liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 10 of 10
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1.
    Erichsén, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Linköping. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Constipation in specialized palliative care: prevalence, definition and patient perceived symptom distress2015In: Journal of Palliative Medicine, ISSN 1096-6218, E-ISSN 1557-7740, Vol. 18, no 7, 585-592 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: The prevalence of constipation among patients in palliative care has varied in prior research, from 18-90 %, depending on different study factors.

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to describe and explore the prevalence and symptom distress of constipation, using different definitions of constipation, in patients admitted to specialized palliative care settings.

    Methods: Data was collected in a cross-sectional survey from 485 patients in 38 palliative care units in Sweden. Variables were analyzed using logistic regression and summarized as odds ratio (OR).

    Result: The prevalence of constipation varied between 7 – 43 %, depending on the definition used. Two constipation- groups were found: (i) Medical constipation- group (MCG; ≤ 3 defecations/week n=114; 23%); (ii) Perceived constipation- group (PCG; Patients with a perception of being constipated the last two weeks; n= 171; 35%). Three sub-groups emerged: patients with (a) only medical constipation (7 %), (b) only perceived constipation (19 %), and (c) with both medical and perceived constipation (16%). There were no differences in symptom severity between groups; 71% of all constipated patients had severe constipation.

    Conclusion: The prevalence of constipation may differ, depending on the definition used and how constipation is assessed. In this study we found two main groups and three sub-groups, analyzed from the definitions of frequency of bowel movements and experience of being constipated. To be able to identify constipation, the patients’ definition has to be further explored and assessed.

  • 2.
    Kastbom, Lisa
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Central County. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping. Vrinnevi Hospital, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Marit
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    A good death from the perspective of palliative cancer patients2017In: Supportive Care in Cancer, ISSN 0941-4355, E-ISSN 1433-7339, Vol. 25, no 3, 933-939 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although previous research has indicated some recurrent themes and similarities between what patients from different cultures regard as a good death, the concept is complex and there is lack of studies from the Nordic countries. The aim of this study was to explore the perception of a good death in dying cancer patients in Sweden. Interviews were conducted with 66 adult patients with cancer in the palliative phase who were recruited from home care and hospital care. Interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Participants viewed death as a process. A good death was associated with living with the prospect of imminent death, preparing for death and dying comfortably, e.g., dying quickly, with independence, with minimised suffering and with social relations intact. Some were comforted by their belief that death is predetermined. Others felt uneasy as they considered death an end to existence. Past experiences of the death of others influenced participants views of a good death. Healthcare staff caring for palliative patients should consider asking them to describe what they consider a good death in order to identify goals for care. Exploring patients personal experience of death and dying can help address their fears as death approaches.

  • 3.
    Lind, Leili
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. SICS East Swedish ICT, Linköping, Sweden.
    Carlgren, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Linköping.
    Karlsson, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Old-and With Severe Heart Failure: Telemonitoring by Using Digital Pen Technology in Specialized Homecare: System Description, Implementation, and Early Results2016In: Computers, Informatics, Nursing, ISSN 1538-2931, E-ISSN 1538-9774, Vol. 34, no 8, 360-368 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Telehealth programs for heart failure have been studied using a variety of techniques. Because currently a majority of the elderly are nonusers of computers and Internet, we developed a home telehealth system based on digital pen technology. Fourteen patients (mean age, 84 years [median, 83 years]) with severe heart failure participated in a 13-month pilot study in specialized homecare. Participants communicated patient-reported outcome measures daily using the digital pen and health diary forms, submitting a total of 3 520 reports. The reports generated a total of 632 notifications when reports indicated worsening health. Healthcare professionals reviewed reports frequently, more than 4700 times throughout the study, and acted on the information provided. Patients answered questionnaires and were observed in their home environment when using the system. Results showed that the technology was accepted by participants: patients experienced an improved contact with clinicians; they felt more compliant with healthcare professionals advice, and they felt more secure and more involved in their own care. Via the system, the healthcare professionals detected heart failure-related deteriorations at an earlier stage, and as a consequence, none of the patients were admitted into hospital care during the study.

  • 4.
    Lind, Leili
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. SICS East Swedish ICT, Linköping, Sweden.
    Carlgren, Gunnar
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Linköping.
    Mudra, Jacqueline
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Linköping.
    Synnergren, Henrik
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Linköping.
    Hilding, Niclas
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Linköping.
    Karlsson, daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Persson, Hans Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Respiratory Medicine.
    Preliminary results of a telemonitoring study: COPD and heart failure patients exhibit great difference in their need of health care2015In: European Respiratory Journal: Official Scientific Journal of ERS / [ed] Marc Humbert, European Respiratory Society , 2015, Vol. 46/suppl 59, PA2790-PA2790 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Growing populations of elderly patients with advanced stages of COPD or heart failure (HF) urge the need for specialized health care in the patients' home. A telemonitoring study has been initiated including patients using digital pens. Health care was provided by the specialized home care unit at a university hospital. Through an IT system the staff checked all daily patient reports. We hypothesized that the two groups of patients, advanced COPD or HF, would exhibit differences regarding exacerbations and the need of health care.

    Objective: To study exacerbations of COPD or HF, and patient health care consumption.

    Methods: A tele-monitoring system, the Health diary, which is based on digital pen technology, was employed. Exacerbations were identified using information provided through the telemonitoring system. Consumed health care was assessed as the number of patient contacts (home visits or telephone consultations).

    Results: Presently, 33 patients with advanced disease are enrolled (13 COPD and 20 HF patients) of which 11 patients (6 COPD and 5 HF patients) have completed the 1-yr study period or have died during the study period (2 COPD and 4 HF patients). Exacerbations were 2.8 and 0.8 and patient contacts were 96 and 42 per COPD and HF patient, respectively. While HF patients were significantly older than COPD patients, the two groups demonstrated no difference regarding gender distribution and comorbidity.

    Conclusions: COPD patients exhibit exacerbations more frequently and demand much more home health care than patients with HF do. It seems that this difference of health care consumption is mainly due to disease characteristics.

  • 5.
    Lind, Leili
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. RISE SICS East.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care. Region Östergötland.
    Carlgren, Gunnar
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Linköping.
    Mudra, Jacqueline
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Linköping.
    Synnergren, Henrik
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Linköping.
    Hilding, Niclas
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Linköping.
    Lyth, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care. Region Östergötland.
    Karlsson, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Persson, Hans Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Respiratory Medicine.
    Re-organising care of elderly, multi-morbid COPD and heartfailure patients with low digital literacy: —a 4 year Swedishtelehealth intervention study2016In: Health—exploring complexity: an interdisciplinary systems approach HEC2016 / [ed] Grill, E., Müller, M. & Mansmann, U., Munich, Germany, 2016, Vol. 31, 118-118 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Malmström, Annika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Linköping.
    Skovgaard Poulsen, Hans
    Rigshosp, Denmark.
    Henning Gronberg, Bjorn
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway; Trondheim Regional and University Hospital, Norway.
    Stragliotto, Giuseppe
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Hansen, Steinbjorn
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Asklund, Thomas
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Umeå University, Sweden.
    Holmlund, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Lysiak, Malgorzata
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dowsett, Joseph
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Winther Kristensen, Bjarne
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Center South East Sweden. Regional Cancer Centre South East Sweden, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Sweden; Regional Cancer Centre Stockholm Gotland, Sweden.
    Postoperative neoadjuvant temozolomide before radiotherapy versus standard radiotherapy in patients 60 years or younger with anaplastic astrocytoma or glioblastoma: a randomized trial2017In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 56, no 12, 1776-1785 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: A pilot study of temozolomide (TMZ) given before radiotherapy (RT) for anaplastic astrocytoma (AA) and glioblastoma (GBM) resulted in prolonged survival compared to historical controls receiving RT alone. We therefore investigated neoadjuvant TMZ (NeoTMZ) in a randomized trial. During enrollment, concomitant and adjuvant radio-chemotherapy with TMZ became standard treatment. The trial was amended to include concurrent TMZ.Patients and methods: Patients, after surgery for GBM or AA, age 60 years and performance status (PS) 0-2, were randomized to either 2-3 cycles of TMZ, 200mg/m(2) days 1-5 every 28 days, followed by RT 60Gy in 30 fractions or RT only. Patients without progressive disease after two TMZ cycles, received the third cycle. From March 2005, TMZ 75mg/m(2) was administered daily concomitant with RT. TMZ was recommended first-line treatment at progression. Primary endpoint was overall survival and secondary safety.Results: The study closed prematurely after enrolling 144 patients, 103 with GBM and 41 with AA. Median age was 53 years (range 24-60) and 89 (62%) were male. PS was 0-1 for 133 (92%) patients, 53 (37%) had complete surgical resection and 18 (12%) biopsy. Ninety-two (64%) received TMZ concomitant with RT. Seventy-two (50%) were randomized to neoadjuvant treatment. For the overall study population survival was 20.3 months for RT and 17.7 months for NeoTMZ (p=.76), this not reaching the primary objective. For the preplanned subgroup analysis, we found that NeoTMZ AA patients had a median survival of 95.1 months compared to 35.2 months for RT (p=.022). For patients with GBM, no difference in survival was observed (p=.10). MGMT and IDH status affected outcome.Conclusions: No advantage of NeoTMZ was noted for the overall study population or subgroup of GBM, while NeoTMZ resulted in 5 years longer median survival for patients diagnosed as AA.

  • 7.
    Mosrati, Mohamed Ali
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Malmström, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lysiak, Malgorzata
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Krysztofiak, Adam
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hallbeck, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Milos, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hallbeck, Anna-Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bratthall, Charlotte
    Dist Hospital, Sweden.
    Strandeus, Michael
    Ryhov Hospital, Sweden.
    Stenmark Askmalm, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    TERT promoter mutations and polymorphisms as prognostic factors in primary glioblastoma2015In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 6, no 18, 16663-16673 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) activity is up-regulated in several types of tumors including glioblastoma (GBM). In the present study, 128 primary glioblastoma patients were examined for single nucleotide polymorphisms of TERT in blood and in 92 cases for TERT promoter mutations in tumors. TERT promoter mutations were observed in 86% of the tumors and of these, C228T (-124 bp upstream start codon) was detected in 75% and C250T (-146 bp) in 25% of cases. TERT promoter mutations were associated with shorter overall survival (11 vs. 20 months p = 0.002 and 12 vs. 20, p = 0.04 for C228T and C250T, respectively). The minor alleles of rs2736100 and rs10069690 SNPs, located in intron 2 and the promotor regions, respectively, were associated with an increased risk of developing GBM (p = 0.004 and 0.001). GBM patients having both TERT promoter mutations and being homozygous carriers of the rs2853669 C-allele displayed significantly shorter overall survival than those with the wild type allele. The rs2853669 SNP is located in a putative Ets2 binding site in the promoter (-246 bp upstream start codon) close to the C228T and C250T mutation hot spots. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) expression regulated by TERT promoter status and polymorphism, what leads us to think that TERT and IL-6 plays a significant role in GBM, where specific SNPs increase the risk of developing GBM while the rs2853669 SNP and specific mutations in the TERT promoter of the tumor lead to shorter survival.

  • 8.
    Ring Jacobsson, Lisa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Linköping.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Experiences, Own Management and Beliefs regarding Residual Symptoms among People with Coeliac DiseaseManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To explore experiences and beliefs concerning residual symptoms despite a gluten-free diet in women and men with coeliac disease, with a focus on causes and management.

    Background: Between 7% and 30% of people with coeliac disease suffer from residual symptoms, despite following a long-term gluten-free diet, and it has been proposed that women in particular, continue to experience such inconveniences. There is a lack of knowledge about own beliefs concerning the underlying causes of persistent symptoms among people with coeliac disease and their own management of these symptoms.

    Methods: A qualitative explorative design with semi-structured interviews with 22 adults, 11 females and 11 males, with coeliac disease in Sweden. Data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis.

    Results: The disease was continuing to have a substantial impact on the informants’ lives even after several years’ treatment. The interviews revealed residual symptoms of both a gastrointestinal and extra-intestinal nature, which were considered to influence their personality. The management of persistent symptoms resembled thorough detective work, and both efforts to find the missing puzzle piece and strategies to prevent problems were used. Beliefs about the underlying causes of these symptoms were bodily convictions and that it was impossible to live completely gluten-free.

    Conclusion: People with treated coeliac disease, irrespective of gender, may experience residual symptoms of both a physical and psychological nature, causing major negative impacts on their lives in different ways. In the light of this, healthcare staff should change their practices regarding the follow-up of these people, and in addition to medical care should  provide guidance on management strategies to facilitate the daily life of these people. Furthermore, information to people who have just been diagnosed should make them aware of the possibility that they may come to experience continued symptoms, despite treatment.

  • 9.
    Roodakker, Kenney R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Elsir, Tamador
    Uppsala University, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Edqvist, Per-Henrik D.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Hagerstrand, Daniel
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Carison, Joseph
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Lysiak, Malgorzata
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Sweden; Regional Cancer Centre, Sweden.
    Ponten, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Center South East Sweden.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Stupp, Roger
    University of Zurich Hospital, Switzerland.
    Tchougounova, Elena
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Nister, Monica
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Malmström, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Linköping.
    Smits, Anja
    Uppsala University, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    PROX1 is a novel pathway-specific prognostic biomarker for high-grade astrocytomas; results from independent glioblastoma cohorts stratified by age and IDH mutation status2016In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 7, no 45, 72431-72442 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PROX1 is a transcription factor with an essential role in embryonic development and determination of cell fate. In addition, PROX1 has been ascribed suppressive as well as oncogenic roles in several human cancers, including brain tumors. In this study we explored the correlation between PROX1 expression and patient survival in high-grade astrocytomas. For this purpose, we analyzed protein expression in tissue microarrays of tumor samples stratified by patient age and IDH mutation status. We initially screened 86 unselected high-grade astrocytomas, followed by 174 IDH1-R132H1 immunonegative glioblastomas derived from patients aged 60 years and older enrolled in the Nordic phase III trial of elderly patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Representing the younger population of glioblastomas, we studied 80 IDH-wildtype glioblastomas from patients aged 18-60 years. There was no correlation between PROX1 protein and survival for patients with primary glioblastomas included in these cohorts. In contrast, high expression of PROX1 protein predicted shorter survival in the group of patients with IDH-mutant anaplastic astrocytomas and secondary glioblastomas. The prognostic impact of PROX1 in IDH-mutant 1p19q non-codeleted high-grade astrocytomas, as well as the negative findings in primary glioblastomas, was corroborated by gene expression data extracted from the Cancer Genome Atlas. We conclude that PROX1 is a new prognostic biomarker for 1p19q non-codeleted high-grade astrocytomas that have progressed from pre-existing lowgrade tumors and harbor IDH mutations.

  • 10.
    van Thuijl, Hinke F.
    et al.
    University of Calif San Francisco, CA 94143 USA; Vrije University of Amsterdam Medical Centre, Netherlands; Vrije University of Amsterdam Medical Centre, Netherlands.
    Mazor, Tali
    University of Calif San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Johnson, Brett E.
    University of Calif San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Fouse, Shaun D.
    University of Calif San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Aihara, Koki
    University of Tokyo, Japan; University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Hong, Chibo
    University of Calif San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Malmström, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Linköping.
    Hallbeck, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Heimans, Jan J.
    Vrije University of Amsterdam Medical Centre, Netherlands.
    Kloezeman, Jenneke J.
    Erasmus MC, Netherlands.
    Stenmark Askmalm, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Lamfers, Martine L. M.
    Erasmus MC, Netherlands.
    Saito, Nobuhito
    University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Aburatani, Hiroyuki
    University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Mukasa, Akitake
    University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Berger, Mitchell S.
    University of Calif San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Taylor, Barry S.
    Mem Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre, NY 10021 USA; Mem Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre, NY 10021 USA.
    Molinaro, Annette M.
    University of Calif San Francisco, CA 94143 USA; University of Calif San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Wesseling, Pieter
    Vrije University of Amsterdam Medical Centre, Netherlands; Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Reijneveld, Jaap C.
    Vrije University of Amsterdam Medical Centre, Netherlands; University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Chang, Susan M.
    University of Calif San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Ylstra, Bauke
    Vrije University of Amsterdam Medical Centre, Netherlands.
    Costello, Joseph F.
    University of Calif San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Evolution of DNA repair defects during malignant progression of low-grade gliomas after temozolomide treatment2015In: Acta Neuropathologica, ISSN 0001-6322, E-ISSN 1432-0533, Vol. 129, no 4, 597-607 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Temozolomide (TMZ) increases the overall survival of patients with glioblastoma (GBM), but its role in the clinical management of diffuse low-grade gliomas (LGG) is still being defined. DNA hypermethylation of the O (6) -methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter is associated with an improved response to TMZ treatment, while inactivation of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) pathway is associated with therapeutic resistance and TMZ-induced mutagenesis. We previously demonstrated that TMZ treatment of LGG induces driver mutations in the RB and AKT-mTOR pathways, which may drive malignant progression to secondary GBM. To better understand the mechanisms underlying TMZ-induced mutagenesis and malignant progression, we explored the evolution of MGMT methylation and genetic alterations affecting MMR genes in a cohort of 34 treatment-na less than ve LGGs and their recurrences. Recurrences with TMZ-associated hypermutation had increased MGMT methylation compared to their untreated initial tumors and higher overall MGMT methylation compared to TMZ-treated non-hypermutated recurrences. A TMZ-associated mutation in one or more MMR genes was observed in five out of six TMZ-treated hypermutated recurrences. In two cases, pre-existing heterozygous deletions encompassing MGMT, or an MMR gene, were followed by TMZ-associated mutations in one of the genes of interest. These results suggest that tumor cells with methylated MGMT may undergo positive selection during TMZ treatment in the context of MMR deficiency.

1 - 10 of 10
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf