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  • 1.
    Antelius, Eleonor
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kiwi, Mahin
    Linköping University, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Etnokulturellt profilerad demensomsorg2016In: Att leva med demens / [ed] Ingrid Hellström, Lars-Christer Hydén, Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2016, 1, 143-154 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Berg, Jessica
    Linköping University, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Everyday Mobility and Travel Activities during the first years of Retirement2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobility is central to living an independent life, to participating in society, and  to maintaining well-being in later life. The point of departure in this thesis is that retirement implies changes in time-space use and interruption in routines, which influence demands and preconditions for mobility in different ways. The aim of this thesis is to explore mobility strategies and changes in mobility upon retirement and how mobility develops during the first years of retirement. A further aim is to provide knowledge of the extent to which newly retired people maintain a desired mobility based on their needs and preconditions. The thesis is empirically based on travel diaries kept by newly retired people, and qualitative interviews with the same persons, and follow-up interviews three and a half years later. The results show that mobility is a way of forming a structure in the new everyday life as retirees by getting out of the house, either just for a walk or to do errands.  Many  patterns  of everyday life remain the same upon retirement, but the informants also merge new responsibilities and seek new social arenas and activities. As a result, the importance of   the car have not changed, but it is used for other reasons than before. After leaving paid work, new space-time constraints are created which influences demands for mobility. The study further shows that “third places” become important, especially among those who live alone, as they give an opportunity to being part of a social context and a reason for getting out of the house. The follow-up interviews revealed that declining health changes the preconditions for mobility. Daily walks had to be made shorter, and the car had to be used for most errands to where they previously could walk or cycle. However, mobility can also be maintained despite a serious illness and a long period of rehabilitation.

    List of papers
    1. Time to spare: Everyday activities among newly retired people in a middle-sizedcity
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Time to spare: Everyday activities among newly retired people in a middle-sizedcity
    2016 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Retirement has recently been studied as a complex process that affects people’s lives in many different ways (Teuscher 2010; Grenier 2011; Halleröd, Örestig and Stattin 2013). Retirement implies changes in time-space use, interruption in routines and changed social patterns. Leisure activities, shopping, errands and rest are no longer determined by the working life rhythm. New time-space constraints might at the same time occur that limit the individual’s actions, such as reduced income, new or increased commitments towards children and grandchildren, involvement in associations or part-time work (Kleiber and Nimrod, 2009; Szinovacz et al., 2001; Van den Bogaard et al., 2013).

    A vast amount of research from different fields has focused on the implications of retirement for wellbeing (Bender 2012; Wang 2007), adjustment (Van Solinge and Henkens 2008), identity (Teucher 2010), volunteering (Van den Bogaard et.al., 2013) and physical activity (Lahti et al. 2011). So far, only a few studies have investigated everyday activities and timespace use among older people in general and the post-World War II generation in particular (Chatzitheochari and Arber 2011; Gauthier and Smeeding 2003). In many studies of  time-space use, the aim has been to illuminate the juggling of everyday activities that occurs and to deal with the balance between work, leisure and family (Schwanen and de Jong 2008; Kwan 2000; Scholten, Friberg and Sanden 2012). Naturally, retired people have not been included in those studies, although many older people play an important role in the lives of families with small children (Schwanen 2008) and seek supporting and leading roles as citizens (cf. Gagliardi, et al. 2007; Leinonen 2011; Liechty, Yarnal and Kerstetter 2012; McCormack et al. 2008; Nimrod and Adoni 2006; Sperazza and Banerjee 2010). Little is known about the expectations this generation has on retirement and its demands for activities. The aim of this study is therefore to explore newly retired peoples everyday activities. What activities do they take part in and where are these activities carried out? In what respect, and for what reasons, do activities change or stay the same upon retirement?

    The remaining of this paper begins with a discussion of the implications of retirement on everyday activities in accordance to previous research. The time-geographical perspective and concepts used here for studying activities is then presented. That is followed by a description of methods, data and analysis, before the empirical analysis of travel diaries and qualitative interviews is given. The paper ends with a discussion of the results in relation to previous research.

    National Category
    Sociology Other Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-124661 (URN)
    Available from: 2016-02-09 Created: 2016-02-09 Last updated: 2016-02-09Bibliographically approved
    2. Mobility in the transition to retirement - the intertwining of transportation and everyday projects
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mobility in the transition to retirement - the intertwining of transportation and everyday projects
    2014 (English)In: Journal of Transport Geography, ISSN 0966-6923, E-ISSN 1873-1236, Vol. 38, 48-54 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Through travel diaries and interviews with newly retired urban residents in Sweden our aim was to explore (1) mobility patterns in the transition to retirement, (2) the influence of space-time restrictions and resources on mobility and (3) the meaning and embodied experience of mobility. This time-geographic study contributes with knowledge on how mobility is influenced by individual, social and geographical contexts. Illustrated by four cases, our result show that retirement changes the preconditions for mobility and creates new space-time restrictions. To spend more time on projects that were previously carried out outside working time, such as caring for grandchildren, volunteer work and household responsibilities, influenced the informants demands for mobility and choice of transport mode. However, the informants have resources that can be seen as strategies to overcome space-time restrictions. Most of the informants found it important to structure the day, to some it was vital to have something to do during the day while others enjoyed the possibility to take each day as it comes. Everyday mobility was a way of forming a structure by getting out of the house, either just for a walk or for making errands. The informants embodied experiences of mobility influenced their choice to walk and cycle for transport for the reasons of comfort, get fresh air, or simply to get out of the house. The daily mobility pattern that was established was a result of individual preferences and resources as well as negotiations with family members. We conclude that the transition to retirement is a period when new mobility patterns are considered, evaluated and practiced.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2014
    Keyword
    Everyday mobility; Transport; Time-geography; Retirement transition; Older people
    National Category
    Sociology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-110496 (URN)10.1016/j.jtrangeo.2014.05.014 (DOI)000340319900005 ()
    Available from: 2014-09-15 Created: 2014-09-12 Last updated: 2016-03-09Bibliographically approved
    3. “I want complete freedom”: car use and everyday mobility among the newly retired
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>“I want complete freedom”: car use and everyday mobility among the newly retired
    2015 (English)In: European Transport Research Review, ISSN 1867-0717, E-ISSN 1866-8887, Vol. 7, no 4Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    To investigate car use among newly retired people, to explore to what extent car transport is used for everyday mobility and how it is valued in comparison to other transport modes.

    Methods

    The data consists of travel diaries and qualitative interviews with 24 individuals, aged between 61 and 67, living in a middle-sized Swedish city. They were recruited via the local branch of one of the main associations of pensioners, one large employer in the municipality, and through another study. The informants filled in a travel diary during 1 week that were analysed by VISUAL- TimePAcTS, an application for visualising and exploring activity diary data. The semi-structured qualitative interviews were analysed using a qualitative content analysis.

    Results

    The car was used for several trips daily and often for short trips. The informants had a lot of everyday projects that they would not be able to perform if they did not have access to a car. The importance of the car does not seem to have changed upon retirement, albeit it is partly used for other reasons than before. The informant’s social context implies new space-time constraints. Commitments to family members, engagement in associations and spouses’ occupations affect how much and when they use the car, and their overall mobility.

    Conclusions

    In contrast to much research on older people’s mobility that has studied slightly older people, this study have focused on a specific group that are relatively healthy, well-off, and have the possibility to choose between different modes of transport. By combining travel diaries and qualitative interviews, we have explored how newly retired people reason as regard their travel behaviour but also how they actually travel. Although the car was used more than other transport modes, being able to walk and cycle now that they had more time as retirees was highly valued. Our results indicate that urban residents that are retiring now and in the future are a key target group in transport planning when it comes to reduce car use in favour of slow modes of transport.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2015
    Keyword
    Car use; Mobility; Retirement; Older people; Space-time restrictions
    National Category
    Transport Systems and Logistics Other Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-124660 (URN)10.1007/s12544-015-0180-6 (DOI)000369916800001 ()
    Note

    Funding agencies:  Vinnova-Swedish Governmental Agency for Innovation Systems; Vinnova

    Available from: 2016-02-09 Created: 2016-02-09 Last updated: 2016-03-08
    4. Mobility changes during the first years of retirement
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mobility changes during the first years of retirement
    2016 (English)In: Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, ISSN 1471-7794, Vol. 17, no 2, 131-140 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – Mobility is an important aspect of well-being, activity and participation. Retiring from paid work is a transition in later life when people need to adjust to a new daily structure and fill the day with activities other than work. Life-course transitions influence demands for mobility and choice of travel mode as people adapt to new circumstances and learning processes. The purpose of this paper is to explore how mobility strategies develop during the first years of retirement.

    Design/methodology/approach – A qualitative analysis based on initial interviews with a total of 27 retired people during their first year of retirement and again, about three years later.

    Findings – Important changes during the first years of retirement included illness or a decline in physical health. Mobility had become a means of achieving certain goals after an illness, such as learning to walk, being able to drive or enjoying the time that was left. While some enjoyed not having commitments, others experienced difficulties in filling the day. The results indicate four dimensions of mobility: means of carrying out activities which are needed and desired; resources for creating activities; a leisure activity in itself; and subordinate to staying at home.

    Originality/value – Gives a deeper understanding of the mobility challenges people ultimately face in later life, and how these are managed, which is important for transport planning and public health policy aimed at improving mobility, activity participation and well-being in later life.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2016
    Keyword
    Ageing, Well-being, Mobility, Older people, Retirement adjustment, Travel activities
    National Category
    Occupational Therapy Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-133997 (URN)10.1108/QAOA-11-2015-0052 (DOI)
    Note

    The previous status of this article was Manuscript.

    Available from: 2017-01-17 Created: 2017-01-17 Last updated: 2017-01-25Bibliographically approved
  • 3.
    Berg, Jessica
    et al.
    Linköping University, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute (VTI), Linköping, Sweden.
    Levin, Lena
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute (VTI), Linköping, Sweden.
    Abramsson, Marianne
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life.
    Hagberg, Jan-Erik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life.
    “I want complete freedom”: car use and everyday mobility among the newly retired2015In: European Transport Research Review, ISSN 1867-0717, E-ISSN 1866-8887, Vol. 7, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    To investigate car use among newly retired people, to explore to what extent car transport is used for everyday mobility and how it is valued in comparison to other transport modes.

    Methods

    The data consists of travel diaries and qualitative interviews with 24 individuals, aged between 61 and 67, living in a middle-sized Swedish city. They were recruited via the local branch of one of the main associations of pensioners, one large employer in the municipality, and through another study. The informants filled in a travel diary during 1 week that were analysed by VISUAL- TimePAcTS, an application for visualising and exploring activity diary data. The semi-structured qualitative interviews were analysed using a qualitative content analysis.

    Results

    The car was used for several trips daily and often for short trips. The informants had a lot of everyday projects that they would not be able to perform if they did not have access to a car. The importance of the car does not seem to have changed upon retirement, albeit it is partly used for other reasons than before. The informant’s social context implies new space-time constraints. Commitments to family members, engagement in associations and spouses’ occupations affect how much and when they use the car, and their overall mobility.

    Conclusions

    In contrast to much research on older people’s mobility that has studied slightly older people, this study have focused on a specific group that are relatively healthy, well-off, and have the possibility to choose between different modes of transport. By combining travel diaries and qualitative interviews, we have explored how newly retired people reason as regard their travel behaviour but also how they actually travel. Although the car was used more than other transport modes, being able to walk and cycle now that they had more time as retirees was highly valued. Our results indicate that urban residents that are retiring now and in the future are a key target group in transport planning when it comes to reduce car use in favour of slow modes of transport.

  • 4.
    Berg, Jessica
    et al.
    Linköping University, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute (VTI), Linköping, Sweden.
    Levin, Lena
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute (VTI), Linköping, Sweden.
    Abramsson, Marianne
    Linköping University, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hagberg, Jan-Erik
    Linköping University, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Time to spare: Everyday activities among newly retired people in a middle-sizedcity2016Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Retirement has recently been studied as a complex process that affects people’s lives in many different ways (Teuscher 2010; Grenier 2011; Halleröd, Örestig and Stattin 2013). Retirement implies changes in time-space use, interruption in routines and changed social patterns. Leisure activities, shopping, errands and rest are no longer determined by the working life rhythm. New time-space constraints might at the same time occur that limit the individual’s actions, such as reduced income, new or increased commitments towards children and grandchildren, involvement in associations or part-time work (Kleiber and Nimrod, 2009; Szinovacz et al., 2001; Van den Bogaard et al., 2013).

    A vast amount of research from different fields has focused on the implications of retirement for wellbeing (Bender 2012; Wang 2007), adjustment (Van Solinge and Henkens 2008), identity (Teucher 2010), volunteering (Van den Bogaard et.al., 2013) and physical activity (Lahti et al. 2011). So far, only a few studies have investigated everyday activities and timespace use among older people in general and the post-World War II generation in particular (Chatzitheochari and Arber 2011; Gauthier and Smeeding 2003). In many studies of  time-space use, the aim has been to illuminate the juggling of everyday activities that occurs and to deal with the balance between work, leisure and family (Schwanen and de Jong 2008; Kwan 2000; Scholten, Friberg and Sanden 2012). Naturally, retired people have not been included in those studies, although many older people play an important role in the lives of families with small children (Schwanen 2008) and seek supporting and leading roles as citizens (cf. Gagliardi, et al. 2007; Leinonen 2011; Liechty, Yarnal and Kerstetter 2012; McCormack et al. 2008; Nimrod and Adoni 2006; Sperazza and Banerjee 2010). Little is known about the expectations this generation has on retirement and its demands for activities. The aim of this study is therefore to explore newly retired peoples everyday activities. What activities do they take part in and where are these activities carried out? In what respect, and for what reasons, do activities change or stay the same upon retirement?

    The remaining of this paper begins with a discussion of the implications of retirement on everyday activities in accordance to previous research. The time-geographical perspective and concepts used here for studying activities is then presented. That is followed by a description of methods, data and analysis, before the empirical analysis of travel diaries and qualitative interviews is given. The paper ends with a discussion of the results in relation to previous research.

  • 5.
    Ekström, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Majlesi, Ali Reza
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Samarbete och delaktighet2016In: Att leva med demens / [ed] Ingrid Hellström, Lars-Christer Hydén, Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2016, 55-62 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Hagberg, Jan-Erik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life.
    Ett smart hem för en bättre vardag2002In: Från våra sinnen: en antologi om sambandet mellan den fysiska miljön, hälsan och sinnesintrycken / [ed] Gösta Blücher, Göran Graninger, Vadstena: Stiftelsen Vadstena forum för samhällsbyggande , 2002, 125-136 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Hasselskog, Peter
    et al.
    Högskolan för design och konsthantverk, Göteborgs universitet.
    Ekström, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Slöjd i grundskolan: En nationell ämnesutvärdering i årskurs 6 och 92015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Slöjdämnet har sedan Skolverkets senaste utvärdering (NU-03) behållit sin ställning som ett mycket uppskattat skolämne bland eleverna. Ämnet intresserar och engagerar, trivseln är hög och eleverna upplever arbetsglädje. En majoritet av eleverna uppger dessutom att deras självförtroende stärks av att lyckas i slöjdarbete. Mer än hälften av eleverna instämmer i att slöjd är ett lärorikt och allmänbildande ämne. En något mindre andel, omkring häften av eleverna, uppger att slöjd är ett viktigt ämne, men i likhet med resultaten från NU-03 uppfattar en majoritet av eleverna inte att kunskaper från slöjdundervisningen är viktiga för deras fortsatta studier och inte heller för det de tänker arbeta med i framtiden.

    Också slöjdlärarna trivs med sitt arbete och en övervägande majoritet av eleverna har en slöjdlärare som tycker det är roligt att undervisa i slöjd. Lärarna uppger samtidigt att deras arbetsbelastning är hög och att de lägger mycket tid på uppgifter som går utöver deras undervisning i klassrummet, exempelvis dokumentation, planering, institutionsvård samt praktiskt för- och efterarbete. Slöjdlärarna är också mycket uppskattade av sina elever – en klar majoritet av eleverna instämmer i att deras slöjdlärare undervisar bra, är bra på att förklara samt tror på eleverna och deras förmåga att lära sig.

    Slöjdämnets kursplan som infördes genom Lgr 11 har mottagits positivt av slöjdlärarna. En majoritet av eleverna har slöjdlärare som anser att kursplanen blivit tydligare, att den utgör ett bättre planeringsinstrument än sin föregångare, samt att kursplanens centrala innehåll är lagom omfattande. En majoritet av eleverna har också lärare som uppfattar att kunskapskraven har blivit tydligare och att de är rimliga. Utvärderingen visar också att de delar av slöjdämnets centrala innehåll som är nya i Lgr 11 jämfört med tidigare kursplan, ännu inte fått någon framträdande roll i undervisningen. Nästan alla elever i utvärderingen har en slöjdlärare vars uppfattning är att slöjd-undervisningen ger eleverna förutsättningar att utveckla ”förmågan att formge och framställa föremål i olika material med hjälp av lämpliga redskap, verktyg och hantverkstekniker”, medan ”förmågan att tolka slöjdföremåls estetiska och kulturella uttryck”, är det av de fyra långsiktiga målen som minst andel elever får förutsättningar att utveckla enligt slöjdlärarna.

    Det vanligaste sättet att organisera slöjdundervisning ute på skolorna är att ämnet introduceras i årskurs 3, även om det förefaller blivit vanligare med slöjd i årskurs 1 och 2 sedan förra utvärderingen. De allra flesta elever möter slöjdundervisningen indelad i två materialinriktningar; textilslöjd respektive trä- och metallslöjd. På de flesta skolor växlar eleverna mellan textilslöjd och trä- och metallslöjd fram till och med årskurs 6, i årskurs 7–9 tillåts de flesta elever välja materialinriktning. När eleverna tillåts att välja sker valet i stor utsträckning könsmässigt traditionellt – tre fjärdedelar av flickorna i årskurs 9 väljer textilslöjd, och en lika stor andel pojkar väljer trä- och metallslöjd. Den dominerande gruppstorleken i den svenska grundskolans slöjdundervisning är 11–15 elever.

    Under slöjdlektionerna arbetar eleverna i stor utsträckning individuellt med handledning från sin lärare. Elevinflytandet är stort, eleverna upplever i stor utsträckning att de får komma med egna idéer och att de kan förverkliga dem i undervisningen. Men det är betydligt vanligare att eleverna själva bestämmer vad de ska göra i slöjden i årskurs 9 än i årskurs 6. Olika typer av digital utrustning förefaller ha ökat sedan NU-03 och är i dag en integrerad del av slöjdundervisningen. De allra flesta elever har en lärare som anger att de i sin slöjdundervisning har tillgång till datorer, internet och skrivare. Digitalkamera, projektor och instruktionsprogram finns också tillgängligt för eleverna i relativt stor utsträckning.

    NU-03 konstaterades att undervisningen i slöjd ofta har stort fokus på elevernas görande och mindre på lärandet, något som fortfarande tycks gälla. Utvärderingen tyder dessutom på brister i uppföljningen av elevers lärande i slöjd. Nästan varannan elev i årskurs 9 uppger att hon eller han inte talar med sin lärare alls, eller har svarat ”vet inte”, på frågan hur ofta de talar med sin lärare om hur det går för dem i slöjd. Var sjätte elev har en lärare som själv uppger att eleverna tar hem sina slöjdarbeten utan någon typ av redovisning.I de grupper där samtal om hur det går för eleverna förekommer mellan elever och lärare, uppger en majoritet av eleverna att samtalen främst handlar om kursplanens mål, vad eleven kan samt vad eleven kan förbättra.

    En stor andel elever uppger att faktorer som inte ska ligga till grund för betyget faktiskt påverkar deras slöjdbetyg, exempelvis närvaron på lektionerna, och den egna prestationen i relation till övriga elever. Lärarna svarar att elevens förmåga att arbeta självständigt, att själv utveckla idéer och lösa problem samt att ta egna initiativ och vara kreativ i stor utsträckning påverkar deras betygssättning. En tredjedel av eleverna uppger dessutom att de inte får reda på vad de ska klara för att få olika betyg i slöjd. Förutsättningarna för rättvisa och säkra betyg stärks om lärare som undervisat samma elever gemensamt diskuterar elevernas utveckling och prestationer inför betygssättningen. Utvärderingen indikerar brister i samverkan vid betygssättningen mellan slöjdlärare som undervisat samma elever. När betyg sätts ska all tillgänglig information om elevens kunskaper, även från tidigare terminer, ligga till grund för betyget. Omkring var tredje elev får ett slutbetyg som sätts enbart av den lärare som undervisat eleven under sista terminen, eller av den lärare som undervisat eleven mest.

    Bristerna i lärarnas kommunikation av grunderna för betygssättning och det svaga genomslaget för nytt innehåll i slöjdundervisningen sammanfaller väl med de områden där slöjdlärarna själva önskar kompetensutveckling. Mer än åtta av tio slöjdlärare är mycket eller ganska angelägna om att delta i kompetensutveckling i bedömning och betygssättning i slöjd, och lika stor andel i kunskapsområdet slöjdens estetiska och kulturella uttrycksformer.

    Utvärderingens fördjupningsstudie där slöjdundervisningen följts under flera lektioner i några slöjdgrupper har bidragit till djupare insikter och problematisering av frågorna i enkäterna. Bland annat har de påtagligt olika förutsättningar för slöjdundervisningen och måluppfyllelsen som gäller mellan skolor synliggjorts.

  • 8.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hydén, Lars-ChristerLinköping University, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Att leva med demens2016Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    För att personer med demenssjukdom ska kunna leva ett fullgott liv behövs mer kunskap. I grunden handlar det om att förändra föreställningar och attityder till personer som lever med en demenssjukdom så att personerna själva, deras anhöriga och personal inom hälso- och sjukvården och politiker, kan se nya möjligheter i stället för enbart förluster. I den här boken presenteras kunskap och forskning som sätter personer med demenssjukdom i centrum. Boken utgår alltså inte i första hand från vården eller anhöriga, utan från dem som lever med sjukdomen. På så sätt skapas en tankeram som ger stöd vid både utvecklingsarbete och reflektion bland människor som på olika sätt arbetar med och för personer med demenssjukdom.

    Cirka 110 000 och 170 000 svenskar har i dag en demenssjukdom. Om ett tiotal år är det betydligt fler: ökad livslängd och en större medvetenhet om demenssjukdomar gör att allt fler personer får en diagnos tidigt i förloppet. Som en konsekvens av detta kommer alltfler personer att leva med en demenssjukdom under lång tid, och ofta i hemmet. Detta innebär inte bara en utmaning för vård, omsorg och socialpolitik, utan väcker också frågor som berör såväl personer med demens, som anhöriga och andra i det sociala nätverket: Hur kan personer med demens leva och fungera i sitt hem tillsammans med eventuella familjemedlemmar? Hur kan de fungera som medborgare och delta i samhällslivet, ha makt över sitt eget vardagsliv och fatta egna beslut om sitt eget liv?

    I boken medverkar forskare från Centrum för demensforskning (CEDER) vid Linköpings universitet. Den innehåller många pedagogiska exempel och riktar sig till utbildningar inom vård, omvårdnad, socialt arbete och omsorg.

  • 9.
    Johansson, Stina
    et al.
    Umeå universitet.
    Taghizadeh Larsson, AnnikaLinköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Förändringsperspektiv på äldreomsorg: att leva som andra2016Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Medborgarskap i ett välfärdssamhälle innebär att samhället träder in när medborgare av olika skäl inte förmår lika mycket som tidigare, eller i jämförelse med andra i samma ålder. Man har alltså en funktionsnedsättning och behöver stöd för att kunna leva som andra. Problemet är att människors funktionsnedsättning bedöms olika beroende på när i livet den har uppstått: före eller efter 65 års ålder, där möjligheterna till hjälp minskar efter 65.

    I denna bok har några av Sveriges främsta äldre- och funktionshinderforskare samlats för att undersöka skillnaderna i lagstiftning, forskning, politik och praktik vad gäller hjälp till människor i olika åldrar. Där formuleringarna kring funktionsnedsättning och -hinder stöttar människors rätt till lika levnadsvillkor, är det svårare för äldre att, utifrån lagstiftning och policydokument, hävda samma rätt.

    Genom att använda begrepp och företeelser från funktionshinderområdet, pekar författarna på skillnader i medborgerliga rättigheter som är kopplade till ålder. På så vis skapar de nya spännande perspektiv som kan leda förändringsarbetet mot en annorlunda äldreomsorg.

  • 10.
    Jönson, Håkan
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Johansson, Stina
    Umeå universitet.
    Harnett, Tove
    Lunds universitet.
    Taghizadeh Larsson, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Från omsorgstagare till medborgare2016In: Förändringsperspektiv på äldreomsorg: att leva som andra / [ed] Stina Johansson & Annika Taghizadeh Larsson, Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2016, 169-173 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Kåhlin, Ida
    Linköping University, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Delaktig (även) på äldre dar: Åldrande och delaktighet bland personer med intellektuell funktionsnedsättning som bor i gruppbostad2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Participation of people in all ages is one of the main goals in Swedish disability policy. Despite this, ageing and becoming old with intellectual disability has been given very little attention in policy documents and guidelines regarding support and service provided for this group. This thesis aims to explore ageing and participation among older people with intellectual disabilities who live in a group homes in accordance to the Swedish Disability Act. The focus has been on the group of people who were born before or around 1960. This group belongs to a generation that share unique experiences. They have lived a long life with disability, and they have experienced first-hand the development of the Swedish disability policy that started in the 1960s and resulted in today’s disability policy. These experiences carried through life course are likely to influence this group’s opportunities to participate as they age and reach later life. The thesis has a multiple methodological approach. Participant observations were executed and combined with individual semi-structured interviews with older people with intellectual disabilities as well as group home staff. The results of this thesis show that there is a discrepancy between how older people with intellectual disabilities experience ageing and later life and how these in turn are described by the staff. The thesis also reveals how aging and becoming old is not given particular attention to in everyday discussions in the group home, and that aging is understood mainly as a physical phenomenon. The results show that the formal organizational culture of the group home is weak in relation to ageing and becoming old with intellectual disability. This is because the staff perceives a lack of preparation, discussion and working methods on how to support participation among older residents. The results also show, however, that the residents’ age does play an important role for the staff’s perceptions and attitudes regarding participation of the older residents. The concept of participation is described and  operationalized as a social contextual doing, and as an aspiration to create a sense of coherence or experience of meaning and security at home. Finally, this thesis underlines that the life course unique to persons growing old with intellectual disabilities may influence the opportunities for and the experience of participation in the group home.

    List of papers
    1. Lived experiences of ageing and later life in older people with intellectual disabilities
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lived experiences of ageing and later life in older people with intellectual disabilities
    2015 (English)In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 35, no 3, 602-628 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to explore how older people with intellectual disability (ID), who live in group accommodation, describe their lived experience in relation to ageing and later life. The study adopted a phenomenological approach, based on the concept of life-world. Individual, qualitative interviews were conducted with twelve people with ID (five men, seven women), between the ages of 48 and 71 (m=64), who lived in four different group accommodation units in southern Sweden. A descriptive phenomenological analysis method was used, which disclosed a structure consisting of themes and subthemes. The findings of the study reveal the informants’ lived experience of ageing and later life as a multifaceted phenomenon, expressed through the two themes, “age as a process of change” and “existential aspects of ageing”, each with three sub themes. along with six substantialising[SK1]  subthemes. The body is an essential element in their experience of ageing and growing old, and in how this experience is expressed. The study also finds social, cultural and historical dimensions of the life-world to be important in the informants’ experience of ageing and later life. This supports understanding of  the existence of a collective life-world for older people with ID, the unique experiences the informants share because of their disability and its consequences for their life course.

     

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Cambridge University Press, 2015
    Keyword
    Intellectual disability, ageing, later life, life-world, phenomenology.
    National Category
    Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-92377 (URN)10.1017/S0144686X13000949 (DOI)000357881100007 ()
    Available from: 2013-05-09 Created: 2013-05-09 Last updated: 2016-08-31Bibliographically approved
    2. Ageing in people with intellectual disability as it is understood by group home staff
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ageing in people with intellectual disability as it is understood by group home staff
    2016 (English)In: Journal of Intellectual & Developmental Disability, ISSN 1366-8250, E-ISSN 1469-9532, Vol. 41, no 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The number of older residents in group homes for people with intellectual disability (ID) is increasing. This interview study was focused on how group home staff addresses issues of ageing and being old among people with ID. Twelve members of staff at four different group homes in Sweden were interviewed. Findings revealed old age as something unarticulated in the group home. Group home staff felt unprepared to meet age-related changes in residents. The study also revealed that group home staff had a one-tracked way of describing the process of ageing among people with ID, seemingly rooted in a medical paradigm of disability. This study suggests that there is a need to raise issues and give guidance related to ageing and ID in disability policy documents in order to support the development of a formal culture that addresses old age and ID in disability services.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Routledge, 2016
    Keyword
    Intellectual disability; ageing; later life; staff; group home
    National Category
    Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-113338 (URN)10.3109/13668250.2015.1094038 (DOI)000369497300001 ()
    Note

    Vid tiden för disputation förelåg publikationen som manuskript

    Available from: 2015-01-16 Created: 2015-01-16 Last updated: 2017-04-21Bibliographically approved
    3. Staff experiences of participation in everyday life of older people with intellectual disability who live in group homes
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Staff experiences of participation in everyday life of older people with intellectual disability who live in group homes
    2015 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 17, no 4, 335-352 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This article aims to explore ways in which members of staff in group homes for people with intellectual disability experience participation, and what participation means for older people with intellectual disability. Qualitative interviews were performed with 15 members of staff at group homes in Sweden. The findings of this study are illustrated by considering two interacting themes and six subthemes. These involve staff experiences of the meaning of participation and factors which facilitate or inhibit it. The meaning of participation was expressed as doing and feeling. Staff described that participation for older people with intellectual disability was influenced by the individual characteristics of the residents, such as the relationship between age and disability. They also expressed the view that participation was influenced by organizational and physical contextual factors such as economics, time and space as well as the social environment. The latter included staff knowledge and skills, family and peers.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Taylor & Francis, 2015
    National Category
    Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Health Sciences Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-113333 (URN)10.1080/15017419.2014.941923 (DOI)
    Conference
    2015/01/16
    Available from: 2015-01-16 Created: 2015-01-16 Last updated: 2016-08-31Bibliographically approved
    4. Choice and control for people ageing with intellectual disability in group homes
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Choice and control for people ageing with intellectual disability in group homes
    2016 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 23, no 2, 127-137 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Many people ageing with intellectual disabilities (ID) age in place in group homes. Participation is a central concept in support and service to people with ID, but age is often a determining factor for participation among this group. Choice and control are dimensions of participation.

    Aim: The aim of this article is to explore how choice and control in the everyday life of people ageing with ID is expressed and performed in the group home’s semi-private spaces.

    Material and methods: Participant observations and interviews with residents and staff were conducted in four different group homes in Sweden that had older residents.

    Results: Four categories were found that can be understood as aspects of choice and control in the group home’s semi-private spaces in the everyday life of people ageing with ID. These categories included aspects such as space and object, time and routines, privacy, and a person-centred approach.

    Conclusion and significance: People ageing with ID are vulnerable when it comes to maintaining choice and control in various situations in the home’s semi-private spaces. It is argued that occupational therapists should include this occupational arena in their evaluations and interventions for people ageing with ID.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Taylor & Francis, 2016
    Keyword
    Autonomy, decision-making, developmental disabilities, empowerment, group accommodation, later life, older adults, participation, occupational justice
    National Category
    Health Sciences Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Occupational Therapy
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-113335 (URN)10.3109/11038128.2015.1095235 (DOI)26452592 (PubMedID)
    Note

    At the time for thesis presentation publication was in status: Manuscript

    Available from: 2015-01-16 Created: 2015-01-16 Last updated: 2017-04-24Bibliographically approved
  • 12.
    Kåhlin, Ida
    et al.
    Linköping University, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kjellberg, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hagberg, Jan-Erik
    Linköping University, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Choice and control for people ageing with intellectual disability in group homes2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 23, no 2, 127-137 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Many people ageing with intellectual disabilities (ID) age in place in group homes. Participation is a central concept in support and service to people with ID, but age is often a determining factor for participation among this group. Choice and control are dimensions of participation.

    Aim: The aim of this article is to explore how choice and control in the everyday life of people ageing with ID is expressed and performed in the group home’s semi-private spaces.

    Material and methods: Participant observations and interviews with residents and staff were conducted in four different group homes in Sweden that had older residents.

    Results: Four categories were found that can be understood as aspects of choice and control in the group home’s semi-private spaces in the everyday life of people ageing with ID. These categories included aspects such as space and object, time and routines, privacy, and a person-centred approach.

    Conclusion and significance: People ageing with ID are vulnerable when it comes to maintaining choice and control in various situations in the home’s semi-private spaces. It is argued that occupational therapists should include this occupational arena in their evaluations and interventions for people ageing with ID.

  • 13.
    Kåhlin, Ida
    et al.
    Linköping University, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kjellberg, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hagberg, Jan-Erik
    Linköping University, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Staff experiences of participation in everyday life of older people with intellectual disability who live in group homes2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 17, no 4, 335-352 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article aims to explore ways in which members of staff in group homes for people with intellectual disability experience participation, and what participation means for older people with intellectual disability. Qualitative interviews were performed with 15 members of staff at group homes in Sweden. The findings of this study are illustrated by considering two interacting themes and six subthemes. These involve staff experiences of the meaning of participation and factors which facilitate or inhibit it. The meaning of participation was expressed as doing and feeling. Staff described that participation for older people with intellectual disability was influenced by the individual characteristics of the residents, such as the relationship between age and disability. They also expressed the view that participation was influenced by organizational and physical contextual factors such as economics, time and space as well as the social environment. The latter included staff knowledge and skills, family and peers.

  • 14.
    Mahrs Träff, Annsofie
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life.
    The notion of physical activity among older people and staff in residential homes2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Perceptions of physical activity among older people and staff in residential homes

    Introduction

    In this paper, I will describe how people define the concept of physical activity and how they understand this phenomenon. This is a part of my PhD-studies, focusing on opportunities to be physically active and factors that may affect the possibilities in residential homes.

    Physical activity is often described as positive and important for all people. Physical activity when moving to a residential home can be problematic when people often are in high age and have major disabilities and diseases, which may affect the physical ability (SOU 2008:113).

    There are several researchers who have defined the concept of physical activity. A common definition of physical activity is Caspersen et al (1985) definition; “Physical activity is any bodily movement produced by skeletal muscles that result in energy expenditure”. The effects of physical activity have been described in many studies. Swedish Council on Technology Assessment has done a compilation of studies on various methods to promote physical activity (SBU 2007). It describe that a physical active lifestyle reduces the risk of developing various diseases. Physical activity has a secondary preventive effect when the disease has already occurred may be affected. This is said to also apply to older persons. Public Health Institute has published with advice based on current research findings on how physical activity can be used to prevent and treat various diseases (FYSS 2008). It explains that physical activity and exercise can help prevent and reduce the number of age-related physical and psychological changes in the body. Welmer et al. (2012)  have made interviews with people in the age of 80-91.The old people describes that they did not see physical activity as a self-defined activity but as a consequence of other activities (social aspects) that are perceived as more important than the actual physical activity. Some people described that morning exercise or a walk gave more energy and gave a better mood while others described the care of things in their own home, such as make the bed, washing dishes and being able to take care of things in the garden, as important. There was also some that described these activities as boring but necessary, and nothing they did because they really wanted. Some people in the study wanted to do things for themselves, while others wanted to be with others.

    Studies point out that when the elderly person's own opinions, desires and needs must be reflected in efforts to promote occupational performance so increasing their motivation to participate Activities that take place at senior housing is often done in groups. The supply to meet an individual's needs for physical activity is very limited. Staff perception of lack of time is a likely reason why collective activities priority over individual. It could also be because the staff do not have knowledge that some people have the need for individual activities (Greenfield et al 1985).

    As the body ages altered bones, joints and muscles, which means loss of power, slower movements and gradually worse coordination. These factors often involve an impaired ability to perform certain daily activities which can lead to physical inactivity (Dehlin et al 2000). Tinetti et al (1993) and Rydwik (2008) describes the body's abilities can be positively affected by physical exercise into old age. They also describe how mental health is positively affected by physical activity. Most people who live in residential homes is in the so-called fourth age which is the last phase of life (Laslett 1994, 1996). They often have multiple diseases, have severe disabilities and are in need of care and attention. Andersson (2009) describes the fourth age as the time when you are older and dependent on aid to survive. The boundary between the third and fourth age varies according to the needs of health care that the elderly have and do not follow as much chronological age.

     

    Staff's role in creating opportunities for physical activity

    The staff have an important role in need of assistance and help for those who is living in residential homes. If the older persons has major physical problems they need someone who motivates and encourages. It creates an opportunity to be involved in their activities and planning of their daily lives. Staff can also be an obstacle. Is the staff afraid for the patient to fall they often help with everyday activities. By helping it save time too which often is

    rendered as a major flaw in the elderly care.

     

    Surveys have been made of how stuff reason about activities (Lundström 2003). The staff felt that the older mainly participated in activities who involved personal care. It was easier to motivate the elderly to be active when the person was just moved. When the person had lived for a while it became more difficult to justify. , prompting staff to musing over what role they had in passivating the elderly. The range of activities in addition to personal care was very limited. The staff lacked knowledge about the interests of older people.

     

    Surveys have been made of how the staff is reasoning about activities (Lundström 2003). The staff felt that the older mainly participated in activities involving personal care. It was easier to motivate the elderly to be active when the person was just moved. When the elder had lived for a while he became more difficult to justify. This meant that staff wondered what role they had in the passivation The staff lacked knowledge about the interests of older people. The staff have an important role in finding out what each individual user has needs and desires. A survey has shown that staff are often the main interlocutor (Karlsson 2006).

     

    There is conflicting research describes where staff describe that the older people are able to decide for themselves how they want their day, when you want to go to bed when you want to shower and how they want to be active. While describing the staff that it was not going to let the older people decide by themselves because there are procedures that must be followed. These procedures often have with the organization to do such as staffing and scheduling (Harnett 2010).

    Regardless of who supports the elderly to perform various activities will affect the helper's behavior Sr. ability of activity positively or negatively (Tamm 1999).

     

    Aim

    The overall aim of my thesis is to study how people in the fourth age, living in residential homes, are willing and have opportunities for physical activity and how the opportunities to be active is affected by the physical environment and the staff behavior.

    The aim of this part of the study is to describe variations in perceptions of the concept of physical activity.

     

    Method

    A phenomenographic research approach was used to analyze semistructurated interviews with older people and the staff at four residential homes in two different municipalities in Sweden.

    Phenomenography is a qualitative research method developed at the Department of Education at the University of Gothenburg. Special features of the method is that it aims to describe different perceptions of a phenomenon. The purpose is not to find out whether some phenomenon is true or false, how many thinks so and so, it is to know how people perceive the phenomenon. The goal is to try to observe a hypothetical range of understanding of a phenomenon. One way to do this is to analyze interviews and compiling various kinds of statements in the categories of description. Relationships between categories of description can then be examined in phenomenography sample space. The process focused on identifying perceptions and examine how perceptions relate to each other. The phenomenografs mean that an idea is something we take for granted. Thus a perception that we do not need to have reflected upon, but as we build our arguments. (Svensson 1984; Marton & Booth 2000).

    Population

    Totally 30 interviews has been carried out in residential homes. The residential homes have been chose strategically from the perspectives. The residential homes has been statistically choose from the perspectives of large municipality, small municipality, inner city, suburban area and rural. 14 of these interviews have been carried out with older people and the rest of the interviews has been carried out with the stuff in the categories' care staff, head, occupational therapist and physiotherapist. All of the interviewed staff was women.

    Among the interviewed elderly were 9 persons women and 5 persons men. Their age had a spread of between 70-95 years, with mean age 87 years. All the people had been living in residential care for more than 6 months.

  • 15.
    Nedlund, Ann-Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jansson, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nordh, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Medborgare med demenssjukdom2016In: Att leva med demens / [ed] Ingrid Hellström, Lars-Christer Hydén, Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2016, 171-181 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Plejert, Charlotta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Majlesi, Ali Reza
    Linköping University, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Antelius, Eleonor
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Flerspråkiga möten vid minnesklinik2016In: Att leva med demens / [ed] Ingrid Hellström, Lars-Christer Hydén, Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2016, 1, 133-142 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Roìn, Ása
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nord, Catharina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Urine incontinence in women aged sixty to sixty-five: negotiating meaning and responsibility2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 29, no 4, 625-632 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Urine incontinence (UI) has been the focus of a considerable number of research projects; yet, there is no evidence that the research has had an impact on the prevalence of UI. Despite great impact on daily living, women seem to be reluctant to seek help from professionals or talk about the problem. Apart from this, scholars have noted that healthcare practitioners rarely ask older women about this health aspect and seem to minimise the problem when confronted with it.

    Aim

    The purpose of the study was to explore how meaning of UI was discursively constructed and negotiated by women bothered with long-term UI in the context of research interviews.

    Method

    Seven women aged 60–65 living in the Faroe Islands were interviewed to elaborate on daily living with long-term UI. The interview texts were analysed by means of discourse analysis.

    Results

    Three main themes emerged from the interviews. All the women related the disorder to their age and positioned themselves within the category ‘old women’ for whom UI was considered a normal condition. At the same time, they opposed to the idea that the condition was inevitable and accused their general practitioners of negligence by failing to take their complaints seriously. They felt ashamed of being incontinent and seemed to subject themselves to moral and aesthetic views about people who were not able to control their bladder function.

    Conclusion

    All the women used different cultural discourses to make meaning of UI and continuously negotiated these meanings. Avoiding public exposure of their leaking problem restricted their daily living, and the embarrassment of not being able to control their bladder function seemed to overrule any wish of actively dealing with their present condition.

  • 18.
    Ryd, Charlotta
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Nygard, Louise
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Malinowsky, Camilla
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Öhman, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life.
    Kottorp, Anders
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Zurich University of Appl Science, Switzerland.
    Associations between performance of activities of daily living and everyday technology use among older adults with mild stage Alzheimers disease or mild cognitive impairment2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 22, no 1, 33-42 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The use of everyday technology (ET) is important for many activities in daily life (ADL) and can be especially challenging for older adults with cognitive impairments. Objective: The aim was to explore associations between ADL performance and perceived ability to use ET among older adults with mild stage Alzheimers disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). ADL motor and process ability, and ability to use ET were also compared between the groups. Methods: Participants with AD (n = 39) and MCI (n = 28) were included. Associations and group differences were explored with nonparametric statistics. Results: Significant correlations were found between ADL process ability and ET use in both groups (R-s = 0.44 and 0.32, p less than 0.05), but for ADL motor ability and ET use, correlations were only found in the MCI group (R-s = 0.51, p less than 0.01). The MCI group had significantly higher measures of ADL process ability (p less than 0.001) and ET use (p less than 0.05). Conclusion: ADL performance ability and perceived ability to use ET are important to consider in evaluations of older adults with cognitive impairments. Group differences indicate that measures of ADL performance ability and ET use are sensitive enough to discriminate the MCI group from the AD group with individually overlapping measures.

  • 19.
    Róin, Ása
    Linköping University, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Is there a ‘fit’ between theories on and the way in which olderpeople make sense of ageing in their everyday lives?2015Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores how older people make sense of ageing and discusses how gerontological theories on ageing compare with empirical findings among older people living in the Faroe Islands. Data derived from group and individual interviews with home dwelling retirees aged 68 to 91. A constructionist grounded theory approach was used. From the analysis, three categories arose that each in their way presented important dimensions of ageing: Physical changes with age; social changes with age and ageing perceived as an ongoing process. No single theory could explain the multifaceted empirical realities of ageing that the analysis showed. The findings from this study underscore the importance of acknowledging ageing as a multidimensional process and, most importantly, that understanding this process requires that older people themselves are recognised as co-constructors of knowledge about ageing.

  • 20.
    Róin, Ása
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    On the making of age: A constructionist study on ageing and later life in the Faroe Islands2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this thesis is to explore how older people living in the Faroe Islands make sense of ageing, how political intentions and strategies resonate with the lived reality of ageing and how theories on ageing compare with this reality.

    This thesis builds on two data sets. The first set is derived from interviews with women aged 60 to 65 years old who suffer from long-term urine incontinence, a disorder commonly associated with old age. The second set is derived from group and individual interviews with community-dwelling men and women aged 68 to 91 years old.

    The results are presented in four papers, each of which addresses aspects of ageing. Health, which appeared to be a strong determinant for how old age was constructed and negotiated, was one aspect considered. The meaning of home or one’s affiliation to a place of living was another important aspect studied. The results of that study indicated the necessity of understanding home as a multifaceted notion that goes beyond a house of residence. In particular, for participants living in small island villages, the notion of home was found to embrace a whole community or island rather than a house of residence, which should promote new thinking about services in remote regions.

    The results compare with gerontological theories on ageing. However, the findings demonstrate the importance of acknowledging that the concepts of ageing and old age do not carry any predefined meanings but should be understood as contingent on social, cultural, historical and  geographical conditions.

    List of papers
    1. Urine incontinence in women aged sixty to sixty-five: negotiating meaning and responsibility
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Urine incontinence in women aged sixty to sixty-five: negotiating meaning and responsibility
    2015 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 29, no 4, 625-632 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Urine incontinence (UI) has been the focus of a considerable number of research projects; yet, there is no evidence that the research has had an impact on the prevalence of UI. Despite great impact on daily living, women seem to be reluctant to seek help from professionals or talk about the problem. Apart from this, scholars have noted that healthcare practitioners rarely ask older women about this health aspect and seem to minimise the problem when confronted with it.

    Aim

    The purpose of the study was to explore how meaning of UI was discursively constructed and negotiated by women bothered with long-term UI in the context of research interviews.

    Method

    Seven women aged 60–65 living in the Faroe Islands were interviewed to elaborate on daily living with long-term UI. The interview texts were analysed by means of discourse analysis.

    Results

    Three main themes emerged from the interviews. All the women related the disorder to their age and positioned themselves within the category ‘old women’ for whom UI was considered a normal condition. At the same time, they opposed to the idea that the condition was inevitable and accused their general practitioners of negligence by failing to take their complaints seriously. They felt ashamed of being incontinent and seemed to subject themselves to moral and aesthetic views about people who were not able to control their bladder function.

    Conclusion

    All the women used different cultural discourses to make meaning of UI and continuously negotiated these meanings. Avoiding public exposure of their leaking problem restricted their daily living, and the embarrassment of not being able to control their bladder function seemed to overrule any wish of actively dealing with their present condition.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wiley, 2015
    Keyword
    urine incontinence, women, discourse analysis, ageing, interpretive repertoires
    National Category
    Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-113750 (URN)10.1111/scs.12190 (DOI)000368345900003 ()
    Note

    Funding agencies: Faroese Research Council

    Available from: 2015-01-29 Created: 2015-01-29 Last updated: 2016-02-15Bibliographically approved
    2. The multifaceted notion of home: Exploring the meaning of home among elderly people living in the Faroe Islands
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The multifaceted notion of home: Exploring the meaning of home among elderly people living in the Faroe Islands
    2015 (English)In: Journal of Rural Studies, ISSN 0743-0167, E-ISSN 1873-1392, Vol. 39, 22-31 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Ageing in place or staying home for as long as possible has long been the policy ideal regarding life in old age in most Western countries. The notion of home, however, is often used as an unquestioned concept that does not reflect the diversity of living conditions among older people. This paper draws upon data from a qualitative study conducted in the Fame Islands, an archipelago in the North Atlantic Ocean, during the winter and spring of 2013. It explores how older people living in different small island communities and one urban area within the same national context construct the meaning of home. The findings supported the assumption that older people want to stay at home for as long as possible, but home as a concept was found to have different meanings for different older people, depending on where they lived, their personal and family history, their social connections and environmental conditions. Differences in the meaning of home for older people living in small remote communities and those living in the city were noticeable. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2015
    Keyword
    Older people; Meaning of home; Attachment to place
    National Category
    Human Geography
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-120466 (URN)10.1016/j.jrurstud.2015.03.002 (DOI)000357544900003 ()
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Faroese Research Council; University of the Faroe Islands

    Available from: 2015-08-12 Created: 2015-08-11 Last updated: 2015-09-03
    3. Embodied ageing and categorisation work amongst retirees in the Faroe Islands
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Embodied ageing and categorisation work amongst retirees in the Faroe Islands
    2014 (English)In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 0890-4056, Vol. 31, 83-92 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract This paper addresses ageing and embodiment and explores how age is negotiated in interaction using Membership Categorisation Work. Data were derived from group and individual interviews with home-dwelling retirees in the Faroe Islands. The analysis showed that the interviewees negotiated age by drawing on two contrasting categories, placing themselves and others in the categories of ‘old’ or ‘not old’. Good health was the main predicate tied to the category ‘not old’ and keeping busy and taking care of oneself were the main activities that the interviewees ascribed to the category ‘not old’. The analysis also demonstrated how health as a moral discourse was actualised during the interviews. Staying active and in good health were not just talked about as ways to achieve personal well-being. The interviewees talked about having a responsibility to stay ‘fit’ for as long as possible to avoid being a burden to the society or to their families.

    Keyword
    Embodied ageing, Categorisation, Negotiating age, Retirees
    National Category
    Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-120903 (URN)10.1016/j.jaging.2014.09.001 (DOI)25456625 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2015-08-28 Created: 2015-08-28 Last updated: 2015-09-17
    4. Is there a ‘fit’ between theories on and the way in which olderpeople make sense of ageing in their everyday lives?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is there a ‘fit’ between theories on and the way in which olderpeople make sense of ageing in their everyday lives?
    2015 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores how older people make sense of ageing and discusses how gerontological theories on ageing compare with empirical findings among older people living in the Faroe Islands. Data derived from group and individual interviews with home dwelling retirees aged 68 to 91. A constructionist grounded theory approach was used. From the analysis, three categories arose that each in their way presented important dimensions of ageing: Physical changes with age; social changes with age and ageing perceived as an ongoing process. No single theory could explain the multifaceted empirical realities of ageing that the analysis showed. The findings from this study underscore the importance of acknowledging ageing as a multidimensional process and, most importantly, that understanding this process requires that older people themselves are recognised as co-constructors of knowledge about ageing.

    Keyword
    Ageing, theories on ageing, continuity and change, adaption, constructivist grounded theory.
    National Category
    Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-120904 (URN)
    Available from: 2015-08-28 Created: 2015-08-28 Last updated: 2015-08-28Bibliographically approved
  • 21.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ekström, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Majlesi, Ali Reza
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Plejert, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kommunikation vid demens2016In: Att leva med demens / [ed] Ingrid Hellström & Lars-Christer Hydén, Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2016, 1, 63-70 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Taghizadeh Larsson, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Funktion2016In: Förändringsperspektiv på äldreomsorg: att leva som andra / [ed] Stina Johansson, Annika Taghizadeh Larsson, Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2016, 73-89 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Taghizadeh Larsson, Annika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johansson, Stina
    Umeå universitet.
    Harnett, Tove
    Lunds universitet.
    Jönson, Håkan
    Lunds universitet.
    Introduktion2016In: Förändringsperspektiv på äldreomsorg: att leva som andra / [ed] Stina Johansson & Annika Taghizadeh Larsson, Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2016, 9-14 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Åsbring, Pia
    et al.
    Centre for Development of Health Services, Department of Public Health Sciences at Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, Sweden.
    Närvänen, Anna-Liisa
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies. Linköping University, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life.
    Women's experiences of stigma in relation to chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia2002In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 12, no 2, 148-160 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia are characterized by being difficidt to diagnose and having an elusive etiology and no clear-cut treatment strategy. The question of whether these illnesses are stigmatizing was investigated through interviews with 25 women with these illnesses. The women experienced stigmatization primarily before receiving a diagnosis, and the diffuse symptomatology associated with the illnesses were significant for stigmatization. Stigma consisted of questioning the veracity, morality, and accuracy of patient symptom descriptions and of psychologizing symptoms. Coping with stigma was also explored and found to comprise both withdrawal and approach strategies, depending on the individual's circumstances and goals.

  • 25.
    Österholm Hjalmarsson, Johannes
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Center for Dementia Research [CEDER].
    Tagizadeh Larsson, Annika
    Linköping University, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Center for Dementia Research [CEDER].
    Olaison, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Handling the dilemma of self-determination and dementia: A study of case managers’ discursive strategies in assessment meetings.2015In: Journal of Gerontological Social Work, ISSN 0163-4372, Vol. 58, no 6, 613-636 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In assessment meetings concerning care services for people with dementia, Swedish case managers face a dilemma. On the one hand, according to the law, the right to self-determination of every adult citizen must be respected, but on the other hand cognitive disabilities make it difficult to fulfill obligations of being a full-fledged citizen. In this article, we examine 15 assessment meetings to identify discursive strategies used by case managers to handle this dilemma. We also examine how these affect the participation of persons with dementia, and indicate implications of our study for social work practice and research.

1 - 25 of 25
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