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  • 1.
    Dong, Huan-Ji
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping.
    Marcusson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping.
    Wressle, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Obese very old women have low relative handgrip strength, poor physical function, and difficulty in daily living2015In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 20-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To investigate how anthropometric and body composition variables, and handgrip strength (HS) affect physical function and independent daily living in 88-year-old Swedish women.

    Participants: A cross-sectional analysis of 83 community-dwelling women, who were 88 years old with normal weight (n=30), overweight (n=29), and obesity (n=24) in Linköping, Sweden, was performed.

    Measures: Assessments of body weight (Wt), height, waist circumference (WC), and arm circumference were performed by using an electronic scale and measuring tape. Tricep skinfold thickness was measured by a skinfold calliper. Fat mass (FM) and fat-free mass (FFM) were measured by bioelectrical impedance analysis, and HS was recorded with an electronic grip force instrument. Linear regression was used to determine the contributions of parameters as a single predictor or as a ratio with HS to physical function (Short Form-36, SF-36PF) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL).

    Results: Obese women had greater absolute FM and FFM, and lower HS corrected for FFM and HS-based ratios (i.e., HS/Wt, HS/body mass index [BMI]) than their normal weight and overweight counterparts. After adjusting for physical activity levels and the number of chronic diseases, HS-based ratios explained more variance in SF-36PF scoring (R2: 0.52–0.54) than single anthropometric and body composition variables (R2: 0.45–0.51). WC, HS, and HS-based ratios (HS/Wt and HS/FFM) were also associated with the number of IADL with no difficulty.

    Conclusion: Obese very old women have a high WC, but their HS is relatively low in relation to their Wt and FFM. These parameters are better than BMI for predicting physical function and independent daily living.

  • 2.
    Dong, Huan-Ji
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wressle, Ewa
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Marcusson, Jan
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Unaltered image of health maintenance: An observation of non-participants in a swedish cohort study of 85 to 86 years olds2015In: The Journal of Frailty & Aging, ISSN 2260-1341, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 93-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Selection bias is often inevitable in epidemiologic studies. It is not surprising that study conclusions based on participants’ health status are frequently questioned. Objective: This study aimed to assess whether the non-participants affected the characteristics of a general population of the very old people. Design, Setting and Participants: Prospective, cross-sectional (N=650, aged 85 years old) analysis and 1-year follow-up (n=273), in Linköping, Sweden. Measurements: We analysed data on health-related factors from a postal questionnaire, a home visit and a clinic visit at baseline and at the 1-year follow-up. We calculated the effect size to evaluate the degree of differences between the groups. Results: A greater proportion of non-participants resided in sheltered accommodation or nursing homes (participants vs non-response vs refusal, 11% vs 22% vs 40, P<0.001, φ=0.24). During the home visit or clinic visit, a higher proportion of dropouts reported mid-severe problems in EQ-5D domains (mobility and self-care) and limitations in personal activities of daily living, but the differences between participants and dropouts were very small (φ<0.2). No significant difference was found between the groups with regard to emergency room visits or hospital admissions, despite the fact that more participants than dropouts (φ=0.23) had multimorbidities (≥2 chronic diseases). Living in sheltered accommodation or a nursing home (odds ratio (OR), 2.8; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.5-5), female gender (OR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.1-3.1) and receiving more home visits in primary care (OR, 1.03; 95% CI, 1-1.06) contributed positively to drop out in the data collection stages over the study period. Conclusion: Non-participants were not considered to be a group with worse health. Mobility problems may influence very old people when considering further participation, which threatens attrition.

  • 3.
    Eckerblad, Jeanette
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Theander, Kersti
    Faculty of Health, Science and Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Ekdahl, Anne
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hellström, Iingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    To adjust and endure: a qualitative study of symptom burden in older people with multimorbidity2015In: Applied Nursing Research, ISSN 0897-1897, E-ISSN 1532-8201, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 322-327Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context Older people with multimorbidity are vulnerable and often suffer from conditions that produce a multiplicity of symptoms and a reduced health-related quality of life. Objectives The aim of this study is to explore the experience of living with a high symptom burden from the perspective of older community-dwelling people with multi-morbidity.

    Method A qualitative descriptive design with semi-structured interviews, including 20 community-dwelling older people with multi-morbidity and a high symptom burden. The participants were 79-€“89 years old with a mean of 12 symptoms per person. Data were analyzed using content analyses.

    Results The experience of living with a high symptom burden revealed the overall theme, “To adjust and endure” and three sub-themes. The first sub-theme was "To feel inadequate and limited". Participants reported that they no longer had the capacity or the ability to manage, and they felt limited and isolated from friends or family. The second sub-theme was "To feel dependent". This was a new and inconvenient experience; the burden they put on others caused a feeling of guilt. The final sub-theme was "To feel dejected". The strength to manage and control their conditions was gone; the only thing left to do was to sit or lie down and wait for it all to pass.

    Conclusion This study highlights the importance of a holistic approach when taking care of older people with multi-morbidity. This approach should employ a broad symptom assessment to reveal diseases and conditions that are possible to treat or improve.

  • 4.
    Ekdahl, Anne W
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society (NVS), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Wirehn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Alwin, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Husberg, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Eckerblad, Jeanette
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Carlsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Costs and Effects of an Ambulatory Geriatric Unit (the AGe-FIT Study): A Randomized Controlled Trial2015In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, ISSN 1538-9375, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 497-503Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To examine costs and effects of care based on comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) provided by an ambulatory geriatric care unit (AGU) in addition to usual care.

    DESIGN: Assessor-blinded, single-center randomized controlled trial.

    SETTING: AGU in an acute hospital in southeastern Sweden.

    PARTICIPANTS: Community-dwelling individuals aged 75 years or older who had received inpatient hospital care 3 or more times in the past 12 months and had 3 or more concomitant medical diagnoses were eligible for study inclusion and randomized to the intervention group (IG; n = 208) or control group (CG; n = 174). Mean age (SD) was 82.5 (4.9) years.

    INTERVENTION: Participants in the IG received CGA-based care at the AGU in addition to usual care.

    OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome was number of hospitalizations. Secondary outcomes were days in hospital and nursing home, mortality, cost of public health and social care, participant' sense of security in care, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL).

    RESULTS: Baseline characteristics did not differ between groups. The number of hospitalizations did not differ between the IG (2.1) and CG (2.4), but the number of inpatient days was lower in the IG (11.1 vs 15.2; P = .035). The IG showed trends of reduced mortality (hazard ratio 1.51; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.988-2.310; P = .057) and an increased sense of security in care interaction. No difference in HRQoL was observed. Costs for the IG and CG were 33,371£ (39,947£) and 30,490£ (31,568£; P = .432).

    CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: This study of CGA-based care was performed in an ambulatory care setting, in contrast to the greater part of studies of the effects of CGA, which have been conducted in hospital settings. This study confirms the superiority of this type of care to elderly people in terms of days in hospital and sense of security in care interaction and that a shift to more accessible care for older people with multimorbidity is possible without increasing costs. This study can aid the planning of future interventions for older people.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION: clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01446757.

  • 5.
    Iresjö, Britt‐Marie
    et al.
    Department of Surgery, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Wang, Wenhua
    Department of Surgery, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Nilsberth, Camilla
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Andersson, Marianne
    Department of Surgery, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Lönnroth, Christina
    Department of Surgery, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Smedh, Ulrika
    Department of Surgery, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Food intake, tumor growth, and weight loss in EP2 receptor subtype knockout mice bearing PGE2-producing tumors2015In: Physiological Reports, E-ISSN 2051-817X, ISSN 2051-817X, Vol. 3, no 7, p. 1-7, article id e12441Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous studies in our laboratory have demonstrated that prostaglandin (PG) E2 is involved in anorexia/cachexia development in MCG 101 tumor‐bearing mice. In the present study, we investigate the role of PGE receptor subtype EP2 in the development of anorexia after MCG 101 implantation in wild‐type (EP2+/+) or EP2‐receptor knockout (EP2−/−) mice. Our results showed that host absence of EP2 receptors attenuated tumor growth and development of anorexia in tumor‐bearing EP2 knockout mice compared to tumor‐bearing wild‐type animals. Microarray profiling of the hypothalamus revealed a relative twofold change in expression of around 35 genes including mRNA transcripts coding for Phospholipase A2 and Prostaglandin D2 synthase (Ptgds) in EP2 receptor knockout mice compared to wild‐type mice. Prostaglandin D2 synthase levels were increased significantly in EP2 receptor knockouts, suggesting that improved food intake may depend on altered balance of prostaglandin production in hypothalamus since PGE2 and PGD2 display opposing effects in feeding control.

  • 6.
    Johansson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping.
    Cognitive impairment and its consequences in everyday life2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim was to improve knowledge of the consequences of cognitive dysfunction in everyday life and of instruments to make these assessments. The thesis contains four studies each of different design using different populations.

    In study I, the relationship between cognitive function, ability to perform activities of daily living and perceived health-related quality of life were investigated in a population of 85-year-old individuals in the community of Linköping (n = 373). The study was part of the Elderly in Linköping Screening Assessment 85 (ELSA 85). Even mild cognitive dysfunction correlated with impaired ability to perform activities of daily living and lower health-related quality of life.

    In study II, the diagnostic accuracy and clinical utility of Cognistat, a cognitive screening instrument, were evaluated for identifying individuals with cognitive impairment in a primary care population. Cognistat has relatively good diagnostic accuracy with a sensitivity of 0.85, a specificity of 0.79 and a Clinical Utility Index (CUI) of 0.72. The corresponding values were 0.59, 0.91 and 0.53 for the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), and 0.26, 0.88 and 0.20 for the Clock Drawing Test (CDT).

    In study III, the aim was to develop an instrument measuring self-perceived or caregiver reported ability to perform everyday life activities in persons with suspected cognitive impairment or dementia and to perform psychometric testing of this instrument, named the Cognitive Impairment in Daily Life (CID). The CID was found to have good content validity.

    In study IV, experiences of cognitive impairment, its consequences in everyday life and the need for support in persons with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or mild dementia and their relatives were explored. Interviews were performed with five people with MCI, eight people with mild dementia and their relatives (n = 13). The main finding was that persons with MCI and dementia experienced cognitive changes that could be burdensome and result in changed activity patterns.

    In conclusion, the findings support earlier research and show that cognitive dysfunction even at mild stages has an impact on everyday life and reduces perceived quality of life. To improve interventions for persons with cognitive impairment, it is important to assess not only cognitive function but also its consequences in everyday life activities.

    List of papers
    1. Cognition, daily living, and health-related quality of life in 85-year-olds in Sweden
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cognition, daily living, and health-related quality of life in 85-year-olds in Sweden
    2012 (English)In: Aging, Neuropsychology and Cognition, ISSN 1382-5585, E-ISSN 1744-4128, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 421-432Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates how cognition influences activities of daily living and health-related quality of life in 85-year-olds in Sweden (n = 373). Data collection included a postal questionnaire comprising demographics and health-related quality of life measured by the EQ-5D. The ability to perform personal activities of daily living (PADL) was assessed during a home visit that included administering the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE). Cognitive impairment was shown in 108 individuals (29%). The majority were independent with respect to PADL. A larger number of participants with cognitive impairment reported that they needed assistance in instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) compared to the group without cognitive impairment. Impaired cognition was significantly related to problems with IADL. Significant but low correlations were found between cognition and health-related quality of life – higher ratings on perceived quality of life correlated with higher results on the MMSE.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Taylor & Francis, 2012
    Keywords
    Elderly; Cognitive impairment; Population study; Daily living; Quality
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-77575 (URN)10.1080/13825585.2011.629290 (DOI)000306171800005 ()
    Available from: 2012-05-23 Created: 2012-05-23 Last updated: 2017-12-07
    2. Clinical Utility of Cognistat in Multiprofessional Team Evalutations of Patients with Cognitive Impairment in Swedish Primary Care
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Clinical Utility of Cognistat in Multiprofessional Team Evalutations of Patients with Cognitive Impairment in Swedish Primary Care
    2014 (English)In: International Journal of Family Medicine, ISSN 2090-2042, E-ISSN 2090-2050, Vol. 2014, p. 649253-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Diagnostic evaluations of dementia are often performed in primary health care (PHC). Cognitive evaluation requires validated instruments.

    Objective. To investigate the diagnostic accuracy and clinical utility of Cognistat in a primary care population.

    Methods. Participants were recruited from 4 PHC centres; 52 had cognitive symptoms and 29 were presumed cognitively healthy. Participants were tested using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), the Clock Drawing Test (CDT), and Cognistat. Clinical diagnoses, based on independent neuropsychological examination and a medical consensus discussion in secondary care, were used as criteria for diagnostic accuracy analyses.

    Results. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 0.85, 0.79, 0.85, and 0.79, respectively, for Cognistat; 0.59, 0.91, 0.90, and 0.61 for MMSE; 0.26, 0.88, 0.75, and 0.46 for CDT; 0.70, 0.79, 0.82, and 0.65 for MMSE and CDT combined. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.82 for Cognistat, 0.75 for MMSE, 0.57 for CDT, and 0.74 for MMSE and CDT combined.

    Conclusions. The diagnostic accuracy and clinical utility of Cognistat was better than the other tests alone or combined. Cognistat is well adapted for cognitive evaluations in PHC and can help the general practitioner to decide which patients should be referred to secondary care.

     

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 2014
    National Category
    Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-107048 (URN)10.1155/2014/649253 (DOI)
    Available from: 2014-06-04 Created: 2014-06-04 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
    3. Development of an instrument for measuring activities of daily living in persons with suspected cognitive impairment
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development of an instrument for measuring activities of daily living in persons with suspected cognitive impairment
    2016 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 230-239Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: According to the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare, structured assessment of function and activity has high priority when investigating for dementia.

    Aim/objectives: The aim was to develop and psychometrically test an instrument to measure self-reported and/or informant-reported ability to perform activities of daily living in persons with suspected cognitive impairment.

    Material and methods: The Cognitive Impairment in Daily Life (CID) instrument has been developed in several phases. Content validity was achieved through five expert panels using a Content Validity Index (CVI). The content was tested further in a pilot study of 51 patients and 49 relatives from primary care or a specialist memory clinic.

    Results: Content validity was good with a CVI index of 0.83. All patients considered that relevant activities were included. Most relatives considered that the activities included in the instrument were adequate and captured the patients’ difficulties in daily life. Some adjustments to the items and scale were suggested and these were done after each phase. In general, relatives indicated more difficulties than patients.

    Conclusion: The CID instrument seems promising in terms of content validity. Further testing of reliability and construct validity is ongoing.

    Keywords
    Cognition, dementia investigation, instrument development
    National Category
    Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-115306 (URN)10.3109/11038128.2016.1139621 (DOI)000374634100006 ()
    Available from: 2015-03-13 Created: 2015-03-13 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
    4. Cognitive impairment and its consequences in everyday life: experiences of people with mild cognitive impairment or mild dementia and their relatives
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cognitive impairment and its consequences in everyday life: experiences of people with mild cognitive impairment or mild dementia and their relatives
    2015 (English)In: International psychogeriatrics, ISSN 1041-6102, E-ISSN 1741-203X, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 949-958Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim of this study was to explore experiences of cognitive impairment, its consequences in everyday life and need for support in people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or mild dementia and their relatives.

    Methods: A qualitative approach with an explorative design with interviews was chosen. The participants included five people with MCI and eight people with mild dementia and their relatives. All participants were recruited at a geriatric memory clinic in Sweden. The Grounded Theory method was used.

    Results: The following categories emerged: noticing cognitive changes; changed activity patterns; coping strategies; uncertainty about own ability and environmental reactions; support in everyday life; support from the healthcare system; consequences in everyday life for relatives; and support for relatives. The main findings were that people with MCI and dementia experienced cognitive changes that could be burdensome and changed activity patterns. Most of them, however, considered themselves capable of coping on their own. The relatives noticed cognitive changes and activity disruptions to a greater extent and tried to be supportive in everyday life. Degree of awareness varied and lack of awareness could lead to many problems in everyday life.

    Conclusions: Perceived cognitive impairment and its consequences in everyday life were individual and differed among people with MCI or dementia and their relatives. Thus, healthcare professionals must listen to both people with cognitive impairment and their relatives for optimal individual care planning. Support such as education groups and day care could be more tailored towards the early stages of dementia.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Cambridge University Press, 2015
    Keywords
    Alzheimer’s disease; activities of daily living; qualitative research
    National Category
    Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-115307 (URN)10.1017/S1041610215000058 (DOI)000354093800009 ()25644289 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2015-03-13 Created: 2015-03-13 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
  • 7.
    Johansson, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science.
    Marcusson, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science.
    Wressle, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping.
    Cognitive impairment and its consequences in everyday life: experiences of people with mild cognitive impairment or mild dementia and their relatives2015In: International psychogeriatrics, ISSN 1041-6102, E-ISSN 1741-203X, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 949-958Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim of this study was to explore experiences of cognitive impairment, its consequences in everyday life and need for support in people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or mild dementia and their relatives.

    Methods: A qualitative approach with an explorative design with interviews was chosen. The participants included five people with MCI and eight people with mild dementia and their relatives. All participants were recruited at a geriatric memory clinic in Sweden. The Grounded Theory method was used.

    Results: The following categories emerged: noticing cognitive changes; changed activity patterns; coping strategies; uncertainty about own ability and environmental reactions; support in everyday life; support from the healthcare system; consequences in everyday life for relatives; and support for relatives. The main findings were that people with MCI and dementia experienced cognitive changes that could be burdensome and changed activity patterns. Most of them, however, considered themselves capable of coping on their own. The relatives noticed cognitive changes and activity disruptions to a greater extent and tried to be supportive in everyday life. Degree of awareness varied and lack of awareness could lead to many problems in everyday life.

    Conclusions: Perceived cognitive impairment and its consequences in everyday life were individual and differed among people with MCI or dementia and their relatives. Thus, healthcare professionals must listen to both people with cognitive impairment and their relatives for optimal individual care planning. Support such as education groups and day care could be more tailored towards the early stages of dementia.

  • 8.
    Ludvigsson, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Marcusson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping.
    Wressle, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping.
    Normal Aging or Depression? A Qualitative Study on the Differences Between Subsyndromal Depression and Depression in Very Old People.2015In: The Gerontologist, ISSN 0016-9013, E-ISSN 1758-5341, Vol. 55, no 5, p. 760-769Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose of the Study: The aim of this study was to make a qualitative comparison of experiences of being in very old people with subsyndromal depression (SSD), in relation to the experiences of very old people with syndromal depression or nondepression. Through investigation and deeper understanding of the interface between depressive disease and normal aging, clinicians might give more accurate prevention or treatment to those very old persons who need such help.

    DESIGN AND METHODS: Semistructured qualitative interviews were conducted for 27 individuals of 87-88 years of age, who were categorized in the 3 strata of nondepressive, SSD, and syndromal depression. Transcripts were analyzed using qualitative content analysis within each stratum and later with a comparison between the strata.

    RESULTS: The content analysis resulted in 4 themes in people with SSD, as defined by a self-report depression screening instrument, giving a comprehensive picture of SSD in very old people, and also showed qualitative differences between the SSD, syndromal depression, and nondepressive groups. A main finding was that SSD differs qualitatively from syndromal depression but not clearly from nondepression.

    IMPLICATIONS: The results might indicate that SSD in very old people is not related to pathology but to normal aging, even though the condition correlates with negative health parameters. Overlooking certain psychosocial aspects of living in the very old may pose a risk of both underdiagnosis and overdiagnosis in the spectrum of depressive disorders.

  • 9.
    Nägga, Katarina
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Clinical Memory Research Unit Lund University.
    Mayer, Sibylle
    Cinical Memory Research Unit Lund University.
    Marcusson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping.
    Wressle, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping.
    Evaluation of short cognitive screening tests in 85-year-old men and women2015In: European Geriatric Medicine, ISSN 1878-7649, E-ISSN 1878-7657, Vol. 6, no 6, p. 545-550Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The study aimed to investigate different aspects of cognition using the Cognitive Assessment Battery (CAB) in community-dwelling older adults aged 85 years. We also investigated the eventual influence of sex on the results and aimed to identify predictors for further cognitive decline after 1 year. Methods: CAB consists of 10 subtests covering the cognitive domains of speed and attention, learning and episodic memory, visuospatial abilities, language, and executive functions. Cognitive tests were performed at baseline (n = 335) and follow-up after 1 year (n = 270). Results: Univariate statistics revealed that men performed better than women on episodic memory (P < 0.05) and on the naming test (P < 0.001). However, floor effects in the paragraph memory test were revealed. There was a high rate of abnormal results on Token Test (67%), PaSMO (50%), Clox (48%), and the cube copying (40%) tests in participants with normal cognition. Logistic regression showed that impaired results on the Stroop III test (odds ratio, 2.38; P < 0.05) was independently associated with an increased risk of cognitive decline. Conclusion: Men performed better than women on the memory and on the naming test. However, due to floor effects in the paragraph memory test in 85 year olds, these results can be disputed. The high rate of abnormal results on the Token Test, PaSMO, Clox, and the cube copying tests in cases with normal cognition indicate that these tests are less suitable for screening in the age group. Impaired result on the Stroop test increased the risk more than two-fold for cognitive decline after 1 year.

  • 10.
    Samuelsson, Kersti
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wressle, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping.
    Turning evidence into practice: Barriers to research use among occupational therapists2015In: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 0308-0226, E-ISSN 1477-6006, Vol. 78, no 3, p. 175-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Research has demonstrated that occupational therapists generally have a positive attitude regarding the use of evidence in their daily practice and decision-making. In addition, occupational therapists are expected to implement evidencebased practice, which is often understood as equivalent to research. However, evidence-based practice might be difficult to reconcile with occupational therapy from a client-centred focus. This study examines what occupational therapists perceive as barriers to research use and discusses the challenge of clinical implementation.

    Method: This study uses a descriptive cross-sectional design. The Barriers to Research Utilization Scale questionnaire was mailed to 807 randomly selected Swedish occupational therapists. The response rate was 59%.

    Findings: The occupational therapists identified three main barriers to the use of research: insufficient facilities (82%); lack of time to read research (77%); difficulty understanding statistical analyses (75%). Degree of education was shown to affect results; occupational therapists with higher education levels indicated a higher use of research.

    Conclusion: Implementing research in clinical practice is a challenge. Occupational therapists are interested but they lack the optimal prerequisites and time.

  • 11.
    Wressle, Ewa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping.
    Samuelsson, Kersti
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The self-reported use of research in clinical practice: A survey of occupational therapists in Sweden2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 226-234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Today, healthcare providers and occupational therapists are increasingly required to rely on evidence-based practices. In both out-patient and in-patient settings, the use of research-based practices can be identified using the questionnaire Research Utilization Measure. Aim: This study explores how occupational therapists in Sweden perceive research utilization. Method: The Research Utilization measure was sent to 807 randomly selected occupational therapists in Sweden, and the response rate was 59% (n=472). Results: The majority of respondents (56%, n=256) reported use of research-based knowledge in their practice “very or rather often”, although 49% (n=225) of these therapists noted that they “very seldom or never” discussed research findings with their managers. Differences in answers for most items were related to degree of education and length of experience. Occupational therapists with higher education levels more often reported use of research in their clinical practice and therapists with greater experience less often reported use of research in their clinical practice. Conclusion: Education seems to influence the degree to which occupational therapists rely on research to inform their practices. A future challenge for managers and occupational therapists is to create strategic discussions on how to implement treatment that is based on current research.

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