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  • 1.
    Abbott, Allan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Schröder, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Enthoven, Paul
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Effectiveness of implementing a best practice primary healthcare model for low back pain (BetterBack) compared with current routine care in the Swedish context: an internal pilot study informed protocol for an effectiveness-implementation hybrid type 2 trial2018In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 8, no 4, article id e019906Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Low back pain (LBP) is a major health problem commonly requiring healthcare. In Sweden, there is a call from healthcare practitioners (HCPs) for the development, implementation and evaluation of a best practice primary healthcare model for LBP.

    Aims (1) To improve and understand the mechanisms underlying changes in HCP confidence, attitudes and beliefs for providing best practice coherent primary healthcare for patients with LBP; (2) to improve and understand the mechanisms underlying illness beliefs, self-care enablement, pain, disability and quality of life in patients with LBP; and (3) to evaluate a multifaceted and sustained implementation strategy and the cost-effectiveness of the BetterBack☺ model of care (MOC) for LBP from the perspective of the Swedish primary healthcare context.

    Methods This study is an effectiveness-implementation hybrid type 2 trial testing the hypothesised superiority of the BetterBack☺ MOC compared with current routine care. The trial involves simultaneous testing of MOC effects at the HCP, patient and implementation process levels. This involves a prospective cohort study investigating implementation at the HCP level and a patient-blinded, pragmatic, cluster, randomised controlled trial with longitudinal follow-up at 3, 6 and 12 months post baseline for effectiveness at the patient level. A parallel process and economic analysis from a healthcare sector perspective will also be performed. Patients will be allocated to routine care (control group) or the BetterBack☺ MOC (intervention group) according to a stepped cluster dogleg structure with two assessments in routine care. Experimental conditions will be compared and causal mediation analysis investigated. Qualitative HCP and patient experiences of the BetterBack☺ MOC will also be investigated.

    Dissemination The findings will be published in peer-reviewed journals and presented at national and international conferences. Further national dissemination and implementation in Sweden and associated national quality register data collection are potential future developments of the project.

  • 2.
    Anskär, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Mantorp.
    Lindberg, Malou
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care. 1177 Med Advisory Serv, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Falk, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Time utilization and perceived psychosocial work environment among staff in Swedish primary care settings2018In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 18, article id 166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Over the past decades, reorganizations and structural changes in Swedish primary care have affected time utilization among health care professionals. Consequently, increases in administrative tasks have substantially reduced the time available for face-to-face consultations. This study examined how work-time was utilized and the association between work time utilization and the perceived psychosocial work environment in Swedish primary care settings. Methods: This descriptive, multicentre, cross-sectional study was performed in 2014-2015. Data collection began with questionnaire. In the first section, respondents were asked to estimate how their workload was distributed between patients (direct and indirect patient work) and other work tasks. The questionnaire also comprised the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire, which assessed the psychosocial work environment. Next a time study was conducted where the participants reported their work-time based on three main categories: direct patient-related work, indirect patient-related work, and other work tasks. Each main category had a number of subcategories. The participants recorded the time spent (minutes) on each work task per hour, every day, for two separate weeks. Eleven primary care centres located in southeast Sweden participated. All professionals were asked to participate (n = 441), including registered nurses, primary care physicians, care administrators, nurse assistants, and allied professionals. Response rates were 75% and 79% for the questionnaires and the time study, respectively. Results: All health professionals allocated between 30.9% - 37.2% of their work-time to each main category: direct patient work, indirect patient work, and other work. All professionals estimated a higher proportion of time spent in direct patient work than they reported in the time study. Physicians scored highest on the psychosocial scales of quantitative demands, stress, and role conflicts. Among allied professionals, the proportion of work-time spent on administrative tasks was associated with more role conflicts. Younger staff perceived more adverse working conditions than older staff. Conclusions: This study indicated that Swedish primary care staff spent a limited proportion of their work time directly with patients. PCPs seemed to perceive their work environment in negative terms to a greater extent than other staff members. This study showed that work task allocations influenced the perceived psychosocial work environment.

  • 3.
    Biermann, Olivia
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Eckhardt, Martin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Emergency Medicine. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine.
    Carlfjord, Siw
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Central County.
    Falk, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Forsberg, Birger C.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Collaboration between non-governmental organizations and public services in health - a qualitative case study from rural Ecuador2016In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 9, article id 32237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Non-governmental organizations (NGOs) have a key role in improving health in low-and middle-income countries. Their work needs to be synergistic, complementary to public services, and rooted in community mobilization and collective action. The study explores how an NGO and its health services are perceived by the population that it serves, and how it can contribute to reducing barriers to care. Design: A qualitative exploratory study was conducted in remote Ecuador, characterized by its widespread poverty and lack of official governance. An international NGO collaborated closely with the public services to deliver preventative and curative health services. Data were collected using focus group discussions and semistructured interviews with purposively sampled community members, healthcare personnel, and community health workers based on their links to the health services. Conventional qualitative content analysis was used, focusing on manifest content. Results: Emerging themes relate to the public private partnership (PPP), the NGO and its services, and community participation. The population perceives the NGO positively, linking it to healthcare improvements. Their priority is to get services, irrespective of the providers structure. The presence of an NGO in the operation may contribute to unrealistic expectations of health services, affecting perceptions of the latter negatively. Conclusions: To avoid unrealistic expectations and dissatisfaction, and to increase and sustain the populations trust in the organization, an NGO should operate in a manner that is as integrated as possible within the existing structure. The NGO should work close to the population it serves, with services anchored in the community. PPP parties should develop a common platform with joint messages to the target population on the providers structure, and regarding partners roles and responsibilities. Interaction between the population and the providers on service content and their expectations is key to positive outcomes of PPP operations.

  • 4.
    Carlsson, Noomi
    et al.
    Reg Execut Off, Sweden.
    Kullberg, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Ida-Klara
    Reg Execut Off, Sweden.
    Bergman, Paula
    Reg Execut Off, Sweden.
    Skagerström, Janna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Exploring experiences among adopters during the diffusion of a novel dance intervention in Sweden2018In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 1438697Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a demand for interventions aimed at adolescent girls with psychosomatic problems. In 2013, positive results were reported from a dance intervention programme addressing girls with internalizing problems. The research team behind the intervention immediately received requests from municipalities and county councils interested in using the intervention. From an implementation point of view it is unclear what made the intervention spread without an active plan. The aim of this study was to explore adopters experiences about the diffusion and initiation of a public health intervention targeting adolescent girls with internalizing problems. Interviews were conducted with 12 people who were engaged in initiating the intervention in different settings. Data were analysed using conventional content analysis, yielding three categories: perceived appeal and trustworthiness, convenient information, and contextual factors. The results reflected that the participants found that there was a need for an intervention and found the dance intervention to be evidence based and not too complex to perform. Further, there was available information on the project which could easily be distributed to decision makers and others. When initiating the intervention, factors related to economy, possibility for collaboration and recruitment were of importance.

  • 5.
    Dannapfel, Petra
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Törnvall, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Wressle, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Education to Increase Skills in Research Methods among Clinicians in Health Care2017In: Journal of Health & Medical Informatics, ISSN 2157-7420, Vol. 8, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    The aim of this study was to evaluate participants’ and managers’ experience of the design and content of an education programme. The Knowledge to Action (KTA) framework was applied to identify the steps of knowledge creation and action in the education programme.

    Methods

    Data were collected from 18 participants representing two groups: participants in the intervention and supervisors and managers. Two focus groups took place: two with participants in the intervention (4 and 3 in each) and one with eleven managers.

    Results

    All steps in the KTA framework were identified and discussed from several aspects. The importance of selecting projects that were relevant and added value in their clinics was mentioned by all participants. The participants also mentioned that after the education, they had further understanding and increased skills in how to be active and perform continuous improvement projects. The step in the KTA process regarding how to adapt knowledge to local context was not discussed explicitly by the participants or managers.

    Discussion

    Education in research methods and performing improvement projects to develop the clinic creates a more positive attitude to working with continuous improvement. The participant’s self-esteem and knowledge increased regarding how to work with improvements. It is important to have the manager’s support to perform a project. Emphasis was on knowledge inquiry and synthesis and presenting the results with or without possible solutions. The participants and managers talked about barriers and knowledge use more generally and at an organizational level. This means that the participants did not gain the last bit of nowledge needed to put the action into practice. This implies that the problem regarding lack of implementation skills in health care might remain.

  • 6.
    Detert, H.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine.
    Hedlund, S.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology.
    Rodvall, Y.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Festin, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Whiteman, D. C.
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Falk, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Validation of sun exposure and protection index (SEPI) for estimation of sun habits2015In: Cancer Epidemiology, ISSN 1877-7821, E-ISSN 1877-783X, Vol. 39, no 6, p. 986-993Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In both Sweden and Australia high incidence rates of skin cancer have become a major health problem. In prevention and risk communication, it is important to have reliable ways for identifying people with risky sun habits. In this study the validity and reliability of the questionnaire Sun Exposure Protection Index (SEPI), developed to assess individuals sun habits and their propensity to increase sun protection during routine, often brief, clinical encounters, has been evaluated. The aim of our study was to evaluate validity and reliability of the proposed SEPI scoring instrument, in two countries with markedly different ultraviolet radiation environments (Sweden and Australia). Method: Two subpopulations in Sweden and Australia respectively were asked to fill out the SEPI together with the previously evaluated Readiness to Alter Sun Protective Behaviour questionnaire (RASP-B) and the associated Sun-protective Behaviours Questionnaire. To test reliability, the SEPI was again filled out by the subjects one month later. Results: Comparison between SEPI and the questions in the Sun-protective Behaviours Questionnaire, analyzed with Spearmans Rho, showed good correlations regarding sun habits. Comparison between SEPI and RASP-B regarding propensity to increase sun protection showed concurrently lower SEPI mean scores for action stage, but no difference between precontemplation and contemplation stages. The SEPI test-retest analysis indicated stability over time. Internal consistency of the SEPI, assessed with Cronbachs alpha estimation showed values marginally lower than the desired >0.70 coefficient value generally recommended, and was somewhat negatively affected by the question on sunscreen use, likely related to the classic "sunscreen paradox". There were some differences in the performance of the SEPI between the Swedish and Australian samples, possibly due to the influence of "available" sunlight and differing attitudes to behaviour and protection "at home" and on vacation. Conclusions: SEPI appears to be a stable instrument with an overall acceptable validity and reliability, applicable for use in populations exposed to different UVR environments, in order to evaluate individual sun exposure and protection. (C) 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  • 7.
    Edvardsson, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Finspång, Primary Health Care in Finspång.
    Sund-Levander, Märtha
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Grodzinsky, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care. Rättsmedicinalverket, Linköping, Sweden.
    Clinical use of conventional reference intervals in the frail elderly2015In: Journal of Evaluation In Clinical Practice, ISSN 1356-1294, E-ISSN 1365-2753, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 229-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rationale, aims and objectives

    Reference intervals provided by the laboratory are commonly established by measuring samples from apparently healthy subjects in the ages 18–65 years, excluding elderly individuals with chronic diseases and medication. The aim of our study was to establish whether current reference intervals for immune parameters and chemical biomarkers are valid for older individuals including those with chronic diseases, so-called frail elderly.

    Methods

    Data from our cohort of 138 non-infected nursing home residents (NHR), mean age 86.8 years, range 80–98, were compared with raw data, as basis for the development of reference intervals, obtained from reference populations, like blood donors (IgA, IgG, IgM, C3 and C4) and from the Nordic Reference Interval Project (NORIP) (alanine aminotransferase, albumin, aspartate aminotransferase, creatinine, gamma-glutamyl transferase, lactate dehydrogenase, phosphate, sodium and urea). Immune parameters were measured by nephelometry and in NORIP the measurements were performed by means of different routine methods, in more than 100 laboratories.

    Results

    Only nine individuals (7%) of NHR were found to be free from chronic disease. C3, C4 (P < 0.001) and IgG levels (P < 0.05) were higher, while IgM levels (P < 0.001) were lower in NHR compared with reference blood donors. Levels of alanine aminotransferase, phosphate (P < 0.001), albumin (P < 0.05) and sodium (P < 0.01) were lower while creatinine and urea levels were higher (P < 0.001) in NHR compared with NORIP subjects.

    Conclusion

    Comparing laboratory results from elderly people with conventional reference intervals can be misleading or even dangerous, as normal conditions may appear pathological, or vice versa and thus lead to unnecessary or even harmful treatment.

  • 8.
    Ekdahl, Anne W.
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Helsingborg Hospital, Sweden.
    Alwin, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Eckerblad, Jeanette
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science.
    Husberg, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lindh Mazya, Amelie
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Danderyd Hospital, Sweden.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science.
    Wiklund, Rolf
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Carlsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Long-Term Evaluation of the Ambulatory Geriatric Assessment: A Frailty Intervention Trial (AGe-FIT): Clinical Outcomes and Total Costs After 36 Months2016In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, ISSN 1525-8610, E-ISSN 1538-9375, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 263-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To compare the effects of care based on comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) as a complement to usual care in an outpatient setting with those of usual care alone. The assessment was performed 36 months after study inclusion. Design: Randomized, controlled, assessor-blinded, single-center trial. Setting: A geriatric ambulatory unit in a municipality in the southeast of Sweden. Participants: Community-dwelling individuals aged &gt;= 75 years who had received inpatient hospital care 3 or more times in the past 12 months and had 3 or more concomitant medical diagnoses were eligible for study inclusion. Participants were randomized to the intervention group (IG) or control group (CG). Intervention: Participants in the IG received CGA-based care for 24 to 31 months at the geriatric ambulatory unit in addition to usual care. Outcome measures: Mortality, transfer to nursing home, days in hospital, and total costs of health and social care after 36 months. Results: Mean age (SD) of participants was 82.5 (4.9) years. Participants in the IG (n = 208) lived 69 days longer than did those in the CG (n = 174); 27.9% (n = 58) of participants in the IG and 38.5% (n = 67) in the CG died (hazard ratio 1.49, 95% confidence interval 1.05-2.12, P =.026). The mean number of inpatient days was lower in the IG (15.1 [SD 18.4]) than in the CG (21.0 [SD 25.0], P =.01). Mean overall costs during the 36-month period did not differ between the IG and CG (USD 71,905 [SD 85,560] and USD 65,626 [SD 66,338], P =.43). Conclusions: CGA-based care resulted in longer survival and fewer days in hospital, without significantly higher cost, at 3 years after baseline. These findings add to the evidence of CGAs superiority over usual care in outpatient settings. As CGA-based care leads to important positive outcomes, this method should be used more extensively in the treatment of older people to meet their needs. (c) 2016 AMDA - The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine.

  • 9.
    Enthoven, Paul
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Molander, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Stålnacke, Britt-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Clinical Sciences, Karolinska Institutet and Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stenberg, Gunilla
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Do pain characteristics guide selection for multimodal pain rehabilitation?2017In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 49, p. 161-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To determine whether self-reported painmeasures are associated with selection for multimodalor multidisciplinary rehabilitation (MMR) andwhether this selection is influenced by sex.Design: Cross-sectional cohort study.Subjects: A total of 1,226 women and 464 men withchronic pain conditions from 2 university hospitals.Methods: Drawing from the Swedish Quality Registryfor Pain Rehabilitation (SQRP), data on pain, psychologicalsymptoms, function, health, and activity/participation were collected. Multiple logistic regressionwas used to investigate association of painmeasures with selection for MMR (no/yes) aftermultidisciplinary assessment. Covariates were: age,educational level, anxiety, depression, working status,and several pain measures.Results: High pain intensity in the previous week(odds ratio (OR) 0.92; 95% confidence interval (CI)0.86–0.99) and high pain severity (MultidimensionalPain Inventory) (OR 0.83; 95% CI 0.74–0.95)were negatively associated with selection for MMR,whereas higher number of pain quadrants was positivelyassociated with selection for MMR. Similarresults were obtained for women, but none of themeasures was predictive for men.Conclusion: This practice-based study showed thathigher scores on self-reported pain were not associatedwith selection for MMR, and in women therewas a negative association for higher pain intensityand pain severity. Thus, other factors than pain determinewhether patients are selected for MMR.

  • 10.
    Eriksson, Hanna
    et al.
    Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, and Deptartment of Oncology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lyth, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Andersson, Therese M-L
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The proportion cured of patients diagnosed with Stage III-IV cutaneous malignant melanoma in Sweden 1990-2007: A population-based study.2016In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 138, no 12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The survival in cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) is highly dependent on the stage of the disease. Stage III-IV CMM patients are at high risk of relapse with a heterogeneous outcome, but not all experience excess mortality due to their disease. This group is referred to as the cure proportion representing the proportion of patients who experience the same mortality rate as the general population. The aim of this study was to estimate the cure proportion of patients diagnosed with Stage III-IV CMM in Sweden. From the population-based Swedish Melanoma Register, we included 856 patients diagnosed with primary Stage III-IV CMM, 1990-2007, followed-up through 2013. We used flexible parametric cure models to estimate cure proportions and median survival times (MSTs) of uncured by sex, age, tumor site, ulceration status (in Stage III patients) and disease stage. The standardized (over sex, age and site) cure proportion was lower in Stage IV CMMs (0.15, 95% CI 0.09-0.22) than non-ulcerated Stage III CMMs (0.48, 95% CI 0.41-0.55) with a statistically significant difference of 0.33 (95% CI = 0.24-0.41). Ulcerated Stage III CMMs had a cure proportion of 0.27 (95% CI 0.21-0.32) with a statistically significant difference compared to non-ulcerated Stage III CMMs (difference 0.21; 95% CI = 0.13-0.30). The standardized MST of uncured was approximately 9-10 months longer for non-ulcerated versus ulcerated Stage III CMMs. We could demonstrate a significantly better outcome in patients diagnosed with non-ulcerated Stage III CMMs compared to ulcerated Stage III CMMs and Stage IV disease after adjusting for age, sex and tumor site.

  • 11.
    Falk, Lars
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Skov Jensen, Jorgen
    Microbiology and Infection Control, Sexually Transmitted Infections, Research and Development, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Successful outcome of macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma genitalium urethritis after spectinomycin treatment: a case report2017In: Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, ISSN 0305-7453, E-ISSN 1460-2091, Vol. 72, no 2, p. 624-625Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Falk, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Hagesund, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    CBT-based group intervention for insomnia – a non-randomized trial in primary care2016In: Journal of Sleep Disorders and Therapy, ISSN 0972-5792, E-ISSN 2327-4123, Vol. 5, no 230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    Insomnia is a major health problem, commonly leading to pharmacological treatment. During recent years, behavioural therapies have gained stronger therapeutic position, not least cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT). The aim was to investigate the effect of a CBT-based group intervention for insomnia in primary care, by means of self-reported sleep quality and duration. In addition, cortisol in saliva, as a biological marker of stress was tested. Methods: Fifty participants with primary insomnia, attending primary care, were enrolled, 35 receiving the intervention, and 15 serving as control. The intervention group was recruited during the first two study years, and controls during a following third year, without randomization. The intervention included eight CBT-based group sessions, each two-hour long and led by a psychologist, with 4-6 participants in each group. Controls were handled in accordance with ordinary clinical routine, including pharmacological intervention. Sleep onset time, duration and quality were assessed before and after the intervention, by patients filling-out the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Insomnia severity was assessed by the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI). Also, cortisol in saliva levels were monitored. Results: In the intervention group, significant shortening of mean sleep onset time, from 60-27 min (p<0.05) was observed, and a prolongation of mean sleep duration time, from 298-358 min (p<0.05), in neither case seen in the control group, although between-group difference was not statistically significant. Both PSQI and ISI means scores were significantly improved in the intervention group, from 12.1 to 7.9 (p<0.05) and from 19.4 to 12.5 (p<0.01), respectively, in the latter case significantly more so than in the control group (p<0.05). No effect on cortisol levels was detected, in either group. In conclusion, the tested eight-session CBT-based group intervention for insomnia appears to reduce severity and duration of insomnia, and to shorten time before falling asleep, when provided in primary care.

  • 13.
    Falk, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Patient Safety.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis.
    Lagerfelt, Marie
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Woisetschläger, Mischa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Ahlström, Ulla
    Vårdcentralen Kungsgatan Linköping, Sweden Region Östergötland, Sweden.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Modifierad brittisk modell kortade ledtid till datortomografi av kolon2015In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The British national Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has presented guidelines based on signs and symptoms which should raise a suspicion of colorectal cancer. A slightly modified version of these guidelines, adapted to Swedish conditions, named Swedish NICE (sNICE) criteria, was implemented at eight primary care centres. By following the sNICE criteria, cases with higher degree of suspicion of colorectal cancer were advised for computer tomography (CT) of the colon, whereas cases of low degree of suspicion were advised for the considerably less time and patient demanding CT of the abdomen. For patients with isolated anal symptoms without presence of sNICE criteria, active expectancy for six weeks was recommended, followed by renewed consideration. Results showed that the ratio between CT colon and CT abdomen was reduced from 2.2 to 1.1 after introduction of the sNICE criteria. Also, the proportion of patients undergoing CT colon within two weeks from admittance was increased from 3 to 25 %. We conclude that the sNICE criteria may be a useful supportive tool for the primary care physician.

  • 14.
    Garvin, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Falk, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Plasma Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Levels Predict First-Time Coronary Heart Disease: An 8-Year Follow-Up of a Community-Based Middle Aged Population2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 9, p. e0138290-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The enzyme in matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 has been suggested to be an important determinant of plaque degradation. While several studies have shown elevated levels in patients with coronary heart disease, results in prospective population based studies evaluating MMP-9 in relation to first time coronary events have been inconclusive. As of today, there are four published studies which have measured MMP-9 in serum and none using plasma. Measures of MMP-9 in serum have been suggested to have more flaws than measures in plasma. Aim To investigate the independent association between plasma levels of MMP-9 and first-time incidence of coronary events in an 8-year follow-up. Material and Methods 428 men and 438 women, aged 45-69 years, free of previous coronary events and stroke at baseline, were followed-up. Adjustments were made for sex, age, socioeconomic position, behavioral and cardiovascular risk factors, chronic disease at baseline, depressive symptoms, interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein. Results 53 events were identified during a risk-time of 6 607 person years. Hazard ratio (HR) for MMP-9 after adjustment for all covariates were HR = 1.44 (1.03 to 2.02, p = 0.033). Overall, the effect of adjustments for other cardiovascular risk factors was low. Conclusion Levels of plasma MMP-9 are independently associated with risk of first-time CHD events, regardless of adjustments. These results are in contrast to previous prospective population-based studies based on MMP-9 in serum. It is essential that more studies look at MMP-9 levels in plasma to further evaluate the association with first coronary events.

  • 15.
    Garvin, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Evalill
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The joint subclinical elevation of CRP and IL-6 is associated with lower health-related quality of life in comparison with no elevation or elevation of only one of the biomarkers2016In: Quality of Life Research, ISSN 0962-9343, E-ISSN 1573-2649, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 213-221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Measures of health-related quality of life (HRQoL), like the Short Form (SF)-36, have been suggested to correlate with inflammatory biomarkers. It is, however, unclear whether a joint measure of two inflammatory biomarkers would bring additional information in comparison with evaluation of one inflammatory biomarker. To evaluate associations between SF-36 and low-grade inflammation in a Swedish population, with emphasis on a combined measure of C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) as a proxy for low-grade inflammation. In a randomly selected sample of a middle-aged Swedish general population (n = 905; aged 45-69 years, 50 % women), relations between SF-36 parameters and the biomarkers were tested. Regression and correlation analyses were adjusted for sex, age, presence of disease, lifestyle, and psychological factors. After adjustment for sex and age, HRQoL was significantly lower in the group with a joint elevation of CRP and IL-6 in comparison with either the group with no elevation or the groups showing elevation of one of the two biomarkers. Also after full adjustments, the combined measure of elevated CRP and IL-6, with few exceptions, was associated with significantly lower HRQoL in comparison with elevations in one of them, difference ranging from 4 (Mental Health scale) to 18 scale steps (Role-Physical scale). This study confirms that there is a relationship between HRQoL and low-grade inflammation. In particular, SF-36 scores are significantly lower in a group with joint elevation of IL-6 and CRP, in comparison with elevation of either one of them.

  • 16.
    Gerdle, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Molander, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Stenberg, Gunilla
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Stålnacke, Britt-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Enthoven, Paul
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care. 5 Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Weak outcome predictors of multimodal rehabilitation at one-year follow-up in patients with chronic pain-a practice based evidence study from two SQRP centres.2016In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 17, no 1, article id 490Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: For patients with chronic pain, the heterogeneity of clinical presentations makes it difficult to identify patients who would benefit from multimodal rehabilitation programs (MMRP). Yet, there is limited knowledge regarding the predictors of MMRP's outcomes. This study identifies predictors of outcome of MMRPs at a 12-month follow-up (FU-12) based on data from the Swedish Quality Registry for Pain Rehabilitation (SQRP).

    METHODS: Patients with chronic pain from two clinical departments in Sweden completed the SQRP questionnaires-background, pain characteristics, psychological symptoms, function, activity/participation, health and quality of life-on three occasions: 1) during their first visit; 2) immediately after the completion of their MMRP; and 3) 12 months after completing the MMRP (n = 227). During the FU-12, the patients also retrospectively reported their global impressions of any changes in their perception of pain and their ability to handle their life situation in general.

    RESULTS: Significant improvements were found for pain, psychological symptoms, activity/participation, health, and quality of life aspects with low/medium strong effects. A general pattern was observed from the analyses of the changes from baseline to FU-12; the largest improvements in outcomes were significantly associated with poor situations according to their respective baseline scores. Although significant regressors of the investigated outcomes were found, the significant predictors were weak and explained a minor part of the variation in outcomes (15-25%). At the FU-12, 53.6% of the patients reported that their pain had decreased and 80.1% reported that their life situation in general had improved. These improvements were associated with high education, low pain intensity, high health level, and work importance (only pain perception). The explained variations were low (9-11%).

    CONCLUSIONS: Representing patients in real-world clinical settings, this study confirmed systematic reviews that outcomes of MMRP are associated with broad positive effects. A mix of background and baseline variables influenced the outcomes investigated, but the explained variations in outcomes were low. There is still a need to develop standardized and relatively simple outcomes that can be used to evaluate MMRP in trials, in clinical evaluations at group level, and for individual patients.

  • 17.
    Granström, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Molarius, Anu
    Vastmanland County Council, Sweden.
    Garvin, Peter
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Elo, Sirkka
    Örebro County Council, Sweden.
    Feldman, Inna
    Uppsala County Council, Sweden; Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Exploring trends in and determinants of educational inequalities in self-rated health2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 43, no 7, p. 677-686Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Educational inequalities in self-rated health (SRH) in European welfare countries are documented, but recent trends in these inequalities are less well understood. We examined educational inequalities in SRH in different age groups, and the contribution of selected material, behavioural and psychosocial determinants from 2000 to 2008. Methods: Data were derived from cross-sectional surveys conducted in 2000, 2004 and 2008 including 37,478, 34,876 and 32,982 respondents, respectively, aged 25-75 in mid-Sweden. Inequalities were analysed by age-standardized and age-stratified rate ratios of poor SRH and age-standardized prevalence of determinants, and contribution of determinants by age-adjusted logistic regression. Results: Relative educational inequalities in SRH increased among women from 2000 (rate ratio (RR) 1.70, 95% CI 1.55-1.85) to 2008 (RR 2.07, 95% CI 1.90-2.26), but were unchanged among men (RR 1.91-2.01). The increase among women was mainly due to growing inequalities in the age group 25-34 years. In 2008, significant age differences emerged with larger inequalities in the youngest compared with the oldest age group in both genders. All determinants were more prevalent in low educational groups; the most prominent were lack of a financial buffer, smoking and low optimism. Educational differences were unchanged over the years for most determinants. In all three surveys, examined determinants together explained a substantial part of the educational inequalities in SRH. Conclusions: Increased relative educational health inequalities among women, and persisting inequalities among men, were paralleled by unchanged, large differences in material/structural, behavioural and psychosocial factors. Interventions to reduce these inequalities need to focus on early mid-life.

  • 18.
    Grodzinsky, Ewa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Viktorsson, Lisa
    Carlsson, Ann-Kristin
    Jones, Michael P.
    Macquarie University, Australia.
    Olsen Faresjö, Ashild
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    More negative self-esteem and inferior coping strategies among patients diagnosed with IBS compared with patients without IBS - a case-control study in primary care2015In: BMC Family Practice, ISSN 1471-2296, E-ISSN 1471-2296, Vol. 16, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is a chronic, relapsing gastrointestinal disorder,that affects approximately 10% of the general population and the majority are diagnosed  in primary care. IBS has been reported to be associated with altered psychological and cognitive functioning such as mood disturbances, somatization, catastrophizing or altered visceral interoception by negative emotions and stress. The aim was to  investigate the psychosocial constructs of self-esteem and sense of coherence among IBS patients compared to non-IBS patients in primary care.     

    Methods

    A case–control study in primary care setting among IBS patients meeting the ROME III         criteria (n = 140) compared to controls i.e. non-IBS patients (n = 213) without any         present or previous gastrointestinal complaints. The data were collected through self-reportedquestionnaires of psychosocial factors.     

    Results

    IBS-patients reported significantly more negative self-esteem (p < 0.001), lower scores         for positive self-esteem (p < 0.001), and lower sense of coherence (p < 0.001) than the controls. The IBS-cases were also less likely to report ‘good’ health status (p < 0.001) and less likely to report a positive belief in the future (p < 0.001). After controlling for relevant confounding factors in multiple regressions, the elevation  in negative self-esteem among IBS patients remained statistically significant (p =0.02), as did the lower scores for sense of coherence among IBS cases (p = 0.04).     

    Conclusions

    The more frequently reported negative self-esteem and inferior coping strategies among         IBS patients found in this study suggest the possibility that psychological therapies         might be helpful for these patients. However these data do not indicate the causal         direction of the observed associations. More research is therefore warranted to determine whether these psychosocial constructs are more frequent in IBS patients.

  • 19.
    Hallgren Elfgren, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Grodzinsky, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Törnvall, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    The Swedish National Diabetes Register in clinical practice and evaluation in primary health care2016In: Primary Health Care Research and Development, ISSN 1463-4236, E-ISSN 1477-1128, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 549-558Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this project is to describe the use of the Swedish National Diabetes Register (NDR) in clinical practice in a Swedish county and to specifically monitor the diabetes care routines at two separate primary health-care centres (PHCC) with a special focus on older patients. Background: According to Swedish law, all health-care units have to maintain a system for quality evaluation and improvement. As the NDR holds the most important quality indicators, implementation of the NDR in primary care was carried out by an implementation project in 2002-2005. Methods: Initially, a digital questionnaire about NDR routines was sent to all PHCC. Statistics about hemoglobin adult 1c (HbA1c) and blood pressure (BP) was presented for the diabetes teams at two centres who were also interviewed. The responses became the basis for a focus group interview with both teams together, with data subject to content analysis. Findings: The study showed that reporting to the NDR has become a compulsory routine in primary care. The diabetes nurse specialist was responsible for the practical management of the register and used the NDR for continuous monitoring of the patients. Most centres used the NDRs statistics for evaluation and analyses annually. The diabetes nurse adapted the visits to the patients wishes and general condition. Only in terms of target values for HbA1c and BP did they accept slightly higher values for the older patients. Since the NDR was implemented, the registration rate has remained at 75% and has not increased. The reason given was that patients with diabetes living in nursing homes are checked up by the municipal nurse who does not use the NDR. However, the risk of omitting older patients in the NDR could be considerably decreased if data could be transferred from the electronic patient record.

  • 20.
    Hasselgren, Kristina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Malago, Massimo
    UCL, England.
    Vyas, Soumil
    UCL, England.
    Robles Campos, Ricardo
    Vizgen De La Arrixaca University Hospital, Spain.
    Brusadin, Roberto
    Vizgen De La Arrixaca University Hospital, Spain.
    Linecker, Michael
    University of Zurich Hospital, Switzerland.
    Petrowsky, Henrik
    University of Zurich Hospital, Switzerland.
    Clavien, Pierre Alain
    University of Zurich Hospital, Switzerland.
    Machado, Marcel Autran
    University of Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Hernandez-Alejandro, Roberto
    University of Rochester, NY USA.
    Wanis, Kerollos
    Western University, Canada.
    Walter, Lars
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy does not affect future liver remnant growth and outcomes of associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy2017In: Surgery, ISSN 0039-6060, E-ISSN 1532-7361, Vol. 161, no 5, p. 1255-1265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. The only potentially curative treatment for patients with colorectal liver metastases is hepatectomy. Associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy has emerged as a method of treatment for patients with inadequate future liver remnant. One concern about associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy is that preoperative chemotherapy may negatively affect the volume increase of the future liver remnant and outcomes. Methods. This study from the International Associating Liver Partition and Portal Vein Ligation for Staged Hepatectomy Registry (NCT01924741) includes 442 patients with colorectal liver metastases registered from 2012-2016. Future liver remnant hypertrophy (absolute increase, percent increase, and kinetic growth rate) and clinical outcome were analyzed retrospectively in relation to type and amount of chemotherapy. The analyzed groups included patients with no chemotherapy, 1 regimen of chemotherapy, amp;gt; 1 regimen, and a group that received monoclonal antibodies in addition to chemotherapy. Results. Ninety percent of the patients received neoadjuvant oncologic therapy including 42% with 1 regimen of chemotherapy, 44% with monoclonal antibodies, and 4% with amp;gt; 1 regimen. Future liver remnant increased between 74-92% with the largest increase in the group with 1 regimen of chemotherapy. The increase in milliliters was between 241 mL (amp;gt; 1 regimen) and 306 mL (1 regimen). Kinetic growth rate was between 14-18% per week and was greatest for the group with 1 regimen of chemotherapy. No statistical significance was found between the groups with any of the measurements of future liver remnant hypertrophy. Conclusion. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy, including monoclonal antibodies, does not negatively affect future liver remnant growth. Patients with colorectal liver metastases who might be potential candidates for associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy should be considered for neoadjuvant chemotherapy. (Surgery 2017;161:1255-65.)

  • 21.
    Holtedahl, Knut
    et al.
    UiT Arctic Univ Norway, Norway.
    Hjertholm, Peter
    Aarhus Univ, Denmark.
    Borgquist, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Donker, Ge A.
    NIVEL Primary Care Database, Netherlands.
    Buntinx, Frank
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium; Maastricht Univ, Netherlands.
    Weller, David
    Univ Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Braaten, Tonje
    UiT Arctic Univ Norway, Norway.
    Mansson, Jorgen
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Strandberg, Eva Lena
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Campbell, Christine
    Univ Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Korevaar, Joke C.
    NIVEL Primary Care Database, Netherlands.
    Parajuli, Ranjan
    UiT Arctic Univ Norway, Norway.
    Abdominal symptoms and cancer in the abdomen: prospective cohort study in European primary care2018In: British Journal of General Practice, ISSN 0960-1643, E-ISSN 1478-5242, Vol. 68, no 670, p. E301-E310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Different abdominal symptoms may signal cancer, but their role is unclear. Aim To examine associations between abdominal symptoms and subsequent cancer diagnosed in the abdominal region. Design and setting Prospective cohort study comprising 493 GPs from surgeries in Norway, Denmark, Sweden, Scotland, Belgium, and the Netherlands. Method Over a 10-day period, the GPs recorded consecutive consultations and noted: patients who presented with abdominal symptoms prespecified on the registration form; additional data on non-specific symptoms; and features of the consultation. Eight months later, data on all cancer diagnoses among all study patients in the participating general practices were requested from the GPs. Results Consultations with 61 802 patients were recorded and abdominal symptoms were documented in 6264 (10.1%) patients. Malignancy, both abdominal and non-abdominal, was subsequently diagnosed in 511 patients (0.8%). Among patients with a new cancer in the abdomen (n = 251), 175 (69.7%) were diagnosed within 180 days after consultation. In a multivariate model, the highest sex- and age-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) was for the single symptom of rectal bleeding (HR 19.1, 95% confidence interval = 8.7 to 41.7). Positive predictive values of amp;gt; 3% were found for macroscopic haematuria, rectal bleeding, and involuntary weight loss, with variations according to age and sex. The three symptoms relating to irregular bleeding had particularly high specificity in terms of colorectal, uterine, and bladder cancer. Conclusions A patient with undiagnosed cancer may present with symptoms or no symptoms. Irregular bleeding must always be explained. Abdominal pain occurs with all types of abdominal cancer and several symptoms may signal colorectal cancer. The findings are important as they influence how GPs think and act, and how they can contribute to an earlier diagnosis of cancer.

  • 22.
    Holtedahl, Knut
    et al.
    Department of Community Medicine, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Norway.
    Vedsted, Peter
    Aarhus University, Research Unit for General Practice, Research Centre for Cancer Diagnosis in Primary Care, Denmark.
    Borgquist, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Donker, Gé A.
    NIVEL Primary Care Database, Sentinel Practices, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Buntinx, Frank
    Dept of General Practice, KULeuven, Belgium, and Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Weller, David
    Usher Institute for Population Health Sciences and Medical Informatics, The University of Edinburgh, Doorway 1, Teviot Place, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK.
    Braaten, Tonje
    Department of Community Medicine, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Norway.
    Hjertholm, Peter
    Aarhus University, Research Unit for General Practice, Research Centre for Cancer Diagnosis in Primary Care, Denmark.
    Månsson, Jörgen
    Department of Public Health and Community Medicine/Primary Health Care, The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Strandberg, Eva Lena
    Lund University, Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Family Medicine/General Practice, Sweden.
    Campbell, Christine
    Usher Institute for Population Health Sciences and Medical Informatics, The University of Edinburgh, Doorway 1, Teviot Place, Edinburgh, EH8 9AG, Scotland, UK.
    Ellegaard, Lisbeth
    Department of Community Medicine, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Norway.
    Parajuli, Ranjan
    Department of Community Medicine, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Norway.
    Abdominal symptoms in general practice: Frequency, cancer suspicions raised, and actions taken by GPs in six European countries. Cohort study with prospective registration of cancer2017In: Heliyon, ISSN 2405-8440, Vol. 3, no 6, article id e00328Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abdominal symptoms are diagnostically challenging to general practitioners (GPs): although common, they may indicate cancer. In a prospective cohort of patients, we examined abdominal symptom frequency, initial diagnostic suspicion, and actions of GPs in response to abdominal symptoms.

  • 23.
    Horner, Patrick J
    et al.
    School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, UK.
    Karla, Blee
    Bristol Sexual Health Centre, University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, UK.
    Falk, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    van der Meijden, W
    Department of Dermatology, New Cross Hospital, UK..
    Moi, H.
    Olafia Clinic, Oslo University Hospital, Institute of Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway.
    2016 European Guideline on the management of non-gonococcal urethritis2016In: International Journal of STD and AIDS (London), ISSN 0956-4624, E-ISSN 1758-1052, Vol. 27, no 11, p. 928-937Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present the updated International Union against Sexually Transmitted Infections guideline for the management of non-gonococcal urethritis in men. This guideline recommends confirmation of urethritis in symptomatic men before starting treatment. It does not recommend testing asymptomatic men for the presence of urethritis. All men with urethritis should be tested for Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae and ideally M. genitalium using a NAAT as this is highly likely to improve clinical outcomes. If a NAAT is positive for gonorrhoea, a culture should be performed before treatment. In view of the increasing evidence that azithromycin 1 g may result in the development of antimicrobial resistance in Mycoplasma genitalium azithromycin 1 g is no longer recommended as first line therapy, which should be doxycycline 100 mg bd for 7 days. If azithromycin is to be prescribed an extended of 500 mg, then 250 mg daily for 4 days is to be preferred over 1 g stat. In men with persistent NGU, M. genitalium NAAT testing is recommended if not previously undertaken, as is Trichomonas vaginalis NAAT testing in populations where T. vaginalis is detectable in >2% of symptomatic women.

  • 24.
    Hägerlind, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Central County. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Falk, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Central County. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Löfstedt, Tommy
    Computational Solutions, Umeå, Sweden.
    Lindholm-Sethson, Britta
    Computational Solutions, Umeå, Sweden.
    Bodén, Ida
    Ivida AB, Umeå.
    Near infrared and skin impedance spectroscopy - a possible support in the diagnostic process of skin tumours in primary health care.2015In: Skin research and technology, ISSN 0909-752X, E-ISSN 1600-0846, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 493-499Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: The global incidence of skin cancer has increased drastically in recent decades, especially in Australia and Northern Europe. Early detection is crucial for good prognosis and high survival rates. In general, primary care physicians have considerably lower sensitivity and specificity rates for detection of skin cancer, compared to dermatologists. A probable main reason for this is that current diagnostic tools are subjective in nature, and therefore diagnostic skills highly depend on experience. Illustratively, in Sweden, approximately 155 500 benign skin lesions are excised unnecessarily every year. An objective instrument, added to the clinical examination, might improve the diagnostic accuracy, and thus promote earlier detection of malignant skin tumours, as well as reduce medical costs associated with unnecessary biopsies and excisions. The general aim of this study was to investigate the usefulness of the combination of near infrared (NIR) and skin impedance spectroscopy as a supportive tool in the diagnosis and evaluation of skin tumours in primary health care.

    METHODS: Near infrared and skin impedance data were collected by performing measurements on suspect malignant, premalignant and benign tumours in the skin of patients seeking primary health care for skin tumour evaluation. The obtained data were analysed using multivariate analysis and compared with the diagnosis received by the conventional diagnostic process.

    RESULTS: The observed sensitivity and specificity rates were both 100%, when discriminating malignant and premalignant skin tumours from benign skin tumours, and the observed sensitivity and specificity for separating malignant skin tumours from premalignant and benign skin tumours were also 100%, respectively.

    CONCLUSION: The results of this study indicate that the NIR and skin impedance spectroscopy may be a useful supportive tool for the general practitioner in the diagnosis and evaluation of skin tumours in primary health care, as a complement to the visual assessment.

  • 25.
    Jangland, Eva
    et al.
    Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nyberg, Berit
    Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Yngman Uhlin, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    ‘It’s a matter of patient safety’: understanding challenges ineveryday clinical practice for achieving good care on thesurgical ward – a qualitative study2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 323-331Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundSurgical care plays an important role in the acute hospital's delivery of safe, high-quality patient care. Although demands for effectiveness are high in surgical wards quality of care and patient safety must also be secured. It is therefore necessary to identify the challenges and barriers linked to quality of care and patient safety with a focus on this specific setting. AimTo explore situations and processes that support or hinder good safe patient care on the surgical ward. MethodThis qualitative study was based on a strategic sample of 10 department and ward leaders in three hospitals and six surgical wards in Sweden. Repeated reflective interviews were analysed using systematic text condensation. FindingsFour themes described the leaders' view of a complex healthcare setting that demands effectiveness and efficiency in moving patients quickly through the healthcare system. Quality of care and patient safety were often hampered factors such as a shift of care level, with critically ill patients cared for without reorganisation of nurses' competencies on the surgical ward. ConclusionsThere is a gap between what is described in written documents and what is or can be performed in clinical practice to achieve good care and safe care on the surgical ward. A shift in levels of care on the surgical ward without reallocation of the necessary competencies at the patient's bedside show consequences for quality of care and patient safety. This means that surgical wards should consider reviewing their organisation and implementing more advanced nursing roles in direct patient care on all shifts. The ethical issues and the moral stress on nurses who lack the resources and competence to deliver good care according to professional values need to be made more explicit as a part of the patient safety agenda in the surgical ward.

  • 26.
    Jangland, Eva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden; University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden.
    Yngman Uhlin, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Arakelian, Erebouni
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Between two roles Experiences of newly trained nurse practitioners in surgical care in Sweden: A qualitative study using repeated interviews2016In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 21, p. 93-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The position of Nurse Practitioner is a new role in Nordic countries. The transition from a registered nurse to the Nurse Practitioner role has been reported to be a personal challenge. This study, guided by the Nordic theoretical model for use in the education of advanced practice nurses, represents a unique opportunity to describe this transition for newly graduated Nurse Practitioners in an interprofessional surgical care team in Sweden. The aim was to explore how the first Nurse Practitioners in surgical care experienced the transition into a new role and what competences they used in the team. Eight new Nurse Practitioners with parallel work in clinical practice were interviewed twice around the time of their graduation. The qualitative analyses show that the participants integrated several central competences, but the focus in this early stage in their new role was on direct clinical praxis, consultation, cooperation, case management, and coaching. Transition from the role of clinical nurse specialist to nurse practitioner was a challenging process in which the positive response from patients was a driving force for the new Nurse Practitioners. The participants felt prepared for and determined to solve the challenging situations they approached working in the interprofessional team. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 27. Johnson, Christina
    et al.
    Wilhelmsson, Susan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Börjeson, Sussanne
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Lindberg, Malou
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Improvement of communication and interpersonal competence in telenursing - development of a self-assessment tool2015In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 24, no 11-12, p. 1489-1501Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectivesThe aim of this study was to develop a self-assessment tool aiming to raise telenurses awareness of their communication and interpersonal competence, and highlight areas in need of improvement. BackgroundSeveral studies have revealed the need for development of communication competence in telenursing. Structured analyses of conversations with patients/callers, is one way to increase telenurses awareness of their unique communication and interpersonal competence. DesignInstrument development, Validation assessment using the method Content Validity Index. MethodThe process to determine content validity was done in two stages; the development stage and the assessment stage. The development stage started with a literature search. The assessment stage was separated into two phases, assessment by an expert group and assessment and test by telenurses. The telenurses also participated in consensus discussions. ResultsA telenursing self-assessment tool with 58 items was developed. The items were sorted into five sections according to the nursing process. ConclusionThis study describes the thorough development process of the telenursing self-assessment tool to be used by telenurses in order to become aware of their unique communication and interpersonal competence when analysing their own conversations with patients/callers. As a formative tool it is meant to provide self-direction, feedback and coaching, and create learning opportunities. Relevance to clinical practiceThe self-assessment tool helps the telenurse to follow the nursing process, to be patient-centred, and it is meant to provide self-direction, feedback, and coaching, as well as create learning opportunities. The tool can contribute to the development of communication and interpersonal competence in telephone advice nursing. Further development of the tool may provide an objective scoring instrument for evaluating communication training and education in the field.

  • 28.
    Lind, Leili
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. SICS East Swedish ICT, Linköping, Sweden.
    Carlgren, Gunnar
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Linköping.
    Mudra, Jacqueline
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Linköping.
    Synnergren, Henrik
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Linköping.
    Hilding, Niclas
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Linköping.
    Karlsson, daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Persson, Hans Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Respiratory Medicine.
    Preliminary results of a telemonitoring study: COPD and heart failure patients exhibit great difference in their need of health care2015In: European Respiratory Journal: Official Scientific Journal of ERS / [ed] Marc Humbert, European Respiratory Society , 2015, Vol. 46/suppl 59, p. PA2790-PA2790Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Growing populations of elderly patients with advanced stages of COPD or heart failure (HF) urge the need for specialized health care in the patients' home. A telemonitoring study has been initiated including patients using digital pens. Health care was provided by the specialized home care unit at a university hospital. Through an IT system the staff checked all daily patient reports. We hypothesized that the two groups of patients, advanced COPD or HF, would exhibit differences regarding exacerbations and the need of health care.

    Objective: To study exacerbations of COPD or HF, and patient health care consumption.

    Methods: A tele-monitoring system, the Health diary, which is based on digital pen technology, was employed. Exacerbations were identified using information provided through the telemonitoring system. Consumed health care was assessed as the number of patient contacts (home visits or telephone consultations).

    Results: Presently, 33 patients with advanced disease are enrolled (13 COPD and 20 HF patients) of which 11 patients (6 COPD and 5 HF patients) have completed the 1-yr study period or have died during the study period (2 COPD and 4 HF patients). Exacerbations were 2.8 and 0.8 and patient contacts were 96 and 42 per COPD and HF patient, respectively. While HF patients were significantly older than COPD patients, the two groups demonstrated no difference regarding gender distribution and comorbidity.

    Conclusions: COPD patients exhibit exacerbations more frequently and demand much more home health care than patients with HF do. It seems that this difference of health care consumption is mainly due to disease characteristics.

  • 29.
    Lind, Leili
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. RISE SICS East.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care. Region Östergötland.
    Carlgren, Gunnar
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Linköping.
    Mudra, Jacqueline
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Linköping.
    Synnergren, Henrik
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Linköping.
    Hilding, Niclas
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Linköping.
    Lyth, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care. Region Östergötland.
    Karlsson, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Persson, Hans Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Respiratory Medicine.
    Re-organising care of elderly, multi-morbid COPD and heartfailure patients with low digital literacy: —a 4 year Swedishtelehealth intervention study2016In: Health—exploring complexity: an interdisciplinary systems approach HEC2016 / [ed] Grill, E., Müller, M. & Mansmann, U., Munich, Germany, 2016, Vol. 31, p. 118-118Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Lindbäck, Yvonne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Central County.
    Tropp, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Spinal Surgery. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Enthoven, Paul
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Abbott, Allan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Bond University, Queensland, Australia.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    PREPARE: presurgery physiotherapy for patients with degenerative lumbar spine disorder: a randomized controlled trial2018In: The spine journal, ISSN 1529-9430, E-ISSN 1878-1632, Vol. 18, no 8, p. 1347-1355Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Context

    Surgery because of disc herniation or spinal stenosis results mostly in large improvement in the short-term, but mild to moderate improvements for pain and disability at long-term follow-up. Prehabilitation has been defined as augmenting functional capacity before surgery, which may have beneficial effect on outcome after surgery.

    Purpose

    The aim was to study if presurgery physiotherapy improves function, pain, and health in patients with degenerative lumbar spine disorder scheduled for surgery.

    Study Design

    A single-blinded, two-arm, randomized controlled trial (RCT).

    Patient Sample

    A total of 197 patients were consecutively included at a spine clinic. The inclusion criteria were patients scheduled for surgery because of disc herniation, spinal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, or degenerative disc disease (DDD), 25–80 years of age.

    Outcome Measures

    Primary outcome was Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Secondary outcomes were pain intensity, anxiety, depression, self-efficacy, fear avoidance, physical activity, and treatment effect.

    Methods

    Patients were randomized to either presurgery physiotherapy or standardized information, with follow-up after the presurgery intervention as well as 3 and 12 months post surgery. The study was funded by regional research funds for US$77,342. No conflict of interest is declared.

    Results

    The presurgery physiotherapy group had better ODI, visual analog scale (VAS) back pain, EuroQol-5D (EQ-5D), EQ-VAS, Fear Avoidance Belief Questionnaire-Physical Activity (FABQ-PA), Self-Efficacy Scale (SES), and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) depression scores and activity level compared with the waiting-list group after the presurgery intervention. The improvements were small, but larger than the study-specific minimal clinical important change (MCIC) in VAS back and leg pain, EQ-5D, and FABQ-PA, and almost in line with MCIC in ODI and Physical Component Summary (PCS) in the physiotherapy group. Post surgery, the only difference between the groups was higher activity level in the physiotherapy group compared with the waiting-list group.

    Conclusions

    Presurgery physiotherapy decreases pain, risk of avoidance behavior, and worsening of psychological well-being, and improves quality of life and physical activity levels before surgery compared with waiting-list controls. These results were maintained only for activity levelspost surgery. Still, presurgery selection, content, dosage of exercises, and importance of being active in a presurgery physiotherapy intervention is of interest to study further to improve long-term outcome.

    The full text will be freely available from 2018-12-17 11:55
  • 31.
    Lindbäck, Yvonne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Central County.
    Tropp, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Enthoven, Paul
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Abbott, Allan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Faculty of Health Science and Medicine, Bond University, Australia.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    PREPARE: Pre-surgery physiotherapy for patients with degenerative lumbar spine disorder: a randomized controlled trial protocol2016In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 17, no 270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Current guidelines for the management of patients with specific low back pain pathology suggest non-surgical intervention as first-line treatment, but there is insufficient evidence to make recommendations of the content in the non-surgical intervention. Opinions regarding the dose of non-surgical intervention that should be trialled prior to decision making about surgery intervention vary. The aim of the present study is to investigate if physiotherapy administrated before surgery improves function, pain and health in patients with degenerative lumbar spine disorder scheduled for surgery. The patients are followed over two years. A secondary aim is to study what factors predict short and long term outcomes. Methods: This study is a single blinded, 2-arm, randomized controlled trial with follow-up after the completion of pre-surgery intervention as well as 3, 12 and 24 months post-surgery. The study will recruit men and women, 25 to 80 years of age, scheduled for surgery due to; disc herniation, spinal stenosis, spondylolisthesis or degenerative disc disease. A total of 202 patients will be randomly allocated to a pre-surgery physiotherapy intervention or a waiting list group for 9 weeks. The waiting-list group will receive standardized information about surgery, post-surgical rehabilitation and advice to stay active. The pre-surgery physiotherapy group will receive physiotherapy 2 times per week, consisting of a stratified classification treatment, based on assessment findings. One of the following treatments will be selected; a) Specific exercises and mobilization, b) Motor control exercises or c) Traction. The pre-surgery physiotherapy group will also be prescribed a tailor-made general supervised exercise program. The physiotherapist will use a behavioral approach aimed at reducing patient fear avoidance and increasing activity levels. They will also receive standardized information about surgery, post-surgical rehabilitation and advice to stay active. Primary outcome measure is Oswestry Disability Index. Secondary outcome measures are the visual analogue scale for back and leg pain, pain drawing, health related quality of life, Hospital anxiety and depression scale, Fear avoidance beliefs questionnaire, Self-efficacy scale and Work Ability Index. Discussion: The study findings will help improve the treatment of patients with degenerative lumbar spine disorder scheduled for surgery.

  • 32.
    Lindbäck, Yvonne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Central County.
    Tropp, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Spinal Surgery.
    Enthoven, Paul
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Abbott, Allan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Bond University, Australia.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Altered somatosensory profile according to quantitative sensory testing in patients with degenerative lumbar spine disorders scheduled for surgery2017In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 18, article id 264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Somatosensory profiling in affected and non-affected body regions can strengthen our insight regarding the underlying pain mechanisms, which can be valuable in treatment decision making and to improve outcomes, in patients with degenerative lumbar spine disorders pre-surgery. The aim was to describe somatosensory profiles in patients with degenerative lumbar spine disorders, to identify the proportion with altered somatosensory profile, and to analyze demographic characteristics, self-reported function, pain, and health pre- and 3 months post-surgery. Methods: In this prospective cohort study in a Spine Clinic, 105 patients scheduled for surgery for spinal stenosis, disc herniation, degenerative disc disease, or spondylolisthesis were consecutively recruited. Exclusion criteria were; indication for acute surgery or previous surgery at the same spinal level or severe grade of pathology. Quantitative sensory testing (QST) and self-reported function, pain, and health was measured pre- and 3 months post-surgery. The somatosensory profile included cold detection threshold, warmth detection threshold, cold pain threshold, heat pain threshold and pressure pain threshold in affected and non-affected body regions. Results: On a group level, the patients somatosensory profiles were within the 95% confidence interval (CI) from normative reference data means. On an individual level, an altered somatosensory profile was defined as having two or more body regions (including a non-affected region) with QST values outside of normal ranges for reference data. The 23 patients (22%) with altered somatosensory profiles, with mostly loss of function, were older (P = 0.031), more often female (P = 0.005), had higher back and leg pain (P = 0.016, 0.020), lower mental health component summary score (SF 36 MCS) (P = 0.004) and larger pain distribution (P = 0.047), compared to others in the cohort. Post-surgery there was a tendency to worse pain, function and health in the group with altered somatosensory profile pre-surgery. Conclusions: On a group level, patients with degenerative lumbar spine disorders scheduled for surgery were within normal range for the QST measurements compared to reference values. On an individual level, an altered somatosensory profile outside of normal range in both affected and non-affected body regions occurred in 22% of patients, which may indicate disturbed somatosensory function. Those patients had mostly loss of sensory function and had worse self-reported outcome pre-surgery, compared to the rest of the cohort. Future prospective studies are needed to further examine whether these dimensions can be useful in predicting post-surgery outcome and guide need of additional treatments.

  • 33.
    Lindbäck, Yvonne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tropp, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Spinal Surgery.
    Enthoven, Paul
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Abbott, Allan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Faculty of Health Science and Medicine, Bond University, Gold Coast, Australia.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Association between pain sensitivity in the hand and outcomes after surgery in patients with lumbar disc herniation or spinal stenosis.2017In: European spine journal, ISSN 0940-6719, E-ISSN 1432-0932, Vol. 26, no 10, p. 2581-2588Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To investigate the association between pain sensitivity in the hand pre-surgery, and patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in function, pain and health pre- and post-surgery in patients with disc herniation or spinal stenosis.

    METHODS: This is a prospective cohort study with 82 patients. Associations between pressure-, cold- and heat pain threshold (PPT, CPT, HPT) in the hand pre-surgery and Oswestry, VAS pain, EQ-5D, HADS, and Self-Efficacy Scale, pre- and three months post-surgery; were investigated with linear regression.

    RESULTS: Patients with disc herniation more sensitive to pressure pain pre-surgery showed lower function and self-efficacy, and higher anxiety and depression pre-surgery, and lower function, and self-efficacy, and higher pain post-surgery. Results for cold pain were similar. In patients with spinal stenosis few associations with PROs were found and none for HPT and PROs.

    CONCLUSIONS: Altered pain response in pressure- and cold pain in the hand, as a sign of widespread pain pre-surgery had associations with higher pain, lower function and self-efficacy post-surgery in patients with disc herniation.

  • 34.
    Lindström, Stefan B
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Uhlin, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology. Department of Biomedical Engineering, Technomedicum, Tallinn University of Technology, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Bjarnegård, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Gylling, Micael
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology.
    Nilsson, Kamilla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Svensson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Yngman-Uhlin, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Computer-Aided Evaluation of Blood Vessel Geometry From Acoustic Images2018In: Journal of ultrasound in medicine, ISSN 0278-4297, E-ISSN 1550-9613, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 1025-1031Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A method for computer-aided assessment of blood vessel geometries based on shape-fitting algorithms from metric vision was evaluated. Acoustic images of cross sections of the radial artery and cephalic vein were acquired, and medical practitioners used a computer application to measure the wall thickness and nominal diameter of these blood vessels with a caliper method and the shape-fitting method. The methods performed equally well for wall thickness measurements. The shape-fitting method was preferable for measuring the diameter, since it reduced systematic errors by up to 63% in the case of the cephalic vein because of its eccentricity.

    The full text will be freely available from 2018-10-13 11:49
  • 35.
    Lovén Wickman, Ulrica
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Riegel, Barbara
    University of Pennsylvania, School of Nursing, Philadelphia, USA.
    Yngman Uhlin, Pia
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Hjortswang, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Self-care of inflammatory bowel disease may be associated with better well-being2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Lovén Wickman, Ulrica
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. County Council of Kalmar, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Yngman Uhlin, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Hjortswang, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Riegel, Barbara
    University of Pennsylvania, School of Nursing, Philadelphia, USA.
    Stjernman, Henrik
    County Hospital Ryhov, County Council of Jonkoping, Jonkoping, Sweden.
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Self-care among patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: An interview study2016In: Gastroenterology Nursing, ISSN 1042-895X, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 121-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic disease of unknown etiology. The disease occurs early in life and the burden of symptoms is significant. Patients need to perform self-care to handle their symptoms, but knowledge about what kind of self-care patients do is limited and these individuals need to learn how to manage the symptoms that arise. The aim of this study was to explore self-care among patients with IBD. Twenty adult patients with IBD, 25-66 years of age, were interviewed. Data were analyzed by performing a qualitative content analysis. Four categories with 10 subcategories emerged from the analysis of the interviews. The self-care patients perform consists of symptom recognition (subcategories: physiological sensations and psychological sensations), handling of symptoms (subcategories: adapting the diet, using medical treatment, stress management, and using complementary alternative medicine), planning life (subcategories: planning for when to do activities and when to refrain from activities), and seeking new options (subcategories: seeking knowledge and personal contacts). Self-care consists of symptom recognition, handling life through planning, and accommodating the existing situation with the ultimate goal of maintaining well-being. Being one step ahead facilitates living with IBD. A decision to actively participate in care of a chronic illness is a prerequisite for self-care. Healthcare professionals must consider patients' potential for and desire for self-care when giving advice on self-care activities. Doing so may help people better cope with IBD.

  • 37.
    Lovén Wickman, Ulrica
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Kalmar läns landsting.
    Yngman-Uhlin, Pia
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Hjortswang, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wenemark, Marika
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care.
    Stjernman, Henrik
    Länssjukhuset Ryhov, Region Jönköpings län.
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center.
    Development of a self-care questionnaire for clinical assessment among patients with inflammatory bowel disease2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Lundgren, Oskar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Garvin, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Inverted items and validity: A psychobiological evaluation of two measures of psychological resources and one depression scale2018In: Health psychology open, ISSN 2055-1029, Vol. 5, no 1, article id 2055102918755045Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Psychological resources and risk factors influence risk of coronary heart disease. We evaluated whether inverted items in the Self-esteem, Mastery, and Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression scales compromise validity in the context of coronary heart disease. In a population-based sample, validity was investigated by calculating correlations with other scales (n = 1004) and interleukin-6 (n = 374), and by analyzing the relationship with 8-year coronary heart disease risk (n = 1000). Negative items did not affect the validity of the resource scales. In contrast, positive items from Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression showed no significant relationships with biological variables. However, they had no major impact on the validity of the original scale.

  • 39.
    Lyth, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Falk, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Kärna, Linköping.
    Maroti, M.
    County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden.
    Eriksson, H.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Ingvar, C.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Prognostic risk factors of first recurrence in patients with primary stages I-II cutaneous malignant melanoma - from the population-based Swedish melanoma register2017In: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 31, no 9, p. 1468-1474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Prognostic factors in patients with localized primary cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) are well described. However, prognostic factors for recurrence are less documented. Objectives The aim of this study was to identify prognostic risk factors for first recurrence in patients with localized stages I-II CMM using population-based data. Methods This study included 1437 CMM patients registered in one region of Sweden during 1999-2012 follow-up through 31 December 2012. To identify first recurrence of CMM disease, data from a care data warehouse, the pathology and radiology department registries were used. Patients were also followed through a census register and the national Cause of Death Register. Results The 5- and 10-year recurrence-free survival (RFS) were 85.7% and 81.2%, respectively. The most common site of first recurrence was regional lymph node metastasis closely followed by distant metastasis. After adjusting for all prognostic factors, women had 50% lower risk of recurrence than men (HR = 0.5, 95% CI 0.4-0.7) and patients = 70 had higher risk compared to patients 55-69 years (HR = 1.7, 95% CI 1.2-2.5). Other significant prognostic factors for risk of recurrence were tumour thickness, presence of ulceration, Clarks level of invasion and histogenetic type. Conclusion Tumour thickness was found to be the predominant risk factor for recurrence. The prognostic factors for recurrence coincided with prognostic factors for CMM death. The most common site of first recurrence in stages I-II CMM is regional lymph node (42.8%) closely followed by distant metastases (37.6%), a fact which has to be taken into consideration when choosing follow-up strategies.

  • 40.
    Lyth, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mikiver, R.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Center South East Sweden.
    Nielsen, K.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Isaksson, K.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Ingvar, C.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Prognostic instrument for survival outcome in melanoma patients: based on data from the population-based Swedish Melanoma Register2016In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 59, p. 171-178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Several major analyses have identified a consistent set of independent risk factors for cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM). A few prognostic models have been presented but some are based on a limited number of patients and others are based on selected groups of patients referred to major institutions. No nationwide population-based prognostic instrument for survival of CMM has been presented. The Swedish Melanoma Register (SMR) database covers 99% of CMM diagnosed in Sweden and includes today &gt;50,000 cases. Objectives: To create a prognostic instrument based on SMR data to give highly reliable risk profiles for patients diagnosed with localised CMM. Methods: Clinicopathological data were linked to the cause of death registry for calculation of CMM-specific survival. A generalised gamma method was used to derive 1, 5 and 10year probabilities of death for each combination of patient and tumour data: age, sex, tumour site, tumour thickness, tumour ulceration, Clarks level of invasion and when applicable also outcome of sentinel node biopsy (SNB). Results: Tumour thickness had the highest prognostic impact, explaining 77% of the model. Women had 30% lower risk of death because of CMM than men. Presence of ulceration nearly doubled the risk. If the patient had a positive SNB status the risk of death due to CMM increased three times versus a negative SNB status. Conclusion: This unique population-based prognostic model for primary CMM shows better survival than the American Joint Commission on Cancer prognostic model widely used. The reason is probably that the referral bias is eliminated in a population-based cohort.

  • 41.
    Maroti, Marianne
    et al.
    County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden.
    Ulff, Eva
    County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden.
    Lyth, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Falkmer, Ursula
    County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden; University Hospital, Denmark.
    A prospective population-based study, aiming to support decision-making in a follow-up programme for patients with cutaneous malignant melanoma, based on patterns of recurrence2016In: EJD. European journal of dermatology, ISSN 1167-1122, E-ISSN 1952-4013, Vol. 26, no 6, p. 586-591Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The incidence of malignant melanoma (MM) is steadily rising, with only a minor increase in mortality. At present, there is no consensus regarding recommendations for follow-up programmes for MM, and health care programmes currently involve different schedules. With increasing opportunities to administer successful treatment for early disseminated disease, it may be of interest to engage MM patients and/or relatives in self-control. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to analyse both the time to, and the location of, the first metastatic lesion in order to provide help for the patient, relatives, and health professionals, and ensure better follow-up. Materials and methods: Data from the Swedish Melanoma Register, pathology registers, and the Cause of Death Register were used. Patients from the south-east region diagnosed with primary cutaneous MM between 1993 and 2007 were selected and data were correlated to characteristics of the primary tumour. Results: Metastases developed in 421 of the 2,910 patients with primary cutaneous MM in Stage I and II of the disease. Thirty-five percent of all recurrences were detected during the first year. Time to first metastasis to the skin and lymph nodes was almost identical. Conclusion: The vast majority of the recurrences were diagnosed at sites that were easily recognised by the patient and relatives; self-examination may therefore be a worthwhile approach. Our findings further indicate that the follow-up programme should focus on the first three years after diagnosis.

  • 42.
    Marteinsdottir, Ina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Garvin, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Psychological Resources Are Independently Associated with Markers of Inflammation in a Middle-Aged Community Sample2016In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 1070-5503, E-ISSN 1532-7558, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 611-620Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose To elucidate possible independent associations of psychological resources with inflammatory markers, all linked with coronary heart disease (CHD). Method In a middle-aged general population (n = 944), psychological resources (coping, self-esteem, and sense of coherence (SOC)), a global measure of quality of life (Cantrils self-anchoring ladder, also called "ladder of life"), and psychological risk factors (hopelessness, vital exhaustion, and depressive symptoms) were used in linear regression models to evaluate associations with the inflammatory markers interleukin (IL)-6, C-reactive protein (CRP), and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9. Adjustments were done for age, sex, medical conditions, and cardiovascular risk factors. Results After full adjustments, self-esteem was independently associated with all three biomarkers. Ladder of life was associated with IL-6 and log-CRP; coping, vital exhaustion, and depressive symptoms with IL-6; and SOC with MMP-9 (p amp;lt; 0.05 for all associations). Conclusion Numerous significant associations of psychological resources and risk factors with IL-6, CRP, and MMP-9 were found in a community-based sample. The associations of psychological resources were mostly independent, while the psychological risk factors seemed preferentially dependent on lifestyle factors as smoking, physical activity, and body mass index (BMI). This suggests that the psychological resources (in particular self-esteem) protective effects on CHD are linked to inflammatory markers.

  • 43.
    Mazya, Amelie Lindh
    et al.
    Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society (NVS)Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden; Geriatric Department of Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden, Danderydsgeriatriken, Danderyd, Sweden.
    Garvin, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Ekdahl, Anne W
    Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society (NVS), Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden; Institution of Clinical Research, Helsingborg Hospital, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Outpatient comprehensive geriatric assessment: effects on frailty and mortality in old people with multimorbidity and high health care utilization2018In: Aging Clinical and Experimental Research, ISSN 1594-0667, E-ISSN 1720-8319Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Multimorbidity and frailty are often associated and Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA) is considered the gold standard of care for these patients.

    AIMS: This study aimed to evaluate the effect of outpatient Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA) on frailty in community-dwelling older people with multimorbidity and high health care utilization.

    METHODS: The Ambulatory Geriatric Assessment-Frailty Intervention Trial (AGe-FIT) was a randomized controlled trial (intervention group, n = 208, control group n = 174) with a follow-up period of 24 months. Frailty was a secondary outcome. Inclusion criteria were: age ≥ 75 years, ≥ 3 current diagnoses per ICD-10, and ≥ 3 inpatient admissions during 12 months prior to study inclusion. The intervention group received CGA-based care and tailored interventions by a multidisciplinary team in an Ambulatory Geriatric Unit, in addition to usual care. The control group received usual care. Frailty was measured with the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS) criteria. At 24 months, frail and deceased participants were combined in the analysis.

    RESULTS: Ninety percent of the population were frail or pre-frail at baseline. After 24 months, there was a significant smaller proportion of frail and deceased (p = 0.002) and a significant higher proportion of pre-frail patients in the intervention group (p = 0.004). Mortality was high, 18% in the intervention group and 26% in the control group.

    CONCLUSION: Outpatient CGA may delay the progression of frailty and may contribute to the improvement of frail patients in older persons with multimorbidity.

  • 44.
    Moberg, A. B.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Central County. Kärna Vårdcent, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Taleus, U.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Central County. Ljungsbro Vårdcent, Sweden.
    Garvin, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fransson, Sven Göran
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences.
    Falk, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Community-acquired pneumonia in primary care: clinical assessment and the usability of chest radiography2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, ISSN 0281-3432, E-ISSN 1502-7724, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 21-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To investigate the diagnostic value of different clinical and laboratory findings in pneumonia and to explore the association between the doctors degree of suspicion and chest X-ray (CXR) result and to evaluate whether or not CXR should be used routinely in primary care, when available. Design: A three-year prospective study was conducted between September 2011 and December 2014. Setting: Two primary care settings in Linkoping, Sweden. Subjects: A total of 103 adult patients with suspected pneumonia in primary care. Main outcome measures: The physicians recorded results of a standardized medical physical examination, including laboratory results, and rated their suspicion into three degrees. The outcome of the diagnostic variables and the degree of suspicion was compared with the result of CXR. Results: Radiographic pneumonia was reported in 45% of patients. When the physicians were sure of the diagnosis radiographic pneumonia was found in 88% of cases (p&lt;0.001), when quite sure the frequency of positive CXR was 45%, and when not sure 28%. Elevated levels of C-reactive protein (CRP)50mg/L were associated with the presence of radiographic pneumonia when the diagnosis was suspected (p&lt;0.001). Conclusion: This study indicates that CXR can be useful if the physician is not sure of the diagnosis, but when sure one can rely on ones judgement without ordering CXR.

  • 45.
    Nilsson, E.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Orwelius, Lotti
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Patient-reported outcomes in the Swedish National Quality Registers2016In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 279, no 2, p. 141-153Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are important in the healthcare system to gain understanding of patients views on the effects of a treatment. There is an abundance of available patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs), both disease specific and generic. In the Swedish healthcare system, the national quality registers are obliged to incorporate PROs for certification at a high level. A review of the latest annual applications for funding (n = 108) shows that at present, 93 national quality registers include some form of PROM or patient-reported experience measure (PREM). Half of the registers include some type of generic measure, more than half include disease/symptom-specific measures, and around 40% include PREMs. Several different measures and combinations of measures are used, the most common of which are the EQ-5D, followed by the SF-36/RAND-36. About one-fifth of the registers report examples of how patient-reported data are used for local quality improvement. These examples include enhancing shared decision-making in clinical encounters (most common), as a basis for care plans, clinical decision aids and treatment guidelines, to improve the precision of indications for surgery (patient and healthcare professional assessments may differ), to monitor complications after the patient has left hospital and to improve patient information. In addition, funding applications reveal that most registers plan to extend their array of PROMs and PREMs in future, and to increase their use of patient-reported data as a basis for quality improvement.

  • 46.
    Norlin, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Tegelstrom, V
    National board of forensic medicine, Sweden.
    Grodzinsky, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Jones, M P
    Psychology Department, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Faresjö, Åshild
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Cortisol levels in hair are altered in irritable bowel syndrome - A case control study in primary care.2017In: Journal of Psychosomatic Research, ISSN 0022-3999, E-ISSN 1879-1360, Vol. 93, p. 69-75, article id S0022-3999(16)30613-4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Stress is an important component in the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Long term Hypothalamus Pituitary Adrenal (HPA)-axis activity can be studied by measuring hair cortisol concentrations (HCC). Some previous studies have indicated a dysregulated HPA-axis in IBS patients, but cortisol levels in hair have not yet been studied. We investigated whether HCC and self-reported stress differentiate IBS patients from controls.

    METHODS: In a cross-sectional study within 10 Swedish Primary Health Care Centers we compared patients in working age with active IBS to patients without GI complaints. The participants donated hair samples and completed questionnaires including a scale of self-reported perceived stress (PSS). 169 Rome III-fulfilling IBS patients and 316 non-IBS patients were available for final analyses.

    RESULTS: IBS patients had significantly lower HCC, median=16.3pg/mg, IQR=26.9pg/mg, compared to non-IBS patients, median=22.8pg/mg, IQR=29.1pg/mg. There was also a difference in the distribution of HCC quintiles between the two groups, with 30.2% IBS patients and 14.2% of non-IBS patients in the lowest quintile of HCC. PSS was higher among IBS patients with a mean (SD) total score of 25.3 (8.0) compared to controls 21.4, (7.5). Quintiles of HCC and PSS stayed significantly but very weakly related to IBS (B=-0.332, Std error=0.146, p<0.005) in multivariable analyses.

    CONCLUSION: This study suggests a possible suppression of the HPA-axis activity in a considerable portion of IBS patients.

  • 47.
    Näsström, Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Luttik, Marie Louise
    Hanze University of Applied Sciences Groningen, Research Group Nursing Diagnostics, Groningen, the Netherlands.
    Idvall, Ewa
    Department of Care Science, Malmö University, and Department of Intensive Care and Perioperative Medicine, Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Exploring partners’ perspectives on participation in heart failure home-care: A mixed method design2017In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 73, no 5, p. 1208-1219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research has shown that partners are involved in the care of patients with heart failure. The aim of this study was to gain a better understanding of the partners ‘perspectives on participation in the care for patients with heart failure receiving structured home-care. A parallel convergent mixed method design with data from interviews analyzed with content analysis and questionnaires statistically analyzed (n=15). Results were analyzed with regard to whether they were comparable and convergent, expanded the understanding, or were inconsistent. Partners scored that they were satisfied with most aspects of participation, information and contact. Qualitative findings revealed four different aspects of participation; adapting to the caring needs and illness trajectory, mastering caregiving demands, interacting with health care providers, and gaining knowledge to comprehend the health situation. Results showed confirmatory results that were convergent and expanded knowledge that gave a broader understanding of partner participation in this context.

  • 48.
    Näsström, Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Mårtensson, Jan
    Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Idvall, Ewa
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Participation in Care Encounters in Heart Failure Home-Care2017In: Clinical Nursing Research, ISSN 1054-7738, E-ISSN 1552-3799, Vol. 26, no 6, p. 713-730Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to observe care encounters during home visits in Heart failure (HF) home-care to identify and describe participation in care. Seventeen patients diagnosed with HF, and 10 registered nurses participated. Data from 19 video-recorded home visits were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Two themes were identified: (a) Participation in the care encounter is made possible by interaction, including exchanging care-related information, care-related reasoning, collaboration; and (b) participation in the care encounter is made possible by an enabling approach, including the patients expressing their own wishes, showing an active interest, while the nurse is committed and invites to having a dialogue. The HF home-care context showed good potential for patient participation. Room for discussions and collaboration facilitated for the patients to be active partners in their care, which in turn may have positive effects on outcomes.

  • 49.
    Olai, Lena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden; Clin Research Centre, Sweden; Dalarna University, Sweden.
    Borgquist, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Svardsudd, Kurt
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Life situations and the care burden for stroke patients and their informal caregivers in a prospective cohort study2015In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 120, no 4, p. 290-298Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. The purpose of this study was to analyse whether the parallel life situation between stroke patients and their informal caregivers (dyads) shown in cross-sectional studies prevails also in a longitudinal perspective.Methods. A total of 377 Swedish stroke patients, aged 65 years, and their 268 informal caregivers were followed from hospital admission and one year on. Analyses were based on patient interviews, functional ability (MMSE) score, Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) score, Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) score, self-rated health score, and the Gothenburg Quality of Life (GQL) activity score. Similar information was obtained by postal questionnaires from informal caregivers, also including information on the nature and amount of assistance provided and on Caregiver Burden (CB) score.Results. Before index admission informal caregivers provided care on average 5 h per week and after discharge 11 h per week (P &lt; 0.0001). Support volume was associated with patient sex (more for men), low patients functional ability, low received municipal social service support, closeness of patient-caregiver relation, and short distance to patients home. Significant positive associations within the dyads were found for HAD anxiety score (P &lt; 0.0001), total NHP score (P &lt; 0.0001), and GQL activity score (P &lt; 0.0001) after adjustment for patients age, sex, functional ability, and patient-caregiver relationship. CB score increased with amount of informal caregiver support, patients age, and with low functional ability and low amount of municipal social service support. All these associations were constant across time.Conclusions. There was an association within the dyads regarding anxiety score, NHP score, and activity score. CB score was generally high.

  • 50.
    Pettersson, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology.
    Henricsson, Joachim
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Falk, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Validation of phototesting for estimation of individual skin ultraviolet sensitivity based on a lengthwise attenuating ultraviolet B field.2015In: Journal of Medical Engineering & Technology, ISSN 0309-1902, E-ISSN 1464-522X, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 91-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conventional skin UV-sensitivity phototesting is based on semi-quantitative assessment of minimal erythema dose (MED). This study demonstrates a method for quantitative MED determination, using a lengthwise attenuating UVB-field combined with tissue viability imaging (TiVi). The study aim was to investigate the agreement between MED acquired by traditional phototest and by the new method. Forty-seven voluntary subjects underwent phototesting with a traditional phototest and with the new technique. Test reading, carried out after 24 h, showed moderate agreement between the methods when assessed with TiVi (Kappa value=0.46) and visually (Kappa value=0.48). For the new method, no systematic differences were seen between outcomes assessed with TiVi or visually (95% CI for the mean difference=-1.6-2.0). In conclusion, the results give promising support for the concept of achieving a more precise MED estimation by combining continuous attenuating UV fields with new available bioengineering technology.

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