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  • 1.
    Abelius, M
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Matthiesen, Leif
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Nilsson, L J
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Immunological interactions between mother and child: a characterisation of Th1-and Th2-like chemokines during pregnancy, postpartum and childhood in JOURNAL OF REPRODUCTIVE IMMUNOLOGY, vol 90, issue 2, pp 170-1712011In: JOURNAL OF REPRODUCTIVE IMMUNOLOGY, Elsevier , 2011, Vol. 90, no 2, p. 170-171Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 2.
    Abelius, Martina S
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Matthiesen, Leif
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    High cord blood levels of the T-helper 2-associated chemokines CCL17 and CCL22 precede allergy development during the first 6 years of life2011In: Pediatric Research, ISSN 0031-3998, E-ISSN 1530-0447, Vol. 70, no 5, p. 495-500Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Exposure to a strong T-helper 2 (Th2)-like environment during fetal development may promote allergy development. Increased cord blood (CB) levels of the Th2-associated chemokine CCL22 were associated with allergy development during the first 2 y of life. The aim of the present study was to determine whether CB Th1- and Th2-associated chemokine levels are associated with allergy development during the first 6 y of life, allowing assessment of respiratory allergic symptoms usually developing in this period. The CB levels of cytokines, chemokines, and total IgE were determined in 56 children of 20 women with allergic symptoms and 36 women without allergic symptoms. Total IgE and allergen-specific IgE antibody levels were quantified at 6, 12, 24 mo, and 6 y of age. Increased CB CCL22 levels were associated with development of allergic sensitization and asthma and increased CCL17 levels with development of allergic symptoms, including asthma. Sensitized children with allergic symptoms showed higher CB CCL17 and CCL22 levels and higher ratios between these Th2-associated chemokines and the Th1-associated chemokine CXCL10 than nonsensitized children without allergic symptoms. A pronounced Th2 deviation at birth, reflected by increased CB CCL17 and CCL22 levels, and increased CCL22/CXCL10 and CCL17/CXCL10 ratios might promote allergy development later in life.

  • 3.
    Adolfsson, Ann-Sofie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Per-Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Guilt and emptiness: Women’s experiences of miscarriage2004In: Health Care for Women International, ISSN 0739-9332, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 543-560Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Women who lose an early pregnancy are shocked when they are first given the information that they have miscarried. Later they feel guilt and emptiness. Heideggerian interpretive phenomenology has been used with 13 women from southwest Sweden to uncover their lived experience of miscarriage. Women plan their future with a child during early pregnancy. When miscarriage occurs it is not a gore, an embryo, or a fetus they lose, it is their child. They feel that they are the cause of the miscarriage through something they have done, eaten, or thought. They feel abandonment and they grieve for their profound loss; they are actually in bereavement.

  • 4.
    Agnafors, Sara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Comasco, Erika
    Division of Pharmacology, Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Dekeyser, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Oreland, Lars
    Division of Pharmacology, Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Effect of gene, environment and maternal depressive symptoms on pre-adolescence behavior problems - a longitudinal study.2013In: Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, ISSN 1753-2000, E-ISSN 1753-2000, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 10-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Depression is a common and disabling condition with a high relapse frequency. Maternal mental health problems and experience of traumatic life events are known to increase the risk of behavior problems in children. Recently, genetic factors, in particular gene-by-environment interaction models, have been implicated to explain depressive etiology. However, results are inconclusive.

    METHODS: Study participants were members of the SESBiC-study. A total of 889 mothers and their children were followed during the child's age of 3 months to 12 years. Information on maternal depressive symptoms was gathered postpartum and at a 12 year follow-up. Mothers reported on child behavior and traumatic life events experienced by the child at age 12. Saliva samples were obtained from children for analysis of 5-HTTLPR and BDNF Val66Met polymorphisms.

    RESULTS: Multivariate analysis showed a significant association between maternal symptoms of depression and anxiety, and internalizing problems in 12-year-old children (OR 5.72, 95% CI 3.30-9.91). Furthermore, carriers of two short alleles (s/s) of the 5-HTTLPR showed a more than 4-fold increased risk of internalizing problems at age 12 compared to l/l carriers (OR 4.73, 95% CI 2.14-10.48). No gene-by-environment interaction was found and neither depressive symptoms postpartum or traumatic experiences during childhood stayed significant in the final model.

    CONCLUSIONS: Concurrent maternal symptoms of depression and anxiety are significant risk factors for behavior problems in children, which need to be taken into account in clinical practice. Furthermore, we found a main effect of 5-HTTLPR on internalizing symptoms in 12-year-old children, a finding that needs to be confirmed in future studies.

  • 5.
    Agnafors, Sara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    deKeyser, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Göran Svedin, Carl
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Symptoms of Depression Postpartum and 12 years Later-Associations to Child Mental Health at 12 years of Age2013In: Maternal and Child Health Journal, ISSN 1092-7875, E-ISSN 1573-6628, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 405-414Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children of depressed mothers have been shown to express behaviour problems to a greater extent than children of non-depressed mothers. The purpose of this study was to examine the persistence of depressive symptoms in mothers and to evaluate the relative importance of symptoms of postpartum depression (PPD) and concurrent maternal symptoms of depression, on child behaviour at age 12. A birth cohort of 1,707 children and their mothers was followed from 3 months after birth to 12 years after birth. Self-reported symptoms of depression in mothers were assessed at baseline and 12-year follow-up where 893 mothers (52.3 %) and their children participated. The mothers reports on the behaviour of their children at age 12 were used. Multivariate analysis was used to assess factors that increased the risk of child behaviour problems. At baseline, 10.4 % scored above the cutoff for symptoms of postpartum depression. At follow up, 18.2 % scored above the cutoff for depressive symptoms. Multivariate analysis showed that ongoing maternal symptoms of depression, as distinct from PPD-symptoms, was the strongest predictor of child behaviour problems at age 12. The gender of the child and socio-demographic factors at baseline were additional factors that affected the risk of behaviour problems in the 12 year old children. Children of mothers who reported symptoms of depression, both postpartum and at follow-up, were at a greater risk of behaviour problems compared to children of women with no depressive symptoms on either occasion. Our findings indicate that recurrent and ongoing maternal depressive symptoms significantly increase the risk of child behaviour problems as reported by mothers, while symptoms of PPD do not seem to result in an increased risk of behaviour problems in 12 year olds. High maternal socio-demographic life stress at childbirth constitutes an important risk factor for later child behaviour problems.

  • 6.
    Ahldén, Ingegerd
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Alehagen, Siw
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahlgren, Lars Owe
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Parents' Expectations About Participating in Antenatal Parenthood Education Classes2012In: The Journal of Perinatal Education, ISSN 1058-1243, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 11-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our objective was to assess parents' expectations about participating in antenatal parenthood education classes and to determine whether their expectations might be related to gender, age, and educational level. Data from 1,117 women and 1,019 partners residing in three cities in Sweden were collected with a questionnaire in a cross-sectional study. Participants believed that antenatal education classes would help them to feel more secure as parents and to be better oriented toward childbirth. Men had more positive expectations about the childbirth than the women. The participants mostly wanted help in preparing for parenthood and in learning infant care skills, followed by help in preparing for childbirth. The participants' expectations were affected by gender, age, and educational level. The expectant parents appeared to want more focus on preparation for parenthood than on childbirth.

  • 7.
    Ahldén, Ingegerd
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Göransson, Anne
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Alehagen, Siw
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Parenthood education in Swedish antenatal care: perceptions of midwives and obstetricians in charge.2008In: The Journal of perinatal education : an ASPO/Lamaze publication, ISSN 1058-1243, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 21-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe perceptions of parenthood education among midwives and obstetricians in charge of antenatal care in Sweden. Focus group interviews of 25 obstetricians and midwives were conducted. Data were analyzed with a phenomenographic approach. Five main categories emerged: aim of the parenthood education, content and expectations, implementation, support to group leaders, and strategies for the future. There is a strong belief in parenthood education, and the overall aim was considered to be support in the transition to parenthood. Contents should focus on awareness of the expected child, confidence in the biological processes, and the changes of roles. Pedagogies training, cost effectiveness, development, and the need to reach target groups were emphasized.

  • 8.
    Aittomaki, K.
    et al.
    Aittomäki, K., Department of Clinical Genetics, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland, Department of Clinical Genetics, Helsinki University Central Hospital, POB 140, FI-00029 HUS Helsinki, Finland.
    Bergh, C.
    Department of Obstetrics, Institute of Women and Children's Health, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Hazekamp, J.
    Department of Reproductive Medicine, Volvat Medical Center, Oslo, Norway.
    Nygren, K.-G.
    IVF Clinic, Sophiahemmet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Selbing, Anders
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Soderstrom-Anttila, V.
    Söderström-Anttila, V., Infertility Clinic, Family Federation of Finland, Helsinki, Finland.
    Wennerholm, U.-B.
    Department of Obstetrics, Institute of Women and Children's Health, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Genetics and assisted reproduction technology2005In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 84, no 5, p. 463-473Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the past 20 years, a significant improvement has been shown in the treatment for infertility in both women and men through the development of in vitro fertilization (IVF) and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Only donated sperm could be previously used for treatment, now oocytes can also be donated. Furthermore, the combination of IVF and ICSI with advanced genetic methods has made preimplantation genetic diagnosis possible for many genetic conditions. These methods enable genetic testing of the early human embryo by using only a single cell, one blastomere biopsied from the embryo, as the sample from which the diagnosis of many chromosome rearrangements and other inherited diseases can be made. It has also been established that a considerable proportion of infertility is caused by genetic defects, which have several implications for infertility treatment. The purpose of this review is to give a concise introduction on how genetics is involved in assisted reproduction technology to specialists who may not be working in this particular field of gynecology, but who would need some knowledge of this for proper care of their patients. © Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand (2005).

  • 9.
    Almen-Christensson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Lindh-Åstrand, Lotta
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Brynhildsen, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist.
    Prevention of menstrual migraine with perimenstrual transdermal 17-beta-estradiol: a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind crossover study2011In: Fertility and Sterility, ISSN 0015-0282, E-ISSN 1556-5653, Vol. 96, no 2, p. 498-500Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    he effect of treatment with percutaneous E(2) (100 mu g/24 h) during 2 weeks perimenstrually on the number and severity of menstrual migraine attacks was studied in 27 women in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover trial. We were not able to demonstrate any difference between E(2) supplementation and placebo on the number or severity of migraine attacks, but both regimens showed significant effects compared with before treatment.

  • 10.
    Austeng, Dordi
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Blennow, Mats
    Karolinska University Hospital .
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University.
    Fellman, Vineta
    Lund University.
    Fritz, Thomas
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Hellstrom-Westas, Lena
    Uppsala University.
    Hellstrom, Ann
    University Gothenburg.
    Holmgren, Per Åke
    Umea University Hospital.
    Holmstrom, Gerd
    Uppsala University.
    Jakobsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Ophthalmology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL/MH.
    Jeppsson, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Kent
    Umeå University.
    Kallen, Karin
    Lund University.
    Lagercrantz, Hugo
    Astrid Lindgren Childrens Hospital.
    Laurini, Ricardo
    Bodo Central Hospital.
    Lindberg, Eva
    University of Örebro.
    Lundqvist, Anita
    Lund University.
    Marsal, Karel
    Lund University.
    Nilstun, Tore
    Lund University.
    Norden-Lindeberg, Solveig
    Uppsala University.
    Norman, Mikael
    Karolinska Institute.
    Olhager, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Oestlund, Ingrid
    University of Örebro.
    Serenius, Fredrik
    Umeå University Hospital.
    Simic, Marija
    Karolinska University Hospital .
    Sjors, Gunnar
    Uppsala University.
    Stigson, Lennart
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Stjernqvist, Karin
    Lund University.
    Stromberg, Bo
    Uppsala University.
    Tornqvist, Kristina
    Lund University.
    Wennergren, Margareta
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Wallin, Agneta
    Karolinska University.
    Westgren, Magnus
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Incidence of and risk factors for neonatal morbidity after active perinatal care: extremely preterm infants study in Sweden (EXPRESS)2010In: ACTA PAEDIATRICA, ISSN 0803-5253, Vol. 99, no 7, p. 978-992Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of neonatal morbidity in extremely preterm infants and to identify associated risk factors. Methods: Population based study of infants born before 27 gestational weeks and admitted for neonatal intensive care in Sweden during 2004-2007. Results: Of 638 admitted infants, 141 died. Among these, life support was withdrawn in 55 infants because of anticipation of poor long-term outcome. Of 497 surviving infants, 10% developed severe intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH), 5.7% cystic periventricular leucomalacia (cPVL), 41% septicaemia and 5.8% necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC); 61% had patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) and 34% developed retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) stage andgt;= 3. Eighty-five per cent needed mechanical ventilation and 25% developed severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Forty-seven per cent survived to one year of age without any severe IVH, cPVL, severe ROP, severe BPD or NEC. Tocolysis increased and prolonged mechanical ventilation decreased the chances of survival without these morbidities. Maternal smoking and higher gestational duration were associated with lower risk of severe ROP, whereas PDA and poor growth increased this risk. Conclusion: Half of the infants surviving extremely preterm birth suffered from severe neonatal morbidities. Studies on how to reduce these morbidities and on the long-term health of survivors are warranted.

  • 11.
    Berg, Göran
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Rodriguez-Martinez, Heriberto
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Special Issue: Marcus Wallenberg International Symposium in Comparative Reproductive Immunology, "Immunology at the fetal maternal interface: Basic science and clinical applications", July 7-8th, 2011, Linkoping University, Sweden2011In: American Journal of Reproductive Immunology, ISSN 1046-7408, E-ISSN 1600-0897, Vol. 66, no Issue supplement 1, p. 1-1Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Bergh, C.
    et al.
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Institution of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Institution of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, SE-413 45, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Soderstrom-Anttila, V.
    Söderström-Anttila, V., Infertility Clinic, Family Federation of Finland, Helsinki, Finland.
    Selbing, Anders
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Aittomaki, K.
    Department of Clinical Genetics, Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
    Hazekamp, J.
    Volvat Medical Center, Oslo, Norway.
    Loft, A.
    Fertility Clinic, Rigshospitalet Section 4071, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Nygren, K.G.
    Sophiahemmet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wennerholm, U.B.
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Institution of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Attitudes towards and management of single embryo transfer among Nordic IVF doctors2007In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 86, no 10, p. 1222-1230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. The objective of this study was to investigate the attitudes towards and management of single embryo transfer (SET) among Nordic in vitro fertilisation (IVF) doctors, and to present the rate of SET and multiple pregnancies in the different countries. Methods. A questionnaire was sent to all IVF doctors in the Nordic countries (n=198, 78.5% responded). Pregnancy rates, SET and multiple births rates were extracted from registries. Main outcome measure was attitudes and management of SET. Results. Almost all doctors thought that a twin pregnancy compared unfavourably to a singleton. A twin rate >10% was acceptable for 5% of Swedish doctors. Corresponding figures for Finnish, Danish and Norwegian doctors were 21, 35 and 35%, respectively. For a woman <36 years, performing her first cycle and with two good quality embryos, almost all doctors would recommend SET. For a woman =36 years in a similar situation, SET would be recommended only in Sweden and Finland. The pregnancy rate per embryo transfer (ET), the SET rate 2003, the multiple birth rate, and the estimated SET rate 2004 were 33.3, 21.5, 22.7 and 25% (Denmark), 31.3, 43.4, 14 and 51% (Finland), 40.5, 10.5, 26.5 and 16% (Iceland), 30.6, 18, 25.2 and 26% (Norway), and 35.3, 55.1, 11.8 and 71% (Sweden). Conclusions. The SET and multiple birth rates reflect the attitudes of Nordic IVF doctors to SET and multiple births well. When introducing SET, the attitude of the IVF doctor seems to be important. © 2007 Taylor & Francis.

  • 13.
    Berlin, Gösta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Transfusion Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Östergötland satsar på klinisk forskning2011In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 108, no 3, p. 81-84Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Flera rapporter har visat att svensk klinisk forskning under senare år har tappat mark i förhållande till omvärlden.Inom Östergötland har landstinget och den medicinska fakulteten vid Linköpings universitet (Hälsouniversitet) tagit gemensamma initiativ för att ge bättre förutsättningar för klinisk forskning kombinerat med sjukvårdsarbete.

    Åtgärdsplanen »FoU i befattningsutvecklingen« slår fast sjukvårdens uppdrag och roll inom klinisk forskning.

    Årliga FoU-bokslut görs för sjukvårdsenheterna.

    Projektet »Från student till docent« syftar till att rekrytera studenter från de olika utbildningarna i vård och medicin till forskning redan under studietiden och därefter ge möjligheter att bedriva forskarutbildning och fortsatt forskning kombinerat med klinisk karriär.

    Tidsbegränsade forskningsbefattningar inom sjukvården har inrättats för medarbetare med legitimationsyrken.

    Infrastrukturen kring klinisk forskning med olika typer av kompetensstöd för den enskilda forskaren har stärkts.

  • 14.
    Bhai Mehta, Ratnesh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mirrasekhian, E
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Svensson, J
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Freland, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sharma, S
    Brown University.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Trophoblast cells in immune regulation: modulation of macrophage polarization and production of IL-35 in JOURNAL OF REPRODUCTIVE IMMUNOLOGY, vol 90, issue 2, pp 165-1652011In: JOURNAL OF REPRODUCTIVE IMMUNOLOGY, Elsevier , 2011, Vol. 90, no 2, p. 165-165Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 15.
    Birch Tyrberg, Rasmus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Blomberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Kjölhede, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Deliveries among teenage women - with emphasis on incidence and mode of delivery: a Swedish national survey from 1973 to 20102013In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 13, no 204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Since the 1970-ies Sweden has actively developed strategies in social care, education and health care in order to counteract the negative consequences of adolescent parenthood. The aims of this study are to determine the annual incidence of singleton delivery among adolescents 1973-2010 and analyse obstetric and neonatal outcomes. Methods: A retrospective cohort study, using data from the Swedish Medical Birth Register was conducted. All singleton deliveries in Sweden between 1973 and 2010 were included. Totally 1,941,940 women had 3,761,576 deliveries during the period. Analyses of obstetric and neonatal outcome were restricted to 1992-2010. Adolescents were subdivided into three groups: less than16 years (n = 472), 16-17 years (n = 5376), 18-19 years (n = 23560). The reference group consisted of women age 20-30 years (n = 893505). Data were analysed using multivariate logistic regression models adjusted for confounding factors and presented as crude and adjusted odds ratios with 95% confidence interval. Results: The annual incidence of teenage births decreased significantly from 7.7 to 1.6%. Teenagers were more likely to deliver normally vaginally (aOR 1.70 (95% CI 1.64-1.75), less likely to have Caesarean section (aOR 0.61 (95% CI 0.58-0.64), and had a greater risk of delivering prematurely (less than 28 weeks)(aOR 1.61 (95% CI 1.31-2.00), but did not have more small-for-gestational-age babies (aOR 1.07 (95% CI 0.99-1.14). Risks of placenta previa, postpartum haemorrhage greater than 1000 ml and perineal rupture were significantly lower among teenagers. Although the rate with Apgar score less than 7 at 5 minutes was similar the teenagers neonates showed less fetal distress and meconium aspiration. Conclusion: Adolescent births have steadily decreased in Sweden. Adolescents were more likely to be delivered vaginally than the adult women. The risks for obstetric maternal complications for adolescents were lower than for adult women except for the risk of prematurity.

  • 16.
    Bladh, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Carstensen, John
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Finnström, Orvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Hospitalization in Adolescence and Young Adulthood Among Twins and Singletons: A Swedish Cohort Study of Subjects Born Between 1973 and 19832013In: Twin Research and Human Genetics, ISSN 1832-4274, E-ISSN 1839-2628, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 707-715Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children born with non-optimal birth characteristics — that is, are small for gestational age and/or preterm — have an increased risk for several long-term effects such as neurological sequelae and chronic disease. The purpose of this study was to examine whether twins exhibited a different outcome, compared with singletons, in terms of hospitalization during adolescence and early adulthood, and to what extent differences remain when considering the divergence in birth characteristics between singletons and twins. Persons born between 1973 and 1983 in Sweden and surviving until age 13 were included and followed until the end of 2006. Data on birth characteristics, parental socio-demographic factors, and hospitalizations were collected from national registers. Adjusting for parental socio-demographic factors, twins had a higher risk of being hospitalized than singletons (odds ratio, OR = 1.17, 95% confidence interval, CI = 1.10–1.25) and more often due to ‘Congenital anomalies’ (OR = 1.18, 95% CI = 1.06–1.28), ‘Infections’ (OR = 1.14; 95% CI = 1.08–1.20), ‘External causes of illness’ (OR = 1.10, 95% CI = 1.06–1.15), and ‘Diseases of the nervous system’ (OR = 1.18, 95% CI = 1.10–1.26). Stratifying for birth characteristics, this difference diminishes, and for some diagnoses non-optimal twins seem to do slightly better than non-optimal singletons. Thus, twins with non-optimal birth characteristics had a lower risk of hospitalization than non-optimal singletons on, for example, ‘Congenital anomalies’ and ‘Diseases of the nervous system’ (OR = 0.86, 95% CI = 0.77–0.96; OR = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.81–0.97, respectively) and Total (any) hospitalization (OR = 0.87, 95% CI = 0.83–0.92). Among those with optimal birth characteristics, twins had an increased hospitalization due to ‘External causes of illness’ (OR = 1.07, 95% CI = 1.02–1.13) compared with optimal singletons. Twins have higher hospitalization rates than singletons. In stratifying for birth characteristics, this difference diminishes, and for some diagnoses, non-optimal twins seem to do less poorly than non-optimal singletons.

  • 17.
    Bladh, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Carstensen, John
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Finnström, Orvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Reproductive patterns among twins: a Swedish register study of men and women born 1973-19832013In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    During the last decades there has been a steady increase of twin births. A combination of improved medical treatment of preterm and small-for-gestational age children has contributed to a higher number of surviving twins. Prematurity is known to affect reproduction in a negative way. Few studies have focused on the potential effect twinning may have on future reproduction. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of being born a twin compared to being born a singleton have on future reproduction.

    Methods

    In a national population-based register study, all individuals born between 1973–1983 who were alive and living in Sweden at 13 years of age (n = 1 016 908) constituted the sample. Data on each study subject’s own birth as well as the birth of their first offspring, and parental socio-demographic factors were collected from Swedish population based registers. Hazard ratios and corresponding 95% CI was calculated using Cox proportional hazards model.

    Results

    Twins, both men and women, had a reduced likelihood of reproducing compared to singletons (women: HR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.86-0.93; men: HR = 0.92, 95% CI = 0.87-0.97). This difference in birth rates can only partly be explained by diverging birth characteristics. Amongst men and women born very preterm, twins had an increased likelihood of reproducing compared to singletons (women: HR = 1.25, 95% CI = 1.02-1.62; men: HR = 1.34, 95% CI = 1.01-1.78).

    Conclusions

    Twins have lower reproduction rates compared to singletons, which only to a certain degree can be explained by diverging birth characteristics.

  • 18.
    Blennow, M
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute.
    Ewald, U
    Uppsala University.
    Fritz, T
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Fellman, V
    Lund University.
    Hellstrorm-Westas, L
    Uppsala University.
    Holmgren, P A
    Norrland University.
    Holmstrom, G
    Uppsala University.
    Jeppsson, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kallen, K
    Lund University.
    Lagercrantz, H
    Karolinska Institute.
    Laurini, R
    Bodo Central Hospital.
    Lindberg, E
    University of Örebro.
    Lundqvist, A
    Lund University.
    Marsal, K
    Lund University.
    Nilstun, T
    Lund University.
    Norden-Lindeberg, S
    Uppsala University.
    Norman, M
    Karolinska Institute.
    Olhager, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Otterblad Olausson, P
    Natl Board Hlth & Welf, Epidemiol Centre, Stockholm.
    Ostlund, I
    University of Örebro.
    Serenius, F
    Norrland University.
    Simic, M
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Sjors, G
    Uppsala University.
    Stigsson, L
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Stjernqvist, K
    Lund University.
    Stromberg, B
    Uppsala University.
    Wennergren, M
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Westgren, M
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    HIGH ONE-YEAR SURVIVAL AFTER ACTIVE PERINATAL CARE: EXTREMELY PRETERM INFANTS IN SWEDEN (EXPRESS)2009In: in ACTA PAEDIATRICA, vol 98, 2009, Vol. 98, p. 8-8Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 19.
    Blennow, Mats
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University.
    Fritz, Tomas
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Ake Holmgren, Per
    Umeå University.
    Jeppsson, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindberg, Eva
    University of Örebro.
    Lundqvist, Anita
    Lund University.
    Norden Lindeberg, Solveig
    Uppsala University.
    Olhager, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Ostlund, Ingrid
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Simic, Marija
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Sjoers, Gunnar
    Uppsala University.
    Stigson, Lennart
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Fellman, Vineta
    Lund University.
    Hellstrom-Westas, Lena
    Uppsala University.
    Norman, Mikael
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Westgren, Magnus
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Holmstrom, Gerd
    Uppsala University.
    Laurini, Ricardo
    Nordland Hospital.
    Stjernqvist, Karin
    Lund University.
    Kallen, Karin
    Lund University.
    Lagercrantz, Hugo
    Karolinska Institute.
    Marsal, Karel
    Lund University.
    Serenius, Fredrik
    Umeå University.
    Wennergren, Margareta
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Nilstun, Tore
    Lund University.
    Otterblad Olausson, Petra
    National Board of Health & Welfare.
    Stromberg, Bo
    Uppsala University.
    One-Year Survival of Extremely Preterm Infants After Active Perinatal Care in Sweden2009In: JAMA-JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION, ISSN 0098-7484, Vol. 301, no 21, p. 2225-2233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context Up-to-date information on infant survival after extremely preterm birth is needed for assessing perinatal care services, clinical guidelines, and parental counseling. Objective To determine the 1-year survival in all infants born before 27 gestational weeks in Sweden during 2004-2007. Design, Setting, and Patients Population-based prospective observational study of extremely preterm infants (707 live-born and 304 stillbirths) born to 887 mothers in 904 deliveries (102 multiple births) in all obstetric and neonatal units in Sweden from April 1, 2004, to March 31, 2007. Main Outcome Measures Infant survival to 365 days and survival without major neonatal morbidity (intraventricular hemorrhage grade andgt; 2, retinopathy of prematurity stage andgt; 2, periventricular leukomalacia, necrotizing enterocolitis, severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia). Associations between perinatal interventions and survival. Results The incidence of extreme prematurity was 3.3 per 1000 infants. Overall perinatal mortality was 45% (from 93% at 22 weeks to 24% at 26 weeks), with 30% stillbirths, including 6.5% intrapartum deaths. Of live-born infants, 91% were admitted to neonatal intensive care and 70% survived to 1 year of age (95% confidence interval [CI], 67%-73%). The Kaplan-Meier survival estimates for 22, 23, 24, 25, and 26 weeks were 9.8% (95% CI, 4%-23%), 53% ( 95% CI, 44%-63%), 67% (95% CI, 59%-75%), 82% (95% CI, 76%-87%), and 85% ( 95% CI, 81%-90%), respectively. Lower risk of infant death was associated with tocolytic treatment (adjusted for gestational age odds ratio [ OR], 0.43; 95% CI, 0.36-0.52), antenatal corticosteroids (OR, 0.44; 95% CI, 0.24-0.81), surfactant treatment within 2 hours after birth ( OR, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.32-0.71), and birth at a level III hospital (OR, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.32-0.75). Among 1-year survivors, 45% had no major neonatal morbidity. Conclusion During 2004 to 2007, 1-year survival of infants born alive at 22 to 26 weeks of gestation in Sweden was 70% and ranged from 9.8% at 22 weeks to 85% at 26 weeks.

  • 20.
    Blomberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Maternal and Neonatal Outcomes Among Obese Women With Weight Gain Below the New Institute of Medicine Recommendations2011In: OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY, ISSN 0029-7844, Vol. 117, no 5, p. 1065-1070Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate whether weight loss or low gestational weight gain in class I-III obese women is associated with adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes compared with gestational weight gain within the new Institute of Medicine recommendations. METHODS: This was a population-based cohort study, which included 32,991 obesity class I, 10,068 obesity class II, and 3,536 obesity class III women who were divided into four gestational weight gain categories. Women with low (0-4.9 kg) or no gestational weight gain were compared with women gaining the recommended 5-9 kg concerning obstetric and neonatal outcome after suitable adjustments. RESULTS: Women in obesity class III who lost weight during pregnancy had a decreased risk of cesarean delivery (24.4%; odds ratio [OR] 0.77, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.60-0.99), large-for-gestational-age births (11.2%, OR 0.64, 95% CI 0.46-0.90), and no significantly increased risk for pre-eclampsia, excessive bleeding during delivery, instrumental delivery, low Apgar score, or fetal distress compared with obese (class III) women gaining within the Institute of Medicine recommendations. There was an increased risk for small for gestational age, 3.7% (OR 2.34, 95% CI 1.15-4.76) among women in obesity class III losing weight, but there was no significantly increased risk of small for gestational age in the same group with low weight gain. CONCLUSION: Obese women (class II and III) who lose weight during pregnancy seem to have a decreased or unaffected risk for cesarean delivery, large for gestational age, pre-eclampsia, excessive postpartum bleeding, instrumental delivery, low Apgar score, and fetal distress. The twofold increased risk of small for gestational age in obesity class III and weight loss (3.7%) is slightly above the overall prevalence of small-for-gestational-age births in Sweden (3.6%).

  • 21.
    Blomberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Maternal Obesity and Risk of Postpartum Hemorrhage2011In: Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 0029-7844, E-ISSN 1873-233X, Vol. 118, no 3, p. 561-568Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate whether maternal obesity was associated with an increased risk for postpartum hemorrhage more than 1,000 mL and whether there was an association between maternal obesity and causes of postpartum hemorrhage and mode of delivery. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMETHODS: A population-based cohort study including 1,114,071 women with singleton pregnancies who gave birth in Sweden from January 1, 1997 through December 31, 2008, who were divided into six body mass index (BMI) classes. Obese women (class I-III) were compared with normal-weight women concerning the risk for postpartum hemorrhage after suitable adjustments. The use of heparin-like drugs over the BMI strata was analyzed in a subgroup. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanRESULTS: There was an increased prevalence of postpartum hemorrhage over the study period associated primarily with changes in maternal characteristics. The risk of atonic uterine hemorrhage increased rapidly with increasing BMI. There was a twofold increased risk in obesity class III (1.8%). No association was found between postpartum hemorrhage with retained placenta and maternal obesity. There was an increased risk for postpartum hemorrhage for women with a BMI of 40 or higher (5.2%) after normal delivery (odds ratio [OR] 1.23, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04-1.45]) compared with normal-weight women (4.4%) and even more pronounced (13.6%) after instrumental delivery (OR 1.69, 95% CI 1.22-2.34) compared with normal-weight women 8.8%). Maternal obesity was a risk factor for the use of heparin-like drugs (OR 2.86, 95% CI 2.22-3.68). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanCONCLUSION: The increased risk for atonic postpartum hemorrhage in the obese group has important clinical implications, such as considering administration of prophylactic postpartum uterotonic drugs to this group.

  • 22.
    Blomberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Maternal Obesity, Mode of Delivery, and Neonatal Outcome2013In: Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 0029-7844, E-ISSN 1873-233X, Vol. 122, no 1, p. 50-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether adverse neonatal outcome, defined as birth injuries or severe illnesses in the newborn, was associated with maternal body mass index (BMI) in singleton pregnancies overall and depending on mode of delivery. METHODS: This was a cohort study including 1,024,471 women. Data were collected from the Swedish Medical Birth Registry. Women were categorized into six classes of BMI. Obese women were compared with normal weight women regarding adverse neonatal outcome after suitable adjustments. Four modes of delivery were evaluated: vaginal delivery; instrumental vaginal delivery; elective cesarean delivery; and emergency cesarean delivery. RESULTS: Compared with neonates born to women of normal weight, neonates born to women with BMIs of 40 or more (morbidly obese) were at increased risk of birth injury to the peripheral nervous system (odds ratio [OR] 3.80, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.83-5.12; 0.2% compared with 0.6%), birth injury to the skeleton (OR 2.59, 95% CI 2.10-3.21; 0.5% compared with 1.1%), respiratory distress syndrome (OR 2.08, 95% CI 1.88-2.30; 2.9 compared with 5.8%), bacterial sepsis (OR 2.90, 95% CI 2.43-3.46; 0.6% compared with 1.7%), convulsions (OR 3.43, 95% CI 2.63-4.47; 0.2% compared with 0.8%), and hypoglycemia (OR 3.48, 95% CI 3.20-3.78; 2.4% compared with 7.9%). For morbidly obese women, elective cesarean delivery and vaginal delivery were associated with twice the increased risk of adverse neonatal outcomes when compared with women of normal weight. CONCLUSION: Neonates born to morbidly obese women are at markedly increased risk of adverse neonatal outcome regardless of mode of delivery. Obstetricians should not disregard the neonatal problems associated with elective cesarean delivery for morbidly obese women.

  • 23.
    Blomberg, Marie I
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Källén, Bengt
    University of Lund.
    Maternal obesity and morbid obesity: the risk for birth defects in the offspring.2010In: Birth defects research. Part A, Clinical and molecular teratology, ISSN 1542-0760, Vol. 88, no 1, p. 35-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to assess, in a large data set from Swedish Medical Health Registries, whether maternal obesity and maternal morbid obesity were associated with an increased risk for various structural birth defects. METHODS: The study population consisted of 1,049,582 infants born in Sweden from January 1, 1995, through December 31, 2007, with known maternal weight and height data. Women were grouped in six categories of body mass index (BMI) according to World Health Organization classification. Infants with congenital birth defects were identified from three sources: the Swedish Medical Birth Registry, the Register of Birth Defects, and the National Patient Register. Maternal age, parity, smoking, and year of birth were thought to be potential confounders and were included as covariates in the adjusted odds ratio analyses. RESULTS: Ten percent of the study population was obese. Morbid obesity (BMI > or = 40) occurred in 0.7%. The prevalence of congenital malformations was 4.7%, and the prevalence of relatively severe malformations was 3.2%. Maternal prepregnancy morbid obesity was associated with neural tube defects OR 4.08 (95% CI 1.87-7.75), cardiac defects OR 1.49 (95% CI 1.24-1.80), and orofacial clefts OR 1.90 (95% CI 1.27-2.86). Maternal obesity (BMI > or = 30) significantly increased the risk of hydrocephaly, anal atresia, hypospadias, cystic kidney, pes equinovarus, omphalocele, and diaphragmatic hernia. CONCLUSION: The risk for a morbidly obese pregnant woman to have an infant with a congenital birth defect is small, but for society the association is important in the light of the ongoing obesity epidemic.

  • 24.
    Boij, R
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Nilsson-Ekdahl, K
    Uppsala University.
    Svensson, J
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sandholm, K
    Linneus University.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Matthiesen, Leif
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Palonek, E
    Karolinska University.
    Jarle, M
    Karolinska University.
    Biomarkers of coagulation, inflammation and angiogenesis are independently associated with preeclampsia in JOURNAL OF REPRODUCTIVE IMMUNOLOGY, vol 94, issue 1, pp 109-1092012In: JOURNAL OF REPRODUCTIVE IMMUNOLOGY, Elsevier , 2012, Vol. 94, no 1, p. 109-109Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 25.
    Boij, Roland
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Svensson, Judit
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson-Ekdahl, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Sweden Linneaus University, Sweden .
    Sandholm, Kerstin
    Linneaus University, Sweden .
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Palonek, Elzbieta
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden Doping Control Lab, Sweden .
    Garle, Mats
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden Doping Control Lab, Sweden .
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Matthiesen, Leif
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Biomarkers of Coagulation, Inflammation, and Angiogenesis are Independently Associated with Preeclampsia2012In: AMERICAN JOURNAL OF REPRODUCTIVE IMMUNOLOGY, ISSN 1046-7408, Vol. 68, no 3, p. 258-270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Problem Although preeclampsia has been associated with inflammation, coagulation, and angiogenesis, their correlation and relative contribution are unknown. Method of Study About 114 women with preeclampsia, 31 with early onset (EOP) and 83 with late onset preeclampsia (LOP), and 100 normal pregnant controls were included. A broad panel of 32 biomarkers reflecting coagulation, inflammation, and angiogenesis was analyzed. Results Preeclampsia was associated with decreased antithrombin, IL-4 and placental growth factor levels and with increased C3a, pentraxin-3, and sFlt-1 levels, with more marked differences in the EOP group. The Th1-associated chemokines CXCL10 and CXCL11 were significantly higher in the preeclampsia and EOP group than in controls, respectively. No correlations between the biomarkers were found in preeclampsia. Multivariate logistic regression tests confirmed the results. Conclusions Cytokines, chemokines and complement activation seem to be part of a Th1-like inflammatory reaction in preeclampsia, most pronounced in EOP, where chemokines may be more useful than cytokines as biomarkers. Biomarkers were not correlated suggesting partly independent or in time separated mechanisms.

  • 26.
    Borendal Wodlin, Ninnie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fast track abdominal hysterectomy: On the mode of anesthesia, postoperative recovery and health economics2011Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Hysterectomy is the most common major gynecological operation in the Western World and approximately 5000 benign hysterectomies are performed in Sweden every year. Consequently it is a surgical procedure that affects many women. The procedure comprises challenges concerning perioperative health care, perceived postoperative symptoms, quality of life aspects and health economics. The concept of fast track is a multimodal strategy to reduce hormonal surgical stress response and achieve an enhanced postoperative recovery and is today considered to be evidence based in relation to colorectal surgery. Spinal anesthesia, as an important part of fast track, provides benefits of extended effect on analgesia and reduced postoperative morbidity. It is reasonable to believe that employing the strategies of fast track including spinal anesthesia could also provide substantial benefits for women requiring surgical removal of the uterus.

    Aims: To determine whether duration of hospital stay, presence and intensity of postoperative symptoms, duration of sick leave and cost-effectiveness differ between women undergoing benign fast track abdominal hysterectomy in spinal anesthesia with intrathecal morphine (SA) and in standard general anesthesia (GA).

    Material & Methods: 180 women participated in this open randomized multicenter study with five participating hospitals in the southeast region of Sweden. One hundred and sixty two completed the study; 82 women were randomized to SA and 80 to GA. A fast track model comprising premedication without sedatives, intravenous fluid regulation, analgesics based on non-opioids, pre-emptive antiemetic therapy, early enteral nutrition and mobilization and standard criteria for discharge were used. End points were duration of hospital stay, use of analgesics, perceived postoperative symptoms, occurrence of postoperative complications, duration of sick leave and health economic evaluations.

    Results: Duration of hospital stay did not differ between the two modes of anesthesia. Vomiting and pruritus occurred significantly more often after SA. Complication rates did not differ between groups. Women with SA experienced less overall discomfort and had a reduced need for opioids postoperatively. Abdominal pain, drowsiness and fatigue occurred less often and with lower intensity among the women in the SA group. Health related quality of life improved faster and the duration of sick leave was shorter in women after SA. Total costs (hospital costs plus costs for productivity loss) were lower for the SA group. Within the first 29 days after hysterectomy the women in the SA group gained more QALYs than women in the GA group.

    Conclusions: The duration of hospitalisation after fast track abdominal hysterectomy was less than 50 hours and mode of anesthesia did not influence this. SA displayed considerable advantages regarding postoperative symptoms and recovery. SA was considered cost-effective in comparison with GA due to lower total costs and more QALYs gained. Our study indicates that SA should be recommended as the first choice of anesthesia in benign abdominal hysterectomy.

    List of papers
    1. The impact of mode of anaesthesia on postoperative recovery from fast-track abdominal hysterectomy: a randomised clinical trial
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The impact of mode of anaesthesia on postoperative recovery from fast-track abdominal hysterectomy: a randomised clinical trial
    2011 (English)In: BJOG-AN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNAECOLOGY, ISSN 1470-0328, Vol. 118, no 3, p. 299-308Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To determine whether the duration of hospital stay after abdominal hysterectomy in a fast-track setting differed between women operated under general anaesthesia or in spinal anaesthesia with intrathecal morphine. Design An open randomised controlled multicentre study. Setting Five hospitals in the south-east of Sweden. Population One hundred and eighty women scheduled for benign hysterectomy were randomised: 162 completed the study, 82 were allocated to spinal anaesthesia and 80 were allocated to general anaesthesia. Methods Fast-track model comprising no use of sedatives for premedication, pre-emptive anti-emetic therapy, intravenous fluid restriction, analgesics based on non-opioids, early enteral nutrition and mobilisation, and standard criteria for discharge. Spinal anaesthesia with 20 mg hyperbaric bupivacaine and 0.2 mg morphine. General anaesthesia with propofol, fentanyl and rocuronium, and with continuous propofol and ventilation with oxygen-in-air for maintenance of anaesthesia. Main outcome measures Hospital stay, consumption of analgesics, vomiting, pruritus and bowel function recovery. Results Median hospitalisation did not differ significantly between women who had hysterectomy with spinal or general anaesthesia (46 and 50 hours, respectively). Spinal anaesthesia was associated with a significantly lower use of opioids and a faster recovery of bowel function, although vomiting and pruritus were more prevalent. Conclusions In a fast-track model the duration of hospitalisation after abdominal hysterectomy was andlt; 50 hours, independent of the mode of anaesthesia. Spinal anaesthesia reduced the need for postoperative morphine compared with general anaesthesia. In order to improve patient recovery after gynaecological surgery further studies based on fast-track programmes are needed.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Blackwell Publishing Ltd., 2011
    Keywords
    Fast-track, general anaesthesia, hysterectomy, intrathecal morphine, randomised study, spinal anaesthesia
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-66315 (URN)10.1111/j.1471-0528.2010.02697.x (DOI)000286148300006 ()
    Note

    This is the authors’ version of the following article: Ninnie Borendal Wodlin, Lena Nilsson and Preben Kjölhede, The impact of mode of anaesthesia on postoperative recovery from fast-track abdominal hysterectomy: a randomised clinical trial, 2011, BJOG-AN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNAECOLOGY, (118), 3, 299-308. which has been published in final form at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1471-0528.2010.02697.x Copyright: Blackwell Publishing Ltd. http://eu.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Brand/id-35.html

    Available from: 2011-03-11 Created: 2011-03-11 Last updated: 2015-06-08
    2. Mode of anesthesia and postoperative symptoms following abdominal hysterectomy in a fast-track setting
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mode of anesthesia and postoperative symptoms following abdominal hysterectomy in a fast-track setting
    2011 (English)In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 90, no 4, p. 369-379Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To determine whether postoperative symptoms differ between women who undergo abdominal benign hysterectomy in a fast-track model under general anesthesia or spinal anesthesia with intrathecal morphine. Design. Secondary analysis from a randomized, open, multicenter study. Setting. Five hospitals in south-east Sweden. Population. One-hundred and eighty women scheduled for benign hysterectomy were randomized; 162 completed the study; 82 were allocated to spinal and 80 to general anesthesia. Methods. The Swedish Postoperative Symptoms Questionnaire, completed daily for 1 week and thereafter once a week until 5 weeks postoperatively. Main Outcome Measures. Occurrence, intensity and duration of postoperative symptoms. Results. Women who had hysterectomy under spinal anesthesia with intrathecal morphine experienced significantly less discomfort postoperatively compared with those who had the operation under general anesthesia. Spinal anesthesia reduced the need for opioids postoperatively. The most common symptoms were pain, nausea and vomiting, itching, drowsiness and fatigue. Abdominal pain, drowsiness and fatigue occurred significantly less often and with lower intensity among the spinal anesthesia group. Although postoperative nausea and vomiting was reported equally in the two groups, vomiting episodes were reported significantly more often during the first day after surgery in the spinal anesthesia group. Spinal anesthesia was associated with a higher prevalence of postoperative itching. Conclusions. Spinal anesthesia with intrathecal morphine carries advantages regarding postoperative symptoms and recovery following fast-track abdominal hysterectomy.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Informa Healthcare, 2011
    Keywords
    Abdominal hysterectomy, anesthesia, fast track, postoperative symptoms, randomized study
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-67978 (URN)10.1111/j.1600-0412.2010.01059.x (DOI)000289515500013 ()
    Note

    Original Publication: Ninnie Borendal Wodlin, Lena Nilsson, Kristofer Arestedt and Preben Kjölhede, Mode of anesthesia and postoperative symptoms following abdominal hysterectomy in a fast-track setting, 2011, ACTA OBSTETRICIA ET GYNECOLOGICA SCANDINAVICA, (90), 4, 369-379. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0412.2010.01059.x Copyright: Informa Healthcare http://informahealthcare.com/

    Available from: 2011-05-04 Created: 2011-05-04 Last updated: 2017-12-11
    3. Health-related quality of life and postoperative recovery in fast-track hysterectomy
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health-related quality of life and postoperative recovery in fast-track hysterectomy
    2011 (English)In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 90, no 4, p. 362-368Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To determine whether health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and postoperative recovery of women who undergo abdominal hysterectomy in a fast-track program under general anesthesia (GA) differ from women who receive spinal anesthesia with intrathecal morphine (SA). Design. Secondary analysis from an open randomized controlled multicenter study. Setting. Five hospitals in south-east Sweden. Population. One hundred and eighty women admitted for abdominal hysterectomy for benign disease were randomized; 162 completed the study, 80 with GA and 82 with SA. Methods. The HRQoL was measured preoperatively using the EuroQoL EQ-5D and the Short-Form-36 health survey (SF-36) questionnaires. The EQ-5D was used daily for 1 week; thereafter, once weekly for 4 weeks and again 6 months after operation. The SF-36 was completed at 5 weeks and 6 months. Dates of commencing and ending sick leave were registered. Main Outcome Measures. Changes in HRQoL; duration of sick leave. Results. The HRQoL improved significantly faster in women after SA than after GA. Sick leave was significantly shorter after SA than after GA (median 22.5 vs. 28 days). Recovery of HRQoL and duration of sick leave were negatively influenced by postoperative complications. In particular, the mental component of HRQoL was negatively affected by minor complications, even 6 months after the operation. Conclusions. Spinal anesthesia with intrathecal morphine provided substantial advantages in fast-track abdominal hysterectomy for benign gynecological disorders by providing faster recovery and shorter sick leave compared with general anesthesia.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Informa Healthcare, 2011
    Keywords
    Abdominal hysterectomy, anesthesia, fast-track program, quality of life, randomized study
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-67977 (URN)10.1111/j.1600-0412.2010.01058.x (DOI)000289515500012 ()
    Note

    Original Publication: Ninnie Borendal Wodlin, Lena Nilsson and Preben Kjölhede, Health-related quality of life and postoperative recovery in fast-track hysterectomy, 2011, ACTA OBSTETRICIA ET GYNECOLOGICA SCANDINAVICA, (90), 4, 362-368. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0412.2010.01058.x Copyright: Informa Healthcare http://informahealthcare.com/

    Available from: 2011-05-04 Created: 2011-05-04 Last updated: 2017-12-11
    4. Cost-effectiveness of general anesthesia versus spinal anesthesia in fast track abdominal benign hysterectomy
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cost-effectiveness of general anesthesia versus spinal anesthesia in fast track abdominal benign hysterectomy
    2011 (English)In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 0002-9378, E-ISSN 1097-6868, Vol. 205, no 4, p. 043-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The study objective was to compare total costs for hospital stay and postoperative recovery for two groups of women who underwent fast track abdominal benign hysterectomy, one group under general anesthesia, the other under spinal anesthesia. Costs were evaluated in relation to health related quality of life.

    Study Design: Costs of treatment using data from a randomized multicenter study at five hospitals in Sweden were analyzed retrospectively. Of 180 women scheduled for benign abdominal hysterectomy; 162 were randomized for the study, 80 allocated to general anesthesia and 82 to spinal anesthesia.

    Results: Total costs (hospital costs plus costs reduced productivity costs) were lower for the spinal anesthesia group. Women who had spinal anesthesia had a faster recovery measured by health related quality of life and QALYs gained in postoperative month one.

    Conclusion: Use of spinal anesthesia for fast track benign abdominal hysterectomy was more cost-effective than general anesthesia.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2011
    Keywords
    Cost-effectiveness; Fast track hysterectomy; General anesthesia; Health economy; Spinal anesthesia
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-70468 (URN)10.1016/j.ajog.2011.05.043 (DOI)000296084600022 ()
    Note

    Funding agencies|Medical Research Council of South East Sweden||Linkoping University||County Council of Ostergotland||multicenter study group||

    Available from: 2011-09-09 Created: 2011-09-09 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
  • 27.
    Borendal Wodlin, Ninnie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Arestedt, Kristofer
    Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Kjölhede, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Mode of anesthesia and postoperative symptoms following abdominal hysterectomy in a fast-track setting2011In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 90, no 4, p. 369-379Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To determine whether postoperative symptoms differ between women who undergo abdominal benign hysterectomy in a fast-track model under general anesthesia or spinal anesthesia with intrathecal morphine. Design. Secondary analysis from a randomized, open, multicenter study. Setting. Five hospitals in south-east Sweden. Population. One-hundred and eighty women scheduled for benign hysterectomy were randomized; 162 completed the study; 82 were allocated to spinal and 80 to general anesthesia. Methods. The Swedish Postoperative Symptoms Questionnaire, completed daily for 1 week and thereafter once a week until 5 weeks postoperatively. Main Outcome Measures. Occurrence, intensity and duration of postoperative symptoms. Results. Women who had hysterectomy under spinal anesthesia with intrathecal morphine experienced significantly less discomfort postoperatively compared with those who had the operation under general anesthesia. Spinal anesthesia reduced the need for opioids postoperatively. The most common symptoms were pain, nausea and vomiting, itching, drowsiness and fatigue. Abdominal pain, drowsiness and fatigue occurred significantly less often and with lower intensity among the spinal anesthesia group. Although postoperative nausea and vomiting was reported equally in the two groups, vomiting episodes were reported significantly more often during the first day after surgery in the spinal anesthesia group. Spinal anesthesia was associated with a higher prevalence of postoperative itching. Conclusions. Spinal anesthesia with intrathecal morphine carries advantages regarding postoperative symptoms and recovery following fast-track abdominal hysterectomy.

  • 28.
    Borendal Wodlin, Ninnie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Carlsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kjølhede, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Cost-effectiveness of general anesthesia versus spinal anesthesia in fast track abdominal benign hysterectomy2011In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 0002-9378, E-ISSN 1097-6868, Vol. 205, no 4, p. 043-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The study objective was to compare total costs for hospital stay and postoperative recovery for two groups of women who underwent fast track abdominal benign hysterectomy, one group under general anesthesia, the other under spinal anesthesia. Costs were evaluated in relation to health related quality of life.

    Study Design: Costs of treatment using data from a randomized multicenter study at five hospitals in Sweden were analyzed retrospectively. Of 180 women scheduled for benign abdominal hysterectomy; 162 were randomized for the study, 80 allocated to general anesthesia and 82 to spinal anesthesia.

    Results: Total costs (hospital costs plus costs reduced productivity costs) were lower for the spinal anesthesia group. Women who had spinal anesthesia had a faster recovery measured by health related quality of life and QALYs gained in postoperative month one.

    Conclusion: Use of spinal anesthesia for fast track benign abdominal hysterectomy was more cost-effective than general anesthesia.

  • 29.
    Borendal Wodlin, Ninnie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Kjölhede, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Health-related quality of life and postoperative recovery in fast-track hysterectomy2011In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 90, no 4, p. 362-368Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To determine whether health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and postoperative recovery of women who undergo abdominal hysterectomy in a fast-track program under general anesthesia (GA) differ from women who receive spinal anesthesia with intrathecal morphine (SA). Design. Secondary analysis from an open randomized controlled multicenter study. Setting. Five hospitals in south-east Sweden. Population. One hundred and eighty women admitted for abdominal hysterectomy for benign disease were randomized; 162 completed the study, 80 with GA and 82 with SA. Methods. The HRQoL was measured preoperatively using the EuroQoL EQ-5D and the Short-Form-36 health survey (SF-36) questionnaires. The EQ-5D was used daily for 1 week; thereafter, once weekly for 4 weeks and again 6 months after operation. The SF-36 was completed at 5 weeks and 6 months. Dates of commencing and ending sick leave were registered. Main Outcome Measures. Changes in HRQoL; duration of sick leave. Results. The HRQoL improved significantly faster in women after SA than after GA. Sick leave was significantly shorter after SA than after GA (median 22.5 vs. 28 days). Recovery of HRQoL and duration of sick leave were negatively influenced by postoperative complications. In particular, the mental component of HRQoL was negatively affected by minor complications, even 6 months after the operation. Conclusions. Spinal anesthesia with intrathecal morphine provided substantial advantages in fast-track abdominal hysterectomy for benign gynecological disorders by providing faster recovery and shorter sick leave compared with general anesthesia.

  • 30.
    Borendal Wodlin, Ninnie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Kjölhede, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    The impact of mode of anaesthesia on postoperative recovery from fast-track abdominal hysterectomy: a randomised clinical trial2011In: BJOG-AN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNAECOLOGY, ISSN 1470-0328, Vol. 118, no 3, p. 299-308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To determine whether the duration of hospital stay after abdominal hysterectomy in a fast-track setting differed between women operated under general anaesthesia or in spinal anaesthesia with intrathecal morphine. Design An open randomised controlled multicentre study. Setting Five hospitals in the south-east of Sweden. Population One hundred and eighty women scheduled for benign hysterectomy were randomised: 162 completed the study, 82 were allocated to spinal anaesthesia and 80 were allocated to general anaesthesia. Methods Fast-track model comprising no use of sedatives for premedication, pre-emptive anti-emetic therapy, intravenous fluid restriction, analgesics based on non-opioids, early enteral nutrition and mobilisation, and standard criteria for discharge. Spinal anaesthesia with 20 mg hyperbaric bupivacaine and 0.2 mg morphine. General anaesthesia with propofol, fentanyl and rocuronium, and with continuous propofol and ventilation with oxygen-in-air for maintenance of anaesthesia. Main outcome measures Hospital stay, consumption of analgesics, vomiting, pruritus and bowel function recovery. Results Median hospitalisation did not differ significantly between women who had hysterectomy with spinal or general anaesthesia (46 and 50 hours, respectively). Spinal anaesthesia was associated with a significantly lower use of opioids and a faster recovery of bowel function, although vomiting and pruritus were more prevalent. Conclusions In a fast-track model the duration of hospitalisation after abdominal hysterectomy was andlt; 50 hours, independent of the mode of anaesthesia. Spinal anaesthesia reduced the need for postoperative morphine compared with general anaesthesia. In order to improve patient recovery after gynaecological surgery further studies based on fast-track programmes are needed.

  • 31.
    Borneskog, C
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Skoog Svanberg, A
    Uppsala University.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Lampic, C
    Karolinska Institute.
    Lesbian relationships - a study of relationship quality in lesbian couples treated with sperm donation in HUMAN REPRODUCTION, vol 26, issue , pp I57-I582011In: HUMAN REPRODUCTION, Oxford University Press (OUP) , 2011, Vol. 26, p. I57-I58Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 32.
    Borneskog, Catrin
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Skoog Svanberg, Agneta
    Uppsala University.
    Lampic, Claudia
    Karolinska Institute.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Relationship quality in lesbian and heterosexual couples undergoing treatment with assisted reproduction2012In: Human Reproduction, ISSN 0268-1161, E-ISSN 1460-2350, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 779-786Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the major factors impacting on a couples relationship is the desire to have children. To many couples having a child is a confirmation of their love and relationship and a means to deepen and develop their intimate relationship. At the same time parental stress can impact on relationship quality. Relationship quality in lesbian couples is, currently, sparsely studied. The aim of the present study was to compare lesbian and heterosexual couples perceptions of their relationship quality at the commencement of assisted reproduction, and to relate this to background data such as educational level, having previous children and, for lesbian couples, the use of a known versus anonymous donor. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanThe present study is part of the prospective longitudinal oSwedish study on gamete donation, including all fertility clinics performing donation treatment in Sweden. Of a consecutive cohort of 214 lesbian couples about to receive donor insemination and 212 heterosexual couples starting regular IVF treatment, 166 lesbian couples (78 response) and 151 heterosexual couples (71 response) accepted participation in the study. At commencement of assisted reproduction participants individually completed questionnaires including the instrument oENRICH, which is a standardized measure concerning relationship quality. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanIn general, the couples rated their relationship quality as good, the lesbian couple better than the heterosexuals. In addition, the lesbian women with previous children assessed their relationship quality lower than did the lesbian woman without previous children. For heterosexual couples previous children did not influence their relationship quality. Higher educational levels reduced the satisfaction with the sexual relationship (P 0.04) for treated lesbian women, and enhanced the rating of conflict resolution for treated lesbian women (P 0.03) and their partners (P 0.02). Heterosexual women with high levels of education expressed more satisfaction with communication in their relationship (P 0.02) than did heterosexual women with lower educational levels. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanIn this Swedish study sample of lesbian and heterosexual couples relationships, we found that they were generally well adjusted and stable in their relationships when starting treatment with donated sperm or IVF, respectively. However, where lesbian women had children from a previous relationship, it decreased relationship quality. For the heterosexual couples previous children did not affect relationship quality.

  • 33.
    Borneskog, Catrin
    et al.
    Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kvinnors och barns hälsa, Obstetrik & gynekologi, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Lampic, C
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Skoog Svanberg, Agneta
    Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kvinnors och barns hälsa, Obstetrik & gynekologi, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Symptoms of anxiety and depression in lesbian couples treated with donated sperm: a descriptive study2013In: British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 1470-0328, E-ISSN 1471-0528, Vol. 120, no 7, p. 839-846Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    To investigate symptoms of anxiety and depression in lesbian couples undergoing assisted reproductive treatment (ART), and to study the relationship of demographic data, pregnancy outcome and future reproductive plans with symptoms of anxiety and depression.

    Design

    Descriptive, a part of the prospective longitudinal ‘Swedish study on gamete donation’.

    Setting

    All university clinics in Sweden performing gamete donation.

    Population

    A consecutive sample of 214 lesbian couples requesting assisted reproduction, 165 of whom participated.

    Methods

    Participants individually completed three study-specific questionnaires and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS): time point 1 (T1), at commencement of ART; time point 2 (T2), approximately 2 months after treatment; and time point 3 (T3), 2–5 years after first treatment.

    Main outcome measures

    Anxiety and depression (HADS), pregnancy outcome and future reproductive plans.

    Results

    The vast majority of lesbian women undergoing assisted reproduction reported no symptoms of anxiety and depression at the three assessment points. A higher percentage of the treated women, compared with the partners, reported symptoms of anxiety at T2 (14% versus 5%, P = 0.011) and T3 (10% versus 4%, P = 0.018), as well as symptoms of depression at T2 (4% versus 0%, P = 0.03) and T3 (3% versus 0%, P = 0.035). The overall pregnancy outcome was high; almost three-quarters of lesbian couples gave birth 2–5 years after sperm donation treatments. Open-ended comments illustrated joy and satisfaction about family building.

    Conclusion

    Lesbian women in Sweden reported good psychological health before and after treatment with donated sperm.

  • 34.
    Borud, Einar Kristian
    et al.
    University of Tromso.
    Alraek, Terje
    University of Tromso.
    White, Adrian
    University of Exeter.
    Fonnebo, Vinjar
    University of Tromso.
    Eggen, Anne Elise
    University of Tromso.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Lindh-Åstrand, Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Grimsgaard, Sameline
    University of Tromso.
    The Acupuncture on Hot Flushes Among Menopausal Women (ACUFLASH) study, a randomized controlled trial2009In: MENOPAUSE-THE JOURNAL OF THE NORTH AMERICAN MENOPAUSE SOCIETY, ISSN 1072-3714, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 484-493Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study compared the effectiveness of individualized acupuncture plus self-care versus self-care alone on hot flashes and health-related quality of life in postmenopausal women.

    Methods: This study involved a multicenter, pragmatic, randomized, controlled trial with two parallel arms. Participants were postmenopausal women experiencing, on average, seven or more hot flashes per 24 hours during seven consecutive days. The acupuncture group received 10 acupuncture treatment sessions and advice on self-care, and the control group received advice on self-care only. The frequency and severity (0-10 scale) of hot flashes were registered in a diary. Urine excretion of calcitonin gene-related peptide was assessed at baseline and after 12 weeks. The primary endpoint was change in mean hot flash frequency from baseline to 12 weeks. The secondary endpoint was change in health-related quality of life measured by the Womens Health Questionnaire.

    Results: Hot flash frequency decreased by 5.8 per 24 hours in the acupuncture group (n = 134) and 3.7 per 24 hours in the control group (n = 133), a difference of 2.1 (P &lt; 0.001). Hot flash intensity decreased by 3.2 units in the acupuncture group and 1.8 units in the control group, a difference of 1.4 (P &lt; 0.001). The acupuncture group experienced statistically significant improvements in the vasomotor, sleep, and somatic symptoms dimensions of the Womens Health Questionnaire compared with the control group. Urine calcitonin gene-related peptide excretion remained unchanged from baseline to week 12.

    Conclusions: Acupuncture plus self-care can contribute to a clinically relevant reduction in hot flashes and increased health-related quality of life in postmenopausal women.

  • 35.
    Brohede, Sabina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Wyon, Yvonne
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Wingren, Gun
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Body dysmorphic disorder in female Swedish dermatology patients2017In: International Journal of Dermatology, ISSN 0011-9059, E-ISSN 1365-4632, Vol. 56, no 12, p. 1387-1394Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundIndividuals with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) are highly distressed and impaired owing to perceived defects in their physical appearance that are not noticeable to others. They are frequently concerned about their skin and often present to dermatologists rather than psychiatrists. However, BDD patients attending dermatology clinics may be at risk of not receiving an appropriate assessment and beneficial treatment. The aims of this study were to estimate the BDD prevalence rate among Swedish female dermatology patients and to assess the psychological condition of BDD patients compared to that of other dermatology patients. MethodsThe occurrence of BDD was estimated using the Body Dysmorphic Disorder Questionnaire (BDDQ), a validated self-report measure for BDD. Symptoms of depression and anxiety were measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), and quality of life was assessed using the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI). ResultsThe prevalence rate of BDD among female Swedish dermatology patients was 4.9% (95% CI 3.2-7.4). Anxiety (HADS A11) was 4-fold more commonly reported by patients with positive BDD screening (48% vs. 11%), and depression (HADS D11) was over 10-fold more common in patients with positive BDD screening (19% vs. 1.8%) (Pamp;lt;0.001). The median DLQI score was 18 in the BDD group, compared to a score of 4 in the non-BDD group (Pamp;lt;0.001). ConclusionsOur results indicate that BDD is fairly common among female Swedish dermatology patients (4.9%) and that BDD patients have high levels of depression and anxiety and severely impaired quality of life.

  • 36.
    Brynhildsen, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Adam
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Ekholm, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    The importance of maternal BMI on infants birth weight in four BMI groups for the period 1978-20012009In: ACTA OBSTETRICIA ET GYNECOLOGICA SCANDINAVICA, ISSN 0001-6349, Vol. 88, no 4, p. 391-396Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To study whether increased maternal weight and other factors of importance is associated with higher birth weights of the children over a period of almost 25 years. Design. Retrospective cohort study. Setting. Delivery wards in southeast Sweden. Sample. A total of 4,330 delivered women and their children from the years 1978, 1986, 1992, 1997, and 2001. Methods. Analysis of covariance was used to evaluate the importance of the mothers body mass index (BMI) on the childrens birth weights during the study years and smoking, parity, employment, gestational age, and the age of the mothers were adjusted for. Main outcome measures. Weight of the offspring in relation to maternal BMI and possible confounders such as smoking, parity, employment, gestational age, and the age of the mother. Results. Between 1978 and 1992, there was an increase in birth weight in each of the four BMI categories (i.e. BMI20, 20-24.9, 25-29.9 and 30, respectively) even after adjustments were made for relevant background characteristics (p0.001). However, between 1992 and 2001, the birth weight for children whose mothers had a BMI of less than 20 or between 20 and 24.9 decreased (p0.001). For almost every study year, the mothers BMI was of significant influence on the childrens birth weights. However, the proportion of variance explained by the models (i.e. the adjusted R2) was not substantially altered when the mothers BMI was excluded from the models. Conclusion. Maternal BMI is of significance to explain trends in infants birth weight over time, but not of sole importance.

  • 37.
    Brynhildsen, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Adam
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Norinder, E.
    Ekholm, Katarina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology .
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Trends in body mass index during early pregnancy in Swedish women 1978-20012006In: Public Health, ISSN 0033-3506, E-ISSN 1476-5616, Vol. 120, no 5, p. 393-399Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: to study the body mass index (BMI) in women seeking maternity health care during early pregnancy in Sweden, and to show trends for a period of more than 20 years. Study design: register study. Methods: data from the maternity health programme on consecutively delivered women in two Swedish hospitals were collected for the years 1978, 1986, 1992, 1997 and 2001. All women were weighed at their first midwife visit between 8 and 10 weeks of gestation and height was also measured. Results: data on 4883 women were collected. Data on weight were available for 4490 (92%) women and data on BMI were available for 4378 (90%) women. The age-adjusted average weight increased from 59.5 kg in 1978 to 68.2 kg in 2001, and the BMI increased from 21.7 in 1978 to 24.7 in 2001. In 2001, 38.6% of the women had a BMI >25 compared with 11.2 in 1978. In 2001, 11.6% of the women were obese compared with 2.2% in 1978. Conclusions: during the last two decades, an alarming increase in weight has occurred in Swedish women of childbearing age. © 2005.

  • 38.
    Brynhildsen, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Blomberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Claesson, Ing-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Nyström, Fredrik H.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Sydsjö, Adam
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Leptin and adiponectin in cord blood from children of normal weight, overweight and obese mothers2013In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 102, no 6, p. 620-624Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim To study cord blood concentrations of adiponectin and leptin in children born by normal weight, overweight and obese mothers and to study these parameters in relation to a weight gain intervention programme for obese mothers. Methods Ten millilitre cord blood was collected and analysed for leptin and adiponectin concentrations in children with gestational age andgt;37weeks born by 60 normal weight, 45 overweight and 145 obese mothers. 82 obese mothers took part in a weight gain intervention programme. Results Concentrations of leptin and adiponectin were higher in cord blood from children of overweight and obese mothers compared with children of normal weight mothers (leptin: Md 13.2, 30, 3 and 90.2ng/mL respectively, pandlt;0.001; adiponectin 35.9, 205.4, 213.8ng/L pandlt;0.001). No differences were found between overweight and obese mothers. The weight gain intervention programme for obese pregnant women had significant effects on the weight gain during pregnancy but had no effects on cord blood serum concentrations of leptin and adiponectin. Conclusion Cord blood leptin and adiponectin concentrations were higher in children born by overweight or obese women compared with children of normal weight mothers. A weight gain intervention programme for obese pregnant women did not affect these results. Intrauterine exposition to high concentrations of leptin and adiponectin may play a role in weight development later in life.

  • 39.
    Bäck, Karolina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wahlström, Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Kjölhede, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Gasslander, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Arnqvist, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Differential expression of insulin and IGF-I receptors in human tissuesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Insulin and IGF-I are related peptides with similar structure. They both signal via their cognate receptors, the insulin receptor (IR) and the insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I receptor (IGF-IR).

    Our aim was to simultaneously measure the amount of insulin and IGF-I receptors in different human tissues and also the IR-A and IR-B isoforms to study tissue specific expression

    Renal artery intima-media, myometrium, skeletal muscle or liver tissue samples were obtained from patients undergoing surgery. IR, IGF-IR, IR-A and IR-B gene expression was investigated with real-time RT-PCR and expression of IR and IGF-IR protein was examined by Western blot and ELISA.

    Renal arteries and myometrium expressed the IGF-IR gene to a higher extent than the IR gene, liver expressed more IR than IGF-IR and skeletal muscle expressed almost equal amounts of both receptors. IR-B was the most abundant isoform in all tissues. With Western blot we could detect IR in skeletal muscle, liver and myometrium. With ELISA we found that, normalized to total protein, the highest levels of IGF-IR were found in renal arteries and myometrium and low levels in skeletal muscle and liver. The highest levels of IR were found in liver.

    In conclusion there is a large variation in the quantity and ratio of insulin receptors and IGF-I receptors expressed in different tissues, the extremes being arterial intima media with predominantly IGF-I receptors and liver with predominantly insulin receptors. This suggests that differential expression of insulin and IGF-I receptors is a key mechanism in regulation of growth and metabolism.

  • 40.
    Carlhall, Sara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Kallen, Karin
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Blomberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Maternal body mass index and duration of labor2013In: European Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology, ISSN 0301-2115, E-ISSN 1872-7654, Vol. 171, no 1, p. 49-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To evaluate whether the duration of the active phase of labor is associated with maternal body mass index (BMI), in nulliparous women with spontaneous onset of labor. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanStudy design: Historical prospective cohort study including 63,829 nulliparous women with a singleton pregnancy and a spontaneous onset of labor, who delivered between January 1, 1995 and December 31, 2009. Data were collected from the Perinatal Revision South registry, a regional perinatal database in Southern Sweden. Women were categorized into six classes of BMI. Overweight and obese women were compared to normal weight women regarding duration of active labor. Adjustments were made for year of delivery, maternal age and infant birth weight. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: The median duration of labor was significantly longer in obese women (class I obesity (BMI 30-34.9) = 9.1 h, class II obesity (BMI 35-39.9) = 9.2 h and class III obesity (BMI andgt; 40) = 9.8 h) compared to normal-weight women (BMI 18.5-24.9) = 8.8 h (p andlt; 0.001). The risk of labor lasting more than 12 h increased with increasing maternal BMI: OR 1.04(1.01-1.06) (OR per 5-units BMI-increase).The risk of labor lasting more than 12 h or emergency cesarean section within 12 h, compared to vaginal deliveries within 12 h, increased with increasing maternal BMI. Duration of the second stage of labor was significantly shorter in obese women: in class III obesity the median value was 0.45 h compared to normal weight women, 0.55 h (p andlt; 0.001). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion: In nulliparous women with a spontaneous onset of labor, duration of the active phase of labor increased significantly with increasing maternal BMI. Once obese women reach the second stage they deliver more quickly than normal weight women, which implies that the risk of prolonged labor is restricted to the first stage of labor. It is clinically important to consider the prolonged first stage of labor in obese women, for example when diagnosing first stage labor arrest, in order to optimize management of this rapidly growing at-risk group of women. Thus, it might be reasonable to adapt the considered upper limit for duration of labor, according to maternal BMI.

  • 41.
    Cedergren, Marie
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Maternal morbid obesity and the risk of adverse pregnancy outcome2004In: Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 0029-7844, E-ISSN 1873-233X, Vol. 103, no 2, p. 219-224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether morbidly obese women have an increased risk of pregnancy complications and adverse perinatal outcomes. METHODS: In a prospective population-based cohort study, 3,480 women with morbid obesity, defined as a body mass index (BMI) more than 40, and 12,698 women with a BMI between 35.1 and 40 were compared with normal-weight women (BMI 19.8-26). The perinatal outcome of singletons born to women without insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus was evaluated after suitable adjustments. RESULTS: In the group of morbidly obese mothers (BMI greater than. 40) as compared with the normal-weight mothers, there was an increased risk of the following outcomes (adjusted odds ratio, 95% confidence interval): preeclampsia (4.82, 4.04, 5.74), antepartum stillbirth (2.79, 1.94,4.02), cesarean delivery (2.69, 2.49,2.90), instrumental delivery (1.34, 1.16, 1.56), shoulder dystocia (3.14, 1.86, 5.31), meconium aspiration (2.85, 1.60, 5.07), fetal distress (2.52, 2.12,2.99), early neonatal death (3.41, 2.07,5.63), and large-for-gestational age (3.82, 3.50, 4.16). The associations were similar for women with BMIs between 35.1 and 40 but to a lesser degree. CONCLUSION: Maternal morbid obesity in early pregnancy is strongly associated with a number of pregnancy complications and perinatal conditions. tricians and Gynecologists.

  • 42.
    Cedergren, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Brynhildsen, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Adam
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Hyperemesis gravidarum that requires hospitalization and the use of antiemetic drugs in relation to maternal body composition2008In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 0002-9378, E-ISSN 1097-6868, Vol. 198, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to assess whether maternal prepregnancy body mass index was associated with the use of antiemetic drugs in early pregnancy and/or with the occurrence of hyperemesis gravidarum. STUDY DESIGN: A retrospective, population-based, cohort study. Women who delivered singleton infants (n = 749,435) from 19952003 were evaluated concerning the use of antiemetic drugs in early pregnancy (data available from 1995). Women who delivered singleton infants (n = 942,894) from 1992-2001 were evaluated concerning hospitalization because of hyperemesis gravidarum (data available until 2001). Adjusted odds ratios were determined by Mantel- Haenszel technique and were used as estimates of relative risk (RR). RESULTS: Underweight pregnant women were more likely to use antiemetic drugs (RR, 1.19, 95% CI, 1.14-1.24) and to become hospitalized for hyperemesis gravidarum (RR, 1.43, 95% CI, 1.33-1.54) compared with ideal weight women. Obese women were less likely to use antiemetic drugs (RR, 0.93, 95% CI, 0.89-0.97) and less likely to require hospitalization because of hyperemesis (RR, 0.90, 95% CI, 0.85-0.95) compared with women with an ideal body mass index. CONCLUSION: The use of antiemetic drugs and the occurrence of hyperemesis gravidarum are related to maternal body composition.

  • 43.
    Cedergren, Marie I
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Non-elective caesarean delivery due to ineffective uterine contractility or due to obstructed labour in relation to maternal body mass index2009In: EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS and GYNECOLOGY AND REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY, ISSN 0301-2115, Vol. 145, no 2, p. 163-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To assess whether non-elective caesarean section due to obstructed labour and/or ineffective uterine contractility was associated with maternal body mass index (BMI). Study design: The prospective dataset from the Swedish Medical Birth Registry consisted of 233,887 nulliparous women with a spontaneous onset of labour categorized in six classes of pre-pregnancy BMI, who delivered in Sweden between, January 1, 1999 and December 31, 2005. The mode of delivery was classified as either vaginal or by caesarean section. The caesarean section was classified as either elective or non-elective. Adjusted risks for non-elective caesarean section due to ineffective uterine contractility, or obstructed labour or fetal distress were determined using Mantel-Haenszel technique. Results: The risk of a non-elective caesarean section due to obstructed about was not significantly associated with maternal BMI. However, ineffective uterine contractility was significantly associated with maternal BMI and the risk of non-elective caesarean delivery due to labour arrest disorders increased with increasing BMI, reaching a 4-fold increased risk among the morbidly obese women. The risk of non-elective caesarean section due to fetal distress also increased significantly with increasing maternal BMI. Conclusions: It appears that ineffective labour could be a factor leading to the increased risk of non-elective caesarean section among obese and morbidly obese women. These findings challenge obstetricians to learn more about how to manage oxytocin infusions during labour in relation to maternal BMI.

  • 44.
    Claesson, Ing-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Weight gain restriction for obese pregnant women: An Intervention study2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Obesity is a growing global public health problem and is as prevalent among pregnant women as in the general population. It is well known that obese women have an increased risk for several complications during pregnancy and delivery and this is also true for the neonate. Excessive gestational weight gain among obese women seems to further increase these risks for adverse outcomes. It has not been known up to the time of this study whether a behavioral intervention program designed for obese pregnant women could result in a reduction of gestational weight gain.

    Aim: The overall aim of the present thesis was to study the effect of an intervention program designed to control weight gain among obese pregnant women during pregnancy and to then observe the outcomes of their pregnancies. In addition we wanted to learn if this behavioral intervention program could result in a weight gain of less than seven kilograms.

    Material and methods: The intervention group consisted of 155 obese (BMI >30 kg/m2) pregnant women at the antenatal care clinic (ANC) in Linköping; the control group consisted of 193 obese pregnant women in two other cities. The women in the intervention group were offered, in addition to regular care at the ANC, motivational interviewing in weekly visits to support them in making this behavioral change. They were also offered aqua aerobic class once or twice a week. The women in the control group attended the routine antenatal program in their respective ANCs. Outcome measures were: weight in kg, pregnancy-, delivery and neonatal outcomes, prevalence of anxiety- and depressive symptoms and attitudes and experiences of participating in an intervention program.

    Results: The women in the intervention group had a significantly lower gestational weight gain and also had a lower postnatal weight than the women in the control group. The percentage of women in the intervention group who gained <7 kg was greater than the percentage in the control group. There were no differences between the two groups in pregnancy-, delivery- and neonatal outcomes. In addition, there was no difference in prevalence of symptoms of anxiety and depressions between the intervention- and control group and the gestational weight gain did not have any effect on symptoms of depression or anxiety. The women in the intervention group with gestational weight gain <7 kg, weighed less at the two years follow-up than the women in the control group. Most of the women who participated in the intervention program expressed positive attitudes and were positive towards their experiences with the intervention program and their efforts to manage the gestational weight gain.

    Conclusion: The intervention program was effective in controlling weight gain during pregnan-cy and did not change the pregnancy, delivery or neonatal outcomes or the prevalence of anxie-ty- and depressive symptoms. The group with a gestational weight gain <7 kg showed the same distribution of complications as the group with a higher weight gain. The intervention program seems to influence the development of weight in a positive direction up to two years after childbirth. The women were also satisfied with their participation in the intervention program.

    List of papers
    1. Weight gain restriction for obese pregnant women: A case-control intervention study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Weight gain restriction for obese pregnant women: A case-control intervention study
    Show others...
    2008 (English)In: British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 1470-0328, E-ISSN 1471-0528, Vol. 115, no 1, p. 44-50Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To minimise obese women's total weight gain during pregnancy to less than 7 kg and to investigate the delivery and neonatal outcome. Design: A prospective case-control intervention study. Setting: Antenatal care clinics in the southeast region of Sweden. Population: One hundred fifty-five pregnant women in an index group and one hundred ninety-three women in a control group. Methods: An intervention programme with weekly motivational talks and aqua aerobic classes for obese pregnant women. Main outcome measures: Weight gain in kilograms, delivery and neonatal outcome. Results: The index group had a significantly lower weight gain during pregnancy compared with the control group (P < 0.001). The women in the index group weighed less at the postnatal check-up compared with the weight registered in early pregnancy (P < 0.001). The percentage of women in the index group who gained less than 7 kg was greater than that of women in the control group who gained less than 7 kg (P = 0.003). The percentage of nulliparous women in this group was greater than that in the control group (P = 0.018). In addition, the women in the index group had a significantly lower body mass index at the postnatal check-up, compared with the control group (P < 0.001). There were no differences between the index group and the control group regarding birthweight, gestational age and mode of delivery. Conclusion: The intervention programme was effective in controlling weight gain during pregnancy and did not affect delivery or neonatal outcome.

    Keywords
    Delivery, intervention, neonatal, obesity, pregnancy, weight gain
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-42955 (URN)10.1111/j.1471-0528.2007.01531.x (DOI)70184 (Local ID)70184 (Archive number)70184 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    2. Weight gain restriction during pregnancy is safe for both the mother and neonate.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Weight gain restriction during pregnancy is safe for both the mother and neonate.
    Show others...
    2009 (English)In: Acta obstetricia et gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 88, no 10, p. 1158-1162Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether pregnancy, delivery, and neonatal outcome among obese pregnant women who took part in an intervention study for weight restriction differed from a group of obese pregnant women attending regular antenatal care. The intervention group consisted of 155 obese pregnant women and 193 obese pregnant women who formed a control group. We found that a weight gain restriction of less than 7 kg during pregnancy is safe for both the mother and the neonate.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-51405 (URN)10.1080/00016340903214916 (DOI)19711205 (PubMedID)
    Note
    Original Publication: Ing-Marie Claesson, Jan Brynhildsen, Marie Cedergren, Annika Jeppsson, Adam Sydsjö and Ann Josefsson, Weight gain restriction during pregnancy is safe for both the mother and neonate., 2009, Acta obstetricia et gynecologica Scandinavica, (88), 10, 1158-1162. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00016340903214916 Copyright: Taylor and Francis http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/default.asp Available from: 2009-10-30 Created: 2009-10-30 Last updated: 2011-04-04
    3. Prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms among obese pregnant and postpartum women: an intervention study.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms among obese pregnant and postpartum women: an intervention study.
    2010 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 10, p. 766-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Although studies have shown an association between anxiety and depression and obesity, psychological health among obese women during and after pregnancy has not been carefully studied. The aim of this study was to investigate psychological well-being using symptoms of depression and/or anxiety among obese pregnant women attending a weight gain restriction program and to then compare this group with a control group receiving traditional antenatal care.

    METHODS: 151 obese pregnant women in an intervention group and 188 obese pregnant women in a control group answered the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). Group differences between the two groups were estimated by using the χ2 - test on categorical variables. The Student's t-test on continuous, normally distributed variables measuring changes in mean score on BAI and EPDS over time was used. To make a more comprehensive assessment of group differences, between as well as within the two groups, logistic regressions were performed with the BAI and EPDS as dependent variables, measured at gestational weeks 15 and 35 and 11 weeks postnatal. The grouping variable has been adjusted for socio-demographic variables and complications.

    RESULTS: The prevalence of symptoms of anxiety during pregnancy varied between 24% and 25% in the intervention group and 22% and 23% in the control group. The prevalence of symptoms of anxiety postnatally was 9% in the intervention group and 11% in the control group. Five percent of the women in the intervention group and 4% of the women in the control group showed symptoms of anxiety during the course of pregnancy and at the postpartum assessment. The prevalence of symptoms of depression during pregnancy varied between 19% and 22% in the intervention group but was constant at 18% in the control group. Postnatal prevalence was 11% in both groups. Six percent of the women in the intervention group and 4% in the control group showed symptoms of depression during the course of pregnancy and at the postpartum assessment. We found no differences between the two groups as concerns demographic characteristics, weight gain in kg, or the distribution of scores on anxiety and depressive symptoms nor did we find differences in the fluctuation of anxiety and depressive symptoms over time between the women in the intervention group and in the control group.

    CONCLUSION: Obese pregnant women attending an intervention program seem to have the same risk of experiencing anxiety and/or depressive symptoms as do obese pregnant and postnatal women in general.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    BMC, 2010
    Keywords
    Depression, anxiety, pregnancy, obesity, weight gain
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-56582 (URN)10.1186/1471-2458-10-766 (DOI)000285890000001 ()
    Note
    Original Publication: Ing-Marie Claesson, Ann Josefsson and Gunilla Sydsjö, Prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms among obese pregnant and postpartum women: an intervention study., 2010, BMC Public Health, (10), 766. http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2458-10-766 Licensee: BioMed Central http://www.biomedcentral.com/ Available from: 2010-05-25 Created: 2010-05-25 Last updated: 2017-12-12
    4. Weight after childbirth: A 2-year follow-up of obese women in a weight-gain restriction program
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Weight after childbirth: A 2-year follow-up of obese women in a weight-gain restriction program
    Show others...
    2011 (English)In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 90, no 1, p. 103-110Article in journal (Other academic) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate the effects of a weight gain restriction program on weight development or weight maintenance two years after childbirth.

    Methods: The intervention group consisted of 155 obese pregnant women who participated in a weight gain restriction program with weekly support duringpregnancy. The control group consisted of 193 obese pregnant women. Follow-up weight measurements were done at 12 and 24 months postpartum.

    Results: The mean value of weight change in the intervention group was -2.2 kg compared to + 0.4 kg in the control group from early pregnancy to the follow-up 12 months after childbirth (p = .046). A greater percentage of women in the intervention group showed a weight loss 24 months after delivery than did women in the control group at that same time (p = .034). Women in the intervention group who gained less than 7 kg during pregnancy had a significantly lower weight than the controls at the 24 months follow-up (p = .018).

    Conclusion: An intervention program with weekly motivational support visits during pregnancy and every 6 months after childbirth seems to have an impact on weight gain up to 24 months after childbirth for those women in the intervention group who succeeded in restricting their gestational weight gain to less than 7 kg.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Informa Healthcare, 2011
    Keywords
    Pregnancy, obesity, postnatal/postpartum, weight gain, intervention
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-56583 (URN)10.1111/j.1600-0412.2010.01016.x (DOI)000287103300016 ()
    Note
    Original Publication: Ing-Marie Claesson, Gunilla Sydsjö, Jan Brynhildsen, Maria Blomberg, Annika Jeppsson, Adam Sydsjö and Ann Josefsson, Weight after childbirth: A 2-year follow-up of obese women in a weight-gain restriction program, 2011, Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, (90), 1, 103-110. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0412.2010.01016.x Copyright: Informa Healthcare http://informahealthcare.com/ Available from: 2010-05-25 Created: 2010-05-25 Last updated: 2018-08-02
    5. Consumer satisfaction with a weight-gain intervention programme for obese pregnant women.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Consumer satisfaction with a weight-gain intervention programme for obese pregnant women.
    Show others...
    2008 (English)In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 163-167Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: to investigate women's attitudes and satisfaction with a weight-gain intervention programme during pregnancy.

    Design: exploratory, descriptive study. Data were collected via interviews.

    Setting: University hospital.

    Participants: 56 obese pregnant women who attended antenatal care at the University Hospital of Linköping's obstetrical department and took part in an intervention programme aimed at reducing weight gain during pregnancy, between November 2003 and August 2004.

    Findings: the interviews comprised several questions concerning attitudes and opinions of the programme. Most of the women expressed positive experiences with the treatment and would attend the programme if they became pregnant again. Most of the women stated that they had changed their eating and exercise habits during pregnancy, and almost all of them had continued with these new habits. Even though the weight gain goal of a maximum 6.9 kg was reached by less than half of the participants, most of the women were satisfied with their weight gain. A total of 71.4% of the women participated in aqua aerobics classes. They stated that they were most satisfied with this form of exercise, and that it also was a good social experience.

    Key conclusions and implications for practice: a pregnant woman herself must be actively involved in setting her own goals to prevent excessive weight gain during pregnancy. Considerable effort and support must be placed on discussing strategies, pitfalls and risks. In order for the woman to maintain the change in attitude and habits, she must probably be given continuous feedback and reinforcement over the long term.

    Keywords
    obesity, pregnancy, intervention
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-15902 (URN)10.1016/j.midw.2006.10.007 (DOI)17316933 (PubMedID)
    Note
    Original Publication:Ing-Marie Claesson, Ann Josefsson, Marie Cedergren, Jan Brynhildsen, Annika Jeppsson, Fredrik Nyström, Adam Sydsjö and Gunilla Sydsjö, Consumer satisfaction with a weight-gain intervention programme for obese pregnant women, 2008, Midwifery, (24), 163-7.http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.midw.2006.10.007Copyright: Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdamhttp://www.elsevier.com/Available from: 2008-12-15 Created: 2008-12-12 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
  • 45.
    Claesson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Brynhildsen, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Cedergren, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Jeppsson, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sydsjö, Adam
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Weight gain restriction during pregnancy is safe for both the mother and neonate.2009In: Acta obstetricia et gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 88, no 10, p. 1158-1162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether pregnancy, delivery, and neonatal outcome among obese pregnant women who took part in an intervention study for weight restriction differed from a group of obese pregnant women attending regular antenatal care. The intervention group consisted of 155 obese pregnant women and 193 obese pregnant women who formed a control group. We found that a weight gain restriction of less than 7 kg during pregnancy is safe for both the mother and the neonate.

  • 46.
    Claesson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Cedergren, Marie
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Brynhildsen, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Jeppsson, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Sydsjö, Adam
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Consumer satisfaction with a weight-gain intervention programme for obese pregnant women.2008In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 163-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: to investigate women's attitudes and satisfaction with a weight-gain intervention programme during pregnancy.

    Design: exploratory, descriptive study. Data were collected via interviews.

    Setting: University hospital.

    Participants: 56 obese pregnant women who attended antenatal care at the University Hospital of Linköping's obstetrical department and took part in an intervention programme aimed at reducing weight gain during pregnancy, between November 2003 and August 2004.

    Findings: the interviews comprised several questions concerning attitudes and opinions of the programme. Most of the women expressed positive experiences with the treatment and would attend the programme if they became pregnant again. Most of the women stated that they had changed their eating and exercise habits during pregnancy, and almost all of them had continued with these new habits. Even though the weight gain goal of a maximum 6.9 kg was reached by less than half of the participants, most of the women were satisfied with their weight gain. A total of 71.4% of the women participated in aqua aerobics classes. They stated that they were most satisfied with this form of exercise, and that it also was a good social experience.

    Key conclusions and implications for practice: a pregnant woman herself must be actively involved in setting her own goals to prevent excessive weight gain during pregnancy. Considerable effort and support must be placed on discussing strategies, pitfalls and risks. In order for the woman to maintain the change in attitude and habits, she must probably be given continuous feedback and reinforcement over the long term.

  • 47.
    Claesson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms among obese pregnant and postpartum women: an intervention study.2010In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 10, p. 766-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Although studies have shown an association between anxiety and depression and obesity, psychological health among obese women during and after pregnancy has not been carefully studied. The aim of this study was to investigate psychological well-being using symptoms of depression and/or anxiety among obese pregnant women attending a weight gain restriction program and to then compare this group with a control group receiving traditional antenatal care.

    METHODS: 151 obese pregnant women in an intervention group and 188 obese pregnant women in a control group answered the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). Group differences between the two groups were estimated by using the χ2 - test on categorical variables. The Student's t-test on continuous, normally distributed variables measuring changes in mean score on BAI and EPDS over time was used. To make a more comprehensive assessment of group differences, between as well as within the two groups, logistic regressions were performed with the BAI and EPDS as dependent variables, measured at gestational weeks 15 and 35 and 11 weeks postnatal. The grouping variable has been adjusted for socio-demographic variables and complications.

    RESULTS: The prevalence of symptoms of anxiety during pregnancy varied between 24% and 25% in the intervention group and 22% and 23% in the control group. The prevalence of symptoms of anxiety postnatally was 9% in the intervention group and 11% in the control group. Five percent of the women in the intervention group and 4% of the women in the control group showed symptoms of anxiety during the course of pregnancy and at the postpartum assessment. The prevalence of symptoms of depression during pregnancy varied between 19% and 22% in the intervention group but was constant at 18% in the control group. Postnatal prevalence was 11% in both groups. Six percent of the women in the intervention group and 4% in the control group showed symptoms of depression during the course of pregnancy and at the postpartum assessment. We found no differences between the two groups as concerns demographic characteristics, weight gain in kg, or the distribution of scores on anxiety and depressive symptoms nor did we find differences in the fluctuation of anxiety and depressive symptoms over time between the women in the intervention group and in the control group.

    CONCLUSION: Obese pregnant women attending an intervention program seem to have the same risk of experiencing anxiety and/or depressive symptoms as do obese pregnant and postnatal women in general.

  • 48.
    Claesson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Brynhildsen, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Blomberg, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Jeppsson, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sydsjö, Adam
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Weight after childbirth: A 2-year follow-up of obese women in a weight-gain restriction program2011In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 90, no 1, p. 103-110Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate the effects of a weight gain restriction program on weight development or weight maintenance two years after childbirth.

    Methods: The intervention group consisted of 155 obese pregnant women who participated in a weight gain restriction program with weekly support duringpregnancy. The control group consisted of 193 obese pregnant women. Follow-up weight measurements were done at 12 and 24 months postpartum.

    Results: The mean value of weight change in the intervention group was -2.2 kg compared to + 0.4 kg in the control group from early pregnancy to the follow-up 12 months after childbirth (p = .046). A greater percentage of women in the intervention group showed a weight loss 24 months after delivery than did women in the control group at that same time (p = .034). Women in the intervention group who gained less than 7 kg during pregnancy had a significantly lower weight than the controls at the 24 months follow-up (p = .018).

    Conclusion: An intervention program with weekly motivational support visits during pregnancy and every 6 months after childbirth seems to have an impact on weight gain up to 24 months after childbirth for those women in the intervention group who succeeded in restricting their gestational weight gain to less than 7 kg.

  • 49.
    Claesson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Brynhildsen, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Cedergren, Marie
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Jeppsson, Annika
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Sydsjö, Adam
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Weight gain restriction for obese pregnant women: A case-control intervention study2008In: British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 1470-0328, E-ISSN 1471-0528, Vol. 115, no 1, p. 44-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To minimise obese women's total weight gain during pregnancy to less than 7 kg and to investigate the delivery and neonatal outcome. Design: A prospective case-control intervention study. Setting: Antenatal care clinics in the southeast region of Sweden. Population: One hundred fifty-five pregnant women in an index group and one hundred ninety-three women in a control group. Methods: An intervention programme with weekly motivational talks and aqua aerobic classes for obese pregnant women. Main outcome measures: Weight gain in kilograms, delivery and neonatal outcome. Results: The index group had a significantly lower weight gain during pregnancy compared with the control group (P < 0.001). The women in the index group weighed less at the postnatal check-up compared with the weight registered in early pregnancy (P < 0.001). The percentage of women in the index group who gained less than 7 kg was greater than that of women in the control group who gained less than 7 kg (P = 0.003). The percentage of nulliparous women in this group was greater than that in the control group (P = 0.018). In addition, the women in the index group had a significantly lower body mass index at the postnatal check-up, compared with the control group (P < 0.001). There were no differences between the index group and the control group regarding birthweight, gestational age and mode of delivery. Conclusion: The intervention programme was effective in controlling weight gain during pregnancy and did not affect delivery or neonatal outcome.

  • 50.
    Cocozza, Madeleine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Child Protection in a Family Service Organisation in Sweden- What is the outcome for maltreated children?2010In: Children and youth services review, ISSN 0190-7409, E-ISSN 1873-7765, Vol. 32, no 7, p. 922-928Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study was conducted to increase the knowledge of what characterises the child-protection process in family-service organisations. A total of 1570 (regarding 1051 children) reports made to Social Services in one municipality during 1 year were followed to a final decision. A five-year follow-up study was conducted. There were 651 (41%) of the reports that were not investigated, 84% of the reports filed were judged not to demonstrate child maltreatment. The most usual cluster consisted of children that had committed a crime/offence when they were between 13 and 18 years old (314/1051–30%). The social worker reported 38% of the reports that regarded sexual or physical abuse to the police. Comparing the filtering pattern with the results from a study conducted in England, the family-service organisation does not seem to lead to the provision of services for a greater percentage of children than does a distinctive child-protection system. In the five-year follow-up period there were 61% of the children that were or had been targeted for an intervention or an investigation. This study raises questions about child protection in Sweden and emphasises the need for the system to be studied further.

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