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  • 1.
    Abouzeedan, Adli
    et al.
    Innovation and Entrepreneurship, Department of Medicine Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Göteborg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Hedner, Thomas
    Innovation and Entrepreneurship, Department of Medicine Sahlgrenska Academy, University of.
    Klofsten, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, HELIX Competence Centre.
    Innovation and entrepreneurship – new themes for new times2010In: Annals of Innovation & Entrepreneurship, ISSN 2000-7396, E-ISSN 2000-7396, ISSN ISSN 2000-7396, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 1-3Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Throughout history, innovators and entrepreneurs have had a tremendous impact on development, exploration, trade, education, science, and integration. During the 20th century, innovation and entrepre-neurship have been regarded as key drivers in technological progress and productivity development worldwide. New radical innovations from new fields of knowledge such as information and communication technologies and biotechnology have emerged to influence everyday life for most people. Realizing this, policy makers as well as individuals argue that innovative and entrepreneurial change processes need to be further implemented on the micro as well as macro levels in society (Abouzeedan, Busler, & Hedner, 2009; Busenitz, Gomez, & Spencer, 2000). The study of innovation is therefore likely to be an increasingly important topic in, for example, economics, business, entrepreneurship, tech-nology, engineering, medicine, environmental biology, sociology, design, and reregional development (cf. Etzkowitz & Klofsten, 2005).

  • 2.
    Abouzeedan, Adli
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Klofsten, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hedner, Thomas
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Analysis of a Swedish High Technology SME Using the Survival Index Value (SIV) Model2011In: Paper Sessions, Workshops and Special Meetings: The 56th ICSB World Conference, Stockholm, Sweden, 15th and 18th of June, ICSB , 2011, p. 170-179Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the major deficiencies in the existing Small and Medium-sized Enterprises’ (SMEs) performance evaluation models is the fact that they lack a clear coupling to the issue of innovation and its impact on performance. A possible candidate model which could achieve this is the Survival Index Value (SIV) model. The model has a parameter incorporated in its structure, the technology-intake. This parameter can be used as an indicator of the degree of innovativeness of the firm. Previous works using the model looked at general performance without specific focus on innovation activities of the firm and without relating that to aspects of survival and growth. In this paper the aim was to demonstrate the ability of the SIV model to indicate a positive overall performance due to the intensive investment of a selected firm in innovation activities.

    The enterprise analyzed, Autoadapt AB, is a Swedish high technology firm working in adapting cars and automobiles to handicapped people. Due to the nature of their activities the firm has a high level of innovation input to be able to solve the complex problems related to usage of cars by disabled people. Both the product development process and managing the activities around it requires a high level of innovativeness and ingenuity. As thus the firm presented a very interesting object to study. The study has a clear significance as there is a need to differentiate the performance of innovation-intensive enterprises from firms who are using less investment in innovation in their activities. This can be done by considering the investment in new technologies both as product development and/or as investing in absorption of external management, product or process innovation. Applying the SIV model to run this analysis can help to demonstrate the need to incorporate the technology intake as an essential component of SME’s performance model.

    The results indicated that the SIVmodel is able to predict correctly the performance of the object firm. By having mostly positive survival factor values, which are single data-points, during years of operation, and also having mostly positive survivability coefficient values, which are agglomerate data-points, the SIVmodel proved its abilities. Clearly, the model has a good potential to be developed and fine-tuned even more. The SIV model can be tested further to look at deviations in performance of firms among different sectors and relates that to the innovativeness of whole sectors.

  • 3.
    Abouzeedan, Adli
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Klofsten, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hedner, Thomas
    University of Gothenburg.
    Implementing the SIV Model on an Intensively Innovation-Oriented Firm: The Case of Autoadapt AB2012In: World Journal of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development, ISSN 2042-5961, Vol. 8, no 2/3, p. 122-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Small to medium-sized enterprise (SME) evaluation models lack a clear coupling to innovation and its impact on firm performance. A model which can achieve this is the Survival Index Value (SIV) model. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the ability of the SIV model to indicate and predict the performance of a company. The firm, Autoadapt AB, is an innovation-oriented enterprise, adapting personal cars to be driven by handicapped people. The authors knew in advance about the good performance of the firm and its high efficiency in conducting its operations and expected the SIV model to reflect correctly on Autoadapt's performance. Because the handicap degree of each of the individuals who benefit from the firm activities differs from one person to another, product solutions have to be individually designed. Therefore the firm has had to pursue a high level of innovativeness and it had to abide with this policy right from the start. The product development processes in the firm needed to adapt to such strategies.

    To be able to demonstrate the ability of the SIV model to indicate a positive performance due to the intensive innovation activities of Autoadapt AB, a case study approach was used. Case studies are very suited for in-depth analysis of an object under a longer period of time. It is a widely-used research method in firm performance studies.

    The results of the SIV analysis indicated that the model is able to project correctly the performance of the object firm. At all the four levels of analysis, i.e. SI values, the SPI slope, the survival factors, and the survivability coefficients, the SIV analysis performance indicated a stable positive development of the firm through the life time of the enterprise.

    Measuring performance of SMEs is an important issue. There are couple of models stemming from the traditional accountancy disciplines in use; however these models suffer from clear disadvantages. Recently a new model, the SIV model, was introduced and has shown the ability of being a better candidate for performance analysis. The paper demonstrates the ability of the SIV model to judge correctly the performance of an innovative firm.

  • 4.
    Adli, Abouzeedan
    et al.
    Innovation and Entrepreneurship, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Klofsten, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Hedner, Thomas
    Innovation and Entrepreneurship, Institute of Medicine Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Internetisation Management as a Facilitator for Managing Innovation in High Technology Smaller Firms2013In: Global Business Review, ISSN 0972-1509, E-ISSN 0973-0664, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 121-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Managing innovation in smaller firms imposes challenges of specific nature. Such challenges include: scarcity of resources for R&D and innovation activities, complexity of scientific fields, coordinating innovation activities with the operational functions of the firm and availability of access to up-to-date scientific excellence. A question of importance should be raised as to how one can use the recent development in information and communication technologies (ITCs) to meet these challenges and to facilitate innovation activities in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), specially the high- technology smaller firms (HTSFs), as these use innovation as their major competitive edge. In this conceptual paper we proposed using a newly introduced management paradigm, namely “internetisation management” to achieve the said. In the article we discussed the different challenges of innovation in HTSFs and how these challenges can be meet when adapting the internetisation management paradigm. The work shed the light on the need for a coupling between management and innovation studies in relation to SMEs while taking in consideration the e-globalized nature of the modern economy. It addresses in a more particular way HTSFs need for that coupling.

  • 5.
    Albahari, Alberto
    et al.
    Universidad de Malaga.
    Klofsten, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rubio-Romero, Juan Carlos
    Universidad de Malaga.
    Science and Technology Parks: A study of value creation for park tenants2018In: Journal of Technology Transfer, ISSN 0892-9912, E-ISSN 1573-7047Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The literature on Science and Technology Parks (STPs) is growing rapidly and, despite the positive impact of STPs on firms found by many studies, it remains unclear how STPs create value for tenants. In this paper, we study the STP supply side through a case study in a Swedish region. We identify two components of the business support provided by parks: a configuration-oriented component, and a process-oriented component. The former refers to the static design of the business support, and the latter to the active, hands-on support provided by parks’ management. Both components must be planned carefully in order to deliver value to tenants. We also discuss some implications for policy and managers.

  • 6.
    Alenvret, Caroline
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Evaldsson, Johannes
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Creating customer value through knowledge integration: How internal stakeholders can be involved in the product development process2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing globalisation of the market is followed by increased competition between organisations. Therefore it becomes more important to create products with high customer value. To be able to create customer value, deep understanding of the customers’ needs must be obtained by employees, shared between them and transformed into products. Further consequences of globalisation are increasing differences between customers’ needs, which results in demand for customisable and flexible products.The purpose of this study was to analyse how organisations can create more customer value through increased knowledge integration. The focus was on how knowledge that already resides within a globally dispersed organisation can be integrated during the product development process.This study showed that customer value is created throughout the product development process by integrating the knowledge held by R&D and internal stakeholders. Different types of value are created at different phases in the product development process. One important finding is that different parts of the augmented value are created throughout the entire product development process. Since employees obtain different knowledge depending on which customer they interact with, it is important to utilise knowledge from a large number of employees with different roles and in different countries. Hence, the significance of knowledge integration must be disseminated and understood across the organisation. After completing the product development process additional customer value is created by the internal stakeholders’ who sell and implement the product, but it is during the product development process that the basis for their value creation is established.Knowledge needs to be integrated in a formalised, repeatable way, so that the R&D department can ensure that the right product is developed at the right time. Integration means that the tacit knowledge that resides within one employee is codified into an explicit form that can be exploited by more employees. Therefore, four steps must be performed and repeated iteratively to create and spread knowledge throughout the organisation. The first step includes communication by exchanging tacit knowledge. The second step entails documenting the knowledge, and the third step involves combining the knowledge residing in the organisations into one common knowledge system. The final step includes distributing the knowledge so that it recievess wide attention within the organisation. Several factors that have a negative impact on these four steps, and knowledge integration, need to be countered somehow. However, it was found that there are several mechanisms that facilitate knowledge integration, and most often the presence of several mechanisms at the same time had a better effect.

  • 7.
    Andersson, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics, Business Administration.
    Berggren, Christian
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship .
    Competence development projects in R&D: the case of North's inventors2007In: 8th International Research Network on Organizing by Projects Conference,2007, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

            

  • 8.
    Andersson, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration .
    Berggren, Christian
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship .
    Individual Inventors in the R&D Factory2007In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 437-446Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Andersson, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration . Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Berggren, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Inventors as innovators and knowledge integrators2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Andersson, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Berggren, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kreativitet och patentering i storföretag: om de innovativa individernas betydelse2012In: Management of Innovation and Technology, no 1, p. 10-11Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11.
    Andersson, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Berggren, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kreativitet och patentering i storföretag: Om de innovativa individernas betydelse för att skapa och bedöma nya idéer2012In: Innovationsledning och kreativitet i svenska företag / [ed] Anders Richtnér & Johan Frishammar, VINNOVA , 2012, p. 86-97Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Bokens syfte är att ge kunskap och inspiration åt chefer, ledare och medarbetare med intresse för kreativitet och innovation. Den baseras på forskning och tar upp exempel hämtade från många av Sveriges ledande företag. Avsikten är att belysa hur organisatoriska förhållanden påverkar förutsättningarna för kreativitet och innovation samt att ge uppslag till hur företags innovationsförmåga kan utvecklas.

  • 12.
    Andersson, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Berggren, ChristianLinköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Sussex.
    Kunskapsintegration och innovation i en internationaliserande ekonomi: Slutrapport från ett forskningsprogram2015Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Den här skriften presenterar ett urval resultat och texter från forskningsprogrammet ”Kunskapsintegration och innovation i en internationaliserande ekonomi” (Knowledge Integration and Innovation in Transnational Enterprise, KITE) som finansierats av Riksbankens Jubileumsfond i två faser under åren 2007–2015. I programmet har vi analyserat hur företag, speciellt i tekniktunga industrier, påverkas av den allt mer globala konkurrensen om nya produkter och tjänster, hur nya specialiserade kunskaper växer fram och tas tillvara, och hur de kan förenas med existerande kunskapsbas. I denna skrift finns studier på tre olika nivåer: branschnivån, med analyser av innovationsprocesser och kunskapsutmaningar i industriella sektorer; företagsnivån, med skildringar av förändringar i företagens interna organisering av kunskapsbildande processer och undersökningar av nya former för utbyte och samspel mellan företag; samt mikronivån, med undersökningar av samspelet mellan individuella specialister inom företag. Skriften vänder sig både till den intresserade allmänheten och till forskare med annan vetenskaplig bakgrund. Fokus är på internationellt konkurrerande branscher och företag, men analyserna av kunskapens delning och sammanflätning, separation och integration, har bäring också på andra kunskapsintensiva sektorer och verksamheter, från statliga verk till sjukvård.

    En vetenskaplig presentation av programmets forskning under de första fyra åren finns i boken Knowledge Integration and Innovation: Critical Challenges Facing International Technology-Based Firms (redigerad av Berggren, Bergek, Bengtsson, Hobday & Söderlund och utgiven av Oxford University Press 2011). En uppföljande volym, Managing Knowledge Integration Across Boundaries, planeras av samma förlag 2016 (redigerad av Tell, Berggren, Brusoni & Van de Ven). I den medverkar ett antal internationella författare vilket visar kunskapsområdets globala tyngd och intresse. Under programmets drygt åtta år har deltagarna publicerat ett mycket stort antal artiklar, konferensbidrag, bokkapitel och liknande. För dessa hänvisar vi till programmets hemsida www.liu.se/kite.

    Vi har under hela programperioden arbetat intensivt med att diskuteraoch konstruktivt kritisera och utveckla varandras bidrag. Därför har det varit naturligt att denna skrift inbegriper många programdeltagares medverkan. En presentation av samtliga medverkande finns i slutet av denna skrift. Följande KITE-forskare har medverkat i nedan angivna kapitel:

    Hans Andersson (kapitel 4)

    Lars Bengtsson (kapitel 7)

    Marie Bengtsson (kapitel 3)

    Anna Bergek (kapitel 2)

    Christian Berggren (kapitel 1)

    Karin Bredin (kapitel 6)

    Cecilia Enberg (kapitel 5, 7)

    Mattias Johansson (kapitel 4)

    Nicolette Lakemond (kapitel 7)

    Lars Lindkvist (kapitel 3)

    Thomas Magnusson (kapitel 1)

    Camilla Niss (kapitel 6)

    Jonas Söderlund (kapitel 6)

    Fredrik Tell (kapitel 5)

    Vi vill också tacka Jenny Björkman på Riksbankens Jubileumsfond och Makadam förlag för deras engagerade arbete med redigering och produktion av slutresultatet.

  • 13.
    Andersson, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Berggren, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Leveraging inventors' creativity2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    While creativity is often understood as the generation of valuable novelty, we extend that view into a framework based on well-known and established models from the creativity literature. In addition to generation of novelty which forms our frameworks first dimension, we add selection of novelty, and type of creative contribution.  

    Based on interviews with inventors and managers in three large, patent-intensive firms, representing completely different industries, we show how the framework can be employed in order to better understand in what ways different practices exploit and/or support the inventors’ creative abilities. By relating the practices not to creativity in general but to components of creativity (c.f Amabile 1997) the paper enriches the discussion of how inventors’ can be leveraged in technology-based firms.

  • 14.
    Ashok Kumar, Allan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship.
    Chau Trinh, Giang
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship.
    Breaking Uncertainties for Product Offerings: "A Holistic Framework of Uncertainty Management for Planning, Designing and Developing PSS (Product/Service System) "2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In the last decade, PSS (Product/ Service System) emerged as a new effective business model in helping manufacturers increase significantly productivity and customer’s satisfaction, whist minimizing environmental impact. PSS contributes drastically to the development of an innovative transaction trend, in which rather than just providing physical products separately, industrial Companies are more focusing on integrated service offers and customer’s need fulfillment. 

     

    However, to implement successfully PSS, manufacturers have to overcome many challenges and uncertainties. The uncertainties in the PSS planning phase are related to market, environment or company analysis; reliability, product/service integration, supplier coordination etc in the design and development stages are considered as potential uncertainties. Uncertainty is defined as “State of deficiency of information related to a future event” (Sakao et al., 2009). In which, risks derived from negative side of uncertainties may reduce efficiency of the model or even make the implementation process fail to some extent. If the uncertainty is resolved in a favorable way, risks can be seen as potential business opportunities for the development of PSS Companies.

    While many Companies already have their own uncertainty management initiative; others just utilize their long time experience to treat uncertainties. Therefore, numerous Companies are seeking a comprehensive uncertainty management framework that could be applicable in most circumstances. In order to fulfill this urgent need, our thesis aimed to develop a holistic framework in order to manage risks occurred in PSS planning, design and development stages. Based on previous valuable PSS researches and useful empirical data collected, our dissertation first determined successfully critical uncertainty factors and potential business opportunities exploited from those. In addition, the research investigated elaborately PSS product quality thresholds and producers’ perception on reliability of their products before constructing a general uncertainty management framework. In which the whole management process based on Active Risk Management philosophy, included Risk Management Planning, Risk Identification, Risk Assessment and Prioritization, Risk Quantification, Risk Response Planning, Risk Tracking and Control were introduced as a helpful guideline to support PSS Companies to treat effectively uncertainties in PSS planning, design and development. 

  • 15.
    Autio, Erkko
    et al.
    Helsinki University of Technology (HUT), Finland.
    Keeley, R. H.
    Klofsten, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ulfstedt, T.
    Entrepreneurial Intent Among Students: Testing an Intent Model in Asia, Scandinavia and USA1997In: Frontiers of Entrepreneurship Research, 1997: Proceedings of the seventeenth annual Entrepreneurship Research Conference / [ed] Paul D. Reynolds, Wellesley, Mass.: Babson College , 1997, p. 133-147Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Autio, Erkko
    et al.
    London Business School.
    Klofsten, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A comparative study of two European business incubators1998In: Journal of small business management (Print), ISSN 0047-2778, E-ISSN 1540-627X, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 30-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to contribute to the literature on the management of SME support arrangements, such as new business incubation programs, by presenting two European case studies of such arrangements. In the case studies, we have tried to identify management practices that seem to work well in both cases. The literature abounds with "success stories" of for example individual science parks but such stories tend to have two major shortcomings. First, what constitutes success is seldom defined. Second, it is difficult to determine to what degree this success depends on local factors and to what degree it can be attributed to the management practices of the support arrangement. This study discusses the management practices of these two arrangements against the background of their regional settings.

  • 17.
    Aziz, Basit
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Improving Project Management with Lean Thinking?2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In the new business economy, project management has become a central way for undertaking several of the business activities. One of the increasing and most significant concerns with projects is that, projects are behind schedule, over budget and show unsatisfactory performance in terms quality and customer satisfaction. In the last few decades the manufacturing industry successfully improved quality and productivity, by using the concepts of lean thinking. The thesis explores the relevance of lean concepts in project management and how lean concepts can improve project productivity.

    The qualitative method is used in this study. Further, a systematic approach was used to identify the relevance of lean concepts in project management. The qualitative data was collected using an interview with a project consultant.

    The results of the study reveal that all concepts of lean thinking are relevant to project management in specific kinds of projects. However, a greater degree of understanding and interpretation of each concept is needed when applying lean thinking in project management. Furthermore, some of the concepts have to be interpreted with caution when they are used in innovative projects.

    In general, it is found that, lean project management can improve project productivity. The findings suggest that the lean concepts can reduce cost and time which are two key measures of project success. The results of this study can be seen as a tentative framework intended to stimulate further discussion about integrating lean thinking in project and program management.

  • 18.
    Bager-Sjögren, Lars
    et al.
    Swedish Agency for Growth Policy Analysis, Sweden.
    Klofsten, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Krakowski, Sebastian
    University of Geneva, Geneva School of Economics and Management (GSEM), Switzerland.
    Firm growth and survival from a 14-year perspective: A cohort analysis2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines whether early growth is important for the short- and long-term survival and development of new firms. The study exploits registry data for a specific cohort of Swedish firms that tracks their development until their exit, or up to 14 years, at which point only 8% of the firms remain. We find growth to be associated with increased survival of the firms, that the number of employees (in the previous year) is positively correlated with survival in following years and somewhat surprisingly, we found subsidiaries to face a significantly larger hazard of closure than independent firms.

  • 19.
    Bank, Natasha
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kanda, Wisdom
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sustainability Profiled Incubators - Procceses For Recruiting And Supporting Tenants2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Since start-ups enterprises often have more room and flexibility for sustainability ideas in the early stages of business development incubators could be particularly important for introducing and developing sustainability thinking. Previous studies on incubators and the incubation processes in general are rather extensive in the literature. However, there are few studies particularly focusing on sustainability dimensions of incubators. In particular how incubators recruit and support start-ups in incorporating sustainability thinking into their core business idea or making their sustainability-oriented idea even more successful has received few research attention. With this gap identified in research and societal need for sustainability, research on green incubators is of timely interest. The latest report from the IPCC on climate change problem warns about the demand of sustainable business creation, which is critical to promote sustainable development. Entrepreneurship is at the heart of sustainable growth (Carayannis and Von Zedtwitz, 2005) and in that sense it is in the heart of sustainability development. Therefore, the goal of this paper is to investigate empirically the recruiting criteria of start-ups by three sustainability oriented incubators in Sweden, Finland and Germany in order to understand how they support sustainable entrepreneurship and eco-innovation.

    Following a literature review on “conventional” incubators, a sample incubator that works with sustainable start-ups in each country was chosen and studied by help of interviews with managers, stakeholders, tenants and managers at incubators in order to investigate deficits and potentials of the existing incubator support systems for sustainable entrepreneurship and eco innovation. The data used in the study comes from Green Tech Park (Sweden), LADEC (Finland) and Green Garage (Germany).

    From this study, our major implications are that, the studied incubators on average have an ambition to recruit and develop sustainability oriented start-ups, but a critical mass of such tenants is vital if any such ambitions are to become a reality. This critical mass of start-ups is very much influenced by the local context of the incubator, which generates both potential tenants and resources to support such firms in sustainability entrepreneurship and eco innovation. For incubator management, this suggests an active search for tenants interested in sustainable entrepreneurship and providing support focused on such activities.

  • 20.
    Bank, Natasha
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kanda, Wisdom
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sustainability profiled incubators-process for recruiting and supporting tenants2015In: Proceedings of XXVI ISPIM Conference: Shaping the Frontiers of Innovation Management, ISPIM – the International Society for Professional Innovation Management , 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the recruitment and support process of sustainability profiled incubators have received little research attention, the goal of this paper is to fill this knowledge gap by an empirically investigation of three sustainability oriented incubators in Sweden, Finland and Germany. The data used in the study comes from interviews with managers, stakeholders, tenants in selected incubators, in Green Tech Park (Sweden), LADEC (Finland) and Green Garage (Germany). Our major implications are that, the studied incubators on average have an ambition to recruit and develop sustainability oriented start-ups, but a critical mass of such tenants is vital if any such ambitions are to become a reality. This critical mass of start-ups is influenced by the local context, which generates both potential tenants and resources to support such firms. For incubator management, this suggests an active search for tenants interested in sustainable entrepreneurship and providing support focused on such activities.

  • 21.
    Bank, Natasha
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kanda, Wisdom
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tenant recruitment and support processes in sustainability-profiled business incubators2016In: Industry & higher education, ISSN 0950-4222, E-ISSN 2043-6858, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 267-277Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recruitment and support processes in sustainability-profiled incubators have received little research attention. The article addresses this knowledge gap in an empirical investigation of three sustainability-oriented incubators in Sweden, Finland and Germany. The data are based on interviews with managers, stakeholders and tenants in Green Tech Park (Sweden), LADEC (Finland) and Green Garage (Germany). On average, the studied incubators had an ambition to recruit and develop sustainability-oriented start-ups, but the number of tenants must reach a critical mass if such ambitions are to become a reality. The local context influences this critical mass of start-ups and is a determining factor in generating (a) potential tenants and (b) the resources to support such firms. This suggests that incubator managers must actively seek tenants interested in sustainable entrepreneurship and that support must focus on activities in sustainability.

  • 22.
    Bank, Natasha
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Klaus, Fichter
    Borderstep Institute/Oldenburg University, Germany.
    Klofsten, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sustainability-profiled incubators and securing the inflow of tenants – the case of Green Garage Berlin2017In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 157, p. 76-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Currently there is an attention in research and practise on entrepreneurial ecosystems, and how these, often using incubators, could support sustainable development through new firm start-ups. Despite the popularity of incubators in the literature and practise, few studies have focused on sustainable incubators in general or, more specifically, on processes that ensure a steady flow of tenants. Thus, this paper investigates how sustainable incubators ensures their inflow of tenants, how they organize their activities and whether the incubator environment affect tenant recruitment. A case study approach analysing the sustainability oriented incubator Green Garage Berlin have been used to generate an understanding of selection and recruitment processes as well the influence of external environments. The results show that regional and inter-regional co-operation, together with a well-planned, structured pre-incubation process, are requirements for securing an inflow of tenants to sustainable incubators. Incubator reputation and sufficient long term funding is also a key to success. A good practice case as Green Garage cannot simply be replicated, but require openness to continue the learning process and adapting the knowledge to be transferred to local conditions.

  • 23.
    Bank, Natasha
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Klofsten, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fichter, Klaus
    Oldenburg University, Germany.
    Sustainability-profiled incubators, regional factors and the recruiting of tenants2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses incubators that claim a sustainability approach and pays particular attention to their inflow of firms – tenant recruitment. We also discuss external environment influences on tenant recruitment to the incubator. A case study approach examined one sustainable incubator that was successful in exclusively targeting ideas with a sustainable, climate-oriented mission. The results show that regional and inter-regional cooperation, together with a well-planned, structured pre-incubation process, are requirements for securing an inflow of tenants to sustainable incubators. Success also dictates that sustainable incubators apply a generous, non-sector-specific intake approach so that as many entrepreneurs as possible enter the incubator process. Ventures with the greatest potential can then be sifted out from this pool over time. Another factor affecting whether an incubator reaches a critical mass of sustainable tenants is the external environment. Finally, we make some suggestions for demand-side legislation that would support sustainable business ideas and lead markets for climate-friendly solutions. Such legislation would encourage or discourage sustainable and less sustainable technologies, setting us one step closer to an ideally sustainable world.

  • 24.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle.
    Dabhilkar, Mandar
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lakemond, Nicolette
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Exploring the strategic role of purchasing: An empirical comparison of purchasing practices and performance outcomes2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Dabhilkar, Mandar
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    von Haartman, Robin
    University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Knowledge Integration Challenges when Outsourcing Manufacturing2011In: Knowledge Integration & Innovation: Critical Challenges Facing International Technology-based Firms / [ed] Christian Berggren, Anna Bergek, Lars Bengtsson, Michael Hobday, Jonas Söderlund, Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, 2011, p. 205-227Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Being R&D intensive has traditionally been seen as an impediment to outsourcing. This study confirms that empirically this was the case for a set of manufacturing industries in The Netherlands in the early 1990s, but also shows that R&D intensity became a positive predictor for changes in outsourcing levels over the 1990s, suggesting firms in R&D intensive industries have increasingly started to rely on partnership relations with outside suppliers. This confirms the need to move the analysis from scale, opportunism and appropriation concerns to a relational perspective when studying outsourcing in R&D intensive industries.

  • 26.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle.
    Enberg, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lakemond, Nicolette
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Öppen och sluten på samma gång: att integrera kunskap över företags gränser2015In: Kunskapsintegration och innovation i en internationaliserande ekonomi: slutrapport från ett forskningsprogram / [ed] Hans Andersson, Christian Berggren, Göteborg: Makadam Förlag, 2015, p. 84-100Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Företag får allt svårare att behärska alla de teknologiområden som behövs för utvecklingen av sofistikerade produkter för den internationella marknaden. Därför ökar betydelsen av samarbete med olika typer av partners vars kunskaper kompletterar dem som finns internt. Detta har lett till ett ökat intresse för det som kallas öppen innovation. Det innebär att företag öppnar sina innovationsprocesser och involverar kunder, leverantörer, konsulter, akademier och ibland även konkurrenter för att underlätta in- och utflöde av kunskaper och teknologier. Företag kan vara öppna i olika faser av produktframtagningsprocessen, från idégenerering till kommersialisering, och samarbetet kan kretsa kring olika typer av kunskapsinnehåll (teknologi, produkter, processer). Tidigare forskning har framför allt betonat fördelarna med ökad öppenhet. Utifrån vår forskning om öppen innovation, som innefattar både intervjubaserade fallstudier av innovationsprojekt och en enkät till 415 företag om öppen innovation, vill vi lyfta fram tre utmaningar i detta sammanhang: den egna spetskompetensen, kostnader för integration av extern kunskap och risken för kunskapsläckage. Resultaten visar att företag behöver utforma sina innovationsprocesser så att de kan vara öppna och slutna på samma gång.

  • 27.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    et al.
    University of Gävle.
    Lakemond, Nicolette
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Dabhilkar, Mandar
    Stockholm University.
    Exploiting supplier innovativeness through knowledge integration2013In: International Journal of Technology Management, ISSN 0267-5730, E-ISSN 1741-5276, Vol. 61, no 3/4, p. 237-253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Firms are increasingly involving and relying on networks of  suppliers and other external partners in their innovation processes. A successful exploitation of suppliers’ technology and competencies is however challenging, not least in situations characterised by technological uncertainty. The main purpose of this study is to analyse how supplier innovativeness may be leveraged through internal knowledge integration capabilities in involving suppliers. The analysis is based on a survey of firms in Europe and North America. The study shows that innovative suppliers do contribute to a firm’s innovation performance in terms of time-to-market and level of innovation in products/services. The main result is that an internal knowledge integration capability in terms of proficiency in supplier management and cross-functional decision making boosts innovation performance, in particular when technological uncertainty is high.

  • 28.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle.
    Lakemond, Nicolette
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Dabhilkar, Mandar
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Innovation through purchasing: Leveraging supplier innovativeness through purchasing involvement and proficiency2010In: Proceedings of the 11th International CINet Conference 2010, 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    et al.
    Gävle högskola.
    Lakemond, Nicolette
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Dabhilkar, Mandar
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Use the inside: Exploiting supplier innovation through knowledge integration2011In: Proceedings of the 12th CINet conference, Arhus, Denmark, 11-13 September, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle.
    Lakemond, Nicolette
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Laursen, Keld
    Department of Innovation and Organizational Economics, Copenhagen Business School.
    Tell, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Open innovation: managing knowledge integration across multiple boundaries2017In: Managing knowledge integration across boundaries / [ed] Fredrik Tell, Christian Berggren, Stefano Brusoni, Andrew Van de Ven, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017, p. 87-105Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Sweden; Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Lakemond, Nicolette
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lazzarotti, Valentina
    LIUC Università Cattaneo, Italy.
    Manzini, Rafaella
    LIUC Università Cattaneo, Italy.
    Pellegrini, Luisa
    University of Pisa, Italy.
    Tell, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Open to a select few?: Matching partners and knowledge content for open innovation performance2015In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 72-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the paper is to illuminate the costs and benefits of crossing firm boundaries in inbound open innovation (OI) by determining the relationships among partner types, knowledge content and performance. The empirical part of the study is based on a survey of OI collaborations answered by R&D managers in 415 Italian, Finnish and Swedish firms. The results show that the depth of collaboration with different partners (academic/consultants, value chain partners, competitors and firms in other industries) is positively related to innovation performance, whereas the number of different partners and size have negative effects. The main result is that the knowledge content of the collaboration moderates the performance outcomes and the negative impact of having too many different kinds of partners. This illustrates how successful firms use selective collaboration strategies characterized by linking explorative and exploitative knowledge content to specific partners, to leverage the benefits and limit the costs of knowledge boundary crossing processes.

  • 32.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle.
    Lakemond, Nicolette
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tell, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hur arbetar svenska företag med öppen innovation?2016In: Öppen innovation: i teori och praktik / [ed] Nicolette Lakemond, Fredrik Tell, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2016, p. 39-53Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    et al.
    University of Gävle.
    Stefan, Ioana
    University of Gävle.
    Lakemond, Nicolette
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Open innovation: Global or local?2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    et al.
    University of Gävle.
    Stefan, Ioana
    University of Gävle.
    Lakemond, Nicolette
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Open innovation: Global or local?2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Bennich, Maria
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping.
    Svensson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Brulin, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Interactive research: a joint learning process with the unions2016In: Action research for democracy: new ideas and perspectives from Scandinavia / [ed] Ewa Gunnarsson, Hans Peter Hansen, Birger Steen Nielsen, Nadarajah Sriskandarajah, New York: Routledge, 2016, p. 27-38Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Berg, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ingebrand, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kunskapsstyrning i teknikkonsultbolag: En studie av forum, verktyg och förutsättningar2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The subject knowledge management is of great relevance in knowledge intensive organizations such as consulting firms or high-tech businesses, since their business model builds on the knowledge of the em- ployees. Knowledge management is a broad subject that includes, among others, organizational theory, cognitive science, and IT.

    The literature study has its foundation in knowledge and how both tacit and explicit knowledge can be transferred between individuals or within an organization. A common organizational structure among consulting firms is the project based organization, therefore challenges related to knowledge management within such organizations, is studied. Different strategies for knowledge management are presented and various methods for knowledge transfer are categorized and assessed. An in depth look into knowledge management in consulting firms end the literature study partnered with a review of affecting factors and tools involved in knowledge exchange and distribution of best practices. The purpose is to create a framework with which to analyze how a case company, a technological consulting firm, works with knowledge exchange. The research questions focus on factors that affect knowledge exchange, what fo- rums and tools drive knowledge exchange, and how best practices are collected and implemented.

    Barriers to functional knowledge exchange that have been encountered include that many of the employed consultants are permanently stationed with customers in their projects, rendering contact with colleagues from the home office sparse. This, combined with a lack of management control and structure in the case of knowledge, affects and limits the knowledge exchange.

    Tools and forums for knowledge exchange were identified and show how knowledge is spread in the or- ganization. A majority of the knowledge exchange is found to take place through person-to-person inter- action through mentorship, working in projects, and through contacts that to not constitute a part of con- scious knowledge management. The organization employs a business system where templates and tools are available to the consultants along with documentation from prior projects and reference projects. The management view is that this system is to function as an important platform for learning and knowledge exchange, in essence a knowledge management system, but the system is burdened by technical issues that lead consultants to circumnavigate the system by using templates and tools provided by colleagues instead of the ones officially provided by the system.

    No structures for continuous development of best practices were identified, although specific projects to update routines and methods occur from time to time on an ad-hoc basis. That lack of structures and routines track back to the handling of consultants’ suggestions for improvements and ideas, where con- sultants experience a lack of directives, support and understanding of how their suggestions and ideas were supposed to be handled in the organization.

    A conclusion regarding knowledge management in a technical consulting firm is hence that organizational and cultural factors have a significant impact on the exchange of knowledge. A shortage of opportunities for contact and knowledge exchange with colleagues combined with lacking management control affects the exchange negatively, but the company also displays several success factors that research point out important in order to build a functioning knowledge management system. These include an openness and willingness to share amongst colleagues, in combination with an understanding of the importance of knowledge exchange in the organization that transcends organizational hierarchy. 

  • 37.
    Bergek, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ambiguities and challenges in the functions approach to TIS analysis: a critical literature review2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on an approach often used in empirical studies of sustainable transitions: the functions of technological innovation system approach. After its introduction by Johnson and Jacobsson (2001), the functions approach has reached a quite widespread diffusion among innovation scholars, especially those interested in sustainability. However, during this diffusion process, the approach has to some extent been “re-invented” (Rogers, 1983) by its users, and many of the original definitions and assumptions are no longer applied. In order to take stock of the work so far and suggest possible avenues for further research in this field, the purpose of this paper is to identify similarities and differences in how the functions approach is applied by different (groups of) researchers. The paper first gives an overview of the functions literature and then critically reviews it. A clear lack of agreement between researchers is identified with regards to how the concepts of ‘function’ and ‘functionality’ are defined and conceptualised. Based on this analysis, the paper discusses the implications of this lack of agreement and identifies a number of critical choices that have to be made by individual researchers, but possibly also by the ‘functions’ community as a whole, in order to increase the lucidity and applicability of the functions approach to TIS analysis.

  • 38.
    Bergek, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Att bryta ny väg genom att fortsätta i gamla hjulspår: hur stigberoende möjliggör innovation i mogna brancher2015In: Kunskapsintegration och innovation i en internationaliserande ekonomi: slutrapport från ett forskningsprogram / [ed] Hans Andersson, Christian Berggren, Göteborg: Makadam Förlag, 2015, p. 32-40Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Bergek, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Entreprenörer och entreprenörskap på det turistiska fältet2013In: Det turistiska fältet och dess aktörer / [ed] Josefina Syssner & Lars Kvarnström, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2013, 1, p. 127-152Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Bergek, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Levelling the playing field? The influence of national wind power planning instruments on conflicts of interests in a Swedish county2010In: ENERGY POLICY, ISSN 0301-4215, Vol. 38, no 5, p. 2357-2369Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Slow and complicated wind power planning and permitting procedures have been a large obstacle for wind power diffusion in Sweden and other countries. This paper complements previous siting-oriented literature with a planning perspective on these problems. The focus is two national planning instruments implemented in Sweden in the early 2000s: a national planning target and an appointment of areas of national interest for wind power. The paper identifies different types of conflicts of interest related to wind power - in addition to the conflict between wind power as a national public interest and various local private interests - and analyses the impact of the national planning instruments on the handling of these conflicts in the land-use planning process in the County of Ostergotland. The analysis shows that the planning target actually made local planning officials even more inclined to treat wind power as a private rather than a public interest and that the method used to identify areas of national interest of wind power forced wind power to compete with the combined strengths of all other public interest. The planning instruments thus left wind power to fight an uphill battle rather than to meet other interests face-to-face on a level playing field.

  • 41.
    Bergek, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Technological dynamics and policy: how to derive policy prescriptions2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The innovation literature acknowledges that innovation policy should be based on an analysis of underlying innovation system dynamics. Whereas policy prescriptions have been derived from analyses of the functional dynamics of emerging innovation systems in the ‘fluid’ phase of the technology life cycle and for the rejuvenation of path-dependent, mature innovation systems associated with a ‘specific’ phase of technology development, the role of policy in the “transitional” phase remains unclear. Through a discussion about the challenges associated with specific functions of a technological innovation system in the transitional phase, this paper identifies a number of potential system weaknesses specifically associated with this phase, for example demand-side path dependency, lack of informational increasing returns to adoption, imbalanced development of components and complementary technologies, lack of financial, physical and human resources and various forms of delegitimation. It also suggests that policy intervention might be justified to remedy these weaknesses, since many of them are out of reach of system actors. Other weaknesses can take too long time for system actors to handle, if a technological transformation is urgent from a societal perspective. Removing obstacles for mass market formation and stimulating system coordination should be a priority for policy aimed at the transitional phase. This would require policy to play the part as an innovation intermediary within the innovation system rather than as an external supplier of pushes and pulls. 

  • 42.
    Bergek, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    The pitfalls of green innovation policy: the case of green certificates2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Bergek, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    The Role of Entrepreneurship and Markets for Sustainable Innovation2012In: Creating a Sustainable Economy: An Institutional and Evolutionary Approach to Environmental Policy / [ed] Gerardo Marletto, Abingdon: Routledge, 2012, , p. 288p. 205-231Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Bergek, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Berggren, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    General versus Technology-Specific Policies for Sustainable Innovation: A Cross-Sector Analysis2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Bergek, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Berggren, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Policy for environmental innovation: a comparative review of empirical evidence from two sectors2012In: Innovation and Competitiveness: Dynamics of Organizations, Industries, Systems and Regions, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the 1960s, governments have sought to encourage technological development to reduce pollution. These efforts now include global greenhouse emissions, especially in sectors such as transport and energy generation. A variety of means are applied: general taxes and trading systems, subsidies and technology-forcing standards. At the macro-level, economists argue that general economic instruments are a more efficient way to regulate emissions than administrative or technology-specific measures. The effectiveness of general economic instruments needs to be examined in relation to their innovation impact in different (sub-) sectors, however. This paper builds on research in the automotive and energy sectors to compare general and specific, economic and administrative, means in terms of their impact on different types of innovation. The review shows that the effectiveness of policy instruments is conditioned by the type of innovation needed (incremental, modular, architectural or radical) and the responding industrial context. General instruments – economic and administrative – encourage development and diffusion of incremental and modular innovation, whereas technology-specific instruments are needed to support the development and diffusion of architectural and radical low-carbon innovations. However, in order to have an effect, instruments have to be connected to a responding industrial context, i.e. networks of firms with requisite resources and capabilities to deploy. Key challenges for policy makers when choosing instruments include issues of selection, stringency, scale and stability.

  • 46.
    Bergek, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Berggren, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    The impact of environmental policy instruments on innovation: A review of energy and automotive industry studies2014In: Ecological Economics, ISSN 0921-8009, E-ISSN 1873-6106, Vol. 106, p. 112-123Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Various types of policy instruments have been implemented to reduce local and global emissions, but the impact on innovation of different instruments has received less attention. This paper reviews empirical studies of the innovation impact of four main types of policy instruments in two high-emitting sectors. The conclusions are threefold. (1) Policy plays a key role for the development and diffusion of environmental innovation in the studied sectors. (2) Different types of instruments promote different types of innovations: general economic instruments has primarily encouraged incremental innovation, general regulatory instruments has enforced improvements based on modular innovation, and technology-specific instruments appears to have been needed to support the development and deployment of radically new technologies. (3) All types of policy instruments face challenges in design and implementation: understanding the selection impact of the chosen instruments, implementing increasing stringency levels, committing to an appropriate scale, and safeguarding policy stability.

  • 47.
    Bergek, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship .
    Berggren, Christian
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship .
    Jacobsson, S
    Håller Sverige på att missa klimatutmaningens innovationspotential?2008In: Ur startblocken. Svensk innovationskraft II, Stockholm: Forum for innovation Management , 2008, 1, p. 159-168Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Ur startblocken – Svensk innovationskraft II. I den här boken ger Forum for Innovation Management, FIM, en samlad bild av Sveriges förutsättningar som innovationsland nu och i framtiden. Bokens teman speglar fims seminarier och salongsdebatter under 2004–2007 och baseras på intervjuer och texter av tongivande personer i Innovationssverige, bland andra Ayad Al Saffar, Efva Attling, Leif Johansson, Lars G Josefsson, Margareta Norell Bergendal, Maud Olofsson, Alf Rehn, Lena Treschow Torell, Per Unckel och Thomas Östros. Boken avslutas med ett manifest riktat till Sveriges beslutsfattare i innovationsfrågor

  • 48.
    Bergek, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Berggren, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Creative Accumulation: Integrating New and Established Technologies in Periods of Discontinuous Change2011In: Knowledge Integration and Innovation: Critical challenges facing international technology-based firms / [ed] Berggren, C., Bergek, A., Bengtsson, L., Hobday, M., Söderlund, J., Oxford: Oxford University Press , 2011, p. 246-273Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Technology-based firms continue to compete primarily on innovation, and are continuously required to present new solutions to an exacting market. As technological complexity and specialization intensifies, firms increasingly need to integrate and co-ordinate knowledge by means of project groups, diversified organizations, inter-organizational partnerships, and strategic alliances. Innovation processes have progressively become interdisciplinary, collaborative, inter-organizational, and international, and a firm's ability to synthesize knowledge across disciplines, organizations, and geographical locations has a major influence on its viability and success.This book demonstrates how knowledge integration is crucial in facilitating innovation within modern firms. It provides original, detailed empirical studies of prerequisites, mechanisms, and outcomes of knowledge integration processes on several organizational levels, from key individuals, projects, and internal organizations, to collaboration between firms. It stresses the need to understand knowledge integration as a multi-level phenomenon, which requires a broad repertoire of organizational and technical means. It further clarifies the need for strong internal capabilities for exploiting external knowledge, reveals how costs of knowledge integration affect outcomes and strategic decisions, and discusses the managerial implications of fostering knowledge integration, providing practical guidance and support for managers of knowledge integration in

  • 49.
    Bergek, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Berggren, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hobday, Michael
    CENTRIM (Centre for Research in Innovation Management), University of Brighton.
    Technological discontinuities and the challenge for incumbent firms: Destruction, disruption or creative accumulation?2013In: Research Policy, ISSN 0048-7333, E-ISSN 1873-7625, Vol. 42, no 6-7, p. 1210-1224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The creative destruction of existing industries as a consequence of discontinuous technological change is a central theme in the literature on industrial innovation and technological development. Established competence-based and market-based explanations of this phenomenon argue that incumbents are seriously challenged only by ‘competence-destroying’ or ‘disruptive’ innovations, which make their existing knowledge base or business models obsolete and leave them vulnerable to attacks from new entrants. This paper challenges these arguments. With detailed empirical analyses of the automotive and gas turbine industries, we demonstrate that these explanations overestimate the ability of new entrants to destroy and disrupt established industries and underestimate the capacity of incumbents to perceive the potential of new technologies and integrate them with existing capabilities. Moreover, we show how intense competition in the wake of technological discontinuities, driven entirely by incumbents, may instead result in late industry shakeouts. We develop and extend the notion of ‘creative accumulation’ as a way of conceptualizing the innovating capacity of the incumbents that appear to master such turbulence. Specifically, we argue that creative accumulation requires firms to handle a triple challenge of simultaneously (a) fine-tuning and evolving existing technologies at a rapid pace, (b) acquiring and developing new technologies and resources and (c) integrating novel and existing knowledge into superior products and solutions.

  • 50.
    Bergek, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Berggren, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tell, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Do technology strategies matter? A comparison of two electrical engineering corporations, 1988-19982009In: Technology Analysis & Strategic Management, ISSN 0953-7325, E-ISSN 1465-3990, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 445-470Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to reap competitive advantage from innovation, a firms technology activities should square with its technology strategy - but how do technology strategies relate to activities and financial performance in relevant business areas? This paper investigates this question by means of a comparison between two leading firms in the electrical engineering industry: ABB and General Electric. We show that substantial performance differences between these companies in the power generation field are related to differences in their espoused technology strategies (as indicated by statements in annual reports) and technology activities (as indicated by patenting) and the degree of alignment between these.

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