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  • 1. Andersson, A
    et al.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, FHVC - Folkhälsovetenskapligt centrum.
    Management perspective on Information and Communication Technology - Requirement specification for process-oriented healthcare2001In: JAMIA Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, ISSN 1067-5027, E-ISSN 1527-974X, p. 854-854Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Andersson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Hallberg, Nicklas
    FOI.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    A management information system-model for process-oriented health care2004In: Medinfo, IOS Press , 2004, p. 1008-1012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Andersson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDA. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hallberg, Niklas
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDA. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDA. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A Management Information System Model for Process-Oriented Health Care2003In: Proceedings of Medinfo 2004, 2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Andersson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDA. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hallberg, Niklas
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDA. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A Model for Interpreting Work and Information Management in Process-Oriented Healthcare Organisations2003In: International Journal of Medical Informatics, ISSN 1386-5056, Vol. 72, no 1-3, p. 47-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: To increase productivity, management in healthcare organisations have introduced different types of process-oriented organisational configurations. Few studies have addressed clinical practice and information management in these settings. Methods: A case study was performed at a paediatric clinic. Data was collected from archives, through interviews, by participatory observation, and by performing a focus group session. The collected data was analysed using a qualitative and interpretative research strategy. Results: A model was developed of care practitioners’ daily work in process-oriented organisations. The model shows that clinical work was deeply integrated; the care activities were dependent on supply activities and tightly connected to management routines. Conclusion: The resulting model can be used to support development of health information system (HIS) embedded in process-oriented healthcare work.

  • 5.
    Andersson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, EISLAB - Economic Information Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Timpka, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Management demands on information and communication technology in process- oriented health-care organizations: The importance of understanding managers expectations during early phases of systems design2002In: Journal of Management in Medicine, ISSN 0268-9235, Vol. 16, no 2-3, p. 159-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are numerous challenges to overcome before information and communication technology (ICT) can achieve its full potential in process-oriented health-care organizations. One of these challenges is designing systems that meet users’ needs, while reflecting a continuously changing organizational environment. Another challenge is to develop ICT that supports both the internal and the external stakeholders’ demands. In this study a qualitative research strategy was used to explore the demands on ICT expressed by managers from functional and process units at a community hospital. The results reveal a multitude of partially competing goals that can make the ICT development process confusing, poor in quality, inefficient and unnecessarily costly. Therefore, from the perspective of ICT development, the main task appears to be to coordinate the different visions and in particular clarify them, as well as to establish the impact that these visions would have on the forthcoming ICT application.

  • 6.
    Andersson Granberg, Tobias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Stenberg, Rebecca
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johansson, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Bång, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kaspersson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Jonsson, Sandra
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nilsson, Lisa
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Tåla: Trygghetsskapande åtgärder för landsbygden2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I april 2010 gav regeringen i uppdrag till Myndigheten för samhällsskydd och beredskap (MSB) att i ett projekt öka säkerheten på landsbygden genom nya former för räddning och respons. Inom ramen för ovanstående uppdrag, vilket benämns ”Samhällsviktig samverkan i landsbygd” har CARER – Centrum för respons- och räddningssystem – vid Linköpings universitet fått i uppdrag av MSB att inventera vilka behov och resurser för säkerhet och trygghet som existerar på lands- och glesbygd, samt undersöka vilka andra projekt och initiativ som föregått detta, nationellt och internationellt. CARERs projekt, som görs inom ramen för regeringsuppdraget, benämns Trygghetshöjande åtgärder för landsbygden (TÅLA).

    TÅLA har genomförts som fyra sammanhängande delstudier där de två första delstudierna använder kvalitativ metodik, främst intervjuer, och syftar till att skapa en förståelse för den upplevda tryggheten på lands- och glesbygden, samt utröna vad den består i och hur den kan stärkas. Delstudie 3 syftar till att kvantitativt uttrycka behov och resurser för säkerhet och trygghet på landsoch glesbygd genom ett urval av indikatorer. Delstudie 4 syftar till att ge en överblick över tidigare forskning och utveckling på området.

    Några generella slutsatser som kan dras från TÅLA-projektets olika delstudier är att det finns en god medvetenhet hos boende i land- och glesbygd för att det kan ta tid innan hjälp kan fås ifrån de traditionella räddningssystemen (som till exempel polis eller räddningstjänst), ett faktum som också kan bekräftas numerärt. Vissa indikatorer tyder dessutom på att boende på lands- och glesbygden är mer drabbade av olyckor än boende i tätort, vilket ger ett ökat behov av de aktuella resurserna. Detta har lett till att nya typer av lösningar har utvecklats, oftast av de boende, för att bistå vid olyckor, många baserade på självhjälp och frivillighet.

    Tydligt är också att trygghet omfattar mer än bara blåljusverksamheter och stöd från det allmänna. Här inkluderas också behov som el, vatten och möjligheten att handla mat. En stor del av den upplevda tryggheten hos befolkningen kommer från det sociala nätverk som finns i respektive by. Möjligheter till kommunikation är centralt och det är när individen är ensam utan möjlighet till kontakt med omvärlden som den största otryggheten infinner sig.

    Det framkom under projektet flera exempel på samverkan och de som medverkar framhåller vikten av att känna varandra innan insatsen, för att bästa möjliga resultat ska uppnås. Såväl de båda kvalitativa studierna som kunskapsöversikten pekar på att en trolig väg till framgång för en ökad säkerhet och trygghet på landsbygden bygger på att de lokala resurserna och strukturerna nyttjas i samverkan med de traditionella räddningsresurserna. Detta innebär att det bör vara möjligt att stärka dels de boendes möjligheter att hjälpa sig själva och att hjälpa varandra, men också att nyttja organisationer som idag inte tillhör blåljusmyndigheterna för att i samverkan med räddningstjänsten, sjukvården och polisen kunna bistå vid olyckor, akuta sjukdomsförlopp och andra relevanta händelser. Viktigt att beakta i detta sammanhang är då att använda de befintliga strukturer som existerar bland såväl boende som olika organisationer, för att på bästa sätt kunna dra nytta av den lokala kunskap, de resurser och det engagemang som existerar.

  • 7.
    Arvola, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Assessment criteria for interaction design projects: Fostering professional perspectives on the design process2010In: When Design Education and Design Research meet…: The 12th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education / [ed] Boks, C., McMahon, C., Ion, W., Parkinson, B., Wiltshire: Institution of Engineering Designers, The Design Society , 2010, p. 432-437Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Quite often the product of design is assessed in interaction design education, but we need to develop criteria also for courses that focus on learning to conduct and manage the design process. An earlier approach to set grading criteria has been grounded in the SOLO (Structure of the Observed Learning Outcome) taxonomy. Students need, however, to learn practitionersᅵ criteria, rather than teachersᅵ criteria, to make a successful transfer to practice. One way of achieving that is to align criteria with the conceptions of design process quality used by professional interaction designers. The question is then what those conceptions are, and how they can be accounted for in assessment criteria for projects in interaction design education. A phenomenographic research method was used, and interviews were conducted with ten experienced interaction designers. The interviews were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. The results show that professional interaction designers see design process quality as inspiration, a well-grounded rationale, employment of established methods, and constraints management. These conceptions are mapped to a criteria-referenced grading scale. The criteria should, with careful transfer, be applicable also in other design disciplines.

  • 8.
    Arvola, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Cognitive anthropology as a basis for studying use quality of IT in the home2000In: 7th IDA Conference on Computer and Information Science, Linköping: Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science , 2000, p. 69-73Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes the theory of quality-in-use of interactive IT-artefacts. It also argues for a multi-perspective view of use quality in the design and study of IT-artefacts in the home. The design community of IT-based consumer products will benefit from studying what users consider being important and meaningful use qualities. For higher transferability of results and theoretical value, an understanding of why users find these qua qualities to meaningful must be developed. Theory and methods from cognitive anthropology may provide a foundation for this. Finally future research questions and methods are presented.

  • 9.
    Arvola, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Interaction design qualities: theory and practice2010In: NordiCHI '10 Proceedings of the 6th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: Extending Boundaries / [ed] Hvannberg, E. Þ., Lárusdóttir, M. K., Blandford, A., Gulliksen, J., New York: ACM , 2010, p. 595-598Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports the results of an action research project investigating the articulation of interaction design qualities for a web portal for urban planning and development. A framework for analyzing interaction design qualities is presented. The framework consists of the practical, the social, the aesthetic, the structural and the ethical quality dimensions, and it was tried out in practice with developers and designers of the portal. This provided experiences used to revise the framework. The results indicate that the framework can be improved by splitting the social quality dimension into a communicational dimension and an organizational dimension. The structural dimension is also renamed to the technical dimension.

  • 10.
    Arvola, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Interaction designers’ conceptions of design quality for interactive artifacts2010In: Design and Complexity,  DRS 2010 / [ed] Durling, D., Bousbaci, R., Chen, L., Gauthier, P., Poldma, T., Roworth-Stokes, S., Stolterman, E., Montréal: Université de Montréal , 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is important to be aware of different ways of seeing design quality of interactive artifacts in order to appreciate the various aspects of a design, but how do professional interaction designers understand design quality? In theory, one way of approaching design quality of interactive artifacts has been the Vitruvian principles of commodity, firmness and delight, originally created for architecture. Such frameworks are, however, seldom directly employed in practice. This paper investigates what conceptions professional interaction designers have of design quality for interactive artifacts. Interviews were conducted with ten designers. The analysis disclosed four conceptions concerning: (a) Constraints & contexts, (b) motivations & purposes, (c) use-qualities of functions & content, and (d) experiential qualities of form & behaviour. An awareness of these conceptions may facilitate the appreciation for different aspects and opportunities in a design situation.

  • 11.
    Arvola, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Holmlid, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    IT-artefacts for socializing: Qualities-in-use and research framework2000In: The 23rd Information Systems Research Seminar in Scandinavia: Doing IT together / [ed] Svensson, L Snis, U Sørensen, C Fägerlind, H., Lindroth, T., Magnusson, M., Östlund, C., Trollhättan: Laboratorium for Interaction Technology, University of Trollhättan Uddevalla , 2000, p. 1293-1301Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of computer artefacts in everyday social activities, is an unexplored research area. In this study, eight academics and university students were interviewed after playing a quiz game on interactive television. The methodology was interpretative to its nature. Four qualities-in-use are identified as means for design of IT-artefacts for socializing: ease of use, enchantment, entertainment, and togetherness. The qualities are placed in context of related research. In addition, the links between the qualities, and between the qualities and the theoretical concepts from the related research are examined. It is concluded that the relations between several of the concepts remain unclear and that IT-artefacts for socializing is a venture of opportunity for future research.

  • 12.
    Arvola, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDI - Interaction and Service Design Research Group.
    Holmlid, Stefan
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDI - Interaction and Service Design Research Group.
    Nygard, Stefan
    IDA MDI.
    Segelström, Fabian
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Wentzel, Jonatan
    IDA MDI.
    Greta & Torsten: Två personas för äldre användare av hälsans nya verktyg2008Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Hälsans nya verktyg är en satsning på tillväxt i östgötaregionen, där planen är att successivt närma sig den växande världsmarknaden inom hälsa och vård. Fokuserade områden är sport och idrott, personlig hälsa, distribuerad vård och egenvård. Som ett led i tillväxtsatsningen identifieras intressanta marknads- och kundsegment, och för dessa segment gäller det att lära känna målgruppen som kommer att använda och beröras av olika tjänster och produkter. Ett sätt att åstadkomma detta är att ta fram personor och scenarios som kan användas som ett led i designarbetet.

  • 13.
    Arvola, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Karsvall, Arvid
    Södertörns Högskola, Institutionen för kommunikation, medier och IT, Medieteknik.
    Tholander, Jakob
    Stockholms universitet, Mobile Life.
    Values and qualities in interaction design meetings2011In: The Endless End: The 9th International European Academy of Design Conference. Porto, Portugal, May 4-7, 2011., 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How are values and qualities expressed in interaction design? Previous research into this topic has largely been conceptual. How interaction designers and clients actually reason has only been touched upon in empirical studies. The research question for this paper is how interaction designers, as a collective and in an unfolding design process, concretize values and qualities in meetings with clients. By way of video recordings, we have analyzed two interaction design workshops. The analysis indicated that values were concretized top-down, from general conceptions and the design brief given, while also explored bottom-up. Several kinds of communicative means (e.g. talk, gestures, whiteboards, post-it notes) were used to animate values and design visions. Mixing a top-down and bottom-up approach allowed the designers to be both prescriptive and sensitive the uniqueness of the design situation. Thedifferences in communicative means did not really matter for how values and qualities weremade concrete. What mattered was that people really started talking with each other.

  • 14.
    Arvola, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Larsson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Regulating prominence: A design pattern for co-located collaboration2004In: Cooperative Systems Design: Scenario-Based Design of Collaborative Systems / [ed] Darses, F., Dieng, R., Simone, C., Zacland, M., Amsterdam: IOS Press , 2004, p. 115-130Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Co-located people do things individually while participating in collaboration. It is, however, difficult for designers to foresee what they will do individually and what they will do jointly. Participants therefore need to be able to move any information object between private and public states, but that is cumbersome to do with objects confined to a traditional PC-based workstation. This paper describes a design pattern, which addresses the problem. Designers can resolve it by making a platform where users can regulate how prominent they want to make information for themselves and others. The pattern is based on field studies and design work in three different settings where desirable use qualities were identified, categorized and translated into forces in a design pattern. Conflicts between forces were noted as problems, and solutions were sought to establish a pattern. A multiple-device platform was finally derived from the pattern to provide an example of how it can be realized. It is concluded that use qualities from a qualitative analysis of technology usage can provide the empirical basis for a design pattern. This fits well with several traditions within HCI and CSCW such as ethnographically informed design, scenario-based design, and design space analysis.

  • 15.
    Arvola, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lundberg, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Holmlid, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Analysis of precedent designs: Competitive analysis meets genre analysis2010In: NordiCHI '10 Proceedings of the 6th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: Extending Boundaries / [ed] Hvannberg, E. Þ., Lárusdóttir, M. K., Blandford, A., Gulliksen, J., New York, NY, USA: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2010, p. 23-31Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Designers need to survey the competition and analyze precedent designs, but methods for that purpose have not been evaluated in earlier research. This paper makes a comparative evaluation between competitive analysis and genre analysis. A randomized between-group experiment was conducted where graphic design students were conducted one of the two analysis methods. There were 13 students in one group and 16 in the other. The results show that genre analysis produced more detailed descriptions of precedent designs, but its process was more difficult to understand. It is concluded that genre analysis can be integrated into competitive analysis, to make use of the strengths of both methods in the analysis of precedents.

  • 16.
    Berglund, Aseel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, ASELAB - Applied Software Engineering Lab. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Berglund, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Larsson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Bång, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    The Paper Remote: An Augmented TV Guide and Remote Control2005In: Universal Access in the Information Society (UAIS), ISSN 1615-5289, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 300-327Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The television (TV) is one of the most common entertainment devices in homes. Searching and finding TV programs is a common task and using TV guides is one way of performing this. This paper presents three studies that are focused on examining audiences’ TV habits and TV guide usage, evaluating a new concept based on linking paper and pen with TV technology, and studying the audiences’ attitudes toward and anticipated interest in the future guide. The results of our first study emphasize the value of using paper based TV guides and also identify the deficiencies. We also found indications that the advantages and disadvantages of paper-based TV guides are related to the physical properties of paper. Thus, we suggest a solution that uses digital pen and paper technology to offer a new interaction method for TV. A research system “Paper Remote”, is developed and used in the two subsequent studies. Viewers tick designated areas on the paper-based guide to perform actions such as channel switching. However, this solution is not a substitute for the remote control device. We argue that these user studies on linking digital paper to the TV for everyday information navigation illuminate the possibilities of providing innovative solutions also for home information systems also.

  • 17.
    Berglund, Erik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Communicating bugs: Global bug knowledge distribution2005In: Information and Software Technology, ISSN 0950-5849, E-ISSN 1873-6025, Vol. 47, no 11, p. 709-719Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Unfortunately, software-component libraries shared on a global scale contain bugs. Members of the library user community often report bugs, workarounds, and fixes. This bug knowledge, however, generally remain undiscovered on library web site or in open bug databases. In this article I describe design criteria for bug handing from a global user community perspective. I also describe a distribution architecture for bug knowledge. The architecture focuses on bug awareness and bug visibility in the standard work environment. © 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 18.
    Berglund, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Designing electronic reference documentation for software component libraries2003In: Journal of Systems and Software, ISSN 0164-1212, E-ISSN 1873-1228, Vol. 68, no 1, p. 65-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Contemporary software development is based on global sharing of software component libraries. As a result, programmers spend much time reading reference documentation rather than writing code, making library reference documentation a central programming tool. Traditionally, reference documentation is designed for textbooks even though it may be distributed online. However, the computer provides new dimensions of change, evolution, and adaptation that can be utilized to support efficiency and quality in software development. What is difficult to determine is how the electronic text dimensions best can be utilized in library reference documentation.

    This article presents a study of the design of electronic reference documentation for software component libraries. Results are drawn from a study in an industrial environment based on the use of an experimental electronic reference documentation (called Dynamic Javadoc or DJavadoc) used in a real-work situation for 4 months. The results from interviews with programmers indicate that the electronic library reference documentation does not require adaptation or evolution on an individual level. More importantly, reference documentation should facilitate the transfer of code from documentation to source files and also support the integration of multiple documentation sources.

  • 19.
    Berglund, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Library Communication Among Programmers Worldwide2002Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Programmers worldwide share components and jointly develop components on a global scale in contemporary software development. An important aspect of such library-based programming is the need for technical communication with regard to libraries – library communication. As part of their work, programmers must discover, study, and learn as well as debate problems and future development. In this sense, the electronic, networked media has fundamentally changed programming by providing new mechanisms for communication and global interaction through global networks such as the Internet. Today, the baseline for library communication is hypertext documentation. Improvements in quality, efficiency, cost and frustration of the programming activity can be expected by further developments in the electronic aspects of library communication.

    This thesis addresses the use of the electronic networked medium in the activity of library communication and aims to discover design knowledge for communication tools and processes directed towards this particular area. A model of library communication is provided that describes interaction among programmer as webs of interrelated library communities. A discussion of electronic, networked tools and processes that match such a model is also provided. Furthermore, research results are provided from the design and industrial valuation

    of electronic reference documentation for the Java domain. Surprisingly, the evaluation did not support individual adaptation (personalization). Furthermore, global library communication processes have been studied in relation to open-source documentation and user-related bug handling. Open-source documentation projects are still relatively uncommon even in open-source software projects. User-related Open-source does not address the passive behavior users have towards bugs. Finally, the adaptive authoring process in electronic reference documentation is addressed and found to provide limited support for expressing the electronic, networked dimensions of authoring requiring programming skill by technical writers.

    Library communication is addressed here by providing engineering knowledge with regards to the construction of practical electronic, networked tools and processes in the area. Much of the work has been performed in relation to Java library communication and therefore the thesis has particular relevancefor the object-oriented programming domain. A practical contribution of the work is the DJavadoc tool that contributes to the development of reference documentation by providing adaptive Java reference documentation.

    List of papers
    1. Designing electronic reference documentation for software component libraries
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Designing electronic reference documentation for software component libraries
    2003 (English)In: Journal of Systems and Software, ISSN 0164-1212, E-ISSN 1873-1228, Vol. 68, no 1, p. 65-75Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Contemporary software development is based on global sharing of software component libraries. As a result, programmers spend much time reading reference documentation rather than writing code, making library reference documentation a central programming tool. Traditionally, reference documentation is designed for textbooks even though it may be distributed online. However, the computer provides new dimensions of change, evolution, and adaptation that can be utilized to support efficiency and quality in software development. What is difficult to determine is how the electronic text dimensions best can be utilized in library reference documentation.

    This article presents a study of the design of electronic reference documentation for software component libraries. Results are drawn from a study in an industrial environment based on the use of an experimental electronic reference documentation (called Dynamic Javadoc or DJavadoc) used in a real-work situation for 4 months. The results from interviews with programmers indicate that the electronic library reference documentation does not require adaptation or evolution on an individual level. More importantly, reference documentation should facilitate the transfer of code from documentation to source files and also support the integration of multiple documentation sources.

    Keywords
    Electronic documentation, Programming, Reference documentation
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology Computer Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13490 (URN)10.1016/S0164-1212(02)00136-X (DOI)
    Available from: 2002-10-20 Created: 2002-10-20 Last updated: 2018-01-13
    2. Helping Users Live With Bugs
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Helping Users Live With Bugs
    Manuscript (Other academic)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13491 (URN)
    Available from: 2002-10-20 Created: 2002-10-20 Last updated: 2010-01-13
    3. Open-Source Documentation: in search of user-driven, just-in-time writing
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Open-Source Documentation: in search of user-driven, just-in-time writing
    2001 (English)In: Proceedings of SIGDOC 2001, October 21– 24, 2001 in Santa Fe, NM, Santa Fee, NM: ACM , 2001, p. 132-141Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Iterative development models allow developers to respond quickly to changing user requirements, but place increasing demands on writers who must handle increasing amounts of change with ever-decreasing resources. In the software development world, one solution to this problem is open-source development: allowing the users to set requirements and priorities by actually contributing to the development of the software. This results in just-in-time software improvements that are explicitly user-driven, since they are actually developed by users.In this article we will discuss how the open source model can be extended to the development of documentation. In many open-source projects, the role of writer has remained unchanged: documentation development remains a specialized activity, owned by a single writer or group of writers, who work as best they can with key developers and frequently out-of-date specification documents. However, a potentially more rewarding approach is to open the development of the documentation to the same sort of community involvement that gives rise to the software: using forums and mailing lists as the tools for developing documentation, driven by debate and dialogue among the actual users and developers.Just as open-source development blurs the line between user and developer, open-source documentation will blur the line between reader and writer. Someone who is a novice reader in one area may be an expert author in another. Two key activities emerge for the technical writer in such a model: as gatekeeper and moderator for FAQs and formal documentation, and as literate expert user of the system they are documenting.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Santa Fee, NM: ACM, 2001
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology Computer Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13492 (URN)10.1145/501516.501543 (DOI)
    Conference
    SIGDOC 2001
    Available from: 2002-10-20 Created: 2002-10-20 Last updated: 2018-01-13
    4. Writing for Adaptable Documentation
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Writing for Adaptable Documentation
    2000 (English)In: Proceedings of IPCC/SIGDOC 2000, September 24 – 27, Cambridge, Massachusetts, IEEE , 2000, p. 497-508Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rapid development of reusable software components results in an information overload problem in the development process. Software developers must read large amounts of documentation. Adaptive documentation is one way to address this problem and support efficient reading. However, in our view, adaptive documentation requires a writing process that delivers the pedagogical strategies for adaptivity. The article takes a stance in a project on adaptive software reference documentation and discusses the requirements on writing. It also discusses writing trends and Web languages in relation to adaptivity. It is concluded that describing change in documentation is not supported on an authoring level but rather on a programming level

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    IEEE, 2000
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13493 (URN)10.1109/IPCC.2000.887306 (DOI)0-7803-6431-7 (ISBN)
    Conference
    2000 Joint IEEE International and 18th Annual Conference on Computer Documentation (IPCC/SIGDOC 2000) Professional Communication Conference, 24-27 September 2000, Cambridge, MA, UK
    Available from: 2002-10-20 Created: 2002-10-20 Last updated: 2015-04-09
    5. Dynamic Software Component Documentation
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dynamic Software Component Documentation
    2000 (English)In: Proceedings of the Second Workshop on Learning Software Organizations, in conjunction with the Second International Conference on Product Focused software Process Improvement June 20 2000, Oulu, Finland, 2000Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    National Category
    Computer Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13494 (URN)
    Conference
    The Second International Conference on Product Focused software Process Improvement, June 20 2000, Oulu, Finland
    Available from: 2002-10-20 Created: 2002-10-20 Last updated: 2018-01-13
    6. Intermediate Knowledge trough Conceptual Source-Code Organization
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intermediate Knowledge trough Conceptual Source-Code Organization
    1998 (English)In: Proceedings of the 10:th International Conference on Software Engineering and Knowledge Engineering, June 18-20 San Francisco Bay CA USA, San Diego: Knowledge Systems Institute , 1998, p. 112-115Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    San Diego: Knowledge Systems Institute, 1998
    National Category
    Computer Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13495 (URN)0-9641699-9-1 (ISBN)
    Conference
    10:th International Conference on Software Engineering and Knowledge Engineering
    Available from: 2002-10-20 Created: 2002-10-20 Last updated: 2018-01-13
  • 20.
    Berglund, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Use-Oriented Documentation in Software Development1999Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Software documentation is an important tool in modem component-based programming. Building software applications requires detailed knowledge about a vast number of components and the structures they form. This knowledge is often acquired by reading reference documentation of application-programming interfaces (APIs). Thus, the design of the API reference documentation and its reading support affect the cost and quality of software development.

    We examine how efficiency and quality in software development can be increased through the design of software documentation and reading support for software documentation. The thesis reports on the DJavadoc project and the reading support for online Java API reference documentation that it provides. The Java API reference documentation can be viewed as a collection of documentation designed for multiple needs. As a consequence, ex:cessive information is present in most situations. In DJavadoc we have extended the official Java API reference documentation to achieve control over the visibility of information types. DJavadoc adds client-side, real-time redesign to the documentation to support the design of multiple views. As a result, the reader may further design views of the information that are more in line with the reader's personal and changing needs. In the thesis we also discuss online API reference documentation and its role in programming.

    Our preliminary studies support the design strategy taken in DJavadoc. The DJavadoc architecture has also proven suitable for continuos redesign of online documentation. Furthermore, our work provides several future research directions for software documentation and communication of functionality. The Javadoc approach can be developed to achieve more use-oriented documentation. However, the need of use-oriented documentation may also have impact on the Java programming language and ultimately object orientation.

  • 21.
    Berglund, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Writing for Adaptable Documentation2000In: Proceedings of IPCC/SIGDOC 2000, September 24 – 27, Cambridge, Massachusetts, IEEE , 2000, p. 497-508Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rapid development of reusable software components results in an information overload problem in the development process. Software developers must read large amounts of documentation. Adaptive documentation is one way to address this problem and support efficient reading. However, in our view, adaptive documentation requires a writing process that delivers the pedagogical strategies for adaptivity. The article takes a stance in a project on adaptive software reference documentation and discusses the requirements on writing. It also discusses writing trends and Web languages in relation to adaptivity. It is concluded that describing change in documentation is not supported on an authoring level but rather on a programming level

  • 22.
    Berglund, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Distributed Interactive Simulation for Group-Distance Exercises on the Web1998In: 1998 International Conference on Web-based Modelling Simulation,1998, San Diego, CA: Society for Computer Simulation International , 1998, p. 91-95Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Berglund, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Dynamic Software Component Documentation2000In: Proceedings of the Second Workshop on Learning Software Organizations, in conjunction with the Second International Conference on Product Focused software Process Improvement June 20 2000, Oulu, Finland, 2000Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Berglund, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Intermediate Knowledge trough Conceptual Source-Code Organization1998In: Proceedings of the 10:th International Conference on Software Engineering and Knowledge Engineering, June 18-20 San Francisco Bay CA USA, San Diego: Knowledge Systems Institute , 1998, p. 112-115Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Berglund, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Priestley, Michael
    IBM Toronto Lab, Canada.
    Open-Source Documentation: in search of user-driven, just-in-time writing2001In: Proceedings of SIGDOC 2001, October 21– 24, 2001 in Santa Fe, NM, Santa Fee, NM: ACM , 2001, p. 132-141Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Iterative development models allow developers to respond quickly to changing user requirements, but place increasing demands on writers who must handle increasing amounts of change with ever-decreasing resources. In the software development world, one solution to this problem is open-source development: allowing the users to set requirements and priorities by actually contributing to the development of the software. This results in just-in-time software improvements that are explicitly user-driven, since they are actually developed by users.In this article we will discuss how the open source model can be extended to the development of documentation. In many open-source projects, the role of writer has remained unchanged: documentation development remains a specialized activity, owned by a single writer or group of writers, who work as best they can with key developers and frequently out-of-date specification documents. However, a potentially more rewarding approach is to open the development of the documentation to the same sort of community involvement that gives rise to the software: using forums and mailing lists as the tools for developing documentation, driven by debate and dialogue among the actual users and developers.Just as open-source development blurs the line between user and developer, open-source documentation will blur the line between reader and writer. Someone who is a novice reader in one area may be an expert author in another. Two key activities emerge for the technical writer in such a model: as gatekeeper and moderator for FAQs and formal documentation, and as literate expert user of the system they are documenting.

  • 26.
    Blomkvist, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Conceptualising Prototypes in Service Design2010Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    To date, service prototyping has been discussed academically as an unproblematic add-on to existing prototyping techniques, or as methods for prototyping social interaction. In fact, most of the knowledge on how services are prototyped comes from organisations and practicing design consultants. Some attempts to define service prototyping have been made but generally without concern about how complete service experiences should or could be represented. Building on existing knowledge about prototyping, a draft of a service prototyping conceptualisation is generated. Based on the draft, the question of how to prototype holistic service experiences is raised and in total, 5 studies have been conducted that contribute knowledge to that overarching question. In addition, each study has its own research question. Study 1 conceptualises prototypes and prototyping in a framework while study 2 and 3 looks at what practicing service designers say they do to prototype services and how they involve different stakeholders in the process. Study 4 examines aspects of design communication and how service experiences are communicated and used during design meetings, and study 5 finally, attempts to generate a process that can be used to evaluate the impact of location oriented service prototypes in e.g. healthcare settings. A number of challenges for service prototyping are identified in the studies, along with the issue of who authors prototypes. The conceptualisation of prototyping is adjusted based on the studies and a framework is constructed that support the conceptualisation. Little evidence for holistic approaches to prototyping services is found in the interviews and service designers involve their clients primarily when prototyping. Service experiences are introduced in communication using a format termed micro-narratives. This format and the purpose of using references to previous experiences are discussed. The thesis is concluded with a suggestion of a process for service prototyping. This process is specific for service design and attempts to support service designers in making holistic service representations when prototyping. Service prototyping requires further research.

  • 27.
    Borg, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, PELAB - Programming Environment Laboratory. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Yong, Angela
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, PELAB - Programming Environment Laboratory. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Carlshamre, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDA - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sandahl, Kristian
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, PELAB - Programming Environment Laboratory. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    The Bad Conscience of Requirements Engineering: An Investigation in Real-World Treatment of Non-Functional Requirements2003In: Third Conference on Software Engineering Research and Practice in Sweden (SERPS'03), Lund, 2003, p. 1-8Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Even though non-functional requirements (NFRs) are critical in order to provide software of good quality, the literature of NFRs is relatively sparse. We describe how NFRs are treated in two development organizations, an Ericsson application center and the IT department of the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute. We have interviewed professionals about problems they face and their ideas on how to improve the situation. Both organizations are aware of NFRs and related problems but their main focus is on functional requirements,primarily because existing methods focus on these. The most tangible problems experienced are that many NFRs remain undiscovered and that NFRs are stated in non-measurable terms. It became clear that the size andstructure of the organization require proper distribution of employees’ interest, authority and competence of NFRs. We argue that a feasible solution might be to strengthen the position of architectural requirements, which are more likely to emphasize NFRs.

  • 28.
    Broms, Loove
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sustainable Interactions: Studies in the Design of Energy Awareness Artefacts2011Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis presents a collection of experimental designs that approach the problem of growing electricity consumption in homes. From the perspective of design, the intention has been to critically explore the design space of energy awareness artefacts to reinstate awareness of energy use in everyday practice. The design experiments were used as vehicles for thinking about the relationship between physical form, interaction, and social practice. The rationale behind the concepts was based on a small-scale ethnography, situated interviews, and design experience. Moreover, the thesis compares designer intention and actual user experiences of a prototype that was installed in nine homes in a residential area in Stockholm for three months. This was done in order to elicit tacit knowledge about how the concept was used in real-world domestic settings, to challenge everyday routines, and to enable both users and designers to critically reflect on artefacts and practices.

    From a design perspective, contributions include design approaches to communicating energy use: visualizations for showing relationships between behaviour and electricity consumption, shapes and forms to direct action, means for turning restrictions caused by energy conservation into central parts of the product experience, and ways to promote sustainable behaviour with positive driving forces based on user lifestyles.

    The general results indicate that inclusion is of great importance when designing energy awareness artefacts; all members of the household should be able to access, interact with, and reflect on their energy use. Therefore, design-related aspects such as placement and visibility, as well as how the artefact might affect the social interactions in the home,  become central. Additionally, the thesis argues that these types of artefacts can potentially create awareness accompanied by negative results such as stress. A challenge for the designer is to create artefacts that communicate and direct energy use in ways that are attractive and can be accepted by all household members as a possible way of life.

    List of papers
    1. Persuasive Engagement: Exploiting lifestyle as a driving force to promoteenergy-aware use patterns and behaviours
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Persuasive Engagement: Exploiting lifestyle as a driving force to promoteenergy-aware use patterns and behaviours
    2008 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Electricity consumption has been rising significantly in the western world the last decades and this affect the environment negatively. Efficient use and more energy conservative usage patterns could be ways to approach this problem. However, electricity has for a long time actively been hidden away and it is rarely thought of unless it ceases to exist. From the perspective of critical design, we have been working to find methods to visualise electricity and electricity consumption in everyday life to promote environmentally positive behavioural change. In this paper, we are looking at how aspects of lifestyles can be used in design as central driving forces that could lead to changed behaviour. Attempts to promote behavioural changes related to energy consumption might be successfully carried out when people are offered desirable alternatives that are engaging and that do not impose a perceived extra burden in their everyday life. This argument is exemplified through two design concepts, the AWARE Laundry Lamp and the Energy Plant, which are examples on how to increase people’s energy awareness and offer them means for reducing their energy consumption in the home. Both prototypes are inspired by current trends in lifestyle as well as actual observed user behaviour.

    Keywords
    Interaction Design; Sustainable Design; Energy; Lifestyle; Persuasive Design
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-67462 (URN)
    Conference
    Design Research Society International Conference 2008 (DRS2008), 16–19 July 2008, Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield, United Kingdom
    Available from: 2011-04-13 Created: 2011-04-13 Last updated: 2011-04-13Bibliographically approved
    2. The Energy AWARE Clock: Incorporating Electricity Use in the Social Interactions of Everyday Life
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Energy AWARE Clock: Incorporating Electricity Use in the Social Interactions of Everyday Life
    2009 (English)In: Proceedings of the 6th International Symposium on Environmentally Conscious Design andInverse Manufacturing (EcoDesign 2009), 2009Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    New interfaces to the energy system can facilitate changes of habits and provide means to control the household’s use of energy. In this paper, we look at energy use and such interfaces in the home from a socio-technical perspective. We describe how interviews and user observations can be used in combination with the theory of domestication to inform and inspire the design of interfaces to the energy system. As a result of our approach, we present the Energy AWARE Clock, an example of a new type of electricity meter that challenges the norm of how the electricity system is typically represented in the home. The Energy AWARE Clock makes use of a clock metaphor to vi sualise electricity-use in relation to time in everyday life. Energy-awareness products always challenge domestic social patterns and it is important to consider these aspects in the design process to find successful solutions for the future.

    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-67463 (URN)
    Conference
    6th International Symposium on Environmentally Conscious Design and Inverse Manufacturing (EcoDesign 2009), 7–9 December 2009, Sapporo, Japan
    Available from: 2011-04-13 Created: 2011-04-13 Last updated: 2011-05-02
    3. Coffee Maker Patterns and the Design of Energy Feedback Artefacts
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Coffee Maker Patterns and the Design of Energy Feedback Artefacts
    Show others...
    2010 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Smart electricity meters and home displays are being installed in people’s homes with the assumption that households will make the necessary efforts to reduce their electricity consumption. However, present solutions do not sufficiently account for the social implications of design. There is a potential for greater savings if we can better understand how such designs affect behaviour. In this paper, we describe our design of an energy awareness artefact – the Energy AWARE Clock – and discuss it in relation to behavioural processes in the home. A user study is carried out to study the deployment of the prototype in real domestic contexts for three months. Results indicate that the Energy AWARE Clock played a significant role in drawing households’ attention to their electricity use. It became a natural part of the house hold and conceptions of electricity became naturalized into informants’ everyday language.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    New York, USA: ACM, 2010
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-67466 (URN)10.1145/1858171.1858191 (DOI)978-1-4503-0103-9 (ISBN)
    Conference
    ACM Designing Interactive Systems Conference (DIS2010), 8–20 August 2010. Åhus, Denmark
    Available from: 2011-04-13 Created: 2011-04-13 Last updated: 2014-09-24Bibliographically approved
  • 29.
    Broms, Loove
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Bång, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ilstedt Hejlm, Sara
    Product and Service Design, Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan, Stockholm.
    Persuasive Engagement: Exploiting lifestyle as a driving force to promoteenergy-aware use patterns and behaviours2008Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Electricity consumption has been rising significantly in the western world the last decades and this affect the environment negatively. Efficient use and more energy conservative usage patterns could be ways to approach this problem. However, electricity has for a long time actively been hidden away and it is rarely thought of unless it ceases to exist. From the perspective of critical design, we have been working to find methods to visualise electricity and electricity consumption in everyday life to promote environmentally positive behavioural change. In this paper, we are looking at how aspects of lifestyles can be used in design as central driving forces that could lead to changed behaviour. Attempts to promote behavioural changes related to energy consumption might be successfully carried out when people are offered desirable alternatives that are engaging and that do not impose a perceived extra burden in their everyday life. This argument is exemplified through two design concepts, the AWARE Laundry Lamp and the Energy Plant, which are examples on how to increase people’s energy awareness and offer them means for reducing their energy consumption in the home. Both prototypes are inspired by current trends in lifestyle as well as actual observed user behaviour.

  • 30.
    Broms, Loove
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ehrnberger, Karin
    Maskinkonstruktion, Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan, Stocholm.
    Ilstedt Hejlm, Sara
    Product and Service Design, Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan, Stockholm.
    Bång, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    The Energy AWARE Clock: Incorporating Electricity Use in the Social Interactions of Everyday Life2009In: Proceedings of the 6th International Symposium on Environmentally Conscious Design andInverse Manufacturing (EcoDesign 2009), 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    New interfaces to the energy system can facilitate changes of habits and provide means to control the household’s use of energy. In this paper, we look at energy use and such interfaces in the home from a socio-technical perspective. We describe how interviews and user observations can be used in combination with the theory of domestication to inform and inspire the design of interfaces to the energy system. As a result of our approach, we present the Energy AWARE Clock, an example of a new type of electricity meter that challenges the norm of how the electricity system is typically represented in the home. The Energy AWARE Clock makes use of a clock metaphor to vi sualise electricity-use in relation to time in everyday life. Energy-awareness products always challenge domestic social patterns and it is important to consider these aspects in the design process to find successful solutions for the future.

  • 31.
    Broms, Loove
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Katzeff, Cecilia
    Interactive Institute, Kista, Sweden.
    Bång, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nyblom, Åsa
    School of Architecture and the Built Environment, Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan, Stockholm.
    Ilstedt Hjelm, Sara
    Product and Service Design, Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan, Stockholm.
    Ehrnberger, Karin
    Maskinkonstruktion, Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan, Stocholm.
    Coffee Maker Patterns and the Design of Energy Feedback Artefacts2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Smart electricity meters and home displays are being installed in people’s homes with the assumption that households will make the necessary efforts to reduce their electricity consumption. However, present solutions do not sufficiently account for the social implications of design. There is a potential for greater savings if we can better understand how such designs affect behaviour. In this paper, we describe our design of an energy awareness artefact – the Energy AWARE Clock – and discuss it in relation to behavioural processes in the home. A user study is carried out to study the deployment of the prototype in real domestic contexts for three months. Results indicate that the Energy AWARE Clock played a significant role in drawing households’ attention to their electricity use. It became a natural part of the house hold and conceptions of electricity became naturalized into informants’ everyday language.

  • 32.
    Bång, Magnus
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    A Ubiquitous Computing Approach to Support Safe Routines in an Emergency Room.2004In: the Second International Conference on IT in Healthcare ITHC 2004,2004, Portland,OR,USA: OHSU , 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Bång, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Arvola, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Cognitive ergonomics of digital desks for healthcare teams: A set of interaction techniques2007In: Work with Computer Systems, Stockholm, May 21-24, 2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The clinician workstation and electronic medial record software (EMR) have been criticised on several accounts. The terminal with its single keyboard, mouse and small display is developed solely for one person work and this setup makes it impractical for multiple data input and for face-to-face collaboration which is so common in clinical environments.

  • 34.
    Bång, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Lindqvist, K
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, FHVC - Folkhälsovetenskapligt centrum.
    An approach to context-sensitive medical applications1999In: JAMIA Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, ISSN 1067-5027, E-ISSN 1527-974X, p. 1017-1017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Bång, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Larsson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Berglund, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Distributed user interfaces for clinical ubiquitous computing applications2005In: International Journal of Medical Informatics, ISSN 1386-5056, E-ISSN 1872-8243, Vol. 74, no 7-8, p. 545-551Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Ubiquitous computing with multiple interaction devices requires new interface models that support user-specific modifications to applications and facilitate the fast development of active workspaces.

    Methods: We have developed NOSTOS, a computer-augmented work environment for clinical personnel to explore new user interface paradigms for ubiquitous computing. NOSTOS uses several devices such as digital pens, an active desk, and walk-up displays that allow the system to track documents and activities in the workplace.

    Results: We present the distributed user interface (DUI) model that allows standalone applications to distribute their user interface components to several devices dynamically at run-time. This mechanism permit clinicians to develop their own user interfaces and forms to clinical information systems to match their specific needs. We discuss the underlying technical concepts of DUIs and show how service discovery, component distribution, events and layout management are dealt with in the NOSTOS system.

    Conclusion: Our results suggest that DUIs - and similar network-based user interfaces - will be a prerequisite of future mobile user interfaces and essential to develop clinical multi-device environments. © 2005 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 36.
    Bång, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Ubiquitous computing to support co-located clinical teams: Using the semiotics of physical objects in system design2007In: International Journal of Medical Informatics, ISSN 1386-5056, E-ISSN 1872-8243, Vol. 76, no SUPPL. 1, p. 58-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Co-located teams often use material objects to communicate messages in collaboration. Modern desktop computing systems with abstract graphical user interface (GUIs) fail to support this material dimension of inter-personal communication. The aim of this study is to investigate how tangible user interfaces can be used in computer systems to better support collaborative routines among co-located clinical teams. Methods: The semiotics of physical objects used in team collaboration was analyzed from data collected during 1 month of observations at an emergency room. The resulting set of communication patterns was used as a framework when designing an experimental system. Following the principles of augmented reality, physical objects were mapped into a physical user interface with the goal of maintaining the symbolic value of those objects. Results: NOSTOS is an experimental ubiquitous computing environment that takes advantage of interaction devices integrated into the traditional clinical environment, including digital pens, walk-up displays, and a digital desk. The design uses familiar workplace tools to function as user interfaces to the computer in order to exploit established cognitive and collaborative routines. Conclusion: Paper-based tangible user interfaces and digital desks are promising technologies for co-located clinical teams. A key issue that needs to be solved before employing such solutions in practice is associated with limited feedback from the passive paper interfaces. © 2006 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 37.
    Bång, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Holm, Einar
    Nordin, Conny
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Psychiatry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Mobile phone computing for in-situ cognitive-behavioral therapy2007In: MedINFO 2007,2007, IOS Press, 2007, p. 1078-1082Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for psychological disorders is becoming increasingly popular on the Internet. However when using this workstation approach, components such as training and learning relaxation skills, problem solving, exposure exercises, and sleep management guidance must be done in the domestic environment. This paper describes design concepts for providing spatially explicit CBT with mobile phones. We reviewed and analyzed a set of treatment manuals to distinguish elements of CBT that can be improved and supported using mobile phone applications. The key advantage of mobile computing support in CBT is that multimedia can be applied to record, scale, and label anxiety-provoking situations where the need arises, which helps the CBT clients formulate and convey their thoughts and feelings to relatives and friends, as well as to therapists at subsequent treatment sessions.

  • 38.
    Bång, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Torstensson, Carin
    Interactive Institute, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Katzeff, Cecilia
    Interactive Institute, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    The PowerHouse: A Persuasive Computer Game Designed to Raise Awareness of Domestic Energy Consumption2006In: Persuasive Technology: First International Conference on Persuasive Technology for Human Well-Being, PERSUASIVE 2006, Eindhoven, The Netherlands, May 18-19, 2006. Proceedings / [ed] Wijnand A. IJsselsteijn, Yvonne A. W. de Kort, Cees Midden, Berry Eggen, Elise van den Hoven, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2006, p. 123-132Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

      Persuasive technologies can be useful to modify behaviors related to energy usage. In this paper, we present the PowerHouse a computer game designed to influence behaviors associated with energy use and promote an energy-aware lifestyle among teenagers. This prototype game aims to influence a set of target activities in the home using several persuasive techniques. Employing the format of a reality TV show (docu soap), the game informs implicitly and explicitly about various energy-efficient actions. We discuss our overall game design and its advantages and disadvantages in relation to the methods we have employed in the game.

  • 39.
    Carlshamre, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A usability perspective on requirements engineering: from methodology to product development2001Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Usability is one of the most important aspects of software. A multitude of methods and techniques intended to support the development of usable systems has been provided, but the impact on industrial software development has been limited. One of the reasons for this limited success is the gap between traditional academic theory generation and commercial practice. Another reason is the gap between usability engineering and established requirements engineering practice. This thesis is based on empirical research and puts a usability focus on three important aspects of requirements engineering: elicitation, specification and release planning.

    There are two main themes of investigation. The first is concerned with the development and introduction of a usability-oriented method for elicitation and specification of requirements, with an explicit focus on utilizing the skills of technical communicators. This longitudinal, qualitative study, performed in an industrial setting in the first half of the nineties, provides ample evidence in favor of a closer collaboration between technical communicators and system developers. It also provides support for the benefits of a task-oriented approach to requirements elicitation. The results are also reflected upon in a retrospective paper, and the experiences point in the direction of an increased focus on the specification part, in order to bridge the gap between usability engineering and established requirements management practice.

    The second represents a usability-oriented approach to understanding and supporting release planning in software product development. Release planning is an increasingly important part of requirements engineering, and it is complicated by intricate dependencies between requirements. A survey performed at five different companies gave an understanding of the nature and frequency of these interdependencies. This knowledge was then turned into the design and implementation of a support tool, with the purpose of provoking a deeper understanding of the release planning task. This was done through a series of cooperative evaluation sessions with release planning experts. The results indicate that, although the tool was considered useful by the experts, the initial understanding of the task was overly simplistic. As a result, a number of design implications are proposed.

    List of papers
    1. Technical Communicators and System Developers Collaborating in Usability-Oriented Systems Development: Case Study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Technical Communicators and System Developers Collaborating in Usability-Oriented Systems Development: Case Study
    1994 (English)In: In Proc. 12th ACM Annual International Conference on Systems Documentation (SIGDOC'94), 1994, p. 200-207Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13478 (URN)
    Available from: 2002-01-24 Created: 2002-01-24 Last updated: 2009-02-09
    2. A Usability-Oriented Approach to Requirements Engineering
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Usability-Oriented Approach to Requirements Engineering
    1996 (English)In: In Proc. 2nd IEEE International Conference on Requirements Engineering (ICRE´96), p. 145-152Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13479 (URN)
    Available from: 2002-01-24 Created: 2002-01-24
    3. Dissemination of Usability: The Failure of a Success Story
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dissemination of Usability: The Failure of a Success Story
    2000 (English)In: ACM interactions, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 31–41-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13480 (URN)
    Available from: 2002-01-24 Created: 2002-01-24
    4. Requirements Lifecycle Management and Release Planning in Market-Driven Requirements Engineering Processes
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Requirements Lifecycle Management and Release Planning in Market-Driven Requirements Engineering Processes
    2000 (English)In: Proc. IEEE Int. Workshop on the Requirements Engineering Process. In Proc. 11th Int. Conf. on Data-base and Expert Systems Application (DEXA2000), IEEE , 2000, p. 961-965Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    IEEE, 2000
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13481 (URN)10.1109/DEXA.2000.875142 (DOI)0-7695-0680-1 (ISBN)
    Conference
    11th International Workshop on Database and Expert Systems Applications, 4-8 September 2000, London, UK
    Available from: 2002-01-24 Created: 2002-01-24 Last updated: 2015-03-16
    5. An Industrial Survey of Requirements Interdependencies in Software Product Release Planning
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>An Industrial Survey of Requirements Interdependencies in Software Product Release Planning
    Show others...
    2001 (English)In: In Proc. Fifth IEEE Int. Symposium on Requirements Engineering (RE'01), IEEE , 2001, p. 84-91Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The task of finding an optimal selection of requirements for the next release of a software system is difficult as requirements may depend on each other in complex ways. The paper presents the results from an in-depth study of the interdependencies within 5 distinct sets of requirements, each including 20 high-priority requirements of 5 distinct products from 5 different companies. The results show that: (1) roughly 20% of the requirements are responsible for 75% of the interdependencies; (2) only a few requirements are singular; (3) customer-specific bespoke development tend to include more functionality- related dependencies whereas market-driven product development have an emphasis on value-related dependencies. Several strategies for reducing the effort needed for identifying and managing interdependencies are outlined. A technique for visualization of interdependencies with the aim of supporting release planning is also discussed. The complexity of requirements interdependency analysis is studied in relation to metrics of requirements coupling. Finally, a number of issues for further research are identified

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    IEEE, 2001
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13482 (URN)10.1109/ISRE.2001.948547 (DOI)0-7695-1125-2 (ISBN)
    Conference
    Fifth IEEE International Symposium on Requirements Engineering, 27-31 August 2001, Toronto, Canada
    Available from: 2002-01-24 Created: 2002-01-24 Last updated: 2015-05-06
    6. Release Planning in Market-Driven Software Product Development: Provoking an Understanding
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Release Planning in Market-Driven Software Product Development: Provoking an Understanding
    2002 (English)In: Requirements Engineering, ISSN 0947-3602, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 139-151Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In market-driven software development, release planning is one of the most critical tasks. Selecting a subset of requirements for realisation in a certain release is as complex as it is important for the success of a software product. Despite this, the literature provides little information on how release planning is done in practice. We designed, implemented and evaluated a support tool for release planning as a means for provoking a rich understanding of the task of release planning. The tool utilises a selection algorithm which, based on value, resource estimate and interdependencies, presents a number of valid and good release suggestions. The initial attempt at supporting release planning proved to be based on an overly simplistic and structuralistic view. The results provide ample evidence that the task could be characterised as a wicked problem, which in turn has several implications for the support needed. Although the provotype could indeed support the planner, in its current version it has several serious shortcomings related to the degree of interactivity, underlying models, presentation of information and general appearance. A rich description of the task of release planning is provided. Based on these findings, a list of design implications is proposed, which is intended to guide the future design of a support tool for release planning.  

    Keywords
    Pragmatic algorithm, Provotype, Release planning, Requirements coupling, Requirements interdependencies, Wicked problem
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13483 (URN)10.1007/s007660200010 (DOI)
    Available from: 2002-01-24 Created: 2002-01-24
  • 40.
    Carlshamre, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDA. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Release Planning in Market-Driven Software Product Development: Provoking an Understanding2002In: Requirements Engineering, ISSN 0947-3602, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 139-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In market-driven software development, release planning is one of the most critical tasks. Selecting a subset of requirements for realisation in a certain release is as complex as it is important for the success of a software product. Despite this, the literature provides little information on how release planning is done in practice. We designed, implemented and evaluated a support tool for release planning as a means for provoking a rich understanding of the task of release planning. The tool utilises a selection algorithm which, based on value, resource estimate and interdependencies, presents a number of valid and good release suggestions. The initial attempt at supporting release planning proved to be based on an overly simplistic and structuralistic view. The results provide ample evidence that the task could be characterised as a wicked problem, which in turn has several implications for the support needed. Although the provotype could indeed support the planner, in its current version it has several serious shortcomings related to the degree of interactivity, underlying models, presentation of information and general appearance. A rich description of the task of release planning is provided. Based on these findings, a list of design implications is proposed, which is intended to guide the future design of a support tool for release planning.  

  • 41.
    Carlshamre, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDA. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Technical Communicators and System Developers Collaborating in Usability-Oriented Systems Development: Case Study1994In: In Proc. 12th ACM Annual International Conference on Systems Documentation (SIGDOC'94), 1994, p. 200-207Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Carlshamre, Pär
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDA. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Rantzer, Martin
    Dissemination of Usability: The Failure of a Success Story2000In: ACM interactions, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 31–41-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Carlshamre, Pär
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Regnell, Björn
    Requirements Lifecycle Management and Release Planning in Market-Driven Requirements Engineering Processes2000In: Proc. IEEE Int. Workshop on the Requirements Engineering Process. In Proc. 11th Int. Conf. on Data-base and Expert Systems Application (DEXA2000), IEEE , 2000, p. 961-965Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Carlshamre, Pär
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sandahl, Kristian
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, PELAB - Programming Environment Laboratory. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lindvall, Mikael
    Regnell, Björn
    Natt och Dag, Johan
    An Industrial Survey of Requirements Interdependencies in Software Product Release Planning2001In: In Proc. Fifth IEEE Int. Symposium on Requirements Engineering (RE'01), IEEE , 2001, p. 84-91Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The task of finding an optimal selection of requirements for the next release of a software system is difficult as requirements may depend on each other in complex ways. The paper presents the results from an in-depth study of the interdependencies within 5 distinct sets of requirements, each including 20 high-priority requirements of 5 distinct products from 5 different companies. The results show that: (1) roughly 20% of the requirements are responsible for 75% of the interdependencies; (2) only a few requirements are singular; (3) customer-specific bespoke development tend to include more functionality- related dependencies whereas market-driven product development have an emphasis on value-related dependencies. Several strategies for reducing the effort needed for identifying and managing interdependencies are outlined. A technique for visualization of interdependencies with the aim of supporting release planning is also discussed. The complexity of requirements interdependency analysis is studied in relation to metrics of requirements coupling. Finally, a number of issues for further research are identified

  • 45.
    Cockburn, A.
    et al.
    Computer Science, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand.
    Kristensson, Per-Ola
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Alexander, J.
    Computer Science, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand.
    Zhai, S.
    IBM Almaden Research Center, 650 Harry Road, NWE-B2, San Jose, CA 95120, United States.
    Hard lessons: Effort-inducing interfaces benefit spatial learning2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interface designers normally strive for a design that minimises the user's effort. However, when the design's objective is to train users to interact with interfaces that are highly dependent on spatial properties (e.g. keypad layout or gesture shapes) we contend that designers should consider explicitly increasing the mental effort of interaction. To test the hypothesis that effort aids spatial memory, we designed a "frost-brushing" interface that forces the user to mentally retrieve spatial information, or to physically brush away the frost to obtain visual guidance. We report results from two experiments using virtual keypad interfaces - the first concerns spatial location learning of buttons on the keypad, and the second concerns both location and trajectory learning of gesture shape. The results support our hypothesis, showing that the frost-brushing design improved spatial learning. The participants' subjective responses emphasised the connections between effort, engagement, boredom, frustration, and enjoyment, suggesting that effort requires careful parameterisation to maximise its effectiveness. Copyright 2007 ACM.

  • 46.
    Demiris, G.
    et al.
    University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States.
    Afrin, L.B.
    Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, United States.
    Speedie, S.
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, United States.
    Courtney, K.L.
    University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States.
    Sondhi, M.
    Health Care Analytics Group, Boston, MA, United States.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Lovis, C.
    University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Goossen, W.
    Results4Care, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Lynch, C.
    University of California, Davis, Davis, CA, United States.
    Patient-centered Applications: Use of Information Technology to Promote Disease Management and Wellness. A White Paper by the AMIA Knowledge in Motion Working Group2008In: JAMIA Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, ISSN 1067-5027, E-ISSN 1527-974X, Vol. 15, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Advances in information technology (IT) enable a fundamental redesign of health care processes based on the use and integration of electronic communication at all levels. New communication technologies can support a transition from institution centric to patient-centric applications. This white paper defines key principles and challenges for designers, policy makers, and evaluators of patient-centered technologies for disease management and prevention. It reviews current and emerging trends, highlights challenges related to design, evaluation, reimbursement and usability, and reaches conclusions for next steps that will advance the domain. © 2008 J Am Med Inform Assoc.

  • 47.
    Dinka, David
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Role and identity: experience of technology in professional settings2005Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to make technology easier to handle for its users, the field of Human-Computer Interaction is increasingly dependent on an understanding of the individual user and the context of use. By investigating the relation between the user and the technology, this thesis explores how roles and professional identity affect and interact with the design, use and views of the technology used.

    By studies in two different domains, involving clinical medicine and media production respectively, professional identities were related to attitudes towards technology and ways of using computer-based tools. In the clinical setting, neurosurgeons and physicists using the Leksell GammaKnife for neurosurgical dose planning were studied. In the media setting, the introduction of new media technology to journalists was in focus. The data collection includes interviews, observations and participatory design oriented workshops. The data collected were analyzed with qualitative methods inspired by grounded theory.

    In the study of the Leksell GammaKnife two different approaches towards the work, the tool and development activities were identified depending on the professional identity. Depending on if the user was a neurosurgeon or a physicist, the user's identity or professional background has a significant impact both on how he or she views his or her role in the clinical setting, and on how he or she defines what improvements are necessary and general safety issues. In the case of the media production tool, the study involved a participatory design development process. Here it was shown that both the identities and the roles possessed by individual participants affect how they want to use new technology for different tasks.

  • 48.
    Dinka, David
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDA - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Role, Identity and Work: Extending the design and development agenda2006Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to make technology easier to handle for its users, the field of HCI (Human- Computer Interaction) has recently often turned the environment and the context of use. In this thesis the focus is on the relation between the user and the technology. More specifically, this thesis explores how roles and professional identity effects the use and views of the technology used. The exploration includes two different domains, a clinical setting and a media production setting, where the focus is on the clinical setting. These are domains that have strong professional identities in common, in the clinical setting neurosurgeons and physicists, and the media setting journalists. These settings also have a strong technological profile, in the clinical setting the focus has been on a specific neurosurgical tool called Leksell GammaKnife and in the journalistic setting the introduction of new media technology in general has been in focus. The data collection includes interviews, observations and participatory design oriented workshops. The data collected were analyzed with qualitative methods inspired by grounded theory. The work with the Leksell GammaKnife showed that there were two different approaches towards the work, the tool and development, depending on the work identity. Depending on if the user were a neurosurgeon or a physicist, the definition of the work preformed was inline with their identity, even if the task preformed was the same. When it comes to the media production tool, the focus of the study was a participatory design oriented development process. The outcome of the process turned out to be oriented towards the objectives that were inline with the users identity, more than with the task that were to be preformed. At some level, even the task was defined from the user dentity.

  • 49.
    Dinka, David
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, ASLAB - Application Systems Laboratory. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ingmarsson, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ambient Intelligence at Home2003Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 50.
    Dinka, David
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lundberg, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDI - Interaction and Service Design Research Group. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Identity and role-A qualitative case study of cooperative scenario building2006In: International journal of human-computer studies, ISSN 1071-5819, E-ISSN 1095-9300, Vol. 64, no 10, p. 1049-1060Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we argue that users participating in the design process will form the participation as a function of their professional role, but also as a function of their identity more or less independent from their role. In order to get the full potential of cooperative design the user identity in general and in this case their attitudes towards technology in particular should be incorporated into the design process. This case study consists of participatory design sessions with two different organizations, in the context of a media production tool development project. Facilitator skills, and workshop interventions to balance attitudes and to take them into account in design are discussed. Furthermore, we argue that attitudes will affect a subsequent implementation of a technical system, and that knowledge about stakeholder identity can be useful for further design activities and for planning system implementation. © 2006.

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