenomenography. In the third study, patients’ verbal responses to the key questions, directed to them by physiotherapists in clinical situations, were investigated, and the four aspects of body experience from study I formed the concepts of a deductive analysis. In study IV, finally, the key questions and typologies were tried by a larger group (31), and their experiences and the possible applicability of the method were studied by qualitative content analysis combined with the counting of codes.

    Results: We created four typologies of attitudes to long-standing pain: “Surrendering to one’s fate”, “Accepting by an active process of change”, “Balancing between hope and resignation” and “Rejecting the body”. These typologies, in turn, were based on four aspects of body experience: “The body as an aspect of identity”. “Body reliance”, “Body awareness”, and “Ways of understanding pain”. In study II, by the aid of key questions,  patient and physiotherapist managed to have a conversation on bodily existential matters. The physiotherapist learnt to know the patient as a person, a process appeared to be initiated in the patient, and their relation changed. The patient was willing to talk about her body in pain, and had the words to do this. In study III, the key questions opened ways to reflections on body, existence, and biography. The four aspects of body experience were central to the patients’ descriptions. In study IV, the participating physiotherapists reported by large positive experiences from applying key questions and typologies. The patients reflected, emotions were evoked, and the relation and the communication often improved. The typologies helped in giving a comprehensive perspective of the patient’s problem, and to grasp where in the process of rehabilitation the patient was to be found.

    Conclusions: The method, seven key questions combined with the tentative frame of interpretation of the answers, seemed to be easily applied by interested physiotherapists in non-specialised practice. The application of the method addresses the need of developing the professional role of the physiotherapist. The challenge is to face the whole person, who is her lived body as well as her identity crisis, carried by emotions such as grief and anger. This may inspire the use of the full potential of the physiotherapist’s professional role in the clinical encounter.

    List of papers
    1. Living with a body in pain – between acceptance and denial
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Living with a body in pain – between acceptance and denial
    2007 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 291-296Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The aetiology of nonspecific musculoskeletal pain is considered to be multi-factorial. Long-standing pain not only has a negative impact on the individual's general health but also changes the individual's experience of him/her self and his/her world. The aim of this study was to describe how individuals with long-standing musculoskeletal pain, in a bodily existential perspective, relate to their aching body. Semi-structured interviews with 20 patients were analysed using mainly a phenomenological-hermeneutic method. From the analysis, four main categories reflect the meaning contents of the interviews: the body as an aspect of identity; body reliance; body awareness; ways of understanding pain. From these categories, four distinct typologies were inferred: surrendering to ones fate; accepting by an active process of change; balancing between hope and resignation; rejecting the body. The result indicates that patients with long-standing pain are to be found along a spectrum from accepting to rejecting the aching body. Body awareness and body reliance seem to have importance in the process of acceptance of the body as well as life situation as a whole, which we regard as interesting hypotheses for further inquiry.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    John Wiley & Sons, 2007
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-106745 (URN)10.1111/j.1471-6712.2007.00475.x (DOI)17727540 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2014-05-21 Created: 2014-05-21 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
    2. We got the whole story all at once: physiotherapists use of key questions when meeting patients with long-standing pain
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>We got the whole story all at once: physiotherapists use of key questions when meeting patients with long-standing pain
    2010 (English)In: SCANDINAVIAN JOURNAL OF CARING SCIENCES, ISSN 0283-9318, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 281-289Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Long-standing musculoskeletal pain has many dimensions. Physiotherapy lacks a tested method of dialogue with which physiotherapists and patients can together explore pain in all its complexity. The present aim was to find out how physiotherapists experienced the influence of systematically prepared key questioning on their relation to, and understanding of, patients with long-standing pain. A group of six physiotherapists with long experience of pain rehabilitation used such questions in their encounters with their patients. Two periods of work with the questions were followed by discussions in which the physiotherapists shared their experience in a joint focus group. Verbatim transcripts of the discussions constitute the data of the study. A phenomenographic method was used for the analysis. The responses to the key questions gave the physiotherapists an insight into the patient as a person. The questions started a process of change in the patient, and changed the physiotherapists relation to her or him. The patient expressed feelings and experience, and this also seemed to encourage a change in chosen coping strategies. This new content of the interaction challenged the physiotherapists role, thus raising questions about her professional mandate.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Blackwell Publishing Ltd, 2010
    Keywords
    qualitative method, phenomenography, dialogue method, key questions, biopsychosocial, pain management, physiotherapy, professional mandate
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-56678 (URN)10.1111/j.1471-6712.2009.00718.x (DOI)000277713500011 ()
    Available from: 2010-05-31 Created: 2010-05-31 Last updated: 2014-05-21
    3. Telling about long-lasting pain – the role of key questions in physiotherapy encounters
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Telling about long-lasting pain – the role of key questions in physiotherapy encounters
    2014 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: For a physiotherapist in primary care wishing to meet her/his patient in the entirety of possible causes of long-lasting pain, the ability to perceive its nuances and context is indispensable.

    The aim was to investigate the verbal responses of patients with long-lasting pain to key questions addressing their biography, identity and lived body.

    Methodology: Three Swedish physiotherapists asked eight patients with long-lasting pain seven questions regarding body experience at the introductory and concluding, tape-recorded, treatment sessions. A deductive, qualitative analysis was made through four concepts naming aspects of body experience: body reliance, body awareness, models for explaining pain and the body’s integration in the identity.

    Major findings: The key questions opened ways to bodily-existential reflections. The aspects of body experience were central to the patients’ descriptions. Appreciable differences emerged between the patients in how they described the experience of living with pain, and in some cases differences were seen between the conversations of the first and the last treatment session with the same patient.

    Conclusions: The questions addressed crucial issues of living with pain and seem to have a potential to capture changes in body experience. Physiotherapists may recognize their patients’ biographical disruptions, reconstruction and adapt their treatment accordingly.

    Keywords
    Pain management, Clinical dialogue, Physiotherapy, Bodily existential perspective, Body awareness, Body reliance, Key questions, Deductive qualitative analysis
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-106746 (URN)
    Available from: 2014-05-21 Created: 2014-05-21 Last updated: 2014-05-21Bibliographically approved
    4. Improving the interaction between the physiotherapist and the patient with long-lasting pain
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Improving the interaction between the physiotherapist and the patient with long-lasting pain
    2014 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate whether it would be possible to improve the understanding and communication between physiotherapists and patients with long-lasting pain by, in a systematic way, approaching their condition from a bodily existential perspective.

    Method: 31 physiotherapists answered written open questions about what happened when they in 90 encounters used key questions about living with pain together with a tentative frame for interpreting the answers - typologies of approaches to living with long-lasting pain. In the analysis, we combined qualitative content analysis with the counting of the numbers of codes.

    Results: According to the physiotherapists, patients were positive to answering the key questions, which also evoked emotional responses and reflection. The relation between the physiotherapists and their patients improved. The typologies helped the physiotherapists understand their patients better, as well as in assessing the patients’ problems and choosing treatment. In all, positive experience clearly dominated. Conclusion: When used by physiotherapists with an interest in patients with longlasting pain, the key questions and typologies seem to enrich the clinical interaction in many cases. To try the generalisability of our findings, we regard it an interesting possibility to conduct a larger, quantitative questionnaire study based on the experiences and results of the present one.

    Keywords
    Qualitative method, pain management, pain assessment, clinical dialogue, communication, bodily existential, physiotherapy
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-106747 (URN)
    Available from: 2014-05-21 Created: 2014-05-21 Last updated: 2014-05-21Bibliographically approved
  • 10.
    Agvall, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Central County.
    Paulsson, Thomas
    Global Health Economics and Outcomes Research, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Belgium.
    Foldevi, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Central County.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Resource use and cost implications of implementing a heart failure program for patients with systolic heart failure in Swedish primary health care2014In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 176, p. 731-738Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Heart failure (HF) is a common but serious condition which involves a significant economic burden on the health care economy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate cost and quality of life (QoL) implications of implementing a HF management program (HFMP) in primary health care (PHC).

    Methods and results: This was a prospective randomized open-label study including 160 patientswith a diagnosis of HF from five PHC centers in south-eastern Sweden. Patients randomized to the intervention group received information about HF from HF nurses and from a validated computer-based awareness program. HF nurses and physicians followed the patients intensely in order to optimize HF treatment according to current guidelines. The patients in the control group were followed by their regular general practitioner (GP) and received standard treatment according to local management routines. No significant changes were observed in NYHA class and quality-adjusted life years (QALY), implying that functional class and QoL were preserved. However, costs for hospital care (HC) and PHC were reduced by EUR 2167, or 33%. The total cost was EUR 4471 in the intervention group and EUR 6638 in the control group.

    Conclusions: Introducing HFMP in Swedish PHC in patients with HF entails a significant reduction in resource utilization and costs, and maintains QoL. Based on these results, a broader implementation of HFMP in PHC may be recommended. However, results should be confirmed with extended follow-up to verify  long-term effects.

  • 11.
    Ahlstrand, I.
    et al.
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden; School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, CHIRI, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Rehabilitation Center. School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Pain and activity limitations in women and men with contemporary treated early RA compared to 10 years ago: the Swedish TIRA project2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 259-264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To study differences regarding pain and activity limitations during the 3 years following diagnosis in women and men with contemporary treated early RA compared with their counterparts who were diagnosed 10 years earlier. Method: This study was based on patients recruited to the Early Intervention in RA (TIRA) project. In the first cohort (TIRA-1) 320 patients were included in time for diagnosis during 1996-1998 and 463 patients were included in the second cohort (TIRA-2) during 2006-2009. Disease activity, pain intensity (Visual Analogue Scale, VAS), bodily pain (BP) in the 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), activity limitations (Health Assessment Questionnaire, HAQ), and medication were reported at inclusion and at follow-up after 1, 2, and 3 years. Results: Disease activity, pain, and activity limitations were pronounced at inclusion across both genders and in both cohorts, with some improvement observed during the first year after diagnosis. Disease activity did not differ between cohorts at inclusion but was significantly lower at the follow-ups in the TIRA-2 cohort, in which the patients were prescribed traditional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and biological agents more frequently. In TIRA-2, patients reported significantly lower pain and activity limitations at all follow-ups, with men reporting lower pain than women. Women reported significantly higher activity limitations at all time points in TIRA-2. Conclusions: Pain and activity limitations were still pronounced in the contemporary treated early RA cohort compared with their counterparts diagnosed 10 years earlier and both of these factors need to be addressed in clinical settings.

  • 12.
    Ahlstrand, Inger
    et al.
    Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Rehabilitation Center. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Jonköping University, Sweden; Curtin University, Australia.
    Pain and difficulties performing valued life activities in women and men with rheumatoid arthritis2015In: Clinical Rheumatology, ISSN 0770-3198, E-ISSN 1434-9949, Vol. 34, no 8, p. 1353-1362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to examine the difficulties with performing valued life activities in relation to pain intensity in women and men with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In total, 737 persons with RA (73 % women) from three rheumatology units in Sweden responded to a questionnaire measuring performance of 33 valued life activities and self-rated pain. The relationships between performance of valued life activities (VLAs) and pain (measured by visual analogue scale (VAS)) were analysed based on gender. Multiple linear regression analyses were conducted with the total VLA score as dependent variable. Women reported more pain and difficulties in performing valued life activities than men. Across genders, 85 % reported at least one valued life activity affected by RA. Significantly more women than men encountered difficulties in performing some activities such as cooking, gardening and meeting new people. Women reported higher pain intensity (35 mm) than men (31 mm). Almost all 33 difficulty ratings for valued life activities were higher among persons with high pain (greater than 40 mm) than persons with lower pain. Difficulty ratings for valued life activities correlated positively with pain in persons with lower pain, but not among those with high pain. The results highlight the importance of addressing pain, especially among women with RA, as they reported pain to impact on their valued life activities. Interestingly, this was evident also in women with lower levels of pain.

  • 13.
    Ahlstrand, Inger
    et al.
    School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Vaz, Sharmila
    School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, CHIRI, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Self-efficacy and pain acceptance as mediators of the relationship between pain and performance of valued life activities in women and men with rheumatoid arthritis2017In: Clinical Rehabilitation, ISSN 0269-2155, E-ISSN 1477-0873, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 824-834Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To study whether personal factors (self-efficacy and pain acceptance) mediate the relationship between pain and performance of valued life activities in persons with rheumatoid arthritis.

    METHODS: Persons with rheumatoid arthritis for at least four years (n = 737; 73% women) answered a questionnaire measuring self-efficacy, pain acceptance, performance of valued life activities, and self-rated pain. Relationships among these constructs were explored using univariate and multivariate analyses. Structural equation modelling was then used to examine the mediational role of personal factors on the relationship between pain and performance of valued life activities.

    RESULTS: A direct negative association between pain and performance of valued life activities was identified (Beta = .34, P < .001). This suggests that people with rheumatoid arthritis who had higher levels of pain has increased difficulties in performing valued life activities. Self-efficacy and activity engagement component of pain acceptance mediated the relationship between pain and performance of valued life activities, however the pain willingness component of pain acceptance did not influence participation in valued life activities.

    CONCLUSION: These findings highlight the importance of considering personal factors, such as pain acceptance and self-efficacy, in facilitating participation in valued life activities.

  • 14.
    Ahlstrom, Gerd
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Benzein, Eva
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden.
    Behm, Lina
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Wallerstedt, Birgitta
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden.
    Persson, Magnus
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Sandgren, Anna
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden.
    Implementation of knowledge-based palliative care in nursing homes and pre-post post evaluation by cross-over design: a study protocol2018In: BMC Palliative Care, ISSN 1472-684X, E-ISSN 1472-684X, Vol. 17, article id 52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The demography of the world is changing as the population is ageing. Because of this change to a higher proportion of older people, the WHO has called for improved palliative care for older persons. A large number of all deaths in the industrialised world occur while older people are living in nursing homes and therefore a key question becomes how the principles of palliative care can be implemented in that context. The aims of this study are: a) to describe a model of an educational intervention with the goal of implementing knowledge-based palliative care in nursing homes, and b) to describe the design of the evaluation of the effectiveness regarding the implementation of knowledge-based palliative care. Methods/design: A complex intervention is evaluated by means of a cross-over design. An educational intervention concerning palliative care consisting of five seminars during 6 months for staff and managers has been developed and conducted in 20 nursing homes in two counties. Before the intervention started, the feasibility was tested in a pilot study conducted in nursing homes not included in the main study. The intervention is evaluated through a non-randomized experimental design with intervention and control groups and pre- and post-assessments. The evaluation includes older persons living in nursing homes, next-of-kin, staff and managers. Data collection consists of quantitative methods such as questionnaires and register data and qualitative methods in the form of individual interviews, focus-group interviews and participant observations. Discussion: The research will contribute to new knowledge about how to implement knowledge-based palliative care in a nursing home setting. A strength of this project is that the Medical Research Council framework of complex intervention is applied. The four recommended stages, Development, Feasibility and piloting, Evaluation and Implementation, are combined for the educational intervention, which functions as a strategy to achieve knowledge-based palliative care in the nursing homes. Implementation is always a question of change and a good theoretical understanding is needed for drawing valid conclusions about the causal mechanisms of change. The topic is highly relevant considering the worlds ageing population. The data collection is completed and the analysis is ongoing.

  • 15.
    Ahlström, Christer
    et al.
    VTI, Swedish Natl Rd and Transport Res Inst, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Anund, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. VTI, Swedish Natl Rd and Transport Res Inst, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Fors, Carina
    VTI, Swedish Natl Rd and Transport Res Inst, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Åkerstedt, Torbjorn
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Effects of the road environment on the development of driver sleepiness in young male drivers2018In: Accident Analysis and Prevention, ISSN 0001-4575, E-ISSN 1879-2057, Vol. 112, p. 127-134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Latent driver sleepiness may in some cases be masked by for example social interaction, stress and physical activity. This short-term modulation of sleepiness may also result from environmental factors, such as when driving in stimulating environments. The aim of this study is to compare two road environments and investigate how they affect driver sleepiness. Thirty young male drivers participated in a driving simulator experiment where they drove two scenarios: a rural environment with winding roads and low traffic density, and a suburban road with higher traffic density and a more built-up roadside environment. The driving task was essentially the same in both scenarios, i.e. to stay on the road, without much interaction with other road users. A 2 x 2 design, with the conditions rural versus suburban, and daytime (full sleep) versus night-time (sleep deprived), was used. The results show that there were only minor effects of the road environment on subjective and physiological indicators of sleepiness. In contrast, there was an increase in subjective sleepiness, longer blink durations and increased EEG alpha content, both due to time on task and to night-time driving. The two road environments differed both in terms of the demand on driver action and of visual load, and the results indicate that action demand is the more important of the two factors. The notion that driver fatigue should be countered in a more stimulating visual environment such as in the city is thus more likely due to increased task demand rather than to a richer visual scenery. This should be investigated in further studies.

  • 16.
    Ahn, Song Ee
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Rimpilainen, Sanna
    University of Stirling, UK.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fenwick, Tara
    University of Stirling, UK.
    Interprofessional training in technology-enhanced medical simulation: Locations and knowings2013In: Conference Programme Book: 8th International Conference on Researching Work and Learning 2013, 2013, p. 15-16Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper take an actor-network theory perspective on the use of medical simulators in professional education as a means of training students in medical education and nursing in handling acute emergency situations in health care.  The main aim of the study is to investigate what activities are performed in what material arrangements in a full cycle of simulation, i.e  the briefing, the simulation in the emergency room, the observations in the control room and the debriefing and what knowing is produced as an effect of these arrangements.

     The use of simulators has become a common teaching strategy in medical education. An ageing population, declining financial resources and lack of trained health care personnel are global trends that call for changing the system of health care practice as well as for professional education in the sector.  To build more effective health services, professionals are required to work more collaboratively and in partnership with health care consumers (WHO 2008; 2010). Recently, leading medical experts have also criticised the training of health personnel for not adequately preparing for cooperation and inter-professional communication (Frenk et al, 2010). In health care, this concern situations demanding effective communication for making prompt decisions that are of critical importance in emergency situations. Training of students and professionals by means of full-scale simulators is a response to accommodate for these needs.  Education in simulation-based environments is seen to offer opportunities to address the needs for training interprofessional collaboration by focusing on communication, situation awareness, decision making and coping with stress (Arafeh et al 2010; Östergaard et al,2011). Cook et al has shown in a meta analysis of more than 600 research articles, that in comparison with no intervention, technology-enhanced simulation is consistently associated with large effects for outcomes of knowledge, skills, and behaviors but moderate effects for patient-related outcomes (Cook et al 2011). A majority of the studies are effect studies with quantitative designs. The authors argue that there is a need for rigorous, theory based qualitative studies in order to clarify how and when to effectively use technology enhanced simulations in the training of health care professionals.

     The present study draws upon Actor-network theory (Latour, 2005).  This perspective which situates materiality as a part of the social practices, provides theoretical tools for observation and discussion of the relation between the material assemblages and human actors. Observations of full-scale simulations of acute trauma handling in the emergency room with ten groups of medical and nursing students make up the data for analysis. Preliminary findings indicate that the different locations and material arrangements of the simulation cycle produce different kinds of knowing and learning than the intended curriculum objectives. The findings can contribute to the theoretical knowledge of how to design simulation-based medical education.

     

     

     

     

     

  • 17.
    Ahn, Song Ee
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Rimpiläinen, Sanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Three locations of technology enhanced medical simulation training and their effect on learning and knowing2014In: Professional Matters: Materialities and virtualities of professional learning, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This qualitative study aims to address the identified gap in literature concerning  the lack of rigorous, theory-based, qualitative studies to clarify how and when to effectively use simulations to train health care professionals (Cook, et al, 2011). By drawing upon actor-network theory (ANT) (Latour, 2005) an approach that situates materiality as a part of the social practices, and provides theoretical tools for observation and discussion of the relation between the material assemblages and human actors, we have investigated how learning takes place during a simulation-based medical training. Knowing and learning, according to ANT, are not simply cognitive or social phenomena, but are seen as emerging as effects of the socio-material networks gathered together and being performed into being in particular locations (Law, 2004; Rimpiläinen, 2011).  In this study we have focussed on observing the socio-material arrangements that emerged in three locations involved in the simulation – the simulation room, the observation room and the reflection room - and analysing what kinds of knowing and learning they have produced through which socio-material arrangements. Data for analysis consists of observations of full-scale simulations of acute trauma handling in the emergency room with ten groups of medical and nursing students.  Preliminary findings indicate that the different locations and material arrangements of the simulation cycle produce different kinds of knowing and learning from the intended curriculum objectives. The findings can contribute to the theoretical knowledge of how to design simulation-based medical education.

  • 18.
    Ahn, Song-Ee
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Rimpiläinen, Sanna
    University of Gothenburg.
    Theodorsson, Annette
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Fenwick, Tara
    University of Stirling.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Learning in Technology-Enhanced Medical Simulation:Locations and Knowings2015In: Professions & Professionalism, ISSN 1893-1049, E-ISSN 1893-1049, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This qualitative study focuses on how knowings and learning take place in full-scale simulation training of medical and nursing students, by drawing upon actor-network theory (ANT). ANT situates materiality as a part of the social practic-es. Knowing and learning, according to ANT, are not simply cognitive or social phenomena, but are seen as emerging as effects of the relation between material assemblages and human actors being performed into being in particular locations. Data consists of observations of simulations performed by ten groups of students. The analysis focuses on the emerging knowings in the socio-material—arrangements of three locations involved in the simulation—the simulation room, the observation room and the reflection room. The findings indicate that medical knowing, affective knowing and communicative knowing are produced in different ways in the different locations and material arrangements of the simulation cycle.

  • 19.
    Albrecht, Matthew A.
    et al.
    Curtin University, Australia .
    Stuart, Geoffrey W.
    La Trobe University, Australia .
    Falkmer, Marita
    Curtin University, Australia, Jonköping University, Sweden .
    Ordqvist, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Leung, Denise
    Curtin University, Australia .
    Foster, Jonathan K.
    Curtin University, Australia Health Department WA, Australia .
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Brief Report: Visual Acuity in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders2014In: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, Vol. 44, no 9, p. 2369-2374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, there has been heightened interest in suggestions of enhanced visual acuity in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) which was sparked by evidence that was later accepted to be methodologically flawed. However, a recent study that claimed children with ASD have enhanced visual acuity (Brosnan et al. in J Autism Dev Disord 42:2491-2497, 2012) repeated a critical methodological flaw by using an inappropriate viewing distance for a computerised acuity test, placing the findings in doubt. We examined visual acuity in 31 children with ASD and 33 controls using the 2 m 2000 Series Revised Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study chart placed at twice the conventional distance to better evaluate possible enhanced acuity. Children with ASD did not demonstrate superior acuity. The current findings strengthen the argument that reports of enhanced acuity in ASD are due to methodological flaws and challenges the reported association between visual acuity and systemising type behaviours.

  • 20.
    Alföldi, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Dragioti, Elena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Wiklund, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    SPREADING OF PAIN AND INSOMNIA IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC PAIN: RESULTS FROM A NATIONAL QUALITY REGISTRY (SQRP)2017In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 63-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To explore how demographics, pain, psychosocial factors and insomnia relate to the spread of chronic pain. Methods: The study included 708 patients (68% women; median age 46 years; interquartile range 3557 years) with chronic pain who were referred to a multidisciplinary pain centre. Spreading of pain was assessed using a questionnaire covering 36 anatomically predefined pain regions. Data were collected on demographics, pain symptoms, psychological distress, and insomnia (Insomnia Severity Index). Four sub-categories of chronic pain were established: chronic local pain, chronic regional pain medium, chronic regional pain heavy, and chronic widespread pain. Results: The median number of pain regions was 10 (interquartile range 6-18). Prevalence of chronic pain was as follows: chronic local pain 9%, chronic regional pain medium 21%, chronic regional pain heavy 39%, and chronic widespread pain 31%. In the regression models, being a woman and persistent pain duration had the strongest associations with spreading of pain, but anxiety, pain interference, and insomnia were also important factors. Conclusion: Spreading of chronic pain can only partly be explained by the simultaneous levels of insomnia. Female sex, pain duration, pain interference and anxiety appear to have more significant relationships with the spread of pain. Targeting these factors may lead to improvements in treatment and prevention strategies.

  • 21.
    Alföldi, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine.
    Wiklund, Tobias
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine.
    Comorbid insomnia in patients with chronic pain: a study based on the Swedish quality registry for pain rehabilitation (SQRP)2014In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 36, no 20, p. 1661-1669Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This study investigates the prevalence of insomnia and its relationship to other symptoms and health aspects in patients with chronic pain. Methods: Patients with chronic pain conditions (n = 845) referred to a multidisciplinary pain centre completed surveys provided by the Swedish quality registry for pain rehabilitation (SQRP). The SQRP collects data on socio-demographics, health status, symptoms of pain, mood and insomnia and life satisfaction. Results: The majority of patients (65.3%) had clinical insomnia according to the insomnia severity index (ISI). Insomnia correlated significantly but weakly with pain, depression, anxiety and coping; the strongest multivariate correlations were found with depression and anxiety followed by pain interference and pain severity. Pain intensity, depression and anxiety correlated stronger than ISI with respect to the two investigated aspects of health. Conclusions: The prevalence of insomnia is high in patients with chronic pain conditions, but the level of importance in relation to other symptoms for health aspects is low, and the associations with other important symptoms are relatively weak. One way to increase the effects of multimodal rehabilitation programs may be to provide interventions directed specifically at insomnia rather than focusing only on interventions that address pain, depression and anxiety. Implications for Rehabilitation The prevalence of insomnia is high in patients with complex chronic pain conditions. Relatively low correlations existed between insomnia and pain intensity, depression, anxiety and other psychological aspects. Pain intensity, anxiety and depression were more important for perceived health aspects than insomnia. One way to increase the effects of multimodal rehabilitation programs may be to also include interventions directed directly to insomnia.

  • 22.
    Al-Karkhi, Isam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Al-Rubaiy, Raad
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Rosenqvist, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Falk, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Central County. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Nyström, Fredrik H
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Comparisons of automated blood pressures in a primary health care setting with self-measurements at the office and at home using the Omron i-C10 device2015In: Blood Pressure Monitoring, ISSN 1359-5237, E-ISSN 1473-5725, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 98-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: We aimed to compare blood pressure (BP) levels recorded using the semiautomatic oscillometric Omron i-C10 BP device in patients with or without hypertension in three different settings: (a) when used by a doctor or a nurse at the office (OBP); (b) when used for self-measurement by the patient at the office (SMOBP); and (c) when used for 7 consecutive days at home (HBP).

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 247 individuals were invited to participate, but 78 of these individuals declined and a further seven were excluded, leaving a final cohort of 162 participants.

    RESULTS: The mean OBP was higher than HBP (difference 8.1±14/3.1±8.8 mmHg, P<0.0001) and so was SMOBP compared with HBP (difference 7.0±13/4.2±7.3 mmHg, P<0.0001). Sixteen participants (9.9%) had at least 10 mmHg higher systolic SMOBP than OBP and 28 (17%) participants had at least 10 mmHg lower systolic SMOBP than OBP. Participants who were current smokers had a larger mean difference between systolic OBP and SMOBP than nonsmokers (OBP-SMOBP in smokers: 6.6±9.4 mmHg, OBP-SMOBP in nonsmokers: 0.5±9.2 mmHg, P=0.011 between groups).

    CONCLUSION: Self-measurement of BP in the office does not preclude an increase in BP when levels in the individual patients are compared with HBP using the same equipment. Thus, SMOBP with a semiautomatic device does not lead to a reduction in the white-coat effect in the same manner as fully automatic devices.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 3.0 License, where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0.

  • 23.
    Allvin, Renée
    et al.
    Clinical Skills Centre, Faculty of Medicine and Health, School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro.
    Berndtzon, Magnus
    Metodikum - Skill Centre of Medical Simulation Region County Jönköping, Jönköping.
    Carlzon, Liisa
    Simulation Centre West, Department of Research, Education and Development, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg.
    Edelbring, Samuel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Hult, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hultin, Magnus
    Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Medical Faculty, Umeå University, Umeå.
    Karlgren, Klas
    Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm; Department of Research, Education and Development and Innovation, Södersjukhuset Hospital, Stockholm.
    Masiello, Italo
    Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institutet, Södersjukhuset Hospital, Stockholm.
    Södersved Källestedt, Marie-Louise
    Clinical Skills Centre, Centre for Clinical Research, Uppsala University, Västerås.
    Tamás, Éva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Confident but not theoretically grounded: experienced simulation educators perceptions of their own professional development2017In: Advances in Medical Education and Practice, ISSN 1179-7258, E-ISSN 1179-7258, Vol. 8, p. 99-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Medical simulation enables the design of learning activities for competency areas (eg, communication and leadership) identified as crucial for future health care professionals. Simulation educators and medical teachers follow different career paths, and their education backgrounds and teaching contexts may be very different in a simulation setting. Although they have a key role in facilitating learning, information on the continuing professional development (pedagogical development) of simulation educators is not available in the literature.

    Objectives: To explore changes in experienced simulation educators’ perceptions of their own teaching skills, practices, and understanding of teaching over time.

    Methods: A qualitative exploratory study. Fourteen experienced simulation educators participated in individual open-ended interviews focusing on their development as simulation educators. Data were analyzed using an inductive thematic analysis.

    Results: Marked educator development was discerned over time, expressed mainly in an altered way of thinking and acting. Five themes were identified: shifting focus, from following to utilizing a structure, setting goals, application of technology, and alignment with profession. Being confident in the role as an instructor seemed to constitute a foundation for the instructor’s pedagogical development.

    Conclusion: Experienced simulation educators’ pedagogical development was based on self-confidence in the educator role, and not on a deeper theoretical understanding of teaching and learning. This is the first clue to gain increased understanding regarding educational level and possible education needs among simulation educators, and it might generate several lines of research for further studies.

  • 24.
    Almberg, Maria
    et al.
    Mobil Centre Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Selander, Helena
    Mobil Centre Gothenburg, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Curtin University, Australia; Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Vaz, Sharmila
    Curtin University, Australia.
    Ciccarelli, Marina
    Curtin University, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Curtin University, Australia.
    Experiences of facilitators or barriers in driving education from learner and novice drivers with ADHD or ASD and their driving instructors2017In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 59-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Little is known about whether individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD) experience any specific facilitators or barriers to driving education. Objective: To explore the facilitators or barriers to driving education experienced by individuals with ASD or ADHD who obtained a learners permit, from the perspective of the learner drivers and their driving instructors. Methods: Datawere collected from33 participants with ASD or ADHD, and nine of their driving instructors. Results: Participants with ASD required twice asmany driving lessons andmore on-road tests than those with ADHD. Participants with ADHD repeated the written tests more than those with ASD. Driving license theory was more challenging for individuals with ADHD, whilst individuals with ASD found translating theory into practice and adjusting to "unfamiliar driving situations to be the greatest challenges. Conclusion: Obtaining a driving license was associated with stressful training experience.

  • 25.
    Alonso, Juan-Manuel
    et al.
    Int Assoc Athlet Federat, Med & Antidoping Commiss, Monaco, Monaco; Qatar Orthoped & Sports Med Hosp, Sports Med Dept, Aspetar, Doha, Qatar.
    Jacobsson, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Center for Public Health.
    Ronsen, Ola
    Int Assoc Athlet Federat, Med & Antidoping Commiss, Monaco, Monaco; Aker Solut, Lysaker, Norway.
    Kajenienne, Alma
    Int Assoc Athlet Federat, Med & Antidoping Commiss, Monaco, Monaco; Lithuanian Univ Hlth Sci, Inst Sport, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Spreco, Armin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Edouard, Pascal
    Univ Hosp St Etienne, Fac Med, Sports Med Unity, Dept Clin & Exercise Physiol, St Etienne, France; Univ Lyon, Exercise Physiol Lab, LPE EA 4338, St Etienne, France; French Athlet Federat, Med Commiss, Paris, France.
    Preparticipation injury complaint is a risk factor for injury: a prospective study of the Moscow 2013 IAAF Championships.2015In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 49, no 17, p. 1118-U45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the health status of athletes before the start of an international athletics championship and to determine whether preparticipation risk factors predicted in-championship injuries.

    METHODS: At the beginning of the 2013 International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) World Championships, all registered athletes (n=1784) were invited to complete a preparticipation health questionnaire (PHQ) on health status during the month preceding the championships. New injuries that occurred at the championships were prospectively recorded.

    RESULTS: The PHQ was completed by 698 (39%) athletes; 204 (29.2%) reported an injury complaint during the month before the championships. The most common mode of onset of preparticipation injury complaints was gradual (43.6%). Forty-nine athletes in the study reported at least one injury during the championships. Athletes who reported a preparticipation injury complaint were at twofold increased risk for an in-championship injury (OR=2.09; 95% CI 1.16 to 3.77); p=0.014). Those who reported a preparticipation gradual-onset injury complaint were at an almost fourfold increased risk for an in-championship time-loss injury (OR=3.92; 95% CI 1.69 to 9.08); p=0.001). Importantly, the preparticipation injury complaint severity score was associated with the risk of sustaining an in-championship injury (OR=1.14; 95% CI 1.06 to 1.22); p=0.001).

    SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS: About one-third of the athletes participating in the study reported an injury complaint during the month before the championships, which represented a risk factor for sustaining an injury during the championship. This study emphasises the importance of the PHQ as a screening tool to identify athletes at risk of injuries before international championships.

  • 26.
    Andersen, Åsa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Ståhl, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Anderzen, Ingrid
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Kristiansson, Per
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Larsson, Kjerstin
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Positive experiences of a vocational rehabilitation intervention for individuals on long-term sick leave, the Dirigo project: a qualitative study2017In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 17, article id 790Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The process of returning to work after long-term sick leave can sometimes be complex. Many factors, (e.g. cooperation between different authorities and the individual as well as individual factors such as health, emotional well-being and self-efficacy) may have an impact on an individuals ability to work. The aim of this study was to investigate clients experiences with an individually tailored vocational rehabilitation, the Dirigo project, and encounters with professionals working on it. The Dirigo project was based on collaboration between rehabilitation authorities, individually tailored interventions and a motivational interviewing approach. Methods: A descriptive qualitative design was used with data collected through interviews. Fourteen individuals on long-term sick leave took part in individual semi-structured interviews. The interviews were analysed using content analysis. Results: The analysis showed overall positive experience of methods and encounters with professionals in a vocational rehabilitation project. The positive experiences were based on four key factors: 1. Opportunities for receiving various dimensions of support. 2. Good overall treatment by the professionals. 3. Satisfaction with the working methods of the project, and 4. Opportunities for personal development. Conclusions: The main result showed that the clients had an overall positive experience of a vocational rehabilitation project and encounters with professionals who used motivational interviewing as a communication method. The overall positive experience indicated that their interactions with the different professionals may have affected their self-efficacy in general and in relation to transition to work. The knowledge is essential for the professionals working in the area of vocational rehabilitation. However, vocational rehabilitation interventions also need a societal approach to be able to offer clients opportunities for job training and real jobs.

  • 27.
    Anderson, Peter
    et al.
    Newcastle University, England; Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Spak, Fredrik
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Reynolds, Jillian
    Hospital Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Drummond, Colin
    Kings Coll London, England; South London and Maudsley NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Segura, Lidia
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Keurhorst, Myrna N.
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Palacio-Vieira, Jorge
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Wojnar, Marcin
    Medical University of Warsaw, Poland.
    Parkinson, Kathryn
    Newcastle University, England.
    Colom, Joan
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Kloda, Karolina
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Deluca, Paolo
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Baena, Begona
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Newbury-Birch, Dorothy
    Newcastle University, England.
    Wallace, Paul
    UCL, England.
    Heinen, Maud
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Wolstenholme, Amy
    Kings Coll London, England.
    van Steenkiste, Ben
    Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Mierzecki, Artur
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Okulicz-Kozaryn, Katarzyna
    State Agency Prevent Alcohol Related Problems, Poland.
    Ronda, Gaby
    Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Kaner, Eileen
    Newcastle University, England.
    Laurant, Miranda G. H.
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands; HAN University of Appl Science, Netherlands.
    Coulton, Simon
    University of Kent, England.
    Gual, Toni
    Hospital Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Improving the delivery of brief interventions for heavy drinking in primary health care: outcome results of the Optimizing Delivery of Health Care Intervention (ODHIN) five-country cluster randomized factorial trial2016In: Addiction, ISSN 0965-2140, E-ISSN 1360-0443, Vol. 111, no 11, p. 1935-1945Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimTo test if training and support, financial reimbursement and option of referring screen-positive patients to an internet-based method of giving advice (eBI) can increase primary health-care providers delivery of Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT)-C-based screening and advice to heavy drinkers. DesignCluster randomized factorial trial with 12-week implementation and measurement period. SettingPrimary health-care units (PHCU) in different locations throughout Catalonia, England, the Netherlands, Poland and Sweden. ParticipantsA total of 120 PHCU, 24 in each of Catalonia, England, the Netherlands, Poland and Sweden. InterventionsPHCUs were randomized to one of eight groups: care as usual, training and support (TS), financial reimbursement (FR) and eBI; paired combinations of TS, FR and eBI, and all of FR, TS and eBI. MeasurementsThe primary outcome measure was the proportion of eligible adult (age 18+ years) patients screened during a 12-week implementation period. Secondary outcome measures were proportion of screen-positive patients advised; and proportion of consulting adult patients given an intervention (screening and advice to screen-positives) during the same 12-week implementation period. FindingsDuring a 4-week baseline measurement period, the proportion of consulting adult patients who were screened for their alcohol consumption was 0.059 per PHCU (95% CI 0.034 to 0.084). Based on the factorial design, the ratio of the logged proportion screened during the 12-week implementation period was 1.48 (95% CI=1.13-1.95) in PHCU that received TS versus PHCU that did not receive TS; for FR, the ratio was 2.00 (95% CI=1.56-2.56). The option of referral to eBI did not lead to a higher proportion of patients screened. The ratio for TS plus FR was 2.34 (95% CI=1.77-3.10), and the ratio for TS plus FR plus eBI was1.68 (95% CI=1.11-2.53). ConclusionsProviding primary health-care units with training, support and financial reimbursement for delivering Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test-C-based screening and advice to heavy drinkers increases screening for alcohol consumption. Providing primary health-care units with the option of referring screen-positive patients to an internet-based method of giving advice does not appear to increase screening for alcohol consumption.

  • 28.
    Anderson, Peter
    et al.
    Newcastle University, England; Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Coulton, Simon
    University of Kent, England.
    Kaner, Eileen
    Newcastle University, England.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Kloda, Karolina
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Reynolds, Jillian
    Hospital Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Segura, Lidia
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Wojnar, Marcin
    Medical University of Warsaw, Poland.
    Mierzecki, Artur
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Deluca, Paolo
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Newbury-Birch, Dorothy
    University of Teesside, England.
    Parkinson, Kathryn
    Newcastle University, England.
    Okulicz-Kozaryn, Katarzyna
    State Agency Prevent Alcohol Related Problems, Poland.
    Drummond, Colin
    Kings Coll London, England; South London and Maudsley NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Gual, Antoni
    Hospital Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Delivery of Brief Interventions for Heavy Drinking in Primary Care: Outcomes of the ODHIN 5-Country Cluster Randomized Trial2017In: Annals of family medicine (online), ISSN 1544-1709, E-ISSN 1544-1717, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 335-340Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE We aimed to test whether 3 strategies-training and support, financial reimbursement, and an option to direct screen-positive patients to an Internet-based method of giving brief advice-have a longer-term effect on primary care clinicians delivery of screening and advice to heavy drinkers operationalized with the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test-Consumption (AUDIT-C) tool. METHODS We undertook a cluster randomized factorial trial with a 12-week implementation period in 120 primary health care units throughout Catalonia, England, Netherlands, Poland, and Sweden. Units were randomized to 8 groups: care as usual (control); training and support alone; financial reimbursement alone; electronic brief advice alone; paired combinations of these conditions; and all 3 combined. The primary outcome was the proportion of consulting adult patients (aged 18 years and older) receiving intervention-screening and, if screen-positive, advice-at 9 months. RESULTS Based on the factorial design, the ratio of the log of the proportion of patients given intervention at the 9-month follow-up was 1.39 (95% CI, 1.03-1.88) in units that received training and support as compared with units that did not. Neither financial reimbursement nor directing screen-positive patients to electronic brief advice led to a higher proportion of patients receiving intervention. CONCLUSIONS Training and support of primary health care units has a lasting, albeit small, impact on the proportion of adult patients given an alcohol intervention at 9 months.

  • 29.
    Anderson, Peter
    et al.
    Newcastle University, England; Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Kaner, Eileen
    Newcastle University, England.
    Keurhorst, Myrna
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands; Saxion University of Appl Science, Netherlands.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    van Steenkiste, Ben
    Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Reynolds, Jillian
    IDIBAPS, Spain.
    Segura, Lidia
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Wojnar, Marcin
    Medical University of Warsaw, Poland.
    Kloda, Karolina
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Parkinson, Kathryn
    Newcastle University, England.
    Drummond, Colin
    Kings Coll London, England; Maudsley NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Okulicz-Kozaryn, Katarzyna
    State Agency Prevent Alcohol Related Problems, Poland.
    Mierzecki, Artur
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Laurant, Miranda
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands; HAN University of Appl Science, Netherlands.
    Newbury-Birch, Dorothy
    University of Teesside, England.
    Gual, Antoni
    IDIBAPS, Spain.
    Attitudes and Learning through Practice Are Key to Delivering Brief Interventions for Heavy Drinking in Primary Health Care: Analyses from the ODHIN Five Country Cluster Randomized Factorial Trial2017In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 14, no 2, article id 121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we test path models that study the interrelations between primary health care provider attitudes towards working with drinkers, their screening and brief advice activity, and their receipt of training and support and financial reimbursement. Study participants were 756 primary health care providers from 120 primary health care units (PHCUs) in different locations throughout Catalonia, England, The Netherlands, Poland, and Sweden. Our interventions were training and support and financial reimbursement to providers. Our design was a randomized factorial trial with baseline measurement period, 12-week implementation period, and 9-month follow-up measurement period. Our outcome measures were: attitudes of individual providers in working with drinkers as measured by the Short Alcohol and Alcohol Problems Perception Questionnaire; and the proportion of consulting adult patients (age 18+ years) who screened positive and were given advice to reduce their alcohol consumption (intervention activity). We found that more positive attitudes were associated with higher intervention activity, and higher intervention activity was then associated with more positive attitudes. Training and support was associated with both positive changes in attitudes and higher intervention activity. Financial reimbursement was associated with more positive attitudes through its impact on higher intervention activity. We conclude that improving primary health care providers screening and brief advice activity for heavy drinking requires a combination of training and support and on-the-job experience of actually delivering screening and brief advice activity.

  • 30.
    Anderson, Peter
    et al.
    Newcastle Univ, England; Maastricht Univ, Netherlands.
    Kloda, Karolina
    Pomeranian Med Univ, Poland.
    Kaner, Eileen
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Reynolds, Jillian
    Hosp Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Pelgrum-Keurhorst, Myrna N.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Netherlands; Saxion Univ Appl Sci, Netherlands.
    Segura, Lidia
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Wojnar, Marcin
    Med Univ Warsaw, Poland.
    Mierzecki, Artur
    Pomeranian Med Univ, Poland.
    Deluca, Paolo
    King’s College London, London, UK.
    Newbury-Birch, Dorothy
    Teesside Univ, England.
    Parkinson, Kathryn
    Newcastle Univ, England; State Agcy Prevent Alcohol Related Problems, Poland.
    Okulicz-Kozaryn, Katarzyna
    State Agency for Prevention of Alcohol-Related Problems, Warsaw, Poland.
    Drummond, Colin
    Kings Coll London, England; South London and Maudsley NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Laurant, Miranda G. H.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Netherlands; HAN Univ Appl Sci, Netherlands.
    Gual, Antoni
    Neurosciences Institute, Hospital Clinic, IDIBAPS, Barcelona, Spain.
    Impact of practice, provider and patient characteristics on delivering screening and brief advice for heavy drinking in primary healthcare: Secondary analyses of data from the ODHIN five-country cluster randomized factorial trial2017In: European Journal of General Practice, ISSN 1381-4788, E-ISSN 1751-1402, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 241-245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The implementation of primary healthcare-based screening and advice that is effective in reducing heavy drinking can be enhanced with training. Objectives: Undertaking secondary analysis of the five-country ODHIN study, we test: the extent to which practice, provider and patient characteristics affect the likelihood of patients being screened and advised; the extent to which such characteristics moderate the impact of training in increasing screening and advice; and the extent to which training mitigates any differences due to such characteristics found at baseline. Methods: A cluster randomized factorial trial involving 120 practices, 746 providers and 46 546 screened patients from Catalonia, England, the Netherlands, Poland, and Sweden. Practices were randomized to receive training or not to receive training. The primary outcome measures were the proportion of adult patients screened, and the proportion of screen-positive patients advised. Results: Nurses tended to screen more patients than doctors (OR = 3.1; 95% CI: 1.9, 4.9). Screenpositive patients were more likely to be advised by doctors than by nurses (OR = 2.3; 95% CI: 1.4, 4.1), and more liable to be advised the higher their risk status (OR = 1.9; 95% CI: 1.3, 2.7). Training increased screening and advice giving, with its impact largely unrelated to practice, provider or patient characteristics. Training diminished the differences between doctors and nurses and between patients with low or high-risk status. Conclusions: Training primary healthcare providers diminishes the negative impacts that some practice, provider and patient characteristics have on the likelihood of patients being screened and advised.

  • 31.
    Andersson, E Kristin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Müssener, Ulrika
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Linderoth, Catharina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Effectiveness of a Text Messaging-Based Intervention Targeting Alcohol Consumption Among University Students: Randomized Controlled Trial2018In: JMIR mhealth and uhealth, E-ISSN 2291-5222, Vol. 6, no 6, article id e146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Excessive drinking among university students is a global challenge, leading to significant health risks. However, heavy drinking among students is widely accepted and socially normalized. Mobile phone interventions have attempted to reach students who engage in excessive drinking. A growing number of studies suggest that text message-based interventions could potentially reach many students and, if effective, such an intervention might help reduce heavy drinking in the student community. Objective: The objective of this study was to test the effectiveness of a behavior change theory-based 6-week text message intervention among university students. Methods: This study was a two-arm, randomized controlled trial with an intervention group receiving a 6-week text message intervention and a control group that was referred to treatment as usual at the local student health care center. Outcome measures were collected at baseline and at 3 months after the initial invitation to participate in the intervention. The primary outcome was total weekly alcohol consumption. Secondary outcomes were frequency of heavy episodic drinking, highest estimated blood alcohol concentration, and number of negative consequences attributable to excessive drinking. Results: A total of 896 students were randomized to either the intervention or control group. The primary outcome analysis included 92.0% of the participants in the intervention group and 90.1% of the control group. At follow-up, total weekly alcohol consumption decreased in both groups, but no significant between-group difference was seen. Data on the secondary outcomes included 49.1% of the participants in the intervention group and 41.3% of the control group. No significant between-group difference was seen for any of the secondary outcomes. Conclusions: The present study was under-powered, which could partly explain the lack of significance. However, the intervention, although theory-based, needs to be re-assessed and refined to better support the target group. Apart from establishing which content forms an effective intervention, the optimal length of an alcohol intervention targeting students also needs to be addressed in future studies.

  • 32.
    Andersson, Kristin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Implementing healthy lifestyle promotion in primary care: a quasi-experimental cross-sectional study evaluating a team initiative2015In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 15, no 31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Non-communicable diseases are a leading cause of death and can largely be prevented by healthy lifestyles. Health care organizations are encouraged to integrate healthy lifestyle promotion in routine care. This study evaluates the impact of a team initiative on healthy lifestyle promotion in primary care.

    Methods: A quasi-experimental, cross-sectional design compared three intervention centres that had implemented lifestyle teams with three control centres that used a traditional model of care. Outcomes were defined using the RE-AIM framework: reach, the proportion of patients receiving lifestyle promotion; effectiveness, self-reported attitudes and competency among staff; adoption, proportion of staff reporting regular practice of lifestyle promotion; implementation, fidelity to the original lifestyle team protocol. Data collection methods included a patient questionnaire (n = 888), a staff questionnaire (n = 120) and structured interviews with all practice managers and, where applicable, team managers (n = 8). The chi square test and problem-driven content analysis was used to analyse the questionnaire and interview data, respectively.

    Results:Reach: patients at control centres (48%, n = 211) received lifestyle promotion significantly more often compared with patients at intervention centres (41%, n = 169). Effectiveness: intervention staff was significantly more positive towards the effectiveness of lifestyle promotion, shared competency and how lifestyle promotion was prioritized at their centre. Adoption: 47% of staff at intervention centres and 58% at control centres reported that they asked patients about their lifestyle on a daily basis. Implementation: all intervention centres had implemented multi-professional teams and team managers and held regular meetings but struggled to implement in-house referral structures for lifestyle promotion, which was used consistently among staff.

    Conclusions:Intervention centres did not show higher rates than control centres on reach of patients or adoption among staff at this stage. All intervention centres struggled to implement working referral structures for lifestyle promotion. Intervention centres were more positive on effectiveness outcomes, attitudes and competency among staff, however. Thus, lifestyle teams may facilitate lifestyle promotion practice in terms of increased responsiveness among staff, illustrated by positive attitudes and perceptions of shared competency. More research is needed on lifestyle promotion referral structures in primary care regarding their configuration and implementation.

  • 33.
    Andersson, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Jan-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Internal Medicine, County Council of Jönköping, Jönköping.
    Landberg, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Festin, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Norrköping, Sweden.
    Consequences of high-sensitivity troponin T testing applied in a primary care population with chest pain compared with a commercially available point-of-care troponin T analysis: an observational prospective study2015In: BMC Research Notes, ISSN 1756-0500, E-ISSN 1756-0500, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:There is a demand for a highly sensitive and specific point-of care test to detect acute myocardial infarction (AMI). It is unclear if a high-sensitivity troponin assay will have enough discriminative power to become a decision support in primary care. The aim of this study was to evaluate a high-sensitivity troponin T assay performed in three primary health care centres in southeast Sweden and to compare the outcome with a point-of-care troponin T test.METHODS:This study included 115 patients who consulted their general practitioner for chest pain, dyspnoea on exertion, unexplained weakness and/or fatigue in the last 7days. Troponin T was analysed by a point-of-care test and a high-sensitivity method together with N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and creatinine. All patients were checked for AMI or unstable angina (UA) within 30days of study enrolment. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression was carried out to examine possible connections between troponin T[greater than or equal to]15ng/L, clinical variables and laboratory findings at baseline. In addition, 21 patients with troponin T[greater than or equal to]15ng/L and no signs of AMI or UA were followed up for 2-3years.RESULTS:Three patients were diagnosed with AMI and three with UA. At the [greater than or equal to]15ng/L cut-off, the troponin T method had 100% sensitivity, 75% specificity for AMI and a positive predictive value of 10%. The troponin T point-of-care test missed one case of AMI and the detection limit was 50ng/L. Troponin T[greater than or equal to]15ng/L was correlated to age [greater than or equal to]65years (odds ratio (OR), 10.9 95% CI 2.28-51.8) and NT-proBNP in accordance with heart failure (OR 8.62 95% CI 1.61-46.1). Fourteen of the 21 patients, without signs of AMI or UA at baseline, still had increased troponin T at follow-up after 2-3years.CONCLUSIONS:A high-sensitivity troponin T assay could become useful in primary care as a point-of-care test for patients <65years. For patients older than 65-70years, a higher decision limit than [greater than or equal to]15ng/L should be considered and used in conjunction with clinical parameters and possibly with NT-proBNP.

  • 34.
    Andersson, Sten-Ove
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Militär akutsjukvård i fält: när den övade verkligheten blir verklig2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Governing for the Armed Forces health care is respect for human dignity and the view of each individual as irreplaceable. The quality of the military care will be at a level equivalent to that of today's civil peace healthcare, which requires that the training is of high quality. Casualty care in the military environment is a complex, challenging and dangerous task. Today there is a lack of knowledge about how to learn these skills. The purpose of the research was to identify the knowledge area pre-hospital care in the military environment by examining what doctors, nurses, paramedics and officers learn about military health care during preparation and exercise.

    Method: A phenomenographic approach was used in all sub-studies, and empirical data were collected by means of semi-structured interviews. Study I‐III are cross-sectional studies and study IV is a longitudinal study. Twelve registered nurses who had served in Bosnia were interviewed for study I, and 24 conscript paramedics were interviewed for study II. Study III included 20 officers in their pre-deployment training for service in Afghanistan and Liberia, and Study IV included 7 doctors and twenty nurses who previously had served in Afghanistan, Bosnia, Kosovo and Liberia.

    Results: Learning military health care by training and gaining experience can be seen as different abilities; interaction, action and reflection. In-depth analysis at a meta--‐level revealed that the integration between the military and military medical fields of knowledge was missing. The results indicate that participants' understanding of their respective fields of knowledge is inadequate and needs to be integrated in education in a clearer way.

    Implications: To create opportunities for better education and integration in these fields of knowledge are proposed (1) that the findings of the thesis could be utilised to develop the design of the curriculum (2) the inter-professional learning is introduced as a part of creating a safer and more effective pre-hospital care, (3) the clinical competence becomes part of the development of pre-hospital emergency care in the field, and (4) that the training is built according to the principle of "train as you fight" with emphasis on the requirements in the combat zone.

    List of papers
    1. The criteria nurses use in assessing acute trauma in military emergency care
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The criteria nurses use in assessing acute trauma in military emergency care
    2007 (English)In: Accident and Emergency Nursing, ISSN 0965-2302, E-ISSN 1532-9267, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 148-156Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Emergency medical care for seriously injured patients in war or warlike situations is highly important when it comes to soldiers' survival and morale. The Swedish Armed Forces sends nurses, who have limited experience of caring for injured personnel in the field, on a variety of international missions. The aim of this investigation was to identify the kind of criteria nurses rely on when assessing acute trauma and what factors are affecting the emergency care of injured soldiers. A phenomenographic research approach based on interviews was used. The database for the study consists of twelve nurses who served in Bosnia in 1994-1996. The criteria nurses rely on, when assessing acute trauma in emergency care, could be described in terms of domain-specific criteria such as a physiological, an anatomical, a causal and a holistic approach as well as contextual criteria such as being able to communicate, having a sense of belonging, the military environment, the conscript medical orderly and familiarity with health-caring activity. The present study shows that the specific contextual factors affecting emergency care in the field must also be practised before the nurse faces military emergency care situations. This calls for realistic exercises and training programs, where experience from civilian emergency care is interwoven with the knowledge specific to military medical care. © 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

    Keywords
    International mission, Military emergency care, Military nursing, Qualitative method
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-49199 (URN)10.1016/j.aaen.2007.05.002 (DOI)
    Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-12
    2. Interaction, action, and reflection: how medics learn medical care in the Swedish armed forces
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Interaction, action, and reflection: how medics learn medical care in the Swedish armed forces
    Show others...
    2013 (English)In: Military medicine, ISSN 0026-4075, E-ISSN 1930-613X, Vol. 178, no 8, p. 861-866Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study is to examine how medics within the Swedish Armed Forces perceive their learning outcome following military prehospital training. A qualitative study with a phenomenographic approach was used to investigate how leaming is perceived among military medics. At meta level, the results can be viewed as an interaction, i.e., being able to collaborate in the medical platoon, including the ability to interact within the group and being able to lead; an action, i.e., being able to assess and treat casualties, including the ability to communicate with the casualty, to prioritize, and to be able to act; and a reflection, i.e., having confidence in one's own ability in first aid, including being prepared and feeling confident. Interaction during the period of education is important for learning. Action, being able to act in the field, is based on a drill in which the subject progresses from simple to complex procedures. Reflection, leaming to help others, is important for confidence, which in turn creates preparedness, thereby making the knowledge meaningful.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    AMSUS, 2013
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-106000 (URN)10.7205/MILMED-D-13-00048 (DOI)
    Available from: 2014-04-16 Created: 2014-04-16 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
    3. Fixing the Wounded or Keeping Lead in the Air: Tactical Officers’ Views of Emergency Care on the Battlefield
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fixing the Wounded or Keeping Lead in the Air: Tactical Officers’ Views of Emergency Care on the Battlefield
    Show others...
    2015 (English)In: Military medicine, ISSN 0026-4075, E-ISSN 1930-613X, Vol. 180, no 2, p. 224-229Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to identify tactical officers’ views of pre-hospital emergency care in the field before an international mission. A qualitative study with a phenomenographic approach based on interviews was used. The result of this study is a set of descriptive categories on a collective level, showing the variation in how the tactical officers perceived the phenomenon of emergency care in the battlefield. The result can be viewed as (1) noncombat oriented including being able to do one’s specialist task, being able to talk with local people and being able to give first aid, (2) combat oriented including soldiers’ skills and roles in the unit, being able to act in the unit and being able to lead the care of  injured These findings are important for officers’ preparation for international missions. The interaction between military and medical knowledge on-site care should be developed between the tactical officer and the medical personnel in order to minimize suffering and to enhance the possibility for survival of the casualty.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Association of Military Surgeons Us, 2015
    National Category
    Social Sciences Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-111668 (URN)10.7205/MILMED-D-13-00558 (DOI)000349101900016 ()25643391 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Armed Forces; Centre for Defence Medicine; VastraFrolunda; Department of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Linkoping

    Available from: 2014-10-28 Created: 2014-10-28 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
    4. Doctors’ and Nurses’ Perceptions of Military Pre-hospital Emergency Care
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Doctors’ and Nurses’ Perceptions of Military Pre-hospital Emergency Care
    Show others...
    2014 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to identify physicians’ and nurses’ perceptions of military prehospital emergency care before and after an international mission. A qualitative empirical study with a phenomenographic approach was used. The aim is to identify the area of knowledge, pre-hospital care in a military environment, in terms of expressions from doctors and nurses focussing on the variation in how learning of pre-hospital care is perceived. The result of the study is a set of descriptive categories on a collective level, showing the variation in how doctors and nurses perceived the phenomenon of military pre-hospital emergency care. The results after predeployment training can be categorized as (1) to learn military medicine, (2) to take care of the casualty and (3) to have safety awareness. The results after an international mission can be categorized as (1) to collaborate with others, (2) to deliver general health care, and (3) to improve competence in military medicine. Possible implications of the results from the present study are the following; (I) better conditions for doctors and nurses to provide appropriate military medical care by clarification and better understanding of professions in the mission area (doctors, nurses, officers), since they may have different goals for their actions, (II) to pay attention to all aspects of military health care during predeployment training, including general health care in the mission area, (III) to implement new knowledge in military medicine in the predeployment training, and (IV) to train for the reality all doctors and nurses are about to meet. These results indicate  that the training should be developed in order to optimize the prepare physicians and nurses for international assignments. This may result in increased safety for the provider of care, while at the same time minimizing suffering and enhancing the possibility of survival of the injured.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences Social Sciences Nursing
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-111669 (URN)
    Available from: 2014-10-28 Created: 2014-10-28 Last updated: 2014-10-28Bibliographically approved
  • 35.
    Andersson, Sten-Ove
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Centre for Defence Medicine, Swedish Armed Forces, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Lundberg, Lars
    Centre for Defence Medicine, Swedish Armed Forces, Göteborg, Sweden/Borås University, School of Health Sciences,Borås Sweden.
    Jonsson, Anders
    Centre for Defence Medicine, Swedish Armed Forces, Göteborg, Sweden/Borås University, School of Health Sciences,Borås Sweden.
    Tingström, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Doctors’ and Nurses’ Perceptions of Military Pre-hospital Emergency Care2014Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to identify physicians’ and nurses’ perceptions of military prehospital emergency care before and after an international mission. A qualitative empirical study with a phenomenographic approach was used. The aim is to identify the area of knowledge, pre-hospital care in a military environment, in terms of expressions from doctors and nurses focussing on the variation in how learning of pre-hospital care is perceived. The result of the study is a set of descriptive categories on a collective level, showing the variation in how doctors and nurses perceived the phenomenon of military pre-hospital emergency care. The results after predeployment training can be categorized as (1) to learn military medicine, (2) to take care of the casualty and (3) to have safety awareness. The results after an international mission can be categorized as (1) to collaborate with others, (2) to deliver general health care, and (3) to improve competence in military medicine. Possible implications of the results from the present study are the following; (I) better conditions for doctors and nurses to provide appropriate military medical care by clarification and better understanding of professions in the mission area (doctors, nurses, officers), since they may have different goals for their actions, (II) to pay attention to all aspects of military health care during predeployment training, including general health care in the mission area, (III) to implement new knowledge in military medicine in the predeployment training, and (IV) to train for the reality all doctors and nurses are about to meet. These results indicate  that the training should be developed in order to optimize the prepare physicians and nurses for international assignments. This may result in increased safety for the provider of care, while at the same time minimizing suffering and enhancing the possibility of survival of the injured.

  • 36.
    Andersson, Sten-Ove
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Sweden, Swedish Armed Forces, V Frölunda, Sweden.
    Lundberg, Lars
    Försvarsmakten, Centrum för Försvarsmedicin, Sweden, Borås University, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Anders
    Borås University, Sweden.
    Tingström, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Doctors' and nurses' perceptions of military pre-hospital emergency care - When training becomes reality2017In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 32, p. 70-77Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to identify physicians' and nurses' perceptions of military pre-hospital emergency care before and after an international mission. A qualitative empirical study with a phenomenographic approach was used. The results after pre-deployment traing can be categorised as 1) learning about military medicine and 2) taking care of the casualty. The results after an international mission can be categorised as 1) collaborating with others 2) providing general health care and 3) improving competence in military medicine. The results indicate that the training should be developed in order to optimise pre-deployment training for physicians and nurses. This may result in increased safety for the provider of care, while at the same time minimising suffering and enhancing the possibility of survival of the injured.

  • 37.
    Andersson, Sten-Ove
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Centre for Defence Medicine, Swedish Armed Forces, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Lundberg, Lars
    Centre for Defence Medicine, Swedish Armed Forces, Göteborg, Sweden/Borås University, School of Health Sciences,Borås Sweden.
    Jonsson, Anders
    Centre for Defence Medicine, Swedish Armed Forces, Göteborg, Sweden/Borås University, School of Health Sciences,Borås Sweden.
    Tingström, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fixing the Wounded or Keeping Lead in the Air: Tactical Officers’ Views of Emergency Care on the Battlefield2015In: Military medicine, ISSN 0026-4075, E-ISSN 1930-613X, Vol. 180, no 2, p. 224-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to identify tactical officers’ views of pre-hospital emergency care in the field before an international mission. A qualitative study with a phenomenographic approach based on interviews was used. The result of this study is a set of descriptive categories on a collective level, showing the variation in how the tactical officers perceived the phenomenon of emergency care in the battlefield. The result can be viewed as (1) noncombat oriented including being able to do one’s specialist task, being able to talk with local people and being able to give first aid, (2) combat oriented including soldiers’ skills and roles in the unit, being able to act in the unit and being able to lead the care of  injured These findings are important for officers’ preparation for international missions. The interaction between military and medical knowledge on-site care should be developed between the tactical officer and the medical personnel in order to minimize suffering and to enhance the possibility for survival of the casualty.

  • 38.
    Andersson, Sten-Ove
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Centre for Defence Medicine, Swedish Armed Forces, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Lundberg, Lars
    Centre for Defence Medicine, Swedish Armed Forces, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Anders
    Centre for Defence Medicine, Swedish Armed Forces, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Tingström, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Interaction, action, and reflection: how medics learn medical care in the Swedish armed forces2013In: Military medicine, ISSN 0026-4075, E-ISSN 1930-613X, Vol. 178, no 8, p. 861-866Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study is to examine how medics within the Swedish Armed Forces perceive their learning outcome following military prehospital training. A qualitative study with a phenomenographic approach was used to investigate how leaming is perceived among military medics. At meta level, the results can be viewed as an interaction, i.e., being able to collaborate in the medical platoon, including the ability to interact within the group and being able to lead; an action, i.e., being able to assess and treat casualties, including the ability to communicate with the casualty, to prioritize, and to be able to act; and a reflection, i.e., having confidence in one's own ability in first aid, including being prepared and feeling confident. Interaction during the period of education is important for learning. Action, being able to act in the field, is based on a drill in which the subject progresses from simple to complex procedures. Reflection, leaming to help others, is important for confidence, which in turn creates preparedness, thereby making the knowledge meaningful.

  • 39.
    André, Malin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Department of Primary Health Care, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Billstedt, Eva
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Bengtsson, Calle
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Hallstrom, Tore
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Lissner, Lauren
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Skoog, Ingmar
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Sundh, Valter
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Waern, Margda
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Bjorkelund, Cecilia
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Personality in women and associations with mortality: a 40-year follow-up in the Population Study of Women in Gothenburg2014In: BMC Women's Health, ISSN 1472-6874, E-ISSN 1472-6874, Vol. 14, no 61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The question of whether personality traits influence health has long been a focus for research and discussion. Therefore, this study was undertaken to examine possible associations between personality traits and mortality in women. Methods: A population-based sample of women aged 38, 46, 50 and 54 years at initial examination in 1968-69 was followed over the course of 40 years. At baseline, 589 women completed the Cesarec-Marke Personality Schedule (the Swedish version of the Edwards Personal Preference Schedule) and the Eysenck Personality Inventory. Associations between personality traits and mortality were tested using Cox proportional hazards models. Results: No linear associations between personality traits or factor indices and mortality were found. When comparing the lowest (Q1) and highest quartile (Q4) against the two middle quartiles (Q2 + Q3), the personality trait Succorance Q1 versus Q2 + Q3 showed hazard ratio (HR) = 1.37 (confidence interval (CI) = 1.08-1.74), and for the factor index Aggressive non-conformance, both the lowest and highest quartiles had a significantly higher risk of death compared to Q2 + Q3: for Q1 HR = 1.32 (CI = 1.03-1.68) and for Q4 HR = 1.36 (CI = 1.06-1.77). Neither Neuroticism nor Extraversion predicted total mortality. Conclusions: Personality traits did not influence long term mortality in this population sample of women followed for 40 years from mid- to late life. One explanation may be that personality in women becomes more circumscribed due to the social constraints generated by the role of women in society.

  • 40.
    André, Malin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department Public Health and Caring Science, Sweden.
    Grondal, Hedvig
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Strandberg, Eva-Lena
    Lund University, Sweden; Blekinge County Council, Sweden.
    Brorsson, Annika
    Lund University, Sweden; Skåne Reg, Sweden.
    Hedin, Katarina
    Lund University, Sweden; Kronoberg County Council, Sweden.
    Uncertainty in clinical practice - an interview study with Swedish GPs on patients with sore throat2016In: BMC Family Practice, ISSN 1471-2296, E-ISSN 1471-2296, Vol. 17, no 56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Uncertainty is inevitable in clinical practice in primary care and tolerance for uncertainty and concern for bad outcomes has been shown to vary between physicians. Uncertainty is a factor for inappropriate antibiotic prescribing. Evidence-based guidelines as well as near-patient tests are suggested tools to decrease uncertainty in the management of patients with respiratory tract infections. The aim of this paper was to describe strategies for coping with uncertainty in patients with pharyngotonsillitis in relation to guidelines. Methods: An interview study was conducted among a strategic sample of 25 general practitioners (GPs). Results: All GPs mentioned potential dangerous differential diagnoses and complications. Four strategies for coping with uncertainty were identified, one of which was compliant with guidelines, "Adherence to guidelines", and three were idiosyncratic: "Clinical picture and C-reactive protein (CRP)", "Expanded control", and "Unstructured". The residual uncertainty differed for the different strategies: in the strategy "Adherence to guidelines" and " Clinical picture and CRP" uncertainty was avoided, based either on adherence to guidelines or on the clinical picture and near-patient CRP; in the strategy " Expanded control" uncertainty was balanced based on expanded control; and in the strategy "Unstructured" uncertainty prevailed in spite of redundant examination and anamnesis. Conclusion: The majority of the GPs avoided uncertainty and deemed they had no problems. Their strategies either adhered to guidelines or comprised excessive use of tests. Thus use of guidelines as well as use of more near-patient tests seemed associated to reduced uncertainty, although the later strategy at the expense of compliance to guidelines. A few GPs did not manage to cope with uncertainty or had to put in excessive work to control uncertainty.

  • 41.
    Angbratt, Marianne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekberg, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Walter, Lars
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Center for Public Health.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Prediction of obesity from infancy to adolescence2011In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 100, no 9, p. 1249-1252Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To examine the development of childhood obesity and to determine the earliest age when estimating body mass using only weight and height data is associated with a corresponding estimate at the age of 15. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods: Subjects included are all children born in 1991 in Ostergotland County, Sweden. Weight and height data collected during regular check-ups at well-child centres and school health care assessments up to 15 years of age were assembled from health records. Correlations between childhood estimates of body mass and the body mass index (BMI) at 15 years of age were computed pairwise. Correlations with r andgt; 0.5 were defined as reliably strong. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: Complete data were available for 3579 children (62%). Fewer girls (2.6%; C.I. 1.9-3.3) than boys (4.6%; C.I. 3.7-5.5) were obese at 15 years of age. Correlations with BMI at 15 years of age were strong (significantly higher than 0.5) from 5 years of age. Only 23% of girls and 8% of boys found to be obese at 5 years of age were of normal weight at the age of 15. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion: From 5 years of age, point estimates of body mass using only weight and height data are strongly associated with BMI at the age of 15. More data sources are needed to predict weight trajectories in younger children.

  • 42.
    Angbratt, Marianne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, FHVC - Folkhälsovetenskapligt centrum.
    Blomberg, C.
    Kronhed, A.-C.
    Waller, J.
    Vadstena Primary Care Centre, Vadstena, Sweden.
    Wingren, Gun
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Moller, M.
    Möller, M., Centre for Caring Sciences, ÖrebroCountyCouncil, Örebro, Sweden.
    Prevalence and correlates of insufficient calcium intake in a Swedish population: Populations at risk across the lifespan2007In: Public Health Nursing, ISSN 0737-1209, E-ISSN 1525-1446, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 511-517Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To examine associations between calcium intake in the diet, lifestyle factors, and forearm bone mineral density (BMD) in order to identify population subgroups for targeting by screening programs. A questionnaire was sent to a random sample of 15 of the inhabitants aged 20-79 years from 2 Swedish municipalities, and the subsample from one of the municipalities was invited to measurement of BMD. The survey response rate was 74 (n=1,1121,510) and participation in BMD measurements was 68 (n=448659). Only a tendency (p=.085) toward direct association between calcium intake and forearm BMD was found, and the best multiple regression model was retained to explain BMD excluded calcium intake. Low calcium intake was, instead, in complementary analyses, found to be correlated with the factors old age, female sex, and urban residence in the best multiple regression model. Population subgroups whose calcium intake is in a range that justifies preventive action could be identified. Screening programs staffed by public health nurses can thereby be informed regarding the subgroups of the population that are at the highest risk of insufficient calcium intake. © 2007, Blackwell Publishing, Inc.

  • 43.
    Anskär, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Mantorp.
    Lindberg, Malou
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care. 1177 Med Advisory Serv, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Falk, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Time utilization and perceived psychosocial work environment among staff in Swedish primary care settings2018In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 18, article id 166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Over the past decades, reorganizations and structural changes in Swedish primary care have affected time utilization among health care professionals. Consequently, increases in administrative tasks have substantially reduced the time available for face-to-face consultations. This study examined how work-time was utilized and the association between work time utilization and the perceived psychosocial work environment in Swedish primary care settings. Methods: This descriptive, multicentre, cross-sectional study was performed in 2014-2015. Data collection began with questionnaire. In the first section, respondents were asked to estimate how their workload was distributed between patients (direct and indirect patient work) and other work tasks. The questionnaire also comprised the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire, which assessed the psychosocial work environment. Next a time study was conducted where the participants reported their work-time based on three main categories: direct patient-related work, indirect patient-related work, and other work tasks. Each main category had a number of subcategories. The participants recorded the time spent (minutes) on each work task per hour, every day, for two separate weeks. Eleven primary care centres located in southeast Sweden participated. All professionals were asked to participate (n = 441), including registered nurses, primary care physicians, care administrators, nurse assistants, and allied professionals. Response rates were 75% and 79% for the questionnaires and the time study, respectively. Results: All health professionals allocated between 30.9% - 37.2% of their work-time to each main category: direct patient work, indirect patient work, and other work. All professionals estimated a higher proportion of time spent in direct patient work than they reported in the time study. Physicians scored highest on the psychosocial scales of quantitative demands, stress, and role conflicts. Among allied professionals, the proportion of work-time spent on administrative tasks was associated with more role conflicts. Younger staff perceived more adverse working conditions than older staff. Conclusions: This study indicated that Swedish primary care staff spent a limited proportion of their work time directly with patients. PCPs seemed to perceive their work environment in negative terms to a greater extent than other staff members. This study showed that work task allocations influenced the perceived psychosocial work environment.

  • 44.
    Anund, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Swedish National Rd and Transport Research Institute, SE-58195 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Antonson, Hans
    Swedish National Rd and Transport Research Institute, SE-58195 Linkoping, Sweden; Lund University, Sweden.
    Ihlstrom, Jonas
    Swedish National Rd and Transport Research Institute, SE-58195 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Stakeholders Opinions on a Future In-Vehicle Alcohol Detection System for Prevention of Drunk Driving2015In: Traffic Injury Prevention, ISSN 1538-9588, E-ISSN 1538-957X, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 336-344Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: There is a common understanding that driving under the influence of alcohol is associated with higher risk of being involved in crashes with injuries and possible fatalities as the outcome. Various countermeasures have therefore from time to time been taken by the authorities to prevent drunk driving. One of them has been the alcohol interlock. Up to now, interlocks have mainly been used by previously convicted drunk drivers and in the commercial road transport sector, but not in private cars. Objective and Method: New technology has today reached a level where broader implementation might be possible. To our knowledge, however, little is known about different stakeholders opinions of a broader implementation of such systems. In order to increase that knowledge, we conducted a focus group study to collect in-depth thoughts from different stakeholders on this topic. Eight focus groups representing a broad societal span were recruited and conducted for the purpose. Results and Conclusions: The results show that most stakeholders thought that an integrated system for alcohol detection in vehicles might be beneficial in lowering the number of drunk driving crashes. They said that the system would probably mainly prevent driving by people who unintentionally and unknowingly drive under the influence of alcohol. The groups did, however, not regard the system as a final solution to the drunk driving problem, and believed that certain groups, such as criminals and alcoholics, would most likely find a way around the system. Concerns were raised about the risk of increased sleepy driving and driving just under the legal blood alcohol concentration (BAC) limit. The results also indicate that stakeholders preferred a system that provides information on the BAC up to the legal limit, but not for levels above the limit; for those, the system should simply prevent the car from starting. Acceptance of the system depended on the reliability of the system, on its ability to perform fast sampling, and on the analytical process, as well as the systems more or less inconspicuous placement and user-friendliness. The stakeholders thought that drivers would probably not voluntarily demand the system. So if broad implementation was desired, it would have to be made compulsory by legislation. As an incentive to increase demand, lower taxes and insurance premiums were suggested.

  • 45.
    Anund, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Swedish National Rd and Transport Research Institute VTI, SE-58195 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Fors, Carina
    Swedish National Rd and Transport Research Institute VTI, SE-58195 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Ahlström, Christer
    Swedish National Rd and Transport Research Institute VTI, SE-58195 Linkoping, Sweden.
    The severity of driver fatigue in terms of line crossing: a pilot study comparing day- and night time driving in simulator2017In: European Transport Research Review, ISSN 1867-0717, E-ISSN 1866-8887, Vol. 9, no 2, article id 31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction The overall aim of this study is to compare daytime driving with night-time driving looking at line crossings during self-reported sleepiness and long blinks. The hypothesis is that high levels of self-reported sleepiness (KSS 9) and long blink duration (amp;gt;0.15 s) will be less associated with critical events during the day-time compared to night-time. Method The study is based on data from a driving simulator experiment with 16 participants driving 150 km on a typical Swedish motorway scenario twice: once during daytime and once during night time. In total data from 6 segments of 4 km each equally distributed along the drive was averaged and included in the analysis. A Mixed Model Anova was used to test the effects on KSS, Blink Duration and Line Crossings with factors for Session (Day/Night) and Road segment (1-6), and participant as random. In addition, a logistic regression was used to identify when there is a risk for line crossings. Finally, the proportion of line crossings in relation to high KSS values and long blink durations was tested with Fishers exact test. Results The results show no differences in the percentage of Line Crossings to the left during high levels of Karolinska Sleepiness Scale during daytime (33%) compare to night-time (40%). However, there was a significant difference between day and night time line crossings while the driver had long duration blinks (4% during daytime and 35% during night-time). Despite these results the most promising predictor of line crossings in each segment of 4 km/h was KSS with an Odds Ratio of 5.4 with a reference value at Karolinska Sleepiness Scale level 5. Conclusion In conclusion, the results do not support the hypothesis that high levels of KSS will result in more frequent line crossings at night time compared to day time. However, the result supports the hypothesis that long blink durations are associated with more line crossings when they appear during night time than during daytime.

  • 46.
    Anund, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Linköping, Sweden.
    Fors, Carina
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Linköping, Sweden.
    Ihlstrom, Jonas
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Linköping, Sweden.
    Kecklund, Goran
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
    An on-road study of sleepiness in split shifts among city bus drivers2018In: Accident Analysis and Prevention, ISSN 0001-4575, E-ISSN 1879-2057, Vol. 114, p. 71-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bus drivers often work irregular hours or split shifts and their work involves high levels of stress. These factors can lead to severe sleepiness and dangerous driving. This study examined how split shift working affects sleepiness and performance during afternoon driving. An experiment was conducted on a real road with a specially equipped regular bus driven by professional bus drivers. The study had a within-subject design and involved 18 professional bus drivers (9 males and 9 females) who drove on two afternoons; one on a day in which they had driven early in the morning (split shift situation) and one on a day when they had been off duty until the test (afternoon shift situation). The hypothesis tested was that split shifts contribute to sleepiness during afternoon, which can increase the safety risks. The overall results supported this hypothesis. In total, five of the 18 drivers reached levels of severe sleepiness (Karolinska Sleepiness Scale 8) with an average increase in KSS of 1.94 when driving in the afternoon after working a morning shift compared with being off duty in the morning. This increase corresponded to differences observed between shift workers starting and ending a night shift. The Psychomotor Vigilance Task showed significantly increased response time with split shift working (afternoon: 0.337 s; split shift 0.347 s), as did the EEG-based Karolinska Drowsiness Score mean/max. Blink duration also increased, although the difference was not significant. One driver fell asleep during the drive. In addition, 12 of the 18 bus drivers reported that in their daily work they have to fight to stay awake while driving at least 2-4 times per month. While there were strong individual differences, the study clearly showed that shift working bus drivers struggle to stay awake and thus countermeasures are needed in order to guarantee safe driving with split shift schedules.

  • 47.
    Anund, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine. Swedish National Rd and Transport Research Institute, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Ihlstrom, Jonas
    Swedish National Rd and Transport Research Institute, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Fors, Carina
    Swedish National Rd and Transport Research Institute, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Kecklund, Göran
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Filtness, Ashleigh
    Queensland University of Technology, Australia.
    Factors associated with self-reported driver sleepiness and incidents in city bus drivers2016In: Industrial Health, ISSN 0019-8366, E-ISSN 1880-8026, Vol. 54, no 4, p. 337-346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Driver fatigue has received increased attention during recent years and is now considered to be a major contributor to approximately 15-30% of all crashes. However, little is known about fatigue in city bus drivers. It is hypothesized that city bus drivers suffer from sleepiness, which is due to a combination of working conditions, lack of health and reduced sleep quantity and quality. The overall aim with the current study is to investigate if severe driver sleepiness, as indicated by subjective reports of having to fight sleep while driving, is a problem for city based bus drivers in Sweden and if so, to identify the determinants related to working conditions, health and sleep which contribute towards this. The results indicate that driver sleepiness is a problem for city bus drivers, with 19% having to fight to stay awake while driving the bus 2-3 times each week or more and nearly half experiencing this at least 2-4 times per month. In conclusion, severe sleepiness, as indicated by having to fight sleep during driving, was common among the city bus drivers. Severe sleepiness correlated with fatigue related safety risks, such as near crashes.

  • 48.
    Anund, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Lahti, Eva
    Volvo Car Cooperat, Sweden.
    Fors, Carina
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Genell, Anders
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Linkoping, Sweden.
    The Effect of Low-Frequency Road Noise on Driver Sleepiness and Performance2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 4, p. e0123835-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is a well-known fact today that driver sleepiness is a contributory factor in crashes. Factors considered as sleepiness contributor are mostly related to time of the day, hours being awake and hours slept. Factors contributing to active and passive fatigue are mostly focusing on the level of cognitive load. Less is known what role external factors, e.g. type of road, sound/noise, vibrations etc., have on the ability to stay awake both under conditions of sleepiness and under active or passive fatigue. The aim of this moving base driving simulator study with 19 drivers participating in a random order day and night time, was to evaluate the effect of low-frequency road noise on driver sleepiness and performance, including both long-term and short-term effects. The results support to some extent the hypothesis that road-induced interior vehicle sound affects driving performance and driver sleepiness. Increased low-frequency noise helps to reduce speed during both day-and night time driving, but also contributes to increase the number of lane crossings during night time.

  • 49.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Örebro University, Sweden; Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Granlund, Mats
    Örebro University, Sweden; Jönköping University, Sweden .
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Thyberg, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Örebro University, Sweden.
    Important aspects of participation and participation restrictions in people with a mild intellectual disability2014In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 36, no 15, p. 1264-1272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This study explored a possibility to assess the concepts of participation and participation restrictions in the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) by combining self-ratings of the perceived importance with the actual performance of different everyday activities in people with a mild intellectual disability. Method: Structured interviews regarding 68 items from the ICF activity/participation domain were conducted (n = 69). The items were ranked by perceived importance, performance and by combined measures. Furthermore, the measures were related to a single question about subjective general well-being. Results: Rankings of performance highlighted about the same items as "important participation", while rankings of low performance addressed quite different items compared with "important participation restriction". Significant correlations were found between subjective general well-being and high performance (r = 0.56), high performance/high importance (important participation) (r = 0.56), low performance (r = -0.56) and low performance/high importance (important participation restriction; r -0.55). Conclusions: The results support the clinical relevance of the ICF and the studied selection of 68 items. Although performance only may sometimes be a relevant aspect, knowledge about the relationship between the perceived importance and the actual performance is essential for clinical interventions and for research aiming to understand specific needs regarding participation.

  • 50.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden; Jonköping University, Sweden; Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jonköping University, Sweden; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Thyberg, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    How are the activity and participation aspects of the ICF used? Examples from studies of people with intellectual disability2015In: NeuroRehabilitation (Reading, MA), ISSN 1053-8135, E-ISSN 1878-6448, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 45-49Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Interdisciplinary differences regarding understanding the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) concepts activity/participation may hinder its unifying purpose. In the ICF model, functioning (and disability) is described as a tripartite concept: 1) Body structures/functions, 2) Activities, and 3) Participation. Activities refer to an individual perspective on disability that does not tally with the basic structure of social models. OBJECTIVE: To review how activity and participation are actually used in studies of intellectual disability (ID). CONCLUSION: Based on 16 papers, four different usages of activity/participation were found. 1) Theoretical reference to tripartite ICF concept with attempts to use it. 2) Theoretical reference to tripartite ICF concept without actual use of activities. 3) "Atheoretical" approach with implicit focus on participation. 4) Theoretical reference to bipartite concept with corresponding use of terms. The highlighted studies have in common a focus on participation. However, the usage of the term "activity" differs both within and between studies. Such terminology will probably confuse interdisciplinary communication rather than facilitating it. Also, the use of an explicit underlying theory differs, from references to a tripartite to references to a bipartite concept of disability. This paper is focused on ID, but the discussed principles regarding the ICF and interdisciplinary disability theory are applicable to other diagnostic groups within rehabilitation practices.

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