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  • 1.
    Blomstrand, Peter
    et al.
    Cty Hosp Ryhov, Sweden; Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Sjöblom, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Mats
    Acad Hlth and Care, Sweden.
    Wijkman, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Engvall, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Nyström, Fredrik H
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, "Primary Health Care in Motala".
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Overweight and obesity impair left ventricular systolic function as measured by left ventricular ejection fraction and global longitudinal strain2018In: Cardiovascular Diabetology, ISSN 1475-2840, E-ISSN 1475-2840, Vol. 17, article id 113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Obesity is associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus, left ventricular diastolic dysfunction and heart failure but it is unclear to which extent it is related to left ventricular systolic dysfunction. The aim of the study was to explore the effects of overweight and obesity on left ventricular systolic function in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and a control group of non-diabetic persons. Methods: We prospectively investigated 384 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and 184 controls who participated in the CARDIPP and CAREFUL studies. The participants were grouped according to body mass index (normal weight amp;lt; 25 kg/m(2), overweight 25-29 kg/m(2), and obesity amp;gt;= 30 kg/m(2) ). Echocardiography was performed at the beginning of the study and after 4-years in the patient group. Results: Univariable and multivariable regression analysis revealed that variations in left ventricular ejection fraction, global longitudinal strain, left ventricular mass and diastolic function expressed as E/e (the ratio between early diastolic mitral flow and annular motion velocities) all are related to body mass index. The mean and standard deviation of left ventricular ejection fraction and global longitudinal strain values were 57% (8%) vs. - 18.6% (2.3%) for normal weight patients, 53% (8%) vs. - 17.5% (2.3%) for overweight, and 49% (9%) vs. - 16.2% (3.0%) for obese (p amp;lt; 0.05 vs. p amp;lt;0.05). Corresponding results in the control group were 58% (6%) vs. -22.3% (3.0%), 55% (7%) vs. - 20.8% (3.1%) and 54% (8%) - 19.6% (4.0%) (p amp;lt;0.05 vs. p amp;lt;0.05). Patients who gained weight from baseline to follow-up changed left ventricular ejection fraction (median and interquartile range) by - 1.0 (9.0) % (n =187) and patients who lost weight changed left ventricular ejection fraction by 1.0 (10.0) % (n =179) (p amp;lt;0.05). Conclusion: Overweight and obesity impair left ventricular ejection fraction and global longitudinal strain in both patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and non-diabetic persons.

  • 2.
    Danielsson, Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lindvall, Björn
    University Hospital Örebro, Sweden.
    Hallert, Claes
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Increased prevalence of celiac disease in idiopathic inflammatory myopathies2017In: Brain and Behavior, ISSN 2162-3279, E-ISSN 2162-3279, Vol. 7, no 10, article id e00803Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ObjectivesIdiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM) are often associated with other immune-mediated diseases or malignancy. Some studies have reported a high frequency of celiac disease in IIM. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of celiac disease, systemic inflammatory diseases, and malignancy in a cohort of IIM patients, and estimate the incidence of IIM in the county of ostergotland, Sweden. Material and MethodsWe reviewed medical records and analyzed sera from 106 patients, fulfilling pathological criteria of inflammatory myopathy, for the presence of IgA antibodies against endomysium and gliadin. Antibody-positive patients were offered further investigation with small bowel biopsy or investigation for the presence of antibodies against antitissue transglutaminase (t-TG). The patients were classified according to Bohan and Peter or Griggs criteria. The presence of celiac disease, systemic inflammatory, and malignant diseases was documented. ResultsFour of 88 patients classified as IIM (4.5%) had biopsy-confirmed celiac disease, which is higher than the prevalence in the general population, detected with a similar screening procedure (0.53%). Thirty-three patients (38%) had a systemic inflammatory disease and five (5.7%) a malignancy. The incidence of confirmed IIM in the county of ostergotland was 7.3 per million/year. ConclusionsThe results highlight the high frequency of associated inflammatory and malignant diseases and confirm an increased prevalence of celiac disease in IIM.

  • 3.
    Jennersjö, Pär
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Guldbrand, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, West County Primary Health Care.
    Björne, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Wijkman, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, "Primary Health Care in Motala".
    Nyström, Fredrik H
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    A prospective observational study of all-cause mortality in relation to serum 25-OH vitamin D-3 and parathyroid hormone levels in patients with type 2 diabetes2015In: Diabetology and Metabolic Syndrome, ISSN 1758-5996, E-ISSN 1758-5996, Vol. 7, no 53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Low levels of vitamin D have been related to increased mortality and morbidity in several non-diabetic studies. We aimed to prospectively study relationships between serum 25-OH vitamin D-3 (vitamin D) and of serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) to total mortality in type 2 diabetes. We also aimed to compare the levels of these potential risk-factors in patients with and without diabetes. Methods: The main study design was prospective and observational. We used baseline data from 472 men and 245 women who participated in the "Cardiovascular Risk factors in Patients with Diabetes-a Prospective study in Primary care" study. Patients were 55-66 years old at recruitment, and an age-matched non-diabetic sample of 129 individuals constituted controls for the baseline data. Carotid-femoral pulse-wave velocity (PWV) was measured with applanation-tonometry and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) with ultrasound. Patients with diabetes were followed for all-cause mortality using the national Swedish Cause of Death Registry. Results: Levels of vitamin D were lower in patients with diabetes than in controls, also after correction for age and obesity, while PTH levels did not differ. Nine women and 24 men died during 6 years of median follow up of the final cohort (n = 698). Vitamin D levels were negatively related to all-cause mortality in men independently of age, PTH, HbA1c, waist circumference, 24-h systolic ambulatory-blood pressure (ABP) and serum-apoB (p = 0.049). This finding was also statistically significant when PWV and IMT were added to the analyses (p = 0.028) and was not affected statistically when medications were also included in the regression-analysis (p = 0.01). In the women with type 2 diabetes, levels of PTH were positively related with all-cause mortality in the corresponding calculations (p = 0.016 without PWV and IMT, p = 0.006 with PWV and IMT, p = 0.045 when also adding medications to the analysis), while levels of vitamin D was without statistical significance (p greater than 0.9). Conclusions: Serum vitamin D in men and serum PTH in women give prognostic information in terms of total-mortality that are independent of regular risk factors in addition to levels of ABP, IMT and PWV.

  • 4.
    Järemo, Petter
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Eriksson-Franzen, Marie
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Milovanovic, Micha
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Platelets, gender and acute cerebral infarction2015In: Journal of Translational Medicine, ISSN 1479-5876, E-ISSN 1479-5876, ISSN ISSN 1479-5876, Vol. 13, no 267Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    Platelets may well be significant in the pathogenesis of cerebral infarction. Platelets vary substantially according to gender. The scope of our current work is to establish if female and male stroke sufferers differ regarding platelet reactivity.

    Patients and methods

    73 Consecutive individuals stricken by acute ischemic cerebral infarction (31 females, 42 males) participated. All stroke subtypes were included. Platelet counts was determined electronically. Platelet reactivity i.e. the presence of surface-bound fibrinogen following provocation was analyzed with a flow cytometer. ADP (1.7 μmol/L) and a thrombin receptor agonist (TRAP-6) (57 μmol/L) were the agonists used.

    Results

    Female stroke sufferers had higher platelet counts (p = 0.013) but their platelets were less reactive. The p values were (p = 0.038) and (p = 0.016) for ADP and TRAP-6, respectively.

    Conclusion

    The current study demonstrates that women suffering acute cerebral infarction have less reactive platelets. It is concluded that gender affects platelets. Our study indicates that it may be beneficial to individualize platelet inhibition of stroke sufferers according to gender.

  • 5.
    Järemo, Petter
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Eriksson-Franzen, Marie
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Oweling, Magnus
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Milovanovic, Micha
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Platelets and inflammatory parameters do not affect long-term survival after acute stroke. Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases,2016In: Journal of Stroke & Cerebrovascular Diseases, ISSN 1052-3057, E-ISSN 1532-8511, Vol. 25, no 8, p. 1936-1938Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rationale

    According to literature, the inflammatory response and platelets are associated with coronary heart disease mortality. In this study, we examine if similar relationships exist after acute cerebral infarctions.

    Design

    Between 2005 and 2007, individuals (n = 61) hospitalized with acute stroke were investigated 2.1 ± .3 (SD) days after hospital admission. After 9.3 ± .7 (SD) years, 29 patients (age 79 ± 8 [SD]; 12 women) had died. They were compared with survivors (age 69 ± 9 [SD]; 9 women) with respect to inflammatory parameters and platelet features such as activity and reactivity.

    Results and conclusion

    Inflammation and platelets at the acute event do not forecast long-term survival of stroke sufferers

  • 6.
    Milovanovic, Micha
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Norrköping.
    Harakka, PI
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Post, C.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gerlde, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    High in vivo platelet activity in female fibromyalgia patients2016In: Journal of Biomedical Sciences, ISSN 2254-609X, Vol. 5, no 3:21, p. 1-5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Fibromyalgia (FMS) is a pain syndrome characterized by chronic widespread pain and hyperalgesia/allodynia. Many affected are women and risk factors are unidentified. Today, a certain number of set criteria of disease signs and symptoms must be met for the diagnosis to be made. These criteria are used because of the lack of reliable biomarkers or other medical examination. The current study examines if in vivo platelet activity varies between FMS and controls without FMS.

    Material and Methods: The study involves 24 females (age 38 + 9 (SD) years) with diagnosed FMS. 25 healthy females (age 50 + 12 (SD) years) without FMS served as controls. After sampling the whole platelet population was separated according to density with a linear Percoll™, into 17 density fractions. Platelet counts was carried out in all fractions using a routine cell counter. In addition, a flow cytometer was used to measure platelet bound fibrinogen without platelet agonist, reflecting in vivo platelet activity.

    Results: The study groups did not differ with respect to the distribution of platelets in the gradient. FMS sufferers demonstrated a significant higher platelet bound fibrinogen in most of the platelet density fractions. In particular, significant differences (p < 0.05) were obtained in fractions numbers 2-14 and 16. In difference, fractions numbers 1, 15 and 17 did not show any significant variance.

    Discussion: This is the first study to examine in vivo platelet activity in FMS. The results indicate that FMS is associated with elevated in vivo platelet activity compared to individuals without FMS. The clinical significance and the biochemical mechanisms regarding platelet heterogeneity are still uncertain. The results stimulate further research to elucidate the importance of platelet diversity in FMS

  • 7.
    Milovanovic, Micha
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Norrköping.
    Pirjo, Harakka
    Department of Neurobiology, Society and Caring Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Augmented serotonin content in density separated platelets of fibromyalgia patients2016In: Clinical and Diagnostic Pathology, ISSN 2399-5297Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Milovanovic, Micha
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Vikbolandet.
    Winblad, B
    NVS, Neurogeriatrics, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Karolinska University Hospital, Geriatrics, Huddinge.
    Jelic, V
    NVS, Neurogeriatrics, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Karolinska University Hospital, Geriatrics, Huddinge.
    Behbahani, H
    NVS, Neurogeriatrics, Karolinska Institutet.
    Shahnaz, T
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping. NVS, Neurogeriatrics, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge .
    Oweling, M
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Järemo, Petter
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Inverse relationship between erythrocyte size and platelet reactivity in elderly.2017In: Platelets, ISSN 0953-7104, E-ISSN 1369-1635, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 182-186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous work indicates that erythrocytes (RBCs) accumulate β-amyloid X-40 (Aβ40) in individuals with Alzheimer disease (AD) and to a lesser extent in healthy elderly. The toxin damages RBCs and increases their mean corpuscular volume (MCV). Furthermore, AD platelets demonstrate lower reactivity. This study investigated interactions between RBCs and platelets. Older individuals with moderate hypertension (n = 57) were classified into two groups, depending on MCV in whole blood: The MCV(high) group comprised individuals with higher MCV (n = 27; 97 ± 3(SD) fl) and MCV(low) group had relatively lower MCV (n = 30; 90 ± 3(SD) fl). Flow cytometry was used to determine platelet reactivity, i.e., the surface binding of fibrinogen after provocation. Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and a thrombin receptor-activating protein (TRAP-6) were used as agonists. Subsequently, blood cells were divided according to density into 17 subfractions. Intra-RBC Aβ40 content was analyzed and in all platelet populations surface-bound fibrinogen was determined to estimate platelet in vivo activity. We found Aβ40 inside RBCs of approximately 50% of participants, but the toxin did not affect MCV and platelet reactivity. In contrast, MCV associated inversely with platelet reactivity as judged from surface-attached fibrinogen after ADP (1.7 μmol/L) (p < 0.05) and TRAP-6 provocation (57 μmol/L (p = 0.01) and 74 μmol/L (p < 0.05)). In several density fractions (nos. 3, 4, 8, 11-13 (p < 0.05) and nos. 5-7 (p < 0.01)) MCV linked inversely with platelet-attached fibrinogen. In our community-dwelling sample, enhanced MCV associated with decreased platelet reactivity and lower in vivo platelet activity. It resembles RBCs and platelet behavior in AD-type dementia.

  • 9.
    Mourad, Ghassan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Svensson, Erland
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    The associations between psychological distress and healthcare use in patients with non-cardiac chest pain: does a history of cardiac disease matter?2018In: BMC Psychiatry, ISSN ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 18, no 1, article id 172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Psychological distress such as somatization, fear of body sensations, cardiac anxiety and depressive symptoms is common among patients with non-cardiac chest pain, and this may lead to increased healthcare use. However, the relationships between the psychological distress variables and healthcare use, and the differences in relation to history of cardiac disease in these patients has not been studied earlier. Therefore, our aim was to explore and model the associations between different variables of psychological distress (i.e. somatization, fear of body sensations, cardiac anxiety, and depressive symptoms) and healthcare use in patients with non-cardiac chest pain in relation to history of cardiac disease.

    METHODS: In total, 552 patients with non-cardiac chest pain (mean age 64 years, 51% women) responded to the Patient Health Questionnaire-15, Body Sensations Questionnaire, Cardiac Anxiety Questionnaire, Patient Health Questionnaire-9 and one question regarding number of healthcare visits. The relationships between the psychological distress variables and healthcare visits were analysed using Structural Equation Modeling in two models representing patients with or without history of cardiac disease.

    RESULTS: A total of 34% of the patients had previous cardiac disease. These patients were older, more males, and reported more comorbidities, psychological distress and healthcare visits. In both models, no direct association between depressive symptoms and healthcare use was found. However, depressive symptoms had an indirect effect on healthcare use, which was mediated by somatization, fear of body sensations, and cardiac anxiety, and this effect was significantly stronger in patients with history of cardiac disease. Additionally, all the direct and indirect effects between depressive symptoms, somatization, fear of body sensations, cardiac anxiety, and healthcare use were significantly stronger in patients with history of cardiac disease.

    CONCLUSIONS: In patients with non-cardiac chest pain, in particular those with history of cardiac disease, psychological mechanisms play an important role for seeking healthcare. Development of interventions targeting psychological distress in these patients is warranted. Furthermore, there is also a need of more research to clarify as to whether such interventions should be tailored with regard to history of cardiac disease or not.

  • 10.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Norrköping.
    Järemo, Petter
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Non-coronary chest pain does not affect long-term mortality: a prospective, observational study using a matched population control2016In: BMC Family Practice, ISSN 1471-2296, E-ISSN 1471-2296, Vol. 17, article id 159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Chest pain assumed to be of non-coronary origin (NCCP) may be linked to enhanced mortality due to coronary heart disease (CHD). The aim of this study was to follow NCCP patients, as defined in primary care, with respect to mortality and long-term morbidity of CHD. We further examined if NCCP associates with risk factors for CHD.

    Methods: Patients consulting general practitioners (GPs) in 1998–2000 in three primary care centers in the southeast Sweden for chest pain regarded as NCCP were compared with controls matched for age, gender and residential area. Causes of death were gathered from registry data and death certificates. In 2005 a postal questionnaire was distributed to the survivors to collect demographic and clinical data. If participants had CHD diagnosed by a physician prior to inclusion they were excluded.

    Results: Patients with NCCP (n = 382) and population controls (n = 746) did not differ with respect to mortality and incidence of CHD. The NCCP group reported more ongoing chest pain (OR 3.34 95 % CI 2.41–4.62), they more often had elevated blood pressure (OR 1.86 95 % CI 1.32–2.60), consumed more β-blockers (p < 0.001), aspirin (p = 0.013), thiazides (p = 0.004) and long-acting nitrates (p = 0.002). They further had more remedies for acid-related disorders (p = 0.014) and obstructive pulmonary disease (p < 0.001).

    Conclusions: The study suggests that individuals with chest pain judged by GPs to be NCCP do not develop CHD more frequently than population controls. It is evident that NCCP often lasts for many years and that the condition associates with hypertension.

  • 11.
    Olafsdottir, Arndis F.
    et al.
    NU Hosp Grp, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Polonsky, William
    Univ Calif San Diego, CA 92103 USA.
    Bolinder, Jan
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Hirsch, Irl B.
    Univ Washington, WA USA.
    Dahlqvist, Sofia
    NU Hosp Grp, Sweden.
    Wedel, Hans
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nystrom, Thomas
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Wijkman, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Schwarcz, Erik
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Hellman, Jarl
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Heise, Tim
    Profil, Germany.
    Lind, Marcus
    NU Hosp Grp, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    A Randomized Clinical Trial of the Effect of Continuous Glucose Monitoring on Nocturnal Hypoglycemia, Daytime Hypoglycemia, Glycemic Variability, and Hypoglycemia Confidence in Persons with Type 1 Diabetes Treated with Multiple Daily Insulin Injections (GOLD-3)2018In: Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics, ISSN 1520-9156, E-ISSN 1557-8593, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 274-284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: To evaluate the effects of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) on nocturnal and daytime hypoglycemia in persons with type 1 diabetes treated with multiple daily insulin injections (MDI); we also evaluated factors related to differences in hypoglycemia confidence in this population. Methods: Evaluations were performed from the GOLD randomized trial, an open-label multicenter crossover randomized clinical trial (n=161) over 69 weeks comparing CGM to self-measurement of blood glucose (SMBG) in persons with type 1 diabetes treated with MDI. Masked CGM and the hypoglycemia confidence questionnaire were used for evaluations. Results: Time with nocturnal hypoglycemia, glucose levels amp;lt;70mg/dL was reduced by 48% (10.2 vs. 19.6min each night, Pamp;lt;0.001) and glucose levels amp;lt;54mg/dL by 65%. (3.1 vs. 8.9min, Pamp;lt;0.001). For the corresponding glucose cutoffs, daytime hypoglycemia was reduced by 40% (29 vs. 49min, Pamp;lt;0.001) and 54% (8 vs. 18min., Pamp;lt;0.001), respectively. Compared with SMBG, CGM use improved hypoglycemia-related confidence in social situations (P=0.016) and confidence in more broadly avoiding serious problems due to hypoglycemia (P=0.0020). Persons also reported greater confidence in detecting and responding to decreasing blood glucose levels (thereby avoiding hypoglycemia) during CGM use (P=0.0033) and indicated greater conviction that they could more freely live their lives despite the risk of hypoglycemia (P=0.022). Conclusion: CGM reduced time in both nocturnal and daytime hypoglycemia in persons with type 1 diabetes treated with MDI and improved hypoglycemia-related confidence, especially in social situations, thus contributing to greater well-being and quality of life. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02092051.

  • 12.
    Sandberg, Klas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Rehabilitation in Norrköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Kleist, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Rehabilitation in Norrköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Falk, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology.
    Enthoven, Paul
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Effects of Twice-Weekly Intense Aerobic Exercise inQ1 Early Subacute Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Trial2016In: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0003-9993, E-ISSN 1532-821X, Vol. 97, no 8, p. 1244-1253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    To examine the effects of 12 weeks of twice-weekly intensive aerobic exercise on physical function and quality of life after subacute stroke.

    DESIGN:

    Randomized controlled trial.

    SETTING:

    Ambulatory care.

    PARTICIPANTS:

    Patients (N=56; 28 women) aged ≥50 years who had a mild stroke (98% ischemic) and were discharged to independent living and enrolled 20 days (median) after stroke onset.

    INTERVENTIONS:

    Sixty minutes of group aerobic exercise, including 2 sets of 8 minutes of exercise with intensity up to exertion level 14 or 15 of 20 on the Borg rating of perceived exertion scale, twice weekly for 12 weeks (n=29). The nonintervention group (n=27) received no organized rehabilitation or scheduled physical exercise.

    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

    Primary outcome measures included aerobic capacity on the standard ergometer exercise stress test (peak work rate) and walking distance on the 6-minute walk test (6MWT). Secondary outcome measures included maximum walking speed for 10m, balance on the timed Up and Go (TUG) test and single leg stance (SLS), health-related quality of life on the European Quality of Life Scale (EQ-5D), and participation and recovery after stroke on the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) version 2.0 domains 8 and 9. Participants were evaluated pre- and postintervention. Patient-reported measures were also evaluated at 6-month follow-up.

    RESULTS:

    The following improved significantly more in the intervention group (pre- to postintervention): peak work rate (group × time interaction, P=.006), 6MWT (P=.011), maximum walking speed for 10m (P<.001), TUG test (P<.001), SLS right and left (eyes open) (P<.001 and P=.022, respectively), and SLS right (eyes closed) (P=.019). Aerobic exercise was associated with improved EQ-5D scores (visual analog scale, P=.008) and perceived recovery (SIS domain 9, P=.002). These patient-reported improvements persisted at 6-month follow-up.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Intensive aerobic exercise twice weekly early in subacute mild stroke improved aerobic capacity, walking, balance, health-related quality of life, and patient-reported recovery.

  • 13.
    Vujasinovic, Miroslav
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Kunst, Gregor
    Department of Surgery, Slovenj Gradec General Hospital, Slovenj Gradec, Slovenia.
    Breznikar, Brane
    Department of Surgery, Slovenj Gradec General Hospital, Slovenj Gradec, Slovenia.
    Rozej, Barbara
    Department of Surgery, Slovenj Gradec General Hospital, Slovenj Gradec, Slovenia.
    Tepes, Bojan
    Abakus Medico Diagnostic Centre, Rogaska Slatina, Slovenia.
    Rudolf, Sasa
    Department of Radiology, University Medical Centre Maribor, Ljubljanska, Maribor, Slovenia.
    Kuster, Andrea
    Department of Surgery, Slovenj Gradec General Hospital, Gosposvetska, Slovenj Gradec, Slovenia.
    Is Pancreatic Exocrine Insufficiency a cause of Malabsorption in Patients after Bariatric Surgery?2016In: Journal of the Pancreas, ISSN 1590-8577, E-ISSN 1590-8577, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 402-405Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction It is known that afferent and efferent loop syndromes can develop following gastric surgery procedures, which can result in accelerated intestinal transit time as well as colonization by pathogenic bacteria in the upper gastrointestinal tract with inadequate stimulation and poorly synchronized pancreatic enzyme secretion. This condition is known as pancreaticocibal asynchrony and can cause pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. The aim of our study was to determine whether pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is impaired in patients after bariatric surgery. We are presenting the results of a pilot study. Patients and methods Patients were selected from the bariatric surgery outpatient clinic of the Slovenj Gradec General Hospital (Slovenian centre of excellence for bariatric surgery). All patients were Caucasians over 18 years of age. The eligibility criteria for surgery were determined according to European guidelines body mass index ≥40 kg/ m2 or ≥35 kg/m2 in patients with obesity-related comorbidities). All procedures were performed by laparoscopic surgery (as Roux-en-Y or mini-omega loop gastric bypass). All patients received standard supplementation after surgery. Faecal elastase-1 (FE1) measurements were performed using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. Results Twenty-two consecutive patients were included in the study: 21 (95.5%) female and 1 (4.5%) male; the mean age was 42.0±9.2 years, with a range of 24 to 57 years. Patients were included in the study one year after bariatric surgery. Weight outcomes Body mass index pre-surgery: 42.5±4.0 (range 34.9-49.1). Body mass index present: 27.4±3.2 (range 23.1-34.6). Pre-surgery weight: 119.5±15.0 kg (range 97-149). Lowest post-surgery weight (present weight): 76.7±9.6 kg (range 63-100). Total weight loss: 42.8±7.3 kg. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency was present in two patients (9.1%): mild to moderate pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (FE1 191 μg/g) in a 39-year-old male and severe pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (FE1 15 μg/g) in a 52-year-old female. Serum nutritional markers were low in both patients (vitamin D, iron, selenium). Conclusions Our results show that pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is possible in patients one year post-surgery and could be an additional cause of malabsorption in this group of patients.

  • 14.
    Vujasinovic, Miroslav
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Makuc, Jana
    Department of Internal Medicine; General Hospital Slovenj Gradec, Slovenj Gradec, Slovenia.
    Tepes, Bojan
    Abakus Medico Diagnostic Centre, Rogaska Slatina, Slovenia.
    Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency and Diabetes Mellitus2016In: Journal of the Pancreas, ISSN 1590-8577, E-ISSN 1590-8577, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 263-268Article, review/survey (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Vujasinovic, Miroslav
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Tretjak, Martin
    Department of Internal Medicine, Slovenj Gradec General Hospital, Slovenj Gradec, Slovenia.
    Tepes, Bojan
    Abakus Medico Diagnostic Centre, Rogaska Slatina, Slovenia.
    Marolt, Apolon
    Department of Internal Medicine, Slovenj Gradec General Hospital, Slovenj Gradec, Slovenia.
    Slemenik Pusnik, Cirila
    Department of Internal Medicine, Slovenj Gradec General Hospital, Slovenj Gradec, Slovenia.
    Kotnik Kerbev, Mateja
    Department of Internal Medicine, Slovenj Gradec General Hospital, Slovenj Gradec, Slovenia.
    Rudolf, Sasa
    Department of Radiology, University Medical Centre Maribor, Ljubljanska, Maribor, Slovenia.
    Is Pancreatic Exocrine Insufficiency A Result of Decreased SplanchnicCirculation in Patients with Chronic Heart Failure?2016In: Journal of the Pancreas, ISSN 1590-8577, E-ISSN 1590-8577, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 201-203Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Wijkman, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Beta-blockers, hypertension, and stroke outcomes2018In: The Journal of Clinical Hypertension, ISSN 1524-6175, E-ISSN 1751-7176, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 573-574Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 17.
    Wijkman, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Editorial Material: Diuretics and Cerebrovascular Outcomes-Beyond Traditional Endpoints in JOURNAL OF CLINICAL HYPERTENSION, vol 17, issue 4, pp 273-2742015In: The Journal of Clinical Hypertension, ISSN 1524-6175, E-ISSN 1751-7176, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 273-274Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 18.
    Wijkman, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, "Primary Health Care in Motala".
    Nyström, Fredrik H
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Aortic pulse wave velocity predicts incident cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes treated in primary care2016In: Journal of diabetes and its complications, ISSN 1056-8727, E-ISSN 1873-460X, Vol. 30, no 7, p. 1223-1228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: The aim was to evaluate the predictive value of aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV) on incident cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes without previous cardiovascular disease who were treated in primary care, after adjustment for traditional risk factors. Methods: We measured aPWV in 627 patients who participated in the epidemiological study CARDIPP (Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Patients with Diabetes-a Prospective Study in Primary Care; ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01049737) and who did not have previously known myocardial infarction or stroke. The outcome variable was a composite endpoint consisting of cardiovascular mortality, hospitalization for myocardial infarction and hospitalization for stroke. Results: During a median follow-up time of almost eight years, the unadjusted HR per each increment of aPWV by 1 m/s was 1.239 (95% CI 1.114-1.379, P amp;lt; 0.001) for the primary endpoint. Following adjustments for age, sex, diabetes duration, office systolic blood pressure, resting heart rate, total cholesterol, HbA1c, estimated glomerular filtration rate and smoking status, the adjusted hazard ratio was 1.142 (95% CI 1.003-1.301, P = 0.044). Conclusions: In primary preventive patients with type 2 diabetes treated in primary care, aPWV predicted a composite outcome of incident cardiovascular events independently of diabetes-specific and traditional risk factors. (C) 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 19.
    Wijkman, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, "Primary Health Care in Motala".
    Nyström, Fredrik H
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Diastolic orthostatic hypertension and cardiovascular prognosis in type 2 diabetes: a prospective cohort study2016In: Cardiovascular Diabetology, ISSN 1475-2840, E-ISSN 1475-2840, Vol. 15, no 83, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: In patients with type 2 diabetes, the prognostic impact of an orthostatic rise in blood pressure is not known. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the prognostic implications of the diastolic orthostatic blood pressure response in a cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes. We also evaluated associations between different orthostatic blood pressure responses and markers of subclinical cardiovascular organ damage.

    METHODS: Office blood pressures were measured in the sitting and in the standing position in 749 patients with type 2 diabetes who participated in the CARDIPP study (Cardiovascular Risk factors in Patients with Diabetes-a Prospective study in Primary care). Diastolic orthostatic hypertension was defined as a rise of diastolic blood pressure ≥10 mmHg and diastolic orthostatic hypotension was defined as a drop of diastolic blood pressure ≥10 mmHg. Recruitment took place between the years 2005-2008, and patients were followed until any of the primary outcome events (cardiovascular death or hospitalization for either myocardial infarction or stroke) occurred or until December 31st, 2014. Measurements of aortic pulse wave velocity and of carotid intima-media thickness were performed at base-line.

    RESULTS: Diastolic orthostatic hypertension was found in 140 patients (18.7 %) and was associated with significantly lower risk of cardiovascular events (crude hazard ratio compared with patients with normal systolic and diastolic orthostatic blood pressure response: 0.450, 95 % C.I. 0.206-0.987, P = 0.046). Diastolic orthostatic hypotension was found in 31 patients (4.1 %) and was associated with higher values for aortic pulse wave velocity and carotid intima-media thickness, compared with patients with normal systolic and diastolic orthostatic blood pressure response.

    CONCLUSIONS: Diastolic orthostatic hypertension is common in patients with type 2 diabetes, and may be a novel marker for decreased cardiovascular risk in these patients.

  • 20.
    Wijkman, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Sandberg, Klas
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Rehabilitation in Norrköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kleist, Marie
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Rehabilitation in Norrköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Falk, Lars
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care. Enheten för forskningsstöd, Region Östergötland Research and Development Unit in Region Östergötland.
    Enthoven, Paul
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    The exaggerated blood pressure response to exercise in the sub-acute phase after stroke is not affected by aerobic exercise.2018In: The Journal of Clinical Hypertension, ISSN 1524-6175, E-ISSN 1751-7176, Journal of Clinical Hypertension, Vol. 20, p. 56-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The prevalence of an exaggerated exercise blood pressure (BP) response is unknown in patients with subacute stroke, and it is not known whether an aerobic exercise program modulates this response. The authors randomized 53 patients (27 women) with subacute stroke to 12 weeks of twice-weekly aerobic exercise (n = 29) or to usual care without scheduled physical exercise (n = 24). At baseline, 66% of the patients exhibited an exaggerated exercise BP response (peak systolic BP ≥210 mm Hg in men and ≥190 mm Hg in women) during a symptom-limited ergometer exercise test. At follow-up, patients who had been randomized to the exercise program achieved higher peak work rate, but peak systolic BP remained unaltered. Among patients with a recent stroke, it was common to have an exaggerated systolic BP response during exercise. This response was not altered by participation in a 12-week program of aerobic exercise.

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