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  • 1.
    Anskär, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Cityhälsan Centrum.
    Falk, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Kärna.
    Sverker, Annette
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    ‘But there are so many referrals which are totally...only generating workand irritation’: a qualitative study of physicians’and nurses’experiences ofwork tasks in primary care in Sweden2022In: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, ISSN 0281-3432, E-ISSN 1502-7724, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 350-359Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective This study explored the perceptions of physicians and nurses in Swedish primary care regarding the legitimacy of their work tasks and the use of their professional competence. Design and setting This qualitative study was based on manifest content analysis. Data were collected with individual semi-structured interviews of physicians and nurses at publicly managed primary care centres in the Region ostergotland, Sweden. To include both large and small primary care centres, we applied strategic sampling. Among 15 primary care centres invited, nine agreed to participate, including four urban, two suburban, and three rural centres. Subjects The study included 11 physicians and 13 nurses from nine primary care centres. Main outcome measures and results The physicians and nurses perceived several of their work tasks as illegitimate. In addition, they experienced work-related difficulties, due to resource shortages, challenging electronic data systems, work inefficiencies, and that there were insufficient cooperation with, and problems drawing the line between, primary care and hospital care responsibilities. However, most found that their individual expertise was appropriately used, overall. Conclusions Strained work situations and illegitimate work tasks may inflate discontentment and lead to negative work stress. Nevertheless, the staff felt that competence was used appropriately in the tasks considered legitimate.

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  • 2.
    Ardern, Clare
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. School of Allied Health, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia, Aspetar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Doha, Qatar.
    Tagesson (Sonesson), Sofi
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Forssblad, M
    Stockholm Sports Trauma Research Center, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Capio Artro Clinic, Sophiahemmet, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Kvist, Joanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Comparison of patient-reported outcomes among those who chose ACL reconstruction or non-surgical treatment.2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 535-544Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of our study was to cross-sectionally compare patient-reported knee function outcomes between people who chose non-surgical treatment for ACL injury and those who chose ACL reconstruction. We extracted Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and EuroQoL-5D data entered into the Swedish National ACL Registry by patients with a non-surgically treated ACL injury within 180 days of injury (n = 306), 1 (n = 350), 2 (n = 358), and 5 years (n = 114) after injury. These data were compared cross-sectionally to data collected pre-operatively (n = 306) and at 1 (n = 350), 2 (n = 358), and 5 years (n = 114) post-operatively from age- and gender-matched groups of patients with primary ACL reconstruction. At the 1 and 2 year comparisons, patients who chose surgical treatment reported superior quality of life and function in sports (1 year mean difference 12.4 and 13.2 points, respectively; 2 year mean difference 4.5 and 6.9 points, respectively) compared to those who chose non-surgical treatment. Patients who chose ACL reconstruction reported superior outcomes for knee symptoms and function, and in knee-specific and health-related quality of life, compared to patients who chose non-surgical treatment.

  • 3.
    Areskoug-Josefsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Sweden; Oslo Metropolitan University, Oslo, Norway; VID Specialized University, Sandnes, Norway.
    Hjalmarsson, Sara
    Swedish Rheumatism Association, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Sverker, Annette M.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Co-Creation of a Working Model to Improve Sexual Health for Persons Living with Rheumatological Diseases2020In: Open Journal of Rheumatology and Autoimmune Diseases, ISSN 2163-9914, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 109-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Sexual health needs are insufficiently met for persons living with rheumatological diseases and it is necessary to create better ways to meet these needs.Objective: To co-create a working model to improve sexual health for persons living with rheumatological diseases, that can be used by rheumatological teams in regular rheumatology practice.Design: This study applied a co-creation design with three key features: 1) it took a systems perspective with emergent multiple interactive entities; 2) the research process was viewed as a creative endeavour with strong links to design, while human imagination and the individual experience of patient and staff were at the core of the creative design effort; 3) the process of the co-creative efforts was as important as the generated product.Results: A model defining the role of the patient, the professionals, and the team in optimizing sexual health for persons living with rheumatological diseases was co-created. The model can be seen as a practice guideline, which includes the support needed from and to each participant in the process of promoting sexual health, while being within the professional scope of the professionals’ knowledge and capacity, and in line with the needs of the persons living with rheumatological diseases.Discussion and Conclusions: The co-creative work process identified crucial factors in promoting sexual health, resulting in a useful model for patients, professionals and teams. Co-creation was experienced to be a useful research design to improve rheumatological care, through valuing and using the competence of all research members equally.

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  • 4.
    Bergström, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Larsson Ranada, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sverker, Annette M.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health. Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Social Work. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Operations management PVC.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    A dyadic exploration of support in everyday life of persons with RA and their significant others2023In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 616-627Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Support from significant others is important for participation in everyday life for persons with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Meanwhile, significant others also experience limitations. Aims To explore how support is expressed by persons with RA and significant others, and how support relates to participation in everyday life of persons with RA. Material and methods Sixteen persons with RA and their significant others participated in individual semi-structured interviews. The material was analyzed using dyadic analysis. Results Persons with RA and significant others reported that RA and support had become natural parts of everyday life, especially emotional support. The reciprocal dynamics of support were also expressed as imperative. Also, support from people outside of the dyads and well-functioning communication facilitated everyday life. Conclusions Significant others and the support they give are prominent factors and facilitators in everyday life of persons with RA. Concurrently, the support persons with RA provide is important, along with support from outside of the dyads. Significance The results indicate that the interaction between persons with RA and the social environment is central to gain insight into how support should be provided for optimal participation in everyday life. Significant others can preferably be more involved in the rehabilitation process.

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  • 5.
    Bergström, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sverker, Annette
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Larsson, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Valtersson, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Ostlund, Gunnel
    Malardalen Univ, Sweden.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Significant others influence on participation in everyday life: the perspectives of persons with early diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis2020In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 385-393Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To describe the meaning of significant others in relation to participation in everyday life of persons with early diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Materials and methods: Fifty-nine persons participated in this interview study. Inclusion criteria were three years experience of diagnosis and being of working age. Semi-structured interviews were conducted using critical incident technique (CIT), and the material was analysed using content analysis. Results: Four categories were revealed: (1) My early RA causes activity adaptations for us all, referring to the person and significant others modifying activities. (2) Making the significant others balance between shortfalls and participation, where the participants distinguished between needing help and feeling involved in activities. (3) Physical interactions with significant others, referring to both the problematic and manageable impact RA could have on body contact. (4) Emotions in relation to activities with others, where participants described feelings of failing others, and anxiety about future activities. Conclusions: For persons with early diagnosed RA, significant others can be both hindering and facilitating for participation in everyday life. As a clinical implication, it is valuable to identify how significant others can be involved in the rehabilitation process, to enhance participation in everyday life early in the disease process.

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  • 6.
    Bergström, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sverker, Annette M.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Larsson Ranada, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Valtersson, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    Mälardalens högskola, Hälsa och välfärd, Sweden.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Significant others as both barriers and facilitators for participation in daily activities in persons with rheumatoid arthritis: an interview study within the Swedish TIRA project2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Bergström, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Sverker, Annette
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för hälsa, vård och välfärd, Sweden.
    Larsson Ranada, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Valtersson, Eva
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Närståendes betydelse för delaktighet i vardagen hos personer med reumatoid artrit.2019In: Best Practice, ISSN 1329-1874Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8.
    Björk, Mathilda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Bergström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sverker, Annette
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Brodin, N.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Danderyd Hosp, Sweden.
    Measures of Participation in Persons With Musculoskeletal Conditions2020In: Arthritis care & research, ISSN 2151-464X, E-ISSN 2151-4658, Vol. 72, p. 486-498Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

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  • 9.
    Björk, Mathilda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Valtersson, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Stenström, Birgitta
    Reumatologförbundet, Sweden.
    Sverker, Annette
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Disability in the feet related to participation in daily life in patients with early RA: – an interview study in the Swedish TIRA project2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Björk, Mathilda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Valtersson, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    School of Health Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Stenström, Birgitta
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Sverker, Annette
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Foot barriers in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: an interview study among Swedish women and men2018In: Arthritis care & research, ISSN 2151-464X, E-ISSN 2151-4658, Vol. 70, no 9, p. 1348-1354Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Foot impairments are related to reduced mobility and participation restrictions in daily activities in patients with established rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The new biological medications are effective and reduce disease activity, but not disability to the same extent. Foot impairments are assumed to be related to participation restrictions also in patients with early RA, diagnosed after the introduction of biological medications. The knowledge of foot impairments needs to be more explored after the introduction of biological disease-modifying drugs (bDMARDs). The aim of this study was to explore the patients' perspective of foot impairments related to early RA.

    METHODS: The sample included 59 patients (20-63 years) who were interviewed about participation dilemmas in daily life using the Critical Incident Technique. The interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed. Data related to foot impairments were extracted and analyzed thematically. A research partner validated the analysis. The study was approved by the Regional Ethics Committee.

    RESULTS: Patients with early RA described a variety of participation restrictions related to foot impairments: 1) foot hindrances in domestic life, 2) foot impairments influencing work, 3) leisure activities restricted by one's feet 4) struggling to be mobile 5) foot impairments as an early sign of rheumatic disease.

    CONCLUSION: There is a need to focus on foot impairments related to early RA, and for health care professionals to understand these signs. A suggestion for future research is to conduct a longitudinal follow-up of foot impairment related to medication, disease activity and disability in patients diagnosed after the introduction of bDMARDs. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 11.
    Classon, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    van den Hurk, Wobbie
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Mindmore AB, Sweden.
    Lyth, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Montreal Cognitive Assessment: Normative Data for Cognitively Healthy Swedish 80-to 94-Year-Olds2022In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, ISSN 1387-2877, E-ISSN 1875-8908, Vol. 87, no 3, p. 1335-1344Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) is sensitive to cognitive impairment; however, it is also sensitive to demographic and socio-cultural factors. This necessitates reliable sub-population norms, but these are often lacking for older adults. Objective: To present demographically adjusted regression-based MoCA norms for cognitively healthy Swedish older adults. Methods: A pseudo-random sample of community-dwelling 80- to 94-year-olds, stratified by age and gender, was invited to the study. Initial telephone interviews and medical records searches (n = 218) were conducted to screen for cognitive impairment. N= 181 eligible participants were administered a protocol including the Swedish version of the MoCA and assessments of global cognition (Mini-Mental State Examination, MMSE) and depression (Patient Health Questionnaire-9, PHQ-9). Individuals scoring in the range of possible cognitive impairment on the MMSE or more than mild depression on the PHQ-9 were excluded (n = 23); three discontinued the test-session. Results: Norms were derived from the remaining n = 158. They were evenly distributed by gender, on average 85 years old, and with a mean education of 11 years. MoCA scores were independently influenced by age and education, together explaining 17.2% of the total variance. Higher age and lower education were associated with lower performance and 46% performed below the original cut-off (< 26/30). Conclusion: The negative impact of increasing age on MoCA performance continues linearly into the nineties in normal aging. Demographic factors should be considered when interpreting MoCA performance and a tool for computing demographically corrected standard scores is provided.

  • 12.
    Dale, Richard Allan
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sverker, Annette
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Hasselberg, Marie
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    School of Health and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Hensing, Gunnel
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Young adults' experiences with near-injury situations: a critical incident study in Sweden2017In: International Journal of Child, Youth & Family Studies, E-ISSN 1920-7298, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 97-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As injuries are the main health threat for young adults (18–29 years) in industrial countries, a better understanding of injury risk is needed for this population. Using the Critical Incident Technique, this study explores how young people experience situations that have the potential to cause physical injury (i.e., near-injury situations). Clearly, understanding how and why near-injury situations arise can be used to develop strategies to help prevent severe injury. Content analysis was used to categorize the characteristics of the experiences into unexpected risk in ordinary tasksduty first, and price for learning. Young adults’ exposures to new or unusual environmental conditions, especially in unexpected risk in ordinary tasks, should be considered when planning injury prevention strategies. A combination of individual, social, and contextual demands and expectations was identified in both work- and sports-related experiences with near-injury situations. The price for learning, which arises from the added risk involved in learning situations, is another condition that was identified and requires further attention. The Critical Incident Technique proved to be a useful method for identifying near-injury situations that might otherwise have been difficult to recall. Young adults’ efforts to display their ability to handle difficult situations at work and in their everyday lives was identified as a major contributor to near-injury situations.

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  • 13.
    Enblom, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Enheten för samordnad cancerutredning. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Steineck, Gunnar
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Gothenburg Univ, Sweden.
    Börjeson, Sussanne
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Methodology Aspects of Nausea Measuring During Pelvic Radiotherapy: Daily Nausea Measuring Is Successful to Identify Patients Experiencing Nausea2020In: Cancer Nursing, ISSN 0162-220X, E-ISSN 1538-9804, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 93-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Nausea seems underreported during pelvic radiotherapy. Objective The aims of this study were to investigate if a 5-week recall measure of nausea covering the entire radiotherapy period was comparable with accumulated daily nausea measurements and to investigate if the measuring method affected potential difference in quality of life (QoL) between nauseated patients and patients free from nausea. Methods This longitudinal methodology study covered 200 patients (mean age, 64 years; 84% women; 69% had gynecological cancer). The patients graded QoL (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General). They registered nausea daily and at a 5-week recall at the end of radiotherapy. Results The nausea-intensity category scale and visual analog scale correlated well (Spearman correlation coefficient = 0.622). According to the 5-week recall, 57 of 157 answering patients (36%) experienced nausea during the radiotherapy period. Using the daily nausea measurements, 94 of 157 patients (60%) experienced nausea (relative risk, 1.65; 95% confidence interval, 1.29-2.10). Of these 94 nauseated patients, 39 (42%) did not report nausea using the 5-week recall. The nauseated patients experienced worse QoL (physical/functional subscores) than patients free from nausea whether nausea was registered daily or at the 5-week recall. Conclusions Almost half, 42%, of the patients who experienced nausea according to daily nausea measurements did not report having had nausea according to the 5-week recall. Nauseated patients graded worse QoL than patients who were free from nausea. Implications for Practice Nursing professionals should measure nausea repeatedly to identify patients at risk of nausea and worsened QoL, to be able to deliver evidence-based antiemetic treatment strategies.

  • 14.
    Enthoven, Paul
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Eddeborn, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Rehabilitation in Motala.
    Abbott, Allan
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Schröder, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fors, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Patients experiences of the BetterBack model of care for low back pain in primary care: a qualitative interview study2021In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 16, no 1, article id 1861719Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to describe patient experiences of received primary care for low back pain (LBP) according to the BetterBack Model of Care (MoC) with a focus on illness beliefs and self-management enablement. Methods: Individual interviews were conducted with 15 adults 4-14 months after receiving treatment according to the BetterBack MoC for LBP in primary care in Sweden. Data were analysed using content analysis. Results: When analysing the data, the following theme emerged; "Participant understanding of their treatment for low back pain and self-management strategies-a matter of support systems", comprising the following categories: "Knowledge translation", "Interaction and dialogue", "The health care professional support" and "Form organization". Participants experienced that they had better knowledge about their LBP and received tools to better manage their health condition. The participants expressed good communication with the treating physiotherapist and provided suggestions to further improve the treatment of LBP. Conclusions: Participants experienced that they had gained new knowledge about their health problems and after the treatment they had the tools to handle their back problems. This suggests that the BetterBack MoC may be used as a basis for a support system to provide valuable tools for self-management for patients with low back pain.

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  • 15.
    Enthoven, Paul
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Menning, Linnea
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Schröder, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fors, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Lindbäck, Yvonne
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Abbott, Allan
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Physiotherapists' experiences of implementation of the BetterBack model of care for low back pain in primary care - a focus group interview study2024In: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The BetterBack model of care (MoC), a best practice physiotherapy MoC for low back pain (LBP), was implemented in Swedish primary care to improve management of patients with LBP and provide patients with support tools to better self-manage episodes of LBP.Purpose: The objective was to describe how physiotherapists in primary care experienced the implementation of the BetterBack MoC for LBP.MethodsFocus group interviews were conducted with physiotherapists in 2018-2019, 14-18 months after the introduction of the BetterBack MoC. Data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis.Results: Five focus group interviews with 23 (15 female and 8 male) physiotherapists, age range 24-61 years were analyzed. A supportive organization and adaptation to the local culture, combined with health care professionals' attitudes and collaboration between physiotherapists emerged as important factors for a successful implementation and for long-term sustainability of the MoC. Physiotherapists had differing opinions if the implementation led to change in clinical practice. Improved confidence in how to manage patients with LBP was expressed by physiotherapists.Conclusions: Several barriers and facilitators influence the implementation of a best practice physiotherapy MoC for LBP in primary care, which need to be considered in future implementation and sustainability processes.

  • 16.
    Enthoven, Paul
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Landén Ludvigsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Rehabilitation in Motala.
    Wibault, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Peterson, Gunnel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    VALIDITY, INTERNAL CONSISTENCY AND SELF-RATED CHANGE OF THE PATIENT ENABLEMENT INSTRUMENT IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC MUSCULOSKELETAL PAIN2019In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 51, no 8, p. 587-597Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Patient enablement reflects patients understanding of and coping with illness. The aim of this study was to investigate the content validity, construct validity, internal consistency and selfrated change (SRC) of the Patient Enablement Instrument (PEI) in patients with whiplash-associated disorders, cervical radiculopathy and mixed chronic pain treated in different settings. Design: Psychometric analyses. Participants: Patients with disabling non-malignant chronic musculoskeletal pain. Methods: Participants answered questionnaires on disability (Neck Disability Index (NDI) or Functional Rating Index (FRI)), anxiety/depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale; HADS) and general health (EuroQol; EQ-5D). Content validity, construct validity (confirmatory factor analysis), internal consistency and cut-off for SRC were investigated for the PEI after treatment. The SRC value was the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve optimal cut-off point. Results: After treatment all items were completed by 516 patients (mean standard deviation (SD) age 45.1 years (SD 10.1), women 75% (n=385)). The 1-factor PEI model had approximate fit to the data. The internal consistency Cronbachs alpha was between 0.878 and 0.929 for the 3 groups. Correlations between the PEI and the NDI/FRI, HADS and EQ-5D were fair to good. The SRCROC for whiplash-associated disorders, cervical radiculopathy and mixed chronic pain groups was 5, 6 and 4 points in the PEI, respectively. Conclusion: The PEI showed fair content validity, construct validity and internal consistency. However, the scale needs further development to improve measurement of change.

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  • 17.
    Filbay, Stephanie R.
    et al.
    Univ Melbourne, Australia.
    Tigerstrand Grevnerts, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Sonesson, Sofi
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hedevik, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kvist, Joanna
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    The Swedish version of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament Quality Of Life measure (ACL-QOL): translation and measurement properties2023In: Quality of Life Research, ISSN 0962-9343, E-ISSN 1573-2649, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 593-604Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose To translate the ACL-QOL from English to Swedish and evaluate measurement properties for use after surgical and non-surgical management of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Methods The ACL-QOL was translated from English to Swedish and data were pooled from 13 cohorts to enable a comprehensive evaluation of measurement properties in line with COSMIN guidelines. We evaluated internal consistency, test-re-test reliability, measurement error, structural validity [confirmatory factor analysis (CFA)], construct validity and responsiveness (hypothesis testing), and floor/ceiling effects. Results were stratified by time since injury (&lt;= 1.5 years; 2-10 years, 15-25 years; &gt; 30 years) and ACL management strategy [surgical (n = 1163), non-surgical (n = 570)]. Results The Swedish ACL-QOL had sufficient internal consistency (total and domain scores) for use in surgically managed (Cronbachs alpha &gt;= 0.744) and non-surgically managed (&gt;= 0.770) ACL-injured individuals at all time-points. Test-re-test reliability was sufficient [intraclass correlation coefficients: all domains &gt; 0.80, total score 0.93 (95% CI 0.86-0.96)]. The standard error of measurement was 5.6 for the total score and ranged from 7.0 to 10.3 for each domain. CFA indicated sufficient SRMR values when using the total score or five domains; however, CFI and RMSEA values did not meet cut-offs for good model fit. Hypothesis testing indicated sufficient construct validity and responsiveness. Floor effects were negligible and ceiling effects were negligible or minor. Conclusion The Swedish version of the ACL-QOL has sufficient internal consistency, test-re-test reliability, construct validity and responsiveness, for use in people with ACL injury managed with or without ACL surgery. Model fit could be improved and investigation into the source of misfit is warranted.

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  • 18. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Fors, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Best Practice Physiotherapy for Patients with Low Back Pain in Primary Care: Clinical Outcomes and Explanatory Factors2023Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Clinical practice guidelines provide general recommendations informing best practice physiotherapy for low back pain (LBP). Despite increased research on LBP, the recommendations have barely changed over the last few decades and the burden of LBP remains. New research strategies have been suggested to further understand the complexity of factors influencing recovery of LBP. Several mechanisms are expected to underpin the benefits of physiotherapy care. How different factors influence and explain treatment outcome in patients in different phases of primary care pathway needs to be better understood for the development of better targeted LBP interventions.

    The overall aim of this thesis was to investigate if and how best practice physiotherapy primary care for patients with LBP can improve clinical outcome.

    Methods: The four papers in the thesis are based on two randomised controlled trials (RCT) evaluating best practice physiotherapy for patients with LBP in different phases of the primary care pathway reflecting the variation of patients’ needs. Two papers investigated pre-surgery physiotherapy compared to being on a waiting-list in patients with degenerative lumbar spine disorders who are surgical candidates (n = 197). Effects on walking ability and quadriceps femoris strength were evaluated. Associations between the pre-surgery physical factors with 1-year post-surgery physical activity (PA) level were analysed using multiple linear regression. The dose-response relationship was investigated comparing the effects of attending ≤11 treatment sessions with ≥12 treatment sessions. Multiple mediation analyses and conditional process analyses were used to explore physical and psychosocial factors as mediators and patients’ treatment expectations as a moderator of the treatment’s effects on disability, back pain intensity, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), and self-rated health.

    Two papers were based on a stepped cluster RCT, where a physiotherapy primary healthcare model for LBP (the BetterBack MoC) was regionally implemented. Patients seeking care for LBP were allocated to either the BetterBack MoC (after implementation) or to routine care (before implementation) (n = 467). In a prospective cohort study within the RCT, the associations between patients’ initial illness perceptions and outcomes in disability, back pain intensity, HRQoL, and self-care enablement (i.e., perceived ability to understand and cope with LBP) after 3 and 12 months were explored using stepwise linear regression. Single mediation analyses were used to test whether a priori hypothesised patients’ illness perceptions and self-care enablement at 3 months mediated effects in disability and pain at 6 months of care according to the BetterBack MoC compared to routine care. Exploratory mediation analyses were also used to compare guideline-adherent care with non-adherent care. Guideline-adherent care was defined as care that included education and exercise interventions and did not include non-evidence-based interventions, referral to specialist care, or imaging.

    Results: Small positive effects from pre-surgery physiotherapy were seen in walking ability and quadriceps femoris strength. No clear dose-response relationship could be demonstrated when comparing the effects of ≤11 treatment sessions with ≥12. Pre-surgery physical outcome measures together explained 27.5% of the variation in PA level 1-year post-surgery, mainly explained by the pre-surgery PA level. The effect of the pre-surgery physiotherapy on patients’ PA level partly explained the treatment’s effect on self-rated health. Furthermore, among biopsychosocial factors, self-efficacy related to activities of daily living (ADL) partly explained the effect on all outcomes. PA related fear avoidance beliefs partly explained the effects on pain and self-rated health. Patients’ treatment expectations moderated the effect in all outcomes. High expectations had a positive moderating effect, while expectation of full recovery had a suppressive effect. In patients seeking physiotherapy for LBP, negative initial prognosis and treatment expectations were associated with worse scores in several outcomes at 3- and 12-month follow-ups. Patients’ illness perceptions and self-care enablement did not explain the effects of care after implementing the BetterBack MoC. This was mainly due to the BetterBack MoC not having superior effects over routine care on the hypothesised mediators. Illness perceptions and self-care enablement at 3 months were associated with disability and pain at 6 months. Further, these factors partly explained the effects of guideline-adherent care in disability and pain.

    Conclusions: Patients’ illness perceptions, self-care enablement, ADL self-efficacy, and PA related fear-avoidance beliefs were supported to be potential factors explaining the effect on clinical outcomes of best practice physiotherapy for LBP in primary care. Patients’ initial expectations regarding the prognosis and treatment may influence prospective outcomes including patients’ self-care enablement. More specifically, pain and disability outcomes of best practice physiotherapy for patients seeking care for LBP may improve by targeting patients’ illness perceptions and self-care enablement. Patients who are surgical candidates can increase their physical capacity and walking related performance through best practice physiotherapy. In this pre-surgery phase, the treatment should include targeting patients’ ADL self-efficacy, PA related fear-avoidance beliefs, and PA level for improved disability, pain, and HRQoL.

    List of papers
    1. Effects of pre-surgery physiotherapy on walking ability and lower extremity strength in patients with degenerative lumbar spine disorder: Secondary outcomes of the PREPARE randomised controlled trial
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of pre-surgery physiotherapy on walking ability and lower extremity strength in patients with degenerative lumbar spine disorder: Secondary outcomes of the PREPARE randomised controlled trial
    2019 (English)In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 1article id 468Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Degenerative lumbar spine disorders are common among musculoskeletal disorders. When disabling pain and radiculopathy persists after adequate course of rehabilitation and imaging confirms compressive pathology, surgical decompression is indicated. Prehabilitation aiming to augment functional capacity pre-surgery may improve physical function and activity levels pre and post-surgery. This study aims to evaluate the effect and dose-response of pre-surgery physiotherapy on quadriceps femoris strength and walking ability in patients with degenerative lumbar spine disorders compared to waiting-list controls and their association with postoperative physical activity level.

    Method

    In this single blinded, 2-arm randomised controlled trial, 197 patients were consecutively recruited. Inclusion criteria were: MRI confirmed diagnosis and scheduled for surgery due to disc herniation, lumbar spinal stenosis, degenerative disc disease or spondylolisthesis, ages 25-80 years. Patients were randomised to 9 weeks of pre-surgery physiotherapy or to waiting-list. Patient reported physical activity level, walking ability according to Oswestry Disability Index item 4, walking distance according to the SWESPINE national register and physical outcome measures including the timed ten-meter walk test, maximum voluntary isometric quadriceps femoris muscle strength, patient-rated were collected at baseline and follow-up. Parametric or non-parametric within and between group comparisons as well as multivariate regression was performed.

    Results

    Patients who received pre-surgery physiotherapy significantly improved in all variables from baseline to follow-up (p < 0.001 – p < 0.05) and in comparison to waiting-list controls (p < 0.001 – p < 0.028). Patients adhering to ≥12 treatment sessions significantly improved in all variables (p < 0.001 – p < 0.032) and those receiving 0-11 treatment session in only normal walking speed (p0.035) but there were no significant differences when comparing dosages. Physical outcome measures after pre-surgery physiotherapy together significantly explain 27.5% of the variation in physical activity level 1 year after surgery with pre-surgery physical activity level having a significant multivariate association.

    Conclusion

    Pre-surgery physiotherapy increased walking ability and lower extremity strength in patients with degenerative lumbar spine disorders compared to waiting-list controls. A clear treatment dose-response response relationship was not found. These results implicate that pre-surgery physiotherapy can influence functional capacity before surgical treatment and has moderate associations with maintained postoperative physical activity levels mostly explained by physical activity level pre-surgery.

    Trial registration

    NCT02454400. Trial registration date: August 31st 2015, retrospectively registered.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    BioMed Central, 2019. p. 1
    Keywords
    Degenerative lumbar spine disorder, Low Back pain, Physiotherapy, Rehabilitation, Exercise, Walking ability, Strength
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences Physiotherapy
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-161361 (URN)10.1186/s12891-019-2850-3 (DOI)000493088500001 ()31651299 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85074073670 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Funding agencies: Ostergotland region public health care research grant

    Available from: 2019-10-30 Created: 2019-10-30 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
    2. What mediates treatment effects in a pre-surgery physiotherapy treatment in surgical candidates with degenerative lumbar spine disorders?: A mediation and conditional process analysis of the PREPARE randomized controlled trial
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>What mediates treatment effects in a pre-surgery physiotherapy treatment in surgical candidates with degenerative lumbar spine disorders?: A mediation and conditional process analysis of the PREPARE randomized controlled trial
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    2021 (English)In: The Clinical Journal of Pain, ISSN 0749-8047, E-ISSN 1536-5409, Vol. 3, p. 168-176Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Treatment guidelines recommend targeting both physical and psychological factors in interventions for degenerative lumbar spine disorders. Studying treatment mechanisms gives information on key factors explaining outcome improvement which can refine treatments for future research. This study explores treatment mediators in a physiotherapy treatment on disability, pain intensity and health related quality of life (HRQoL) in surgical candidates with degenerative lumbar spine disorders compared to waiting-list controls. An additional aim was to evaluate patients´ expectation as a moderator of treatment outcome.

    Methods: Data collected from 197 patients in a single blinded randomized controlled trial comparing 9 weeks of multifaceted physiotherapy to waiting-list were used in this conditional process analysis. Analysis was carried out on group differences for change in Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Pain Visual Analog Scale (VAS) back pain, EuroQol-5D (EQ-5D) and EQ-VAS. The putative moderation role of expectations and mediation role of change in physical variables and psychosocial variables were tested.

    Results: Change in self-efficacy mediated improvement in all outcomes. Improvement in ODI was also mediated by change in depression, VAS was mediated by change in fear avoidance beliefs and EQ-VAS was mediated by change in activity level and fear avoidance beliefs. Improvements were moderated by patients´ treatment expectations.

    Discussion: Self-efficacy, fear avoidance beliefs, physical activity level and patients´ treatment expectations were found to be important factors explaining treatment effects. Self-efficacy was the consistent mediator for effects of the pre-surgical physiotherapy on disability, back pain intensity and HRQoL.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2021
    National Category
    Physiotherapy
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-171792 (URN)10.1097/AJP.0000000000000901 (DOI)000622346700002 ()
    Conference
    373168-1762021
    Funder
    Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden (FORSS), FORSS*660371Swedish Research Council, 2017*01444Region Östergötland, (LIO-921021
    Note

    Funding:Research Council in Southeast, Linkoping, Sweden [FORSS*660371]; Swedish Research Council, Stockholm, SwedenSwedish Research Council [2017*01444]; Region Ostergotland, Linkoping, Sweden [LIO-921021]

    Available from: 2020-12-07 Created: 2020-12-07 Last updated: 2023-12-28Bibliographically approved
    3. The association between patients' illness perceptions and longitudinal clinical outcome in patients with low back pain
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The association between patients' illness perceptions and longitudinal clinical outcome in patients with low back pain
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    2022 (English)In: PAIN Reports, ISSN 2471-2531, Vol. 7, no 3, article id e1004Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Illness perception is suggested to influence outcome in patients with low back pain (LBP). It is unknown if specific illness perceptions are of more importance for longitudinal outcomes, including development of self-management strategies.

    Objectives: This study explores whether patients' initial illness perceptions were associated with disability, pain, health-related quality of life, and self-care enablement outcomes in patients with LBP after 3 and 12 months.

    Methods: Four hundred sixty-seven consecutive patients seeking physiotherapeutic primary care for LBP were eligible to participate in this prospective cohort study, providing data at baseline and after 3 and 12 months (mean age 45 years, 56% women). Multiple linear regression analysis was used to explore whether patients' illness perceptions at baseline were associated with outcome in the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Numeric Rating Scale–LBP (NRS-LBP), EuroQol Five Dimensions, and Patient Enablement Instrument (PEI).

    Results: Stronger beliefs that the back problem will last a long time at baseline were associated with worse outcome in ODI, NRS-LBP, and PEI at 3 and 12 months and in EuroQol Five Dimensions at 12 months. Negative beliefs regarding treatment's ability to improve LBP were associated with worse outcome in NRS-LBP and PEI at 3 and 12 months and in ODI at 12 months.

    Conclusions: Illness perceptions regarding prognosis and treatment's ability to improve symptoms were the most prominent perceptions explaining several longitudinal clinical outcomes. These expectations should be addressed in an early stage in the delivery of interventions for LBP. These expectations were also important for patients' development of coping and self-management strategies.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Philadelphia, PA, United States: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2022
    Keywords
    Low back pain; Illness perceptions; Prospective cohort; Common-Sense Model of Self-Regulation; Patient-reported outcome; Clinical outcomes
    National Category
    Physiotherapy
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-184667 (URN)10.1097/pr9.0000000000001004 (DOI)000787925900001 ()35505791 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding: Swedish Research Council [2017*01444]; Research Council in Southeast Sweden [FORSS*660371, FORSS*757721, FORSS*931966]; Region of Ostergotland [RO938179, RO-921021]

    Available from: 2022-04-29 Created: 2022-04-29 Last updated: 2023-12-28Bibliographically approved
    4. Are illness perceptions and patient self-care enablement mediators of treatment effect in best practice physiotherapy low back pain care? Secondary mediation analyses in the BetterBack trial
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Are illness perceptions and patient self-care enablement mediators of treatment effect in best practice physiotherapy low back pain care? Secondary mediation analyses in the BetterBack trial
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    2023 (English)In: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040, article id 2210676Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: A best practice physiotherapy model of care (BetterBack MoC) for low back pain (LBP) aimed to improve patients illness perceptions and self-care enablement, according to the Common-Sense Model of Self-Regulation (CSM). Objective: To confirm if illness perceptions and patient self-care enablement, in line with the CSM, are mediators of treatment effects on disability and pain of the BetterBack MoC for patients with LBP compared to routine primary care. A secondary aim was to explore if illness perceptions and patient self-care enablement are mediators of guideline adherent care. Methods: Pre-planned single mediation analyses tested whether hypothesized mediators at 3 months mediated the treatment effect of the MoC (n = 264) compared to routine care (n = 203) on disability and pain at 6 months. Secondary mediation analyses compared guideline adherent care with non-adherent care. Results: No indirect effects were identified. The BetterBack intervention did not have superior effects over routine care on the hypothesized mediators. Illness perceptions and self-care enablement were significantly associated with disability and pain at 6 months. Secondary analyses showed significant indirect effects of guideline adherent care through tested mediators. Conclusion: Despite no indirect effects, patients illness perceptions and self-care enablement were associated with disability and back pain intensity outcomes and are potentially relevant treatment targets.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    TAYLOR & FRANCIS INC, 2023
    Keywords
    Physiotherapy; illness perception; self-management; mediation analysis; low back pain
    National Category
    Nursing
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-195781 (URN)10.1080/09593985.2023.2210676 (DOI)000992675300001 ()37204261 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council [2017?x?01444]; Research Council in Southeast Sweden [FORSSx?660371, FORSS?x?757721, FORSS?x?931966]; Region of Ostergotland [RO-938179, RO-921021]

    Available from: 2023-06-27 Created: 2023-06-27 Last updated: 2023-12-28
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  • 19.
    Fors, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Enthoven, Paul
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Schröder, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Abbott, Allan
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    The association between patients' illness perceptions and longitudinal clinical outcome in patients with low back pain2022In: PAIN Reports, ISSN 2471-2531, Vol. 7, no 3, article id e1004Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Illness perception is suggested to influence outcome in patients with low back pain (LBP). It is unknown if specific illness perceptions are of more importance for longitudinal outcomes, including development of self-management strategies.

    Objectives: This study explores whether patients' initial illness perceptions were associated with disability, pain, health-related quality of life, and self-care enablement outcomes in patients with LBP after 3 and 12 months.

    Methods: Four hundred sixty-seven consecutive patients seeking physiotherapeutic primary care for LBP were eligible to participate in this prospective cohort study, providing data at baseline and after 3 and 12 months (mean age 45 years, 56% women). Multiple linear regression analysis was used to explore whether patients' illness perceptions at baseline were associated with outcome in the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Numeric Rating Scale–LBP (NRS-LBP), EuroQol Five Dimensions, and Patient Enablement Instrument (PEI).

    Results: Stronger beliefs that the back problem will last a long time at baseline were associated with worse outcome in ODI, NRS-LBP, and PEI at 3 and 12 months and in EuroQol Five Dimensions at 12 months. Negative beliefs regarding treatment's ability to improve LBP were associated with worse outcome in NRS-LBP and PEI at 3 and 12 months and in ODI at 12 months.

    Conclusions: Illness perceptions regarding prognosis and treatment's ability to improve symptoms were the most prominent perceptions explaining several longitudinal clinical outcomes. These expectations should be addressed in an early stage in the delivery of interventions for LBP. These expectations were also important for patients' development of coping and self-management strategies.

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  • 20.
    Fors, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Enthoven, Paul
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Schröder, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hesser, Hugo
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology. Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Hedevik, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Abbott, Allan
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Are illness perceptions and patient self-care enablement mediators of treatment effect in best practice physiotherapy low back pain care? Secondary mediation analyses in the BetterBack trial2023In: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040, article id 2210676Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: A best practice physiotherapy model of care (BetterBack MoC) for low back pain (LBP) aimed to improve patients illness perceptions and self-care enablement, according to the Common-Sense Model of Self-Regulation (CSM). Objective: To confirm if illness perceptions and patient self-care enablement, in line with the CSM, are mediators of treatment effects on disability and pain of the BetterBack MoC for patients with LBP compared to routine primary care. A secondary aim was to explore if illness perceptions and patient self-care enablement are mediators of guideline adherent care. Methods: Pre-planned single mediation analyses tested whether hypothesized mediators at 3 months mediated the treatment effect of the MoC (n = 264) compared to routine care (n = 203) on disability and pain at 6 months. Secondary mediation analyses compared guideline adherent care with non-adherent care. Results: No indirect effects were identified. The BetterBack intervention did not have superior effects over routine care on the hypothesized mediators. Illness perceptions and self-care enablement were significantly associated with disability and pain at 6 months. Secondary analyses showed significant indirect effects of guideline adherent care through tested mediators. Conclusion: Despite no indirect effects, patients illness perceptions and self-care enablement were associated with disability and back pain intensity outcomes and are potentially relevant treatment targets.

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  • 21.
    Fors, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lindbäck, Yvonne
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Enthoven, Paul
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Abbott, Allan
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    What mediates treatment effects in a pre-surgery physiotherapy treatment in surgical candidates with degenerative lumbar spine disorders?: A mediation and conditional process analysis of the PREPARE randomized controlled trial2021In: The Clinical Journal of Pain, ISSN 0749-8047, E-ISSN 1536-5409, Vol. 3, p. 168-176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Treatment guidelines recommend targeting both physical and psychological factors in interventions for degenerative lumbar spine disorders. Studying treatment mechanisms gives information on key factors explaining outcome improvement which can refine treatments for future research. This study explores treatment mediators in a physiotherapy treatment on disability, pain intensity and health related quality of life (HRQoL) in surgical candidates with degenerative lumbar spine disorders compared to waiting-list controls. An additional aim was to evaluate patients´ expectation as a moderator of treatment outcome.

    Methods: Data collected from 197 patients in a single blinded randomized controlled trial comparing 9 weeks of multifaceted physiotherapy to waiting-list were used in this conditional process analysis. Analysis was carried out on group differences for change in Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Pain Visual Analog Scale (VAS) back pain, EuroQol-5D (EQ-5D) and EQ-VAS. The putative moderation role of expectations and mediation role of change in physical variables and psychosocial variables were tested.

    Results: Change in self-efficacy mediated improvement in all outcomes. Improvement in ODI was also mediated by change in depression, VAS was mediated by change in fear avoidance beliefs and EQ-VAS was mediated by change in activity level and fear avoidance beliefs. Improvements were moderated by patients´ treatment expectations.

    Discussion: Self-efficacy, fear avoidance beliefs, physical activity level and patients´ treatment expectations were found to be important factors explaining treatment effects. Self-efficacy was the consistent mediator for effects of the pre-surgical physiotherapy on disability, back pain intensity and HRQoL.

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  • 22.
    Gauffin, Håkan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Tagesson (Sonesson), Sofi
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Meunier, Andreas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Magnusson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Kvist, Joanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Knee Arthroscopic Surgery in Middle-Aged Patients With Meniscal Symptoms A 3-Year Follow-up of a Prospective, Randomized Study2017In: American Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0363-5465, E-ISSN 1552-3365, Vol. 45, no 9, p. 2077-2084Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The optimal treatment for middle-aged patients with knee pain and meniscal lesions has been extensively debated. Most previous studies have revealed only short-term beneficial results of knee arthroscopic surgery. The authors have previously shown a positive benefit of knee arthroscopic surgery and an exercise program after 1 year when compared with an exercise program alone. Purpose: To evaluate if knee arthroscopic surgery combined with an exercise program provided an additional long-term benefit after 3 years compared with an exercise program alone in middle-aged patients with meniscal symptoms. Study Design: Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1. Methods: Of 179 eligible patients, aged 45 to 64 years, 150 were randomized to (1) a 3-month exercise program (nonsurgery group) or (2) the same as group 1 plus knee arthroscopic surgery within 4 weeks (surgery group). The primary outcome was the change in the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) subscore of pain between baseline and the 3-year follow-up. Results from the 1-year follow-up have been published previously. Results: Both treatment groups improved significantly in the KOOS pain subscore at 3 years follow-up in the intention-to-treat and as-treated analyses (P amp;lt; .001). The between-group difference for the change in the KOOS pain subscore between baseline and the 3-year follow-up was no longer statistically significant, neither in the intention-to-treat analysis (7.6 points; 95% CI, -0.6 to 15.9; P = .068) nor in the as-treated analysis (5.3 points; 95% CI, -3.1 to 13.8; P = .216). The factorial analysis of the effect of the intervention and age, onset of pain, and mechanical symptoms indicated that older patients improved more, regardless of treatment, and surgery may be more beneficial for patients without mechanical symptoms (as-treated analysis). The effect of the predictive factors on the KOOS pain subscore was uncertain because of the small sample size in the subgroup analyses. Conclusion: The benefit of knee arthroscopic surgery, seen at 1 year in middle-aged patients with meniscal symptoms, was diminished at 3 years and was no longer statistically significant.

  • 23. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Hermansen, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Clinical and patient-reported outcomes after anterior cervical decompression and fusion surgery: A focus on functioning and daily life2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF), with or without an intervertebral cage to add support to the fused segment, is an established surgical treatment of cervical radiculopathy due to cervical disc disease. High recovery rates and pain reductions after surgery have been reported, with similar results with or without a cage. A few small studies have evaluated neck-related physical function and patient-reported disability with less promising results. No previous studies have evaluated clinical and patientreported measures of functioning or compared the Cloward Procedure with the Cervical Intervertebral Fusion Cage (CIFC) more than 10 year after surgery. No studies have explored the patients’ perspective on surgical outcome Knowledge on long-term functioning may provide a base for improved postoperative care and rehabilitation. Combining the perspectives of clinicians and patients may provide a better understanding of outcome after ACDF surgery than has previously been reported.

    The overall aim of the thesis was to evaluate long-term functioning after anterior cervical decompression and fusion surgery due to cervical disc disease, and to provide new insights into patients’ experiences of daily life after surgery.

    The more than 10-year patient-reported outcomes of pain, disability and psychosocial factors (n=77), as well as clinical outcomes of neck-related physical function (n=51) were evaluated and compared between the Cloward Procedure and the CIFC. Preoperative and surgery-related factors of importance for a good outcome in neck-related pain and disability at 10-year follow-up were also identified. Fourteen women were interviewed at 1.5 to 3 years after ACDF to explore their experiences of daily life.

    There were no differences between the surgical techniques in long-term neck-related pain or patient-reported disability. Secondary outcomes were, with a few exceptions, similar between groups. Neck-related pain decreased after surgery and remained improved from the 2-year to the 10-year follow-up. However, disability ratings remained improved only in the CIFC group. Predictors of a successful outcome in neck-related pain intensity were high preoperative neck-related pain intensity (Odds Ratio 1.06) and nonsmoking (Odds Ratio 3.03). Male gender was the only predictive factor of a successful outcome in neck-related disability (Odds Ratio 4.33). Moderate to severe pain and patient-reported disability were seen in half of the participants at the 10-year follow-up, and neck-related physical impairments were seen in between 18% (cervical flexion) and 82% (neck-muscle endurance) of participants. Daily life was experienced as recovered or improved by women after ACDF surgery. However they were at the same time affected and limited by remaining symptoms. Behaviors and activities were altered to adjust to the symptoms. Social support provided by family, social and occupational networks, and by healthcare professionals were experienced as important in a good daily life.

    In conclusion: long-term pain, physical function and patient-reported disability were similar between the two ACDF techniques. High preoperative pain intensity, non-smoking and male gender predicted a good long-term outcome. Individuals after ACDF surgery experienced improvements in pain intensity and a good effect of surgery although they simultaneously reported residual or recurrent disability.

    List of papers
    1. A Comparison Between the Carbon Fiber Cage and the Cloward Procedure in Cervical Spine Surgery A Ten- to Thirteen-Year Follow-Up of a Prospective Randomized Study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Comparison Between the Carbon Fiber Cage and the Cloward Procedure in Cervical Spine Surgery A Ten- to Thirteen-Year Follow-Up of a Prospective Randomized Study
    2011 (English)In: SPINE, ISSN 0362-2436, Vol. 36, no 12, p. 919-925Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Study Design. Ten- to 13-year follow-up of a prospective randomized study. Objective. To compare the 10- to 13-year outcomes of anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF) with a cervical intervertebral fusion cage (CIFC), and the Cloward procedure (CP) using a broad clinical and patient-centered assessment. Summary of Background Data. There are few prospective studies and none with a follow-up of 10 years or more. Methods. Patient questionnaires completed 10 years or more after ACDF. Seventy-three patients (77%) responded. Radiographs were obtained at 2 years. Results. Apart from greater fulfillment of preoperative expectation (P = 0.01) and less headache (P = 0.005) in the CIFC group compared with the CP group, there were no significant differences in the outcomes of the two surgical methods. Pain intensity improved in comparison with preoperative levels in both the CIFC and CP groups (P andlt; 0.0001), but the Neck Disability Index (NDI) only improved in the CIFC group (P = 0.04). Only those with a healed fusion benefited from an improved NDI (P = 0.02). There was no deterioration in pain intensity or NDI after the 2-year follow-up. Conclusion. The outcomes of the two surgical methods, with a few exceptions, were equal at 10- to 13-year follow-up, and there was no deterioration in outcome after the 2-year follow-up. Pain intensity improved more than disability, which may indicate that further improvement of physical function requires early more extensive postoperative rehabilitation. Despite persisting disability, repeat surgery was relatively uncommon.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    J B Lippincott Co, 2011
    Keywords
    cervical spine, disc, cage, Cloward, outcome
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-68683 (URN)10.1097/BRS.0b013e3181e8e4a3 (DOI)000290473500011 ()
    Note

    Original Publication: Anna Hermansen, Rune Hedlund, Ludek Vavruch and Anneli Peolsson, A Comparison Between the Carbon Fiber Cage and the Cloward Procedure in Cervical Spine Surgery A Ten- to Thirteen-Year Follow-Up of a Prospective Randomized Study, 2011, SPINE, (36), 12, 919-925. http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/BRS.0b013e3181e8e4a3 Copyright: J B Lippincott Co http://www.lww.com/

    Available from: 2011-05-27 Created: 2011-05-27 Last updated: 2015-04-23
    2. Positive predictive factors and subgroup analysis of clinically relevant improvement after anterior cervical decompression and fusion for cervical disc disease: a 10-to 13-year follow-up of a prospective randomized study Clinical article
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Positive predictive factors and subgroup analysis of clinically relevant improvement after anterior cervical decompression and fusion for cervical disc disease: a 10-to 13-year follow-up of a prospective randomized study Clinical article
    2013 (English)In: Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine, ISSN 1547-5654, E-ISSN 1547-5646, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 403-411Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Object. The main purpose of this 10- to 13-year follow-up of a prospective randomized study was to identify preoperative factors that predicted good long-term outcome after anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF) with the Cloward procedure or the cervical intervertebral fusion cage. A second purpose was to investigate subgroup differences at the 10-year follow-up between patients with and without clinically relevant improvement (CRI) and between men and women. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods. To evaluate clinically meaningful outcomes, good outcome was defined as CRI in neck-related pain intensity (andgt;= 30-mm improvement on a visual analog scale), and CRI in neck-specific disability (andgt;= 20% improvement in the neck disability index [NUT]) from preoperative measurements to the 10-year follow-up. A total of 73 patients (77% of the original study sample) completed questionnaires at least 10 years after ACDF. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults. High preoperative neck-related pain intensity and preoperative nonsmoking status were predictors of CRI in neck-related pain intensity, and male sex was a predictor of CRI in neck-specific disability; however, no additional predictive factors were identified for good outcome after ACDF. The surgical procedure, number of operated levels, and radiological factors such as healing status did not influence the prediction models. Individuals without CRI in neck-specific disability (75%) and pain intensity (43%) reported a worse outcome for several psychosocial outcome variables compared with those with CRI. At the 10-year follow-up, women reported significantly greater neck- and arm-related pain intensity than men, and women also reported more disability and worse psychosocial status. Women reported CRI on the NDI less frequently than men (p = 0.01). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions. Preoperative predictive factors of good outcome 10-13 years after ACDF included initial high neck-related pain intensity, nonsmoking status at the time of surgery, and male sex. There were greater improvements in pain intensity than in neck-specific disability, and the latter showed a greater association with psychosocial factors. These results suggest the need for multimodal postoperative rehabilitation for patients who do not have a satisfactory outcome after ACDF.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    American Association of Neurological Surgeons, 2013
    Keywords
    cervical disc disease, radiculopathy, anterior cervical fusion, clinical relevant outcome, prognostic factors
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-100024 (URN)10.3171/2013.7.SPINE12843 (DOI)000324964700002 ()
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council||Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden (FORSS)||County Council of Ostergotland||

    Available from: 2013-10-25 Created: 2013-10-25 Last updated: 2019-04-10
    3. Evaluation of Physical Function in Individuals 11 to 14 Years after AnteriorCervical Decompression and Fusion Surgery: A Comparison betweenPatients and Healthy Reference Samples and Between 2 Surgical Techniques
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of Physical Function in Individuals 11 to 14 Years after AnteriorCervical Decompression and Fusion Surgery: A Comparison betweenPatients and Healthy Reference Samples and Between 2 Surgical Techniques
    2014 (English)In: Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, ISSN 0161-4754, E-ISSN 1532-6586, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 87-96Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate neck-related physical function in individuals 11 to 14 years after anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF) surgery for degenerative cervical disk disease and to compare the long-term outcome of 2 surgical techniques, including the Cloward procedure and cervical intervertebral fusion cage. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 51 individuals, 11 years or more after ACDF, underwent testing of cervical active range of motion, hand-grip strength, static and dynamic balance, neck muscle endurance, and completed pain ratings. The participants values were compared with values of age-and sex-matched healthy individuals to evaluate impairments. Correlations between different test scores and pain were performed. Group differences were analyzed between the 2 surgical techniques. Results: Sixty-five percent and 82% exhibited impairment in ventral and dorsal neck muscle endurance, respectively. Impairment rates of 18% to 39% for cervical active range of motion, 27% to 43% for hand-grip strength, 37% for standing balance, and 35% for dynamic balance were recorded. Twenty-nine percent of the participants had impairment (greater than30 mm visual analog scale) in pain. There were no significant differences in physical function between the 2 surgical treatment groups (Cloward procedure or cervical intervertebral fusion cage) (P = .10-.92). Conclusions: In those studied, a large percentage of patients who had anterior cervical decompression and fusion surgery have impairments in neck-related physical function when compared 11 to 14 years after surgery with age-and sex-matched healthy reference individuals. Neck-specific function, but not balance, was statistically correlated to pain. Neck muscle endurance was most affected, and balance impairments were also present in one-third of the individuals. There were no differences in long-term physical function between the 2 surgical techniques.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2014
    Keywords
    Cervical Vertebrae; Neck Muscles; Physical Endurance; Range of Motion; Postural Balance; Surgical Procedure
    National Category
    Physiotherapy
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-104837 (URN)10.1016/j.jmpt.2013.11.002 (DOI)000330584200004 ()
    Available from: 2014-02-28 Created: 2014-02-28 Last updated: 2020-03-23Bibliographically approved
    4. Women’s experiences of daily life after anterior cervical decompression and fusion surgery: A qualitative interview study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Women’s experiences of daily life after anterior cervical decompression and fusion surgery: A qualitative interview study
    2016 (English)In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 352-358Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Subjects: Fourteen women aged 39-62 years (median 52 years), were included 1.5 to 3 years after ACDF for cervical degenerative disc disease.

    Methods: Individual semi-structured interviews were analyzed by qualitative content analysis with an inductive approach.

    Results: The women described their experiences of daily life in five different ways; Experiences of recovery; Experiences of symptoms in daily life influence feelings and thoughts; Making daily life work; Importance of social  and occupational networks; Experiences of the influence of healthcare professionals and interventions on daily life.

    Conclusion: This interview study provides insight into women’s daily life after ACDF. While improved after surgery, informants also experienced remaining symptoms and limitations in daily life. A variety of mostly active coping strategies were used to manage daily life. Social support from family, friends, occupational networks and healthcare professionals positively influenced daily life. These findings provide knowledge on aspects of daily life that should be considered in individualized postoperative care and rehabilitation in an attempt to provide better outcomes in women after ACDF.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Uppsala, Sweden: Stiftelsen Rehabiliteringsinformation /Foundation for Rehabilitation Information, 2016
    Keywords
    Daily life, cervical spine, research interview, content analysis
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences Physiotherapy
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-117344 (URN)10.2340/16501977-2076 (DOI)000372456100005 ()26999327 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding agencies: NSC FoU-fond; County Council of Ostergotland

    Available from: 2015-04-23 Created: 2015-04-23 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
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  • 24.
    Hermansen, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Hedlund, Rune
    Nacka Specialistsjukhus, Sweden.
    Zsigmond, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    A more than 20-year follow-up of pain and disability after anterior cervical decompression and fusion surgery for degenerative disc disease and comparisons between two surgical techniques2023In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 24, no 1, article id 406Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundFollow-ups more than 20 years after neck surgery are extremely rare. No previous randomized studies have investigated differences in pain and disability more than 20 years after ACDF surgery using different techniques. The purpose of this study was to describe pain and functioning more than 20 years after anterior cervical decompression and fusion surgery, and to compare outcomes between the Cloward Procedure and the carbon fiber fusion cage (CIFC).MethodsThis study is a 20 to 24-year follow-up of a randomized controlled trial. Questionnaires were sent to 64 individuals, at least 20 years after ACDF due to cervical radiculopathy. Fifty individuals (mean age 69, 60% women, 55% CIFC) completed questionnaires. Mean time since surgery was 22.4 years (range 20,5-24). Primary outcomes were neck pain and neck disability index (NDI). Secondary outcomes were frequency and intensity of neck and arm pain, headache, dizziness, self-efficacy, health related quality of life or global outcome. Clinically relevant improvements were defined as 30 mm decrease in pain and a decrease in disability of 20 percentage units. Between-group differences over time were analyzed with mixed design ANOVA and relationships between main outcomes and psychosocial factors were analyzed by Spearman s rho.ResultsNeck pain and NDI score significantly improved over time (p &lt; .001), with no group differences in primary or secondary outcomes. Eighty-eight per cent of participants experienced improvements or full recovery, 71% (pain) and 41% (NDI) had clinically relevant improvements. Pain and NDI were correlated with lower self-efficacy and quality of life.ConclusionThe results from this study do not support the idea that fusion technique affects long-term outcome of ACDF. Pain and disability improved substantially over time, irrespective of surgical technique. However, the majority of participants reported residual disability not to a negligible extent. Pain and disability were correlated to lower self-efficacy and quality of life.

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  • 25.
    Hermansen, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Kammerlind, Ann-Sofi
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Reg Jönkoping Cty, Sweden.
    Wibault, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Löfgren, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Reg Jonkoping Cty, Sweden.
    Zsigmond, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Dedering, Åsa
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dizziness and balance outcomes after two different postoperative rehabilitation approaches following neck surgery: analyses of a multicenter randomized controlled trial2023In: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 750-760Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Dizziness and balance problems are common symptoms in patients with cervical radiculopathy. Objective To evaluate the effect of neck surgery postoperatively combined with either structured rehabilitation or standard approach in patients with cervical radiculopathy and dizziness and/or balance problems, and investigate factors influencing dizziness and balance at 6-month follow-up.

    Methods Individuals (n = 149) with cervical radiculopathy and dizziness and/or balance problems were randomized preoperatively to structured postoperative rehabilitation or standard postoperative approach. Outcomes were intensity of dizziness and subjective balance, and clinical measures of balance.

    Results Self-reported measures improved at three months (p &lt; 0.001 to p = .007) and the standing balance at six months (p = .008). No between-group differences. Baseline values, neck pain, and physical activity level explained 23-39% of the variance in 6-month outcomes for self-reported measures. Baseline values and physical activity level explained 71% of the variance in walking balance, and lower baseline scores were significantly associated with standing balance impairments (OR 0.876).

    Conclusion Patients improved significantly in dizziness and subjective balance intensity shortly after surgery, and in standing balance at 6 months, independent of postoperative rehabilitation. Neck pain, physical activity, and neck muscle function influenced dizziness and balance, although preoperative values and neck pain were of most importance for 6-month outcomes.

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  • 26.
    Hermansen, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hedlund, Rune
    Department of Orthopaedics , Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg , Göteborg , Sweden.
    Kammerlind, Ann-Sofi
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Futurum , Region Jönköping County , Jönköping , Sweden.
    Balance problems and dizziness after neck surgery: associations with pain and health-related quality of life2020In: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040, Vol. 36, no 10, p. 1145-1152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Symptoms of dizziness or imbalance are often present in individuals with a variety of neck-disorders. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of patient-reported balance problems and dizziness 10-13 years after surgery for cervical degenerative disc disease; evaluate associations with neck pain and health-related quality of life; and investigate how these individuals described dizziness.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sixty-eight individuals, 10 years or more after anterior cervical decompression and fusion surgery, who previously participated in a randomized controlled trial were included. Participants completed questionnaires including ratings of dizziness and balance problems, the Dizziness Handicap Inventory, and an open-ended question regarding their experience of dizziness. Secondary outcomes were neck pain and quality of life.

    RESULTS: Seventy-two percent experienced occasional or daily symptoms of unsteadiness and/or dizziness. Intensity ratings for dizziness during movement and for balance problems were similar and rather low, but had an impact on quality of life. Ratings of dizziness at rest were even lower. Dizziness ratings were associated with neck pain. Strenuous activities were related to dizziness and dizziness was primarily described as intermittent and non-rotatory.

    CONCLUSIONS: Dizziness or balance problems in the long-term after surgery for cervical degenerative disc disease are common and have an impact on daily life. Ratings of problem frequency and intensity were usually low. Dizziness and balance problems may affect quality of life. Patients' descriptions of these problems are in line with common symptoms of cervicogenic dizziness.

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  • 27.
    Johansson, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Barbero, Marco
    Univ Appl Sci & Arts Southern Switzerland, Switzerland.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Falla, Deborah
    Univ Birmingham, England.
    Cescon, Corrado
    Univ Appl Sci & Arts Southern Switzerland, Switzerland.
    Folli, Anna
    Univ Appl Sci & Arts Southern Switzerland, Switzerland.
    Dong, Huan-Ji
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Pain Characteristics and Quality of Life in Older People at High Risk of Future Hospitalization2021In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 18, no 3, article id 958Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study deals with how pain characteristics in conjunction with other factors affect quality of life (QoL) in a vulnerable primary care population. We recruited vulnerable older people (75+, n = 825) living in south-eastern Sweden. A postal questionnaire included pain aspects, QoL (EQ-5D-3L, RAND-36 physical functioning, attitudes toward own aging, and life satisfaction), functional status, social networks, and basic demographic information. Pain extent and localization was obtained by digitalization of pain drawings reported on standard body charts. Most respondents were experiencing pain longer than 3 months (88.8%). Pain frequency varied mostly between occasionally (33.8%) and every day (34.8%). A minority reported high pain intensity (13.6%). The lower back and lower legs were the most frequently reported pain locations (&gt;25%). Multiple linear regression model revealed three characteristics of pain (intensity, frequency, and extent) remained inversely associated with the EQ-5D-3L index score (R-2 = 0.57). Individually, each of these pain characteristics showed a negative impact on the other three dimensions of QoL (R-2 = 0.23-0.59). Different features of pain had impact on different dimensions of QoL in this aging population. A global pain assessment is useful to facilitate individual treatment and rehabilitation strategies in primary care.

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  • 28.
    Johansson, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Segernäs Kvitting, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Ekholmen.
    Cognitive impairment in daily life (CID): A double-faced instrument to detect changes and impairments in activities of daily living for people with suspected cognitive impairment2023In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 34-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Assessment of cognitive function and its consequences for activities of daily living is an important part of a dementia evaluation. To describe patients functional impairment accurately, a feasible instrument is needed. The Cognitive Impairment in Daily Life (CID) is an instrument developed with that purpose. Aim To describe and compare self- and proxy-reported difficulties in everyday life in patients undergoing a dementia investigation, measured by CID. A secondary aim was to compare the results between those who were diagnosed with dementia versus those without dementia. Method Self- and proxy-reported data using CID in 77 cases in dementia investigations. Of those, 32 were diagnosed with dementia and were compared to those without dementia (n = 45). Descriptive statistics. Results When comparing self-reported and proxy-reported activity problems, most activities differed significantly. Proxies reported more difficulties than patients did. When comparing no dementia and dementia groups, significant differences were shown regarding initiative, planning and performance but not for memory and attention estimated by the patient themselves. Proxies differed significantly from patients in all tasks. Conclusion Overall, proxies reported that patients had more difficulties than patients reported themselves. The CID seems to be usable in dementia investigations and the results highlight the importance of involving both patients and relatives.

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  • 29.
    Johansson, Martina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Vavruch, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Ekholmen.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Ekholmen. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Nyström, Fredrik H
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Cityhälsan Centrum.
    Circulating TNFrII levels predict incidence of ischemic heart disease and total mortality, independently of intima media thickness and pulse wave velocity in male with type 2 diabetes2021In: Heart and Vessels, ISSN 0910-8327, E-ISSN 1615-2573, Vol. 36, no 10, p. 1591-1596Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New and clinically useful markers of cardiovascular risk are of great importance in patients with type 2 diabetes since cardiovascular disease is a major cause of death in these patients. We analyzed inflammatory markers and other risk factors for heart disease in 761 patients who participated in the CARDIPP-study, Cardiovascular Risk factors in Patients with Diabetes-a Prospective study in Primary care. All participants had type 2 diabetes and were 55-66 years old at recruitment during the years 2005-2008. Patients were followed for incidence of stroke, myocardial infarction, or death from cardiovascular disease until the end of the year 2018 using the national Swedish Cause of Death and Hospitalization Registries. Besides traditional risk-markers for vascular disease, we also measured carotid-femoral pulse-wave velocity and intima-media thickness of carotid arteries. During a median period of 13 years, 165 men and 65 women died or were hospitalized for ischemic heart disease and stroke. TNFrII showed statistically significance as a risk factor for stroke, ischemic heart disease, and total mortality in male patients with diabetes type 2, independently of age, diabetes duration, BMI, Hba1c, systolic blood pressure, triglycerides, IMT and PWV (p = 0.002, HR 2.70, CI 1.42:5.13, p = 0.002). Circulating TNFrII levels failed to present a similar correlation in women (p = 0.48, CI 0.48:4.84). TNFrII stayed significant in males when HDL/LDL-ratio, CRP and smoking were added to the statistical analysis. Our data support the use of serum TNFrII in male type 2 diabetes patients to add independent prognostic information in terms of mortality and heart disease independently of other strong and well-established risk markers including cholesterol, inflammatory cytokines, PWV and IMT. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01049737.

  • 30.
    Johansson, Martina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Ekholmen.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Wijkman, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping. Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine.
    Nyström, Fredrik H
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Cityhälsan Centrum.
    Relationships between cardiovascular risk factors and white-coat hypertension diagnosed by home blood pressure recordings in a middle-aged population2021In: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 39, no 10, p. 2009-2014Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To study risk in white-coat hypertension (WCH) by measurement of coronary artery calcium score (CACS), carotid--femoral pulse-wave velocity (PWV) and carotid plaques. Methods: Cross-sectional population-based cohort with randomized selection of participants from Linkoping, Sweden. An Omron m10-IT oscillometric device was used for clinic and home blood pressures (HBP) in the morning and evening for 1 week. Results: We recruited 5029 middle-aged and mainly defined WCH as SBP at least 140 mmHg and/or DBP at least 90 mmHg with HBP less than 135/85 mmHg. There were 2680 normotensive participants and 648 had WCH after exclusion of treated participants. More women (59.5%) than men (42.8%, P &lt; 0.001) had WCH. We found higher prevalence of CACS greater than 100 compared with less than 100 (12.4 vs. 7.2%, P &lt; 0.001), PWV (11.5 +/- 1.5 vs. 10.4 +/- 1.3 m/s, P &lt; 0.001) and a higher prevalence of one or more carotid plaques (59.5 vs. 48%, P &lt; 0.001) in participants with WCH than in normotension. Participants with WCH also had more dyslipidemia and higher glucose levels. Normotensive women scored lower on nervousness than women with WCH (P = 0.022). After matching of 639 participants with WCH to normotensive participants according to age, gender and systolic HBP the prevalence of a high CACS (12.1 vs. 8.6%, P = 0.003,) PWV (11.0 +/- 0.068 vs. 11.5 +/- 0.068 m/s, estimated marginal means +/- SE, P &lt; 0.001 by ANOVA) but not more carotid plaques (59.5 vs. 55.6%, P = 0.23), remained in the participants with WCH compared with the matched normotensive participants. Conclusion: WCH is particularly common in middle-aged women, and it displays metabolic dysfunction and increased prevalence of arteriosclerotic manifestations in both genders. As markers of increased cardiovascular risk were present also after matching normotensive and WCH participants according to systolic HBP, age and gender, the presence of WCH signals an increased cardiovascular risk burden that is not fully explained by elevated BP levels at home.

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  • 31.
    Kammerlind, Ann-Sofi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Reg Jonkoping Cty, Sweden.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Johansson, Maria M.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Dizziness in older persons at high risk of future hospitalization: prevalence, differences between those with and without dizziness, and effect of a proactive primary care intervention2022In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Dizziness is a common reason for seeking care, and frequently affects older persons. The aims were to determine the prevalence of dizziness in older persons at high risk of hospitalization, to compare subjects with and without dizziness, and to examine the effects on dizziness of a proactive primary care intervention in comparison with conventional care after one year.

    Methods: Data were derived from a prospective multicentre clinical trial in persons aged 75 and older and at high risk of hospitalization. A baseline questionnaire included demographic data, use of aids, questions about everyday physical activity and exercise, pain (intensity, frequency, and duration), activities of daily living measured using the ADL Staircase, and health-related quality of life measured using the EQ-5D-3L vertical visual analogue scale. Both at baseline and after one year, subjects were asked about dizziness, and those with dizziness answered the Dizziness Handicap Inventory - Screening version. Subjects in the intervention group were evaluated by a primary care team and when needed proactive care plans were established. Groups were compared using the Mann Whitney U-test or chi-squared test.

    Results: Of the 779 subjects, 493 (63%) experienced dizziness. Persons with dizziness differed regarding sex, homecare service, aids, activities of daily living, health-related quality of life, physical activity, and pain. The intervention did not significantly reduce the level of dizziness.

    Conclusions: Dizziness is common in vulnerable older persons, and individuals with dizziness differ in several respects. Further studies are needed employing more dizziness-specific assessment and individually tailored interventions.

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  • 32.
    Kvist, Joanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Gauffin, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Tigerstrand Grevnerts, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Ardern, Clare
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. La Trobe Univ, Australia.
    Hägglund, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Stalman, Anders
    Capio ArtroClin, Sweden.
    Frobell, Richard
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Natural corollaries and recovery after acute ACL injury: the NACOX cohort study protocol2018In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 8, no 6, article id e020543Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury can result in joint instability, decreased functional performance, reduced physical activity and quality of life and an increased risk for post-traumatic osteoarthritis. Despite the development of new treatment techniques and extensive research, the complex and multifaceted nature of ACL injury and its consequences are yet to be fully understood. The overall aim of the NACOX study is to evaluate the natural corollaries and recovery after an ACL injury. Methods and analysis The NACOX study is a multicentre prospective prognostic cohort study of patients with acute ACL injury. At seven sites in Sweden, we will include patients aged 15-40 years, within 6 weeks after primary ACL injury. Patients will complete questionnaires at multiple occasions over the 3 years following injury or the 3 years following ACL reconstruction (for participants who have surgical treatment). In addition, a subgroup of 130 patients will be followed with clinical examinations, several imaging modalities and biological samples. Data analyses will he specific to each aim. Ethics and dissemination This study has been approved by the regional Ethical committee in Linkoping, Sweden (Dnr 2016/44-31 and 2017/221-32). We plan to present the results at national and international conferences and in peer-reviewed scientific journals. Participants will receive a short summary of the results following completion of the study.

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  • 33.
    Lam, Kwun
    et al.
    Univ Birmingham, England.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Soldini, Emiliano
    Univ Appl Sci & Arts Southern Switzerland, Switzerland.
    Löfgren, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ryhov Hosp, Sweden.
    Wibault, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Dedering, Åsa
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Zsigmond, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Barbero, Marco
    Univ Appl Sci & Arts Southern Switzerland, Switzerland.
    Falla, Deborah
    Univ Birmingham, England.
    Larger pain extent is associated with greater pain intensity and disability but not with general health status or psychosocial features in patients with cervical radiculopathy2021In: Medicine, ISSN 0025-7974, E-ISSN 1536-5964, Vol. 100, no 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pain as a result of cervical radiculopathy (CR) can be widespread, nondermatomal and individually specific, but the association between pain extent and other clinical features has never been explored. The objective of this study is to investigate whether pain extent relates to clinical variables including pain intensity in addition to health indicators including disability, general health, depression, somatic anxiety, coping strategies or self-efficacy. An observational cohort study was conducted. Participants were recruited from 4 hospital spinal centres in Sweden. Pain extent was quantified from the pain drawings of 190 individuals with cervical disc disease, verified with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and compatible with clinical findings (examined by a neurosurgeon), that show cervical nerve root compression. Pain extent was evaluated in relation to neck pain, arm pain, and headache intensity. Multiple linear regression analysis were then used to verify whether pain extent was associated with other health indicators including disability, health-related quality of life, depression, somatic anxiety, coping strategies and self-efficacy. Pain extent was directly related to neck, arm and headache pain intensity (all P &lt; .01). Multiple linear regression revealed that pain extent was significantly associated only to the level of perceived disability (P &lt; .01). Increased pain extent in people with CR is associated with higher headache, neck and arm pain intensity, and disability but not measures of general health, depression, somatic anxiety, coping strategies or self-efficacy.

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  • 34.
    Landén Ludvigsson, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Rehabilitation in Motala.
    Peterson, Gunnel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Widh, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Exercise, headache, and factors associated with headache in chronic whiplash Analysis of a randomized clinical trial2019In: Medicine, ISSN 0025-7974, E-ISSN 1536-5964, Vol. 98, no 48, article id e18130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Almost 40% of individuals with chronic whiplash-associated disorders (WAD) report headache after 5 years, making it one of the most common persistent symptoms besides neck pain, but randomized treatment studies are lacking. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of 3 different exercise approaches on headache in chronic WAD grades 2 and 3, and to identify potential factors associated with such headache, and whether they differ depending on 3 different aspects of such headache (current headache, maximum headache, or headache bothersomeness).Methods: This was an analysis of a randomized clinical trial of people with chronic WAD and headache (n = 188), who were randomized to either 12 weeks of neck-specific exercise without (NSE) or with a behavioral approach (NSEB) or physical activity prescription (PPA). Data were collected at baseline and at 3, 6, and 12 months. Physical and psychosocial factors were tested for association with headache. Multivariate regression models and linear mixed models were used.Results: The NSE/NSEB groups reported reduced headache both over time and compared to PPA. Up to 51% (NSE) and 61% (NSEB) reported at least 50% reduction in their headache at 12 months. The PPA group was not improved over time. Neck pain and dizziness were associated with headache regardless of aspect of headache. The only associated psychosocial factor was anxiety, which was associated with headache bothersomeness. Other factors were mainly physical, and up to 51% of the variance was explained.Conclusion: Headache in chronic WAD, may be reduced with neck-specific exercise with or without a behavioral approach. Chronic headache was associated with neck pain and dizziness regardless of aspect tested. Other factors associated with headache in chronic WAD were mainly physical rather than psychosocial.Trial registration number: Clinical Trials.gov, no: NCT015285

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  • 35.
    Liew, Bernard X. W.
    et al.
    Univ Essex, England.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Rugamer, David
    Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Germany; Humboldt Univ, Germany.
    Wibault, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Löfgren, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Neuroorthoped Ctr, Sweden.
    Dedering, Asa
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Zsigmond, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Falla, Deborah
    Univ Birmingham, England.
    Clinical predictive modelling of post-surgical recovery in individuals with cervical radiculopathy: a machine learning approach2020In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 16782Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prognostic models play an important role in the clinical management of cervical radiculopathy (CR). No study has compared the performance of modern machine learning techniques, against more traditional stepwise regression techniques, when developing prognostic models in individuals with CR. We analysed a prospective cohort dataset of 201 individuals with CR. Four modelling techniques (stepwise regression, least absolute shrinkage and selection operator [LASSO], boosting, and multivariate adaptive regression splines [MuARS]) were each used to form a prognostic model for each of four outcomes obtained at a 12 month follow-up (disability-neck disability index [NDI]), quality of life (EQ5D), present neck pain intensity, and present arm pain intensity). For all four outcomes, the differences in mean performance between all four models were small (difference of NDI&lt;1 point; EQ5D&lt;0.1 point; neck and arm pain&lt;2 points). Given that the predictive accuracy of all four modelling methods were clinically similar, the optimal modelling method may be selected based on the parsimony of predictors. Some of the most parsimonious models were achieved using MuARS, a non-linear technique. Modern machine learning methods may be used to probe relationships along different regions of the predictor space.

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  • 36.
    Liew, Bernard X W
    et al.
    University of Essex, United Kingdom.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Scutari, Marco
    IDSIA, Switzerland.
    Löfgren, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ryhov Hospital, Region Jönköping.
    Wibault, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Dedering, Åsa
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden..
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Zsigmond, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Falla, Deborah
    University of Birmingham, United Kingdom.
    Probing the mechanisms underpinning recovery in post-surgical patients with cervical radiculopathy using Bayesian networks2020In: European Journal of Pain, ISSN 1090-3801, E-ISSN 1532-2149, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 909-920Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Rehabilitation approaches should be based on an understanding of the mechanisms underpinning functional recovery. Yet, the mediators that drive an improvement in post-surgical pain-related disability in individuals with cervical radiculopathy (CR) are unknown. The aim of the present study is to use Bayesian networks (BN) to learn the probabilistic relationships between physical and psychological factors, and pain-related disability in CR.

    METHODS: We analysed a prospective cohort dataset of 201 post-surgical individuals with CR. In all, 15 variables were used to build a BN model: age, sex, neck muscle endurance, neck range of motion, neck proprioception, hand grip strength, self-efficacy, catastrophizing, depression, somatic perception, arm pain intensity, neck pain intensity and disability.

    RESULTS: A one point increase in a change of self-efficacy at 6 months was associated with a 0.09 point decrease in a change in disability at 12 months (t = -64.09, p < .001). Two pathways led to a change in disability: a direct path leading from a change in self-efficacy at 6 months to disability, and an indirect path which was mediated by neck and arm pain intensity changes at 6 and 12 months.

    CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to apply BN modelling to understand the mechanisms of recovery in post-surgical individuals with CR. Improvements in pain-related disability was directly and indirectly driven by changes in self-efficacy levels. The present study provides potentially modifiable mediators that could be the target of future intervention trials. BN models could increase the precision of treatment and outcome assessment of individuals with CR.

    SIGNIFICANCE: Using Bayesian Network modelling, we found that changes in self-efficacy levels at 6-month post-surgery directly and indirectly influenced the change in disability in individuals with CR. A mechanistic understanding of recovery provides potentially modifiable mediators that could be the target of future intervention trials.

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  • 37.
    Lindgren, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Dunberger, G.
    Ersta Skondal Univ Coll, Sweden.
    Steineck, G.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Gothenburg Univ, Sweden.
    Bergmark, K.
    Gothenburg Univ, Sweden.
    Enblom, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Enheten för samordnad cancerutredning.
    Identifying female pelvic cancer survivors with low levels of physical activity after radiotherapy: women with fecal and urinary leakage need additional support2020In: Supportive Care in Cancer, ISSN 0941-4355, E-ISSN 1433-7339, Vol. 28, p. 2669-2681Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ObjectiveTo investigate the frequency of physical activity among female pelvic cancer survivors (i.e., gynecological, rectal, and anal cancer survivors) and to investigate if survivors who practiced physical activity less than once a week differed from survivors practicing physical activity at least once a week with respect to urinary and fecal leakage, clinical and sociodemographic characteristics, quality of life (QoL), and depressed and anxious mood.MethodsFemale pelvic cancer survivors (n=578, mean age 64 years) answered a questionnaire 6-48 months after radiotherapy. A multivariable regression model analyzed factors covarying with frequency of physical activity. We compared QoL and depressed and anxious mood between women practicing physical activity at least or less than once a week.ResultsOf 568 women delivering data, 186 (33%) practiced physical activity less than once a week while 382 (67%) practiced physical activity at least weekly. Women who leaked a large or all volume of stools (p=0.01), had just elementary school level of education (pamp;lt;0.001), smokers (p=0.049), or had lymphedema without receiving lymphedema treatment (p=0.030) were more likely to practice physical activity less than weekly (50%, 45%, 45%, and 37%, respectively) compared with other women. Women practicing physical activity at least weekly reported better QoL (pamp;lt;0.001) and lower frequency of depressed mood (p=0.044) compared with the others.ConclusionsFemale cancer survivors experiencing fecal leakage were less likely to practice weekly physical activity than survivors without leakage. The survivors practicing weekly physical activity experienced better QoL and experienced depressed mood less frequently than the others.

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  • 38.
    Marcusson, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Nord, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Alwin, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dannapfel, Petra
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Thomas, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Poksinska, Bozena
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sverker, Annette M.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Olaison, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cedersund, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kelfve, Susanne
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Motel-Klingebiel, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kullberg, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Böttiger, Ylva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Dong, Huan-Ji
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lyth, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Operations management Region Östergötland, Research and Development Unit.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Operations management Region Östergötland, Research and Development Unit.
    Proactive healthcare for frail elderly persons: study protocol for a prospective controlled primary care intervention in Sweden2019In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, no 5, article id e027847Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction The provision of healthcare services is not dedicated to promoting maintenance of function and does not target frail older persons at high risk of the main causes of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of a proactive medical and social intervention in comparison with conventional care on a group of persons aged 75 and older selected by statistical prediction.

    Methods and analysis In a pragmatic multicentre primary care setting (n=1600), a prediction model to find elderly (75+) persons at high risk of complex medical care or hospitalisation is used, followed by proactive medical and social care, in comparison with usual care. The study started in April 2017 with a run-in period until December 2017, followed by a 2-year continued intervention phase that will continue until the end of December 2019. The intervention includes several tools (multiprofessional team for rehabilitation, social support, medical care home visits and telephone support). Primary outcome measures are healthcare cost, number of hospital care episodes, hospital care days and mortality. Secondary outcome measures are number of outpatient visits, cost of social care and informal care, number of prescribed drugs, health-related quality of life, cost-effectiveness, sense of security, functional status and ability. We also study the care of elderly persons in a broader sense, by covering the perspectives of the patients, the professional staff and the management, and on a political level, by using semistructured interviews, qualitative methods and a questionnaire.

    Ethics and dissemination Approved by the regional ethical review board in Linköping (Dnr 2016/347-31). The results will be presented in scientific journals and scientific meetings during 2019–2022 and are planned to be used for the development of future care models.

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  • 39.
    Nilsson, Evalill
    et al.
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden.
    Sverker, Annette M.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Eldh, Ann Catrine
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    A Human, Organization, and Technology Perspective on Patients Experiences of a Chat-Based and Automated Medical History-Taking Service in Primary Health Care: Interview Study Among Primary Care Patients2021In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 23, no 10, article id e29868Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The use of e-visits in health care is progressing rapidly worldwide. To date, studies on the advantages and disadvantages of e-consultations in the form of chat services for all inquiries in primary care have focused on the perspective of health care professionals (HCPs) rather than those of end users (patients). Objective: This study aims to explore patients experiences using a chat-based and automated medical history-taking service in regular, tax-based, not-for-profit primary care in Sweden. Methods: Overall, 25 individual interviews were conducted with patients in the catchment areas of 5 primary care centers (PCCs) in Sweden that tested a chat-based and automated medical history-taking service for all types of patient inquiries. The semistructured interviews were transcribed verbatim before content analysis using inductive and deductive strategies, the latter including an unconstrained matrix of human, organization, and technology perspectives. Results: The service provided an easily managed way for patients to make written contact with HCPs, which was considered beneficial for some patients and issues but less suitable for others (acute or more complex cases). The automated medical history-taking service was perceived as having potential but still derived from what HCPs need to know and how they address and communicate health and health care issues. Technical skills were not considered as necessary for a mobile phone chat as for handling a computer; however, patients still expressed concern for people with less digital literacy. The opportunity to take ones time and reflect on ones situation before answering questions from the HCPs was found to reduce stress and prevent errors, and patients speculated that it might be the same for the HCPs on the other end of the system. Patients appreciated the ability to have a conversation from almost anywhere, even from places not suitable for telephone calls. The asynchronicity of the chat service allowed the patients to take more control of the conversation and initiate a chat at any time at their own convenience; however, it could also lead to lengthy conversations where a single issue in the worst cases could take days to close. The opportunity to upload photographs made some visits to the PCC redundant, which would otherwise have been necessary if the ordinary telephone service had been used, saving patients both time and money. Conclusions: Patients generally had a positive attitude toward e-visits in primary care and were generally pleased with the prospects of the digital tool tested, somewhat more with the actual chat than with the automated history-taking system preceding the chat. Although patients expect their PCC to offer a range of different means of communication, the human, organization, and technology analysis revealed a need for more extensive (end) user experience design in the further development of the chat service.

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  • 40.
    Nord, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Valla.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Ödeshög.
    Marcusson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Johansson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Staff experiences of a new tool for comprehensive geriatric assessment in primary care (PASTEL): a focus group study Primary care staff experiences of geriatric assessment2020In: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, ISSN 0281-3432, E-ISSN 1502-7724, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 132-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) is recommended for the management of frailty. Little is known about professionals experiences of CGA; therefore we wanted to investigate the experiences of staff in primary care using a new CGA tool: the Primary care Assessment Tool for Elderly (PASTEL). Design: Focus group interviews. Manifest qualitative content analysis. Setting: Nine primary health care centres in Sweden that participated in a CGA intervention. These centres represent urban as well as rural areas. Subjects: Nine nurses, five GPs and one pharmacist were divided into three focus groups. Main outcome measures: Participants experiences of conducting CGA with PASTEL. Results: The analysis resulted in four main categories. A valuable tool for selected patients: The participants considered the assessment tool to be feasible and valuable. They stated that having enough time for the assessment interview was essential but views about the ideal patient for assessment were divided. Creating conditions for dialogue: The process of adapting the assessment to the individual and create conditions for dialogue was recognised as important. Managing in-depth conversations: In-depth conversations turned out to be an important component of the assessment. Patients were eager to share their stories, but talking about the future or the end of life was demanding. The winding road of actions and teamwork: PASTEL was regarded as a good preparation tool for care planning and a means of support for identifying appropriate actions to manage frailty but there were challenges to implement these actions and to obtain good teamwork. Conclusion: The participants reported that PASTEL, a tool for CGA, gave a holistic picture of the older person and was helpful in care planning.

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  • 41.
    Olaison, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cedersund, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Marcusson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Nord, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Valla.
    Sverker, Annette M.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    ‘Do you have a future when you are 93?’ Frail older person’s perceptions about the future and end of life – a qualitative interview study in primary care2022In: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, ISSN 0281-3432, E-ISSN 1502-7724, Vol. 40, no 4, p. 417-425Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To explore frail older persons’ perceptions of the future and the end of life.

    Design: Qualitative content analysis of individual semi-structured interviews.

    Setting: Nine primary health care centres in both small and middle-sized municipalities in Sweden that participated in the intervention project Proactive healthcare for frail elderly persons.

    Subjects/Patients: The study includes 20 older persons (eight women and 12 men, aged 76–93 years).

    Main outcome measures: Frail older persons’ perceptions of the future and end of life.

    Results: The analysis uncovered two main categories: Dealing with the future and Approaching the end of life. Dealing with the future includes two subcategories: Plans and reflections and Distrust and delay. Approaching the end of life includes three subcategories: Practical issues, Worries and realism, and Keeping it away.

    Conclusion: This study highlights the diverse ways older people perceive future and the end of life. The results make it possible to further understand the complex phenomenon of frail older persons’ perceptions on the future and the end of life.

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  • 42.
    Olaison, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cedersund, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Marcusson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Valtersson, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health. Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine.
    Sverker, Annette M.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Maneuvering the care puzzle: Experiences of participation in care by frail older persons with significant care needs living at home2021In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 16, no 1, article id 1937896Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Despite evidence that older persons want to be involved in care, little is known about how frail older people with significant care needs living at home experience participation in care provided by different stakeholders. This study investigates the experiences of participation in care by older people following their involvement in an intervention of a health care model called Focused Primary care (FPC).'Methods: Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with 20 older persons in five municipalities in Sweden.Results: The results show that older persons highlighted opportunities and limitations for participation on a personal level i.e., conditions for being involved in direct care and in relation to independence. Experiences of participation on organizational levels were reported to a lesser degree. This included being able to understand the organizational system underpinning care. The relational dimensions of caregiving were emphasized by the older persons as the most central aspects of caregiving in relation to participation .Conclusions: Primary care should involve older persons more directly in planning and execution of care on all levels. An ongoing connection with one specialized elderly team and a coordinating person in Primary care who safeguards relationships is important fo rproviding participation in care for frail older persons with significant care needs living at home.

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  • 43.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hermansen, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Peterson, Gunnel
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Nilsing Strid, E.
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Return to work a bumpy road: a qualitative study on experiences of work ability and work situation in individuals with chronic whiplash-associated disorders2021In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 21, no 1, article id 785Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Work resumption is a big challenge in the rehabilitation process for individuals with whiplash-associated disorders (WAD). To better meet the needs of individuals with WAD in their return to work process, more knowledge on their experiences and perspectives is needed. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of work ability and the work situation of individuals who participated in a neck-specific exercise programme for chronic WAD. Methods This qualitative study has an exploratory and descriptive design based on data collected through open-ended interviews with 17 individuals with chronic WAD. Data were analysed inductively using conventional content analysis. Results Analysis of the data yielded the following five categories related to the participants narratives on their experiences of work ability and their work situation: Return to work - a process of setbacks and bureaucracy; The need to be understood by health care professionals, and to receive a treatment plan; Individual resources are important for work ability; The consequences of reduced work ability; and Working conditions are important for work ability. Conclusion Individuals with chronic WAD often struggle to return to work. Emotional and practical support from stakeholders is imperative and needs to be strengthened. Participating in a neck-specific exercise programme, including being acknowledged and receiving information about WAD, could positively affect the work ability of WAD sufferers. This study has provided management strategies to improve the ability to work for individuals with chronic WAD, and highlights the need to incorporate a healthy and sustainable return to work in the rehabilitation of individuals with WAD, thereby making their return to work a success.

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  • 44.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Löfgren, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Neuro Orthoped Ctr, Sweden.
    Dedering, Asa
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Kristedal, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Zsigmond, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Wibault, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Neurological outcomes after surgery and postoperative rehabilitation for cervical radiculopathy due to disc disease: a 2-year-follow-up of a randomized clinical trial2023In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 3830Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reports on neurological outcomes in patients with cervical radiculopathy (CR) undergoing surgery and postoperative rehabilitation are important to inform prognosis. This 2-year-follow-up of a randomized clinical trial aimed to compare secondary neurological outcomes between structured postoperative rehabilitation and a standard approach after surgery for CR. A secondary aim was to increase knowledge about recovery of neurological impairments in relation to patient-reported neck disability. Neurological outcomes included assessment of sensibility, motor function, arm reflexes and the Spurling test. A total of 153 and 135 participants (&gt;70% response rate) completed the clinical examination. Between-group differences, changes over time, and associations between persistent neurological impairments and the Neck Disability Index were investigated. No between-group differences were reported (p&gt;0.07), and neurological impairments in sensibility, motor function, and a positive Spurling test decreased over time in both groups (p&lt;0.04). Persistent impairments in sensibility and reflex arm were most frequent at follow-up, whereas, a persistent positive Spurling test, and impairments in motor function were associated with higher NDI score. Neurological outcomes improved over time in patients undergoing surgery for CR with no between-group differences., However, persistent neurological impairments were common, and associated with poorer outcome for patient-reported neck disability.Clinical registration: clinicaltrial.gov NCT01547611, 08/03/2012, Title: Outcome of physiotherapy after surgery for cervical disc disease: a prospective multi-centre trial.

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  • 45.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Löfgren, Håkan
    Ryhov Hosp, Sweden.
    Dedering, Asa
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Zsigmond, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Hedevik, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wibault, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Postoperative structured rehabilitation in patients undergoing surgery for cervical radiculopathy: a 2-year follow-up of a randomized controlled trial2019In: Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine, ISSN 1547-5654, E-ISSN 1547-5646, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 60-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE Information about postoperative rehabilitation for cervical radiculopathy (CR) is scarce. The aim of this study was to investigate the additional benefits of structured postoperative rehabilitation (SPT), which was performed in all patients, compared with a pragmatic standard postoperative approach (SA), in which rehabilitation was used as needed and patients sought physiotherapy on their own without a referral, in patients with MRI evidence of disc herniation and concomitant clinical signs who underwent surgery for CR. METHODS Patients (n = 202) were randomized to receive SPT or SA. Included key variables in the present study were primary and selected secondary outcomes of a prospective randomized controlled multicenter study. The main outcome was the Neck Disability Index (NDI) score. The NDI score, pain variables, self-efficacy, and health-related quality of life were investigated at baseline and 3, 6, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. RESULTS SPT provided no additional benefits over SA (p = 0.08 to p = 0.99) at the postoperative 2-year follow-up. Both groups improved over time (p amp;lt; 0.0001), with no reported adverse effects. CONCLUSIONS One can conclude that SPT offered no additional benefits over SA; however, patients tolerated postoperative neck exercises without any negative side effects. These findings are important for the development of future active and neck-specific post-operative rehabilitation interventions for patients with CR.

  • 46.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Peterson, Gunnel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Hermansen, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Landén Ludvigsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Rehabilitation in Motala.
    Dedering, Asa
    Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Lofgren, Hakan
    Ryhov Hosp, Sweden.
    Physiotherapy after anterior cervical spine surgery for cervical disc disease: study protocol of a prospective randomised study to compare internet-based neck-specific exercise with prescribed physical activity2019In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, no 2, article id e027387Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Patients suffering from remaining disability after anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF) surgery for cervical disc disease may be prescribed physical activity (PPA) or neck-specific exercises (NSEs). Currently, we lack data for the success of either approach. There is also a knowledge gap concerning the use of internet-based care for cervical disc disease. The scarcity of these data, and the high proportion of patients with various degrees of incapacity following ACDF, warrant increased efforts to investigate and improve cost-effective rehabilitation. The objective is to compare the effectiveness of a structured, internet-based NSE programme, versus PPA following ACDF surgery. Methods and analysis This is a prospective, randomised, multicentre study that includes 140 patients with remaining disability (amp;gt;= 30% on the Neck Disability Index, NDI) following ACDF for radiculopathy due to cervical disc disease. Patient recruitment occurs following attendance at routine clinical appointments, scheduled at 3 months postsurgery. Patients are then randomised to one of two groups (70 patients/group) for a 3-month treatment programme/period of either internet-based NSE or PPA. Questionnaires on background data, pain and discomfort, physical and mental capacity, satisfaction with care, and health and workplace factors are completed, along with physical measures of neck-related function conducted by independent test leaders blinded to randomisation. Measures are collected at inclusion, after the 3-month treatments (end of treatment) and at a 2-year follow-up. Radiography will be completed at the 2-year follow-up. Preoperative data will be collected from the Swedish Spine Registry. Data on healthcare consumption, drug use and sick leave will be requested from the relevant national registers. Ethical considerations This study was approved by the Regional Ethical Review Board in Linkoping Ref. 2016/283-31 and 2017/91-32. The scientists are independent with no commercial ties. Patients are recruited after providing written informed consent. Patient data are presented at group level such that no connection to any individual can be made. All data are anonymised when reported, and subject to the Swedish Official Secrets Health Acts. The test leaders are independent and blinded for randomisation. Exercises, both general and neck-specific, have been used extensively in clinical practice and we anticipate no harm from their implementation other than a risk of muscle soreness. Both randomisation groups will receive care that is expected to relieve pain, although the group receiving NSE is expected to demonstrate a greater and more cost-effective improvement versu s the PPA group. Any significant harm or unintended effects in each group will be collected by the test leaders. All questionnaires and test materials are coded by the research group, with code lists stored in locked, fireproof file cabinets, housed at the university in a room with controlled (card-based) access. Only individuals in receipt of a unique website address posted by the researchers can access the programme; patients can neither communicate with each other nor with caregivers via the programme. Study participation might lead to improved rehabilitation versus non-participation, and might therefore be of benefit. The results of this study should also contribute to more effective and flexible rehabilitation, shorter waiting times, lower costs and the possibility to implement our findings on a wider level. Dissemination If effective, the protocols used in this study can be implemented in existing healthcare structures. The results of the study will be presented in scientific journals and popular science magazines of relevance to health. The findings will also be presented at local, regional, national and international conferences and meetings, as well as in the education of university students and at public lectures. Information about the results will be communicated to the general population in cooperation with patient organisations and the media.

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  • 47.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Wibault, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Löfgren, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Neuroorthoped Ctr, Sweden.
    Dedering, Åsa
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Zsigmond, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Work Ability After Anterior Cervical Decompression and Fusion Followed by a Structured Postoperative Rehabilitation: Secondary Outcomes of a Prospective Randomized Controlled Multi-Centre Trial with a 2-year Follow-up2022In: Journal of occupational rehabilitation, ISSN 1053-0487, E-ISSN 1573-3688, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 473-482Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose Information on work ability after ACDF and postoperative rehabilitation is lacking. The aim of the present study is therefore to investigate the work ability benefits of a structured postoperative treatment (SPT) over a standard care approach (SA) in patients who underwent anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF) for cervical radiculopathy and factors important to the 2-year outcome. Methods Secondary outcome and prediction model of a prospective randomized controlled multi-centre study with a 2-year follow-up (clinicaltrials.gov NCT01547611). The Work Ability Index (WAI) and Work Ability Score (WAS) were measured at baseline and up to 2 years after ACDF in 154 patients of working age who underwent SPT or SA after surgery. Predictive factors for the WAI at 2 years were analysed. Results Both WAI and WAS significantly improved with SPT and SA (p &lt; 0.001), without any between-group differences. Thoughts of being able to work within the next 6 months, Neck Disability Index (NDI), and work-related neck load explained 59% of the variance in WAI at the 2-year follow-up after ACDF. Conclusions Patients improved over time without group differences, suggesting the improvement to be surgery related. Expectation to work within the next 6 months, self-reported neck functioning and work-related neck load were important to work ability and are central factors to ask early after ACDF, to identifying further interventions promoting return to work.

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  • 48.
    Pohl, Petra
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    The Ronnie Gardiner Method: An Innovative Music-Based Intervention for Neurological Rehabilitation - Theoretical Background and Contemporary Research with Focus on Parkinson`s Disease2018In: Neurophysiology and Rehabilitation, ISSN 2641-8991, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 32-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Ronnie Gardiner Method (RGM) is an innovative, practitioner-led, music-based intervention using sensorimotor and cognitive integration. RGM was originally developed by the Swedish musician Ronnie Gardiner. Since 2010, RGM has been successfully implemented within neurorehabilitation in many countries. The purpose of this article is to outline some of the theoretical assumptions underpinning the potential benefits from this intervention, using Parkinson’s disease as an example. RGM is based on principles of neuroplasticity, motor learning, and postural control, and uses energizing, beat-based music to provide multisensory input (visual, audio, kinetic, and tactile) in order to stimulate experience-dependent neuroplastic processes. It aims at stimulating cognitive and motor function (e.g., memory, concentration, executive function, multitasking, coordination, mobility, balance, and motor skills). In addition, it may aid body awareness, self-esteem, and social skills. RGM has been scientifically evaluated as a means of multimodal sensory stimulation after stroke and as a means of improving mobility and cognitive function in Parkinson’s disease. RGM is a complex multi-task intervention with the potential to be beneficial in different settings and in different neurological conditions. It can be performed either while standing up or sitting down and can be practiced with the advantages gained as a group activity or individually, which makes it very flexible. It is currently being used as rehabilitation activity for people with stroke, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, dementia, and depression. Furthermore, RGM is used in programs targeting healthy aging, ADHD, autism, and dyslexia, and in ordinary school environments.

  • 49.
    Pohl, Petra
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health. Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Gunnel
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kall, Lina Bunketorp
    Sahlgrenska Univ Hosp Molndal, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Michael
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Univ Newcastle, Australia.
    Blomstrand, Christian
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    A qualitative exploration of post-acute stroke participants experiences of a multimodal intervention incorporating horseback riding2018In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 9, article id e0203933Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Multimodal rehabilitation interventions delivered in late phase of stroke recovery involve physical (motor and sensory), social, and cognitively challenging activities. Horseback riding can be incorporated within such interventions, leading to meaningful long-term improvements when applied to individuals with moderate levels of disability. There is a lack of research illuminating stroke survivors experiences and perceptions of horseback riding in the context of multimodal interventions. Aim To explore stroke survivors experiences of participation in a multimodal group-based intervention that included horseback riding. Methods An explorative interview study was conducted with individual face-to-face interviews performed on a single occasion, utilising a semi-structured interview guide. Eighteen participants were purposively selected from a larger trial (mean age 62, 12 men, 6 women) within four weeks after treatment completion. The interview duration was between 17 and 50 minutes. The data was analysed using a qualitative content analysis method. Findings Four broad themes were identified from the analysis. These themes were: transformative experiences; human-horse interaction; togetherness and belonging; and the all-in-one solution. Interacting with the horse and peers had a profound emotional impact on the participants. The participants also reported having learned new skills, increased self-efficacy and self-esteem, and improvements in balance and gait, all of which could be transferred to everyday life. The horse itself played a central role, but other components, such as the other group members, the instructors, and the challenging tasks on the horseback, were also important. Conclusion A multimodal rehabilitation intervention that includes horseback riding may provide stroke survivors in a late phase of recovery with rich pleasurable experiences that may have life-changing and profound impacts on their emotional and physical state.

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  • 50.
    Pohl, Petra
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health. Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Gunnel
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kall, Lina Bunketorp
    Sahlgrenska Univ Hosp Molndal, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Michael
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Univ Newcastle, Australia.
    Blomstrand, Christian
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Experiences from a multimodal rhythm and music-based rehabilitation program in late phase of stroke recovery - A qualitative study2018In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 9, article id e0204215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Rehabilitative stroke interventions based on principles of multimodal stimulation have the potential to profoundly affect neuroplastic processes beyond the sub-acute phase. In order to identify important core mechanisms, there is a need to explore how interventions that combine physical, social, sensory, and cognitively challenging activities are perceived and experienced by the participants. This qualitative study, based on an interpretive interactionist perspective, explored the experiences of stroke survivors who participated in a group-based multimodal rehabilitation program based on rhythm and music. Methods and findings Within four weeks after completion of the multimodal rehabilitation program, face-to-face semi-structured interviews were conducted on a single occasion with 15 purposively selected individuals (mean age 65, 8 men, 7 women). The interview duration was between 13 and 44 minutes. Qualitative content analysis with an inductive approach was used to analyze data. Three categories were identified, each containing several sub-categories: To be intellectually challenged (energy-consuming activity and coordinating multiple input and output), Perceived therapeutic benefits (motor skills, cognitive skills, emotional and psychological responses), and Pros and cons with social integration (fellowship, competing with others, and instructor characteristics). From these categories, an overall theme was derived: The multifaceted layers of multimodal stimulation. Enjoying music, being part of a group with peers, a skilled instructor, and being able to manage the challenging movements, were related to positive experiences. In contrast, negative experiences were associated with not being able to perform the exercises, and with group members who dominated the conversational space. Conclusion This study shows that access to a multimodal rehabilitation program with rhythm and music as operating ingredients may contribute to positive experiences for many individuals in a late phase after stroke in terms of motor, cognitive, as well as emotional enhancements. Important components were the music, the social interaction, the challenging exercises, and the skilled instructor.

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