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  • 1.
    Aboyans, Victor
    et al.
    Dupuytren University Hospital.
    Criqui, Michael
    University of California, USA.
    Abraham, Pierre
    University Hospital of Angers, France.
    Allison, Matthew
    University of California, USA.
    Creager, Mark
    Brigham and Women’s Hospital, USA.
    Diehm, Curt
    Karlsbad Clinic/University of Heidelberg, Germany.
    Fowkes, Gerry
    University of Edinburgh, UK.
    Hiatt, William
    University of Colorado, USA.
    Jönsson, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Lacroix, Philippe
    Limoges University, France.
    Marin, Benoit
    Limoges Teaching Hospital, France.
    McDermott, Mary
    Northwestern University,USA.
    Norgren, Lars
    University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Pande, Reena
    Brigham and Women’s Hospital, USA.
    Preux, Pierre-Marie
    University of Limoges, France.
    Stoffers, H.E.
    Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Treat-Jacobsson, Diane
    University of Minnesota, USA.
    Measurement and interpretation of the ankle-brachial index: a scientific statement from the Ammerican Heart Association2012In: Circulation, ISSN 0009-7322, E-ISSN 1524-4539Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Ahlgren, Ewa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Cederholm, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Gårdelöf, B
    Hübbert, Laila
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Josefsson, A
    Planerat kejsarsnitt på en kvinna med uttalat hypertrof obstruktiv kardiomyopati2011In: Svensk Förening för Anestesi och Intensivvård, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 40-41Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Ahlsson, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Jideus, Lena
    Uppsala University Hospital .
    Albåge, Anders
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Källner, Göran
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Holmgren, Anders
    Umeå University Hospital .
    Boano, Gabriella
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Hermansson, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Kimblad, Per-Ola
    Lund University Hospital.
    Schersten, Henrik
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg.
    Sjögren, Johan
    Lund University Hospital .
    Ståhle, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University Hospital.
    Åberg, Bengt
    Blekinge Hospital, Karskrona, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg.
    Berglin, Eva
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg.
    A Swedish consensus on the surgical treatment of concomitant atrial fibrillation2012In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 46, no 4, p. 212-218Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common arrhythmia among patients scheduled for open heart surgery and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. According to international guidelines, symptomatic and selected asymptomatic patients should be offered concomitant surgical AF ablation in conjunction with valvular or coronary surgery. The gold standard in AF surgery is the Cox Maze III ("cut-and-sew") procedure, with surgical incisions in both atria according to a specified pattern, in order to prevent AF reentry circuits from developing. Over 90% of patients treated with the Cox Maze III procedure are free of AF after 1 year. Recent developments in ablation technology have introduced several energy sources capable of creating nonconducting atrial wall lesions. In addition, simplified lesion patterns have been suggested, but results with these techniques have been unsatisfactory. There is a clear need for standardization in AF surgery. The Swedish Arrhythmia Surgery Group, represented by surgeons from all Swedish units for cardiothoracic surgery, has therefore reached a consensus on surgical treatment of concomitant AF. This consensus emphasizes adherence to the lesion pattern in the Cox Maze III procedure and the use of biatrial lesions in nonparoxysmal AF.

  • 4.
    Ahn, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Baranowski, Jacek
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Dahlin, Lars-Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Nielsen, Niels-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Wallby, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    TAVI without concomitant balloon dilatation2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Ahn, Henrik Casimir
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Baranowski, J
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Nielsen, Nils Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Tamas, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Wallby, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation in high-risk surgical candidates with low risk-scores1984Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Ahn, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Granfeldt, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Hübbert, Laila
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Peterzén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiothoracic Anaesthesia and Intensive care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Long-term mechanical circulatory support in patients with a prosthetic aortic valve2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Alstrom, U
    et al.
    University of Uppsala Hospital.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stahle, E
    University of Uppsala Hospital.
    Svedjeholm, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Friberg, O
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Cost analysis of re-exploration for bleeding after coronary artery bypass graft surgery2012In: British Journal of Anaesthesia, ISSN 0007-0912, E-ISSN 1471-6771, Vol. 108, no 2, p. 216-222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Re-exploration for bleeding after cardiac surgery is an indicator of substantial haemorrhage and is associated with increased hospital resource utilization. This study aimed to analyse the costs of re-exploration and estimate the costs of haemostatic prophylaxis. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods. A total of 4232 patients underwent isolated, first-time, coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery during 2005-8. Each patient re-explored for bleeding (n = 127) was matched with two controls not requiring re-exploration (n = 254). Cost analysis was based on resource utilization from completion of CABG until discharge. A mean cost per patient for re-exploration was calculated. Based on this, the net cost of prophylactic treatment with haemostatic drugs for preventing re-exploration was calculated. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults. Patients undergoing re-exploration had higher exposure to clopidogrel before operation, prolonged stays in the intensive care unit, and more blood transfusions than controls. The mean incremental cost for re-exploration was (sic)6290 [95% confidence interval (CI) (sic)3408-(sic)9173] per patient, of which 48% [(sic)3001 (95% CI (sic)249-(sic)2147)] was due to prolonged stay, 31% [(sic)1928 (95% CI (sic)1710-(sic)2147)] to the cost of surgery/anaesthesia, 20% [(sic)1261 (95% CI (sic)1145-(sic)1378)] to the increased number of blood transfusions, and andlt;2% [(sic)100 (95% CI (sic)39-(sic)161)] to the cost of haemostatic drugs. A cost model, at an estimated 50% efficacy for recombinant activated clotting factor VIIa and a 50% expected risk for re-exploration without prophylaxis, demonstrated that to be cost neutral, prophylaxis of four patients needed to result in one avoided re-exploration. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions. The resource utilization costs were substantially higher in patients requiring re-exploration for bleeding. From a strict cost-effectiveness perspective, clinical interventions to prevent haemorrhage might be underutilized.

  • 8.
    Appel, Carl-Fredrik
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hultkvist, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Ahn, Henrik Casimir
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Nielsen, Niels Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Freter, Wolfgang
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Vánky, Farkas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Transcatheter versus surgical treatment for aortic stenosis: Patient selection and early outcome2012In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 46, no 5, p. 301-307Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. To describe short-term clinical and echocardiography outcomes in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). To explore patient selection criteria for treatment with TAVI. Design. TAVI patients (n = 45) were matched to SAVR patients (n = 45) with respect to age within +/- 10 years, sex and systolic left ventricular function. Results. TAVI patients were older, 82 +/- 8 versus 78 +/- 5 years (p = 0.005) and they had higher logEuroSCORE, 16 +/- 11% versus 8 +/- 4% (p andlt; 0.001). There were no significant differences in 30 days mortality, stroke and myocardial infarction. TAVI patients received less erythrocyte (53% vs. 78%, p = 0.03) and thrombocyte (7% vs. 27%, p = 0.02) transfusions. Postoperative atrial fibrillation was less common (18% vs. 60%, p andlt; 0.001) in the TAVI group. Paravalvular regurgitation was more common in TAVI patients (87% vs. 0%, p andlt; 0.001) and 27% had access site complications. Aortic transvalvular velocity was 2.3 +/- 0.4 m/s versus 2.6 +/- 0.5 m/s (p = 0.002) and mean valve pressure gradient was 12 +/- 4 mmHg versus 15 +/- 5 mmHg (p = 0.01) in the TAVI and SAVR groups, respectively. Twenty-nine (64%) of the TAVI patients had logEuroSCORE andlt; 15%. Conclusions. Both TAVI and SAVR have good short term clinical outcome with excellent hemodynamic result. In clinical practice, factors other than high logEuroSCORE play an important role in patient selection for TAVI.

  • 9.
    Baranowski, Jacek
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Ahn, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Freter, Wolfgang
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Nielsen, Niels-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Janerot-Sjöberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Sandborg, Michael
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL.
    Wallby, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Echo-guided presentation of the aortic valve minimises contrast exposure in transcatheter valve recipients2011In: Catheterization and cardiovascular interventions, ISSN 1522-1946, E-ISSN 1522-726X, Vol. 77, no 2, p. 272-275Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES:

    We have developed a method using transthoracic echocardiography in establishing optimal visualization of the aortic root, to reduce the amount of contrast medium used in each patient.

    BACKGROUND:

    During transcatheter aortic valve implantation, it is necessary to obtain an optimal fluoroscopic projection for deployment of the valve showing the aortic ostium with the three cusps aligned in the beam direction. This may require repeat aortic root angiograms at this stage of the procedure with a high amount of contrast medium with a risk of detrimental influence on renal function.

    METHODS:

    We studied the conventional way and an echo guided way to optimize visualisation of the aortic root. Echocardiography was used initially allowing easier alignment of the image intensifier with the transducer's direction.

    RESULTS:

    Contrast volumes, radiation/fluoroscopy exposure times, and postoperative creatinine levels were significantly less in patients having the echo-guided orientation of the optimal fluoroscopic angles compared with patients treated with the conventional approach.

    CONCLUSION:

    We present a user-friendly echo-guided method to facilitate fluoroscopy adjustment during transcatheter aortic valve implantation. In our series, the amounts of contrast medium and radiation have been significantly reduced, with a concomitant reduction in detrimental effects on renal function in the early postoperative phase.

  • 10.
    Berg, Sören
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Delude, RL
    Fink, MP
    Increased glycolysis maintains ATP levels after hypoxia and cytokine stimulation in rat enterocytes2002In: Intensive Care Medicine, ISSN 0342-4642, E-ISSN 1432-1238, Vol. 28, p. 236-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Berg, Sören
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Fink, MP
    Linkoping Univ, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden Univ Pittsburgh, Dept Surg, Pittsburgh, PA USA Univ Pittsburgh, Dept Crit Care Med, Pittsburgh, PA USA.
    Delude, RL
    Linkoping Univ, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden Univ Pittsburgh, Dept Surg, Pittsburgh, PA USA Univ Pittsburgh, Dept Crit Care Med, Pittsburgh, PA USA.
    Cytokine exposure prior to hypoxia modulates HIF-1 nuclear binding in response to hypoxia in cultured rat (IEC-6) enterocytes2001In: Critical Care Medicine, ISSN 0090-3493, E-ISSN 1530-0293, Vol. 29, no 12, p. 77-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Berg, Sören
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Sappington, P.L.
    Department of Critical Care Medicine, Univ. of Pittsburgh Sch. of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, United States.
    Guzik, L.J.
    Department of Critical Care Medicine, Univ. of Pittsburgh Sch. of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, United States.
    Delude, R.L.
    Department of Critical Care Medicine, Univ. of Pittsburgh Sch. of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, United States, Department of Pathology, Univ. of Pittsburgh Sch. of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, United States.
    Fink, M.P.
    Department of Critical Care Medicine, Univ. of Pittsburgh Sch. of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, United States, Department of Surgery, Univ. of Pittsburgh Sch. of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, United States, 616 Scaife Hall, 3550 Terrace Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, United States.
    Proinflammatory cytokines increase the rate of glycolysis and adenosine-5'-triphosphate turnover in cultured rat enterocytes2003In: Critical Care Medicine, ISSN 0090-3493, E-ISSN 1530-0293, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 1203-1212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Measurements of steady-state adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) levels in tissue samples from patients or experimental animals with sepsis or endotoxemia provide little information about the rate of ATP production and consumption in these conditions. Accordingly, we sought to use an in vitro "reductionist" model of sepsis to test the hypothesis that proinflammatory cytokines modulate ATP turnover rate. Design: In vitro "reductionist" model of sepsis. Setting: University laboratory. Subjects: Cultured rat enterocyte-like cells. Interventions: IEC-6 nontransformed rat enterocytes were studied under control conditions or following incubation for 24 or 48 hrs with cytomix, a mixture of tumor necrosis factor-a (10 ng/mL), interleukin-1ß (1 ng/mL), and interferon-? (1000 units/mL). To measure ATP turnover rate, ATP synthesis was acutely blocked by adding to the cells a mixture of 2-deoxyglucose (10 mM), potassium cyanide (8 mM), and antimycin A (1 µM). ATP content was measured at baseline (before metabolic inhibition) and 0.5, 1, 2, 5, and 10 mins later. Log-linear ATP decay curves were generated and the kinetics of ATP utilization thereby calculated. Measurements and Main Results: ATP consumption rate was higher in cytomix-stimulated compared with control cells (3.11 ± 1.39 vs. 1.25 ± 0.66 nmol/min, respectively, p < .01). Similarly, the half-time for ATP disappearance was shorter in cytomix-stimulated compared with control cells (2.63 ± 1.00 vs. 6.21 ± 3.49, p < .05). In contrast to these findings, the rate of ATP disappearance was similar in cytokine-naïve and immunostimulated IEC-6 cells when protein and nucleic acid synthesis were inhibited by adding 50 µg/mL cycloheximide and 5 µg/mL actinomycin D to cultures for 4 hrs. The rates of glucose consumption and lactate production were significantly greater in cytomix-stimulated compared with controls cells. Conclusions: Incubation of IEC-6 cells with cytomix significantly increased ATP turnover. Increased ATP turnover rate was supported by increases in the rate of anaerobic glycolysis. These findings support the view that proinflammatory mediators impose a metabolic demand on visceral cells. In sepsis, cells may be more susceptible to dysfunction on the basis of diminished oxygen delivery and/or mitochondrial dysfunction.

  • 13.
    Cardell, Kristina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Infectious Diseases . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases in Östergötland.
    Widell, A
    Department of Medical Microbiology Lund University.
    Frydén, Aril
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Infectious Diseases . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases in Östergötland.
    Åkerlind, Britt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Microbiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Månsson, A-S
    Department of Medical Microbiology Lund University.
    FranzÉn, Stefan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Lymer, U-B
    Department of Natural Sciences and Biomedicine, School of Health Sciences Jönköping University.
    Isaksson, Barbro
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Microbiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Nosocomial hepatitis C in a thoracic surgery unit, retrospective findings generating a prospective study2008In: Journal of Hospital Infection, ISSN 0195-6701, E-ISSN 1532-2939, Vol. 68, no 4, p. 322-328Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe the transmission of hepatitis C virus (HCV) to two patients from a thoracic surgeon who was unaware of his hepatitis C infection. By partial sequencing of the non-structural 5B gene and phylogenetic analysis, the viruses from both patients were found to be closely related to genotype 1a strain from the surgeon. Two further hepatitis C cases were found in relation to the thoracic clinic. Their HCV sequences were related to each other but were of genotype 2b and the source of infection was never revealed. To elucidate the magnitude of the problem, we conducted a prospective study for a period of 17 months in which patients who were about to undergo thoracic surgery were asked to participate. Blood samples were drawn prior to surgery and at least four months later. The postoperative samples were then screened for anti-HCV and, if positive, the initial sample was also analysed. The only two patients (0.4%) identified were confirmed anti-HCV positive before surgery, and none out of 456 evaluable cases seroconverted to anti-HCV during the observation period. Despite the retrospectively identified cases, nosocomial hepatitis C is rare in our thoracic unit. The study points out the risk of transmission of hepatitis C from infected personnel and reiterates the need for universal precautions. © 2008 The Hospital Infection Society.

  • 14.
    Casimir Ahn, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Granfeldt, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Hübbert, Laila
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Peterzén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Long-term left ventricular support in patients with a mechanical aortic valve2013In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 47, no 4, p. 236-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. The presence of a mechanical prosthesis has been regarded as an increased risk of thromboembolic complications and as a relative contraindication for a left ventricular assist device (LVAD). Five patients in our center had a mechanical aortic valve at the time of device implantation and were studied regarding thromboembolic complications. Design. Five patients operated upon with an LVAD (1 HeartMate I (TM), 4 HeartMate II (TM)) between 2002 and 2011 had a mechanical aortic valve at the time of implantation. The first patient had a patch closure of the aortic valve. In four patients, the prosthesis was left in place. Anticoagulants included aspirin, warfarin, and clopidogrel. Results. The average and accumulated treatment times were 150 and 752 days, respectively. Three of the five patients showed early signs of valve thrombosis on echo with concomitant valve dysfunction. Four patients were transplanted without thromboembolic events during pump treatment. One patient died from a hemorrhagic stroke after 90 days on the LVAD. Conclusions. The strategy of leaving a mechanical heart valve in place at the time of LVAD implantation in five patients led to valvular thrombosis in three but did not provoke embolic events. It increased the complexity of postoperative anticoagulation.

  • 15.
    Dahlin, Lars-Göran
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Peterzén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Impella Used for Hemostasis by Left Ventricular Unloading, in a Case With Left Ventricular Posterior Wall Rupture2008In: Annals of Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 0003-4975, E-ISSN 1552-6259, Vol. 85, no 4, p. 1445-1447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Left ventricle wall rupture is a feared complication in mitral valve surgery. We report a combined mitral valve anuloplasty and coronary artery bypass grafting procedure with severe, life-threatening bleeding complication due to left ventricular posterior wall rupture. The patient was successfully treated with a temporary left ventricular assist device to decompress the left ventricle in an attempt to minimize the bleeding, as the patient's condition did not allow standard repair of the left ventricle.

  • 16.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Escobar Kvitting, John Peder
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Boano, G.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Carlhäll, Carljohan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Sigfridsson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Hermansson, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Bolger, A.F.
    University of California, San Fransisco, San Franisco, California, United States.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Turbulence Mapping Extends the Utility of Phase-Contrast MRI in Mitral Valve Regurgitation2009In: Proc. Intl. Soc. Mag. Reson. Med., 2009, p. 3939-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology.
    Escobar Kvitting, John-Peder
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Carlhäll, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Boano, Gabriella
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Sigfridsson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Hermansson, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Bolger, Ann F.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology.
    Hemodynamic aspects of mitral regurgitation assessed by generalized phase-contrast MRI2011In: Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, ISSN 1053-1807, E-ISSN 1522-2586, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 582-588Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Mitral regurgitation creates a high velocity jet into the left atrium (LA), contributing both volume andpressure; we hypothesized that the severity of regurgitation would be reflected in the degree of LA flowdistortion.

    Material and Methods: Three-dimensional cine PC-MRI was applied to determine LA flow patterns andturbulent kinetic energy (TKE) in seven subjects (five patients with posterior mitral leaflet prolapse, two normalsubjects). In addition, the regurgitant volume and the time-velocity profiles in the pulmonary veins weremeasured.

    Results: The LA flow in the mitral regurgitation patients was highly disturbed with elevated values of TKE.Peak TKE occurred consistently at late systole. The total LA TKE was closely related to the regurgitant volume.LA flow patterns were characterized by a pronounced vortex in proximity to the regurgitant jet. In some patients,pronounced discordances were observed between individual pulmonary venous inflows, but these could not berelated to the direction of the flow jet or parameters describing global LA hemodynamics.

    Conclusion: PC-MRI permits investigations of atrial and pulmonary vein flow patterns and TKE in significantmitral regurgitation, reflecting the impact of the highly disturbed blood flow that accompanies this importantvalve disease.

  • 18.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Escobar Kvitting, John-Peder
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Sigfridsson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Mätning och visualisering av blodflödet i höger kammare med tidsupplöst tredimensionell MR2007In: Riksstämman,2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

       

  • 19.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Escobar Kvitting, John-Peder
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Sigfridsson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Franzén, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Bolger, Ann F.
    University of California San Fransisco, San Fransisco, California, United States.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    In-Vitro Turbulence Mapping in Prosthetic Heart Valves using Generalized Phase-Contrast MRI2009In: Proc. Intl. Soc. Mag. Reson. Med., 2009, p. 3941-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Ehnsio, G.
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Norderfeldt, J.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Berg, Sören
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Platelet Reactivity During Carciopulmonary Bypass: Marked Reduction Followed by Early Restitution2009In: in Intensive Care Medicine, vol 35, Supplement 1, Posters, Springer, 2009, Vol. 35, p. 132-132Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION. Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) affects platelets, and platelet dysfunction is considered to be an important risk factor for post-operative bleeding after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. Monitoring platelet function in the peri-operative period therefore is of importance to reduce morbidity due to both bleeding and post-operative graft occlusion. Our aim was to study platelet reactivity in CABG patients in the peri-operative period.

    METHODS. Platelet function in 30 patients undergoing CABG was analyzed using an impedance aggregometry point-of-care (POC) instrument (Multiplate). Platelet reactivity was measured preoperatively at induction of anaesthesia, preoperatively immediately before CPB, after 30 minutes of CPB, after end of CPB, postoperatively at arrival to the ICU and finally at 3 and 18 h after surgery. Whole blood platelet aggregation was measured after activation with ADP (adenosin diphosphate), TRAP (thrombin receptor activating peptide), AA (arachidonic acid) and collagen. Platelet count was measured, and circulating platelet pool was assessed by correcting for hemodilution by indexing to hemoglobin. Non-parametric statistics were used, results are presented as median and 25–75%-percentiles.

    RESULTS. Reactivity to ADP, TRAP and AA agonists was significantly reduced at 30 min of CPB and at the end of CPB, followed by a rapid increase after CPB to preoperative values. Collagen showed a similar, but not significant, decrease during CPB followed by a post-CPB increase to values above baseline (p\0.001). Platelet count dropped after 30 min of CPB from 240 (204–301) preoperatively to 150 (132–189) after 30 min of CPB and further to 134 (120–151) 9 109/L at the end of CPB (p\0.001). Corrected for blood loss and hemodilution there was a reduced platelet pool at the end of CPB and at arrival at the ICU (p\0.001)

    CONCLUSION. There is an early decrease in platelet reactivity during CPB followed by a rapid post-CPB restitution of platelet function, despite low preoperative aggregometry values and lower post-CPB platelet count. The rapid preoperative changes in aggregometry points to a possible role for POC analysis of hemostatic function. The post-CPB increase in platelet reactivity simultaneously to the decrease in platelet count could imply increased aggregating tendency for remaining platelets, with possible implications for early graft failure and postoperative anti-platelet therapy.

  • 21.
    Elfstrom, J.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Patient Security.
    Nilsson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre.
    Sturnegk, C.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Patient Security.
    Sjukvårdens händelse-analyser bör skärpas och involvera läkare2009In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 106, no 48, p. 3262-3267Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    [No abstract available]

  • 22.
    Engström, A E
    et al.
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    Granfeldt, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Seybold-Epting, W
    Westpfalz Klinikum, Germany .
    Dahm, M
    Westpfalz Klinikum, Germany .
    Cocchieri, R
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    Driessen, A H G
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    Sjauw, K D
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    Vis, M M
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    Baan, J
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    Koch, K T
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    De Jong, M
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    Lagrand, W K
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    Van Der Sloot, J A P
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    Tijssen, J G P
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    De Winter, R J
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    De Mol, B A J M
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    Piek, J J
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    Henriques, J P S
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    Mechanical circulatory support with the Impella 5.0 device for postcardiotomy cardiogenic shock: a three-center experience2013In: Minerva Cardioangiologica: Journal on Cardiovascular Pathophysiology, Clinical Medicine and Therapy, ISSN 0026-4725, E-ISSN 1827-1618, Vol. 61, no 5, p. 539-546Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM:

    Postcardiotomy cardiogenic shock (PCCS) is associated with high mortality rates, despite full conventional treatment. Although the results of treatment with surgically implantable ventricular assist devices have been encouraging, the invasiveness of this treatment limits its applicability. Several less invasive devices have been developed, including the Impella system. The objective of this study was to describe our three-center experience with the Impella 5.0 device in the setting of PCCS.

    METHODS:

    From January 2004 through December 2010, a total of 46 patients were diagnosed with treatment-refractory PCCS and treated with the Impella 5.0 percutaneous left ventricular assist device at three european heart centers. Baseline and follow-up characteristics were collected retrospectively and entered into a dedicated database.

    RESULTS:

    Within the study cohort of 46 patients, mean logistic and additive EuroSCORES were 24 ± 19 and 10 ± 4. The majority of patients underwent coronary artery bypass grafting (48%) or combined surgery (33%). Half of all patients had been treated with an intra-aortic balloon pump before 5.0-implantation, 1 patient had been treated with an Impella 2.5 device. All patients were on mechanical ventilation and intravenous inotropes. The Kaplan-Meier estimate of overall 30-day survival was 39.5%.

    CONCLUSION:

    Thirty-day survival rates for patients with PCCS, refractory to aggressive conventional treatment and treated with the Impella 5.0 device, are comparable to those reported in studies evaluating surgically implantable VADs, whereas the Impella system is much less invasive. Therefore, mechanical circulatory support with the Impella 5.0 device is a suitable treatment modality for patients with severe PCCS.

  • 23.
    Eriksson, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Huljebrant, Inger
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Nettelblad, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Svedjeholm, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Functional impairment after treatment with pectoral muscle flaps because of deep sternal wound infection2011In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 45, no 3, p. 174-180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. Pectoral muscle flaps (PMF) are effective in terminating protracted sternal wound infections (SWI) but long-term outcome remains uncertain. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate long-term outcome in patients treated with PMF. Design. Thirty-four of 263 patients revised because of deep SWI from 1991-2005 were treated with PMF. Of the 21 patients alive, 11 had left-sided, two right-sided and eight bilateral procedures. Sternal debridement without closure of the sternum was done in 17 patients. Nineteen of 21 patients responded to a questionnaire. Results. At follow-up on average 5.9 years (range 1.9-14.8 years) after surgery 63% (12/19) experienced unstable chest. Two thirds (12/18) reported problems carrying a grocery bag and 37% (7/19) had problems putting on a coat. Reduction of power and mobility was more common in the right arm and shoulder even in patients with left-sided PMF. Thirty-two percent (6/19) would have preferred alternative treatment if possible to avoid sternal instability even if healing had been substantially delayed. Conclusions. Surgery with PMF and sternal debridement was associated with long-term disability, which appeared to be significant in one third of the patients. The function of the right arm and shoulder was affected more often despite the majority of procedures being left-sided suggesting that loss of skeletal continuity of the chest wall is more disabling than loss of pectoral muscle function.

  • 24.
    Escobar Kvitting, John-Peder
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Sigfridsson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Franzen, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Wigström, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Bolger, Ann F
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    In Vitro Assessment of Flow Patterns and Turbulence Intensity in Prosthetic Heart Valves Using Generalized Phase-Contrast MRI2010In: JOURNAL OF MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING, ISSN 1053-1807, Vol. 31, no 5, p. 1075-1080Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To assess in vitro the three-dimensional mean velocity field and the extent and degree of turbulence intensity (TI) in different prosthetic heart valves using a generalization of phase-contrast MRI (PC-MRI). Materials and Methods: Four 27-mm aortic valves (Bjork-Shiley Monostrut tilting-disc, St. Jude Medical Standard bileaflet, Medtronic Mosaic stented and Freestyle stentless porcine valve) were tested under steady inflow conditions in a Plexiglas phantom. Three-dimensional PC-MRI data were acquired to measure the mean velocity field and the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), a direction-independent measure of TI. Results: Velocity and TI estimates could be obtained up and downstream of the valves, except where metallic structure in the valves caused signal void. Distinct differences in the location, extent, and peak values of velocity and TI were observed between the valves tested. The maximum values of TKE varied between the different valves: tilting disc, 100 J/m(3); bileaflet, 115 J/m(3); stented, 200 J/m(3); stentless, 145 J/m(3). Conclusion: The TI downstream from a prosthetic heart valve is dependent on the specific valve design. Generalized PC-MRI can be used to quantify velocity and TI downstream from prosthetic heart valves, which may allow assessment of these aspects of prosthetic valvular function in postoperative patients.

  • 25.
    Escobar Kvitting, John-Peder
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Broqvist, Mats
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    FranzÉn, Stefan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Andersson, Mats
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Ohlsson, Ulf
    Department of Medicine Oskarshamns Hospital.
    Nielsen, Niels Erik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Recurrence of myxoma in the left ventricle with concurrent cerebral fusiform aneurysms after previous atrial myxoma surgery2008In: Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, ISSN 0022-5223, E-ISSN 1097-685X, Vol. 135, no 5, p. 1172-1173Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Fors, Carina
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Ahn, Henrik Casimir
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Online Laser Doppler Measurements of Myocardial Perfusion2008In: IFMBE Proceedings 22,2008, Springer Berlin Heidelberg , 2008, p. 1718-1721Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Laser Doppler perfusion monitoring is a suitable method for microvascular blood perfusion measurements. When used on a moving tissue or organ, the Doppler signal arising from the moving blood cells may be distorted. ECG triggering of the laser Doppler signal can be used for reducing the influence from movements during measurements on the beating heart. The aim of this study was to determine the most appropriate triggering intervals during the cardiac cycle for online measurements. Recordings from thirteen coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) patients were included in the study. During surgery, the fibre-optic probe was passed through the chest wall and sutured to the left anterior ventricular wall with the probe tip inserted 3–5 mm into the myocardium. After the patient arrived at the intensive care unit a second measurement was initiated and lasted for about two hours. Before the probe was removed a third measurement was performed for about 5 minutes the following morning. A total of 97 data sequences were analysed and the intervals of low and stable perfusion signal were compared to the positions of the T and P peaks in the ECG.

    It was found that the most appropriate time intervals were in late systole at the T peak [−3, 9] ms and just before the P peak [−28, -10] ms in late diastole. However, the position of these intervals may vary between individuals, because of e.g., abnormal cardiac motion. With the use of the appropriate interval online measurement of the myocardial perfusion on a beating heart appears possible.

  • 27.
    Fors, Carina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Casimir Ahn, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Analysis of breathing-related variations in ECG-triggered laser Doppler perfusion signals measured on the beating heart during surgery2006In: Computers in cardiology, ISSN 0276-6574, Vol. 33, p. 181-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Laser Doppler perfusion monitoring (LDPM) is a

    method to assess microvascular perfusion. A modified,

    ECG-triggered LDPM system has been developed to

    measure myocardial perfusion with minimum influence

    from heart motion. With this method, one systolic (PLS)

    and one diastolic (PLD) perfusion value is obtained.

    The aim of this study was to analyse breathing-related

    variations in PLS and PLD measured during open-heart

    surgery. The phase delays between PLS, PLD, mean

    arterial blood pressure (MAP), heart rate and, indirectly,

    the respiration were determined.

    MAP tended to be in phase with or precede the

    variations in PLD, i.e., PLD was at a maximum at the end

    of inspiration or at the beginning of expiration. No clear

    relation between PLS and any of the other signals could

    be found.

  • 28.
    Fors, Carina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Casimir Ahn, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Determination of appropriate times during the cardiac cycle for online laser Doppler measurements of myocardial perfusion2007Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Forsberg, Lena M
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Tamas, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Vánky, Farkas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Nielsen, Niels Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
    Left and right ventricular function in aortic stenosis patients 8 weeks post-transcatheter aortic valve implantation or surgical aortic valve replacement2011In: European Journal of Echocardiography, ISSN 1525-2167, E-ISSN 1532-2114, Vol. 12, no 8, p. 603-611Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims Knowledge of longitudinal left and right ventricular (LV and RV) function after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is scarce. We hypothesized that the longitudinal systolic biventricular function in aortic stenosis (AS) patients is affected differently by TAVI and surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods and results Thirty-three AS patients (all-TAVI group, age 81 +/- 9 years, 18 female), with EuroSCORE 18 +/- 9%, were accepted for TAVI. Seventeen of these patients were matched (by gender, age, and LV function) to 17 patients undergoing SAVR. Conventional echocardiographic parameters, systolic atrioventricular plane displacement (AVPD) at standard sites and peak systolic velocity (PSV) by pulsed tissue Doppler at basal RV free wall, LV lateral wall, and septum were studied before and 8 weeks after the procedure. Procedural success was 100%, and 30-day mortality 9%. In all TAVI patients, AVPD(lateral), PSV(lateral), AVPD(septal), and PSV(septal) increased (P andlt; 0.001, 0.003, 0.006 and 0.002). When studying the matched patients postoperatively, both the SAVR and TAVI patients had increased PSV(lateral) and AVPD(lateral) (SAVR: P = 0.03 and P = 0.04, TAVI: P = 0.04 and P = 0.01). The PSV(RV) increased in the all-TAVI group (P = 0.007), while the AVPD(RV) was unchanged. SAVR patients had decreased AVPD(RV) (P = 0.001) and PSV(RV) (P = 0.004), while the matched TAVI patients had unchanged RV function parameters. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion An improvement in regional longitudinal LV function in the septal and lateral wall could be seen after TAVI. Among the matched patients, both the TAVI and SAVR patients seemed to improve LV function in the lateral wall. RV systolic function increased in TAVI patients, but was impaired in the matched SAVR group at the 8-week follow-up.

  • 30.
    Forsberg, Lena M
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Tamás, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Vánky, Farkas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Differences in recovery of left and right ventricular function following aortic valve interventions: a longitudinal echocardiographic study in patients undergoing surgical, transapical or transfemoral aortic valve implantation2013In: Catheterization and cardiovascular interventions, ISSN 1522-1946, E-ISSN 1522-726X, Vol. 82, no 6, p. 1004-1014Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    To evaluate longitudinal left and right ventricular function (LVF and RVF) after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) as compared to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) and LVF and RVF after TAVI by the transfemoral (TF) or transapical (TA) approach.

    Background

    Knowledge about differences in recovery of LVF and RVF after TAVI and SAVR is scarce.

    Methods

    Sixty patients (age 81 ± 7 years, logistic EuroSCORE 16 ± 10%), undergoing TAVI (TF: n = 35 and TA: n  = 25), were examined by echocardiography including atrioventricular plane displacement (AVPD) and peak systolic velocities (PSV) by tissue Doppler at basal RV free wall, LV lateral wall and septum preprocedurally, 7 weeks and 6 months postprocedurally. Twenty-seven SAVR patients were matched to 27 TAVI patients by age, gender and LVF.

    Results

    Early postintervention, TAVI patients had improved longitudinal LVF. However, when analyzed separately, only TF, but not TA patients, had improved LV lateral and septal AVPD and PSV (all P ≤ 0.01). All TAVI patients, as well as the TF and TA group had unchanged longitudinal LVF between the early and late follow-ups (all P > 0.05). The SAVR group had higher septal LVF than the matched TAVI group preprocedurally, while postoperatively this difference was diminished. Longitudinal RVF was better in the TF group than in the TA group pre- and postprocedurally. Although the SAVR group had superior longitudinal RVF preoperatively, this was inferior to TAVI postoperatively.

    Conclusions

    Postprocedural longitudinal LVF and RVF in patients undergoing TF-TAVI, TA-TAVI, or SAVR differ considerably. Preservation of longitudinal RVF after TAVI might influence the selection of aortic valve intervention in the future.

  • 31.
    Friberg, O
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Dahlin, Lars-Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Kallman, J
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Kihlström, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Microbiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Soderquist, B
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Svedjeholm, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    COLLAGEN-GENTAMICIN IMPLANT FOR PREVENTION OF STERNAL WOUND INFECTION; LONG TERM EFFECTIVENESS2009In: in INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ANTIMICROBIAL AGENTS vol 33, 2009, Vol. 33, p. S42-S42Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Friberg, Orjan
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Svedjeholm, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Soderquist, Bo
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Letter: Treating Sternal Wound Infections After Cardiac Surgery With an Implantable Gentamicin-Collagen Sponge2010In: Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), ISSN 0098-7484, E-ISSN 1538-3598, Vol. 304, no 19, p. 2123-2124Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 33.
    Friberg, Ö
    et al.
    n/a.
    Dahlin, Lars-Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Källman, J
    n/a.
    Kihlström, E
    n/a.
    Söderquist, B
    n/a.
    Svedjeholm, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Collagen-gentamicin implant for prevention of sternal wound infection, long term effectiveness.2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Friberg, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Local Collagen-Gentamicin for Prevention of Sternal Wound Infections2006Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In cardiac surgery, sternal wound infection (SWI) continues to be one of the most serious postoperative complications. Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) have become the most common causative agents of SWI. Prophylaxis with intravenous beta-lactam antibiotics (cephalosporins or in Sweden most commonly isoxazolyl penicillins) is routinely practised. However, many CoNS species are resistant to beta-lactam antibiotics. Vancomycin is often the only effective antibiotic available for treatment of these infections, but its use for routine prophylaxis is strongly discouraged because of the risk of increasing the selection of resistant bacteria.

    The aim of this work was to develop and evaluate a new technique for antibiotic prophylaxis in cardiac surgery consisting of application of drug eluting collagen-gentamicin sponges in the sternal wound in addition to conventional intravenous antibiotics.

    The antibiotic concentrations in the wound and serum achieved by routine intravenous dicloxacillin prophylaxis and those after application of local collagen-gentamicin in the sternal wound were investigated. These studies showed dicloxacillin levels adequate for prevention of infections by methicillin-susceptible staphylococci, and extremely high gentamicin levels in the wound fluid, during the first 8-12 hours postoperatively with the local application.

    Two thousand cardiac surgery patients were then randomised to routine prophylaxis with intravenous isoxazolyl penicillin alone (control group) or to this prophylaxis combined with application of collagen-gentamicin (260 mg gentamicin) sponges within the sternotomy before wound closure. The primary end-point was any sternal wound infection within two months postoperatively.

    Evaluation was possible in 983 and 967 patients in the treatment and control groups, respectively. The incidence of any sternal wound infection was 4.3% in the treatment group and 9.0 % in the control group (relative risk = 0.47, (95% confidence interval 0.33 to 0.68); P<0.001). The most common microbiological agents were CoNS, followed by Staphylococcus aureus. Local gentamicin reduced the incidence of SWIs caused by all major, clinically important microbiological agents except Propionibacterium acnes.

    Assignment to the control group, high body mass index, diabetes mellitus, younger age, single or double internal mammary artery, left ventricular ejection fraction less than 35% and longer operation time were independent risk factors for SWI in a multivariable risk factor analysis.

    In patients with additional sternal fixation wires (> six wires) the collagen-gentamicin prophylaxis was associated with an approximately 70 % reduction in the incidence of SWI at all depths and the application of collagen sponges between sternal halves may require particular attention regarding the stability of fixation.

    A cost effectiveness analysis showed that the application of local collagen-gentamicin as prophylaxis was dominant, i.e. resulted in both lower costs and fewer wound infections.

    Routine use of the described prophylaxis in all adult cardiac surgery patients could be recommended.

    List of papers
    1. Antibiotic concentrations in serum and wound fluid after local gentamicin or intravenous dicloxacillin prophylaxis in cardiac surgery
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Antibiotic concentrations in serum and wound fluid after local gentamicin or intravenous dicloxacillin prophylaxis in cardiac surgery
    Show others...
    2003 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0036-5548, E-ISSN 1651-1980, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 251-254Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    One important aim of antibiotic prophylaxis in cardiac surgery is preventing mediastinitis and thus it would appear to be relevant to study the antibiotic concentrations in pericardial/mediastinal fluid. Local administration of gentamicin in the wound before sternal closure is a novel way of antibiotic prophylaxis and could be effective against bacteria resistant to intravenous antibiotics. This study measured dicloxacillin concentrations in 101 patients in serum and wound fluid following intravenous administration of dicloxacillin. Similarly, concentrations of gentamicin in serum and wound fluid were determined in 30 patients after administration of 260 mg gentamicin in the wound at sternal closure. Median dicloxacillin concentrations in serum and wound fluid at sternal closure were 59.4 and 55.35 mg/l, respectively. Gentamicin levels in the wound were very high (median 304 mg/l), whereas serum concentrations were low (peak median 2.05 mg/l). Dicloxacillin, 1 g given intravenously, according to the clinical protocol, resulted in levels in serum and wound fluid at sternal closure likely to prevent Staphylococcus aureus infections. Locally administered gentamicin resulted in high local concentrations, potentially effective against agents normally considered resistant.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13924 (URN)10.1080/003655400310000184 (DOI)
    Available from: 2006-07-20 Created: 2006-07-20 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    2. Local gentamicin reduces sternal wound infections after cardiac surgery: a randomized controlled trial
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Local gentamicin reduces sternal wound infections after cardiac surgery: a randomized controlled trial
    Show others...
    2005 (English)In: The Annals of Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 0003-4975, Vol. 79, no 1, p. 153-161Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Sternal wound infections remain a major cause of morbidity after cardiac surgery. Vancomycin is often the only effective antibiotic available for their treatment but its use for routine prophylaxis is inadvisable for ecological reasons. Local application of gentamicin produces high antibiotic concentrations in the wound. We aimed to determine whether this treatment could have an additive effect on the incidence of sternal wound infections when combined with routine prophylaxis.

    METHODS: Two thousand cardiac surgery patients were randomized to routine prophylaxis with intravenous isoxazolyl-penicillin alone (control group) or to this prophylaxis combined with application of collagen-gentamicin (260 mg gentamicin) sponges within the sternotomy before wound closure. Endpoint was any sternal wound infection within 2 months postoperatively. Evaluations were double-blind and made on an intention-to-treat basis.

    RESULTS: Evaluation was possible in 967 and 983 patients in the control and treatment groups, respectively. The incidence of sternal wound infection was 4.3% in the treatment group and 9.0% in the control group (relative risk 0.47; 95% confidence interval 0.33–0.68; p < 0.001). Early reoperation for bleeding was more common in the treatment group (4.0% vs 2.3%, p = 0.03). No difference in postoperative renal function was noted.

    CONCLUSIONS: Local collagen-gentamicin reduced the risk for postoperative sternal wound infections. Further studies are warranted to confirm these results, particularly with regard to deep infections.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13925 (URN)10.1016/j.athoracsur.2004.06.043 (DOI)
    Available from: 2006-07-20 Created: 2006-07-20 Last updated: 2009-05-14
    3. Cost effectiveness of local collagen-gentamicin as prophylaxis for sternal wound infections in different risk groups
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cost effectiveness of local collagen-gentamicin as prophylaxis for sternal wound infections in different risk groups
    Show others...
    2006 (English)In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 117-125Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. In a randomized trial addition of local collagen-gentamicin in the sternal wound reduced the rate of sternal wound infection (SWI) to about 50% compared to intravenous prophylaxis alone. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the economic rationale for its use in every-day clinical practice. This includes the question whether high-risk groups that may have particular benefit should be identified.

    Design. For each patient with SWI in the trial the costs attributable to the SWI were calculated. Risk factors for SWI were identified and any heterogeneity of the effect of the prophylaxis examined.

    Results. The mean cost of a SWI was about 14500 Euros. A cost effectiveness analysis showed that the prophylaxis was cost saving. The positive net balance was even higher in risk groups. Assignment to the control group, overweight, diabetes, younger age, mammarian artery use, left ventricular ejection fraction < 35% and longer operation time were independent risk factors for infection.

    Conclusion. The addition of local collagen-gentamicin to intravenous antibiotic prophylaxis was dominant, i.e. resulted in both lower costs and fewer wound infections.

    Keyword
    Cardiac Surgery; Cardiology
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13926 (URN)10.1080/14017430500363024 (DOI)
    Available from: 2006-07-20 Created: 2006-07-20
    4. Incidence, microbiological findings and clinical presentation of sternal wound infections after cardiac surgery with and without local gentamicin prophylaxis
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Incidence, microbiological findings and clinical presentation of sternal wound infections after cardiac surgery with and without local gentamicin prophylaxis
    2007 (English)In: European Journal of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0934-9723, E-ISSN 1435-4373, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 91-97Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Sternal wound infection (SWI) is a serious complication after cardiac surgery. In a previous randomized controlled trial, the addition of local collagen-gentamicin in the sternal wound before wound closure was found to significantly reduce the incidence of postoperative wound infections compared with the routine intravenous prophylaxis of isoxazolyl-penicillin only. The aims of the present study were to analyse the microbiological findings of the SWIs from the previous trial as well as to correlate these findings with the clinical presentation of SWI. Differences in clinical presentation of SWIs, depending on the causative agent, could be identified. Most infections had a late, insidious onset, and the majority of these were caused by staphylococci, predominantly coagulase-negative staphylococci. The clinically most fulminant infections were caused by gram-negative bacteria and presented early after surgery. Local administration of gentamicin reduced the incidence of SWIs caused by all major, clinically important bacterial species. Propionibacterium acnes was identified as a possible cause of SWI and may be linked to instability in the sternal fixation. There was no indication of an increase in the occurrence of gentamicin-resistant bacterial isolates in the treatment group. Furthermore, the addition of local collagen-gentamicin reduced the incidence of SWIs caused by methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci. This technique warrants further evaluation as an alternative to prophylactic vancomycin in settings with a high prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13927 (URN)10.1007/s10096-006-0252-6 (DOI)
    Available from: 2006-07-20 Created: 2006-07-20 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    5. Reduced deep sternal wound infection rate in patients with more than six sternal fixation wires and local collagen-gentamicin as prophylaxis
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reduced deep sternal wound infection rate in patients with more than six sternal fixation wires and local collagen-gentamicin as prophylaxis
    Show others...
    2006 (English)Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13928 (URN)
    Available from: 2006-07-20 Created: 2006-07-20
  • 35.
    Friberg, Örjan
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Dahlin, Lars-Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Källman, Jan
    Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Kihlström, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Söderquist, Bo
    Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Svedjeholm, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Collagen-gentamicin implant for prevention of sternal wound infection; long-term follow-up of effectiveness2009In: Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 1569-9293, E-ISSN 1569-9285, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 454-458Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a previous randomized controlled trial (LOGIP trial) the addition of local collagen-gentamicin reduced the incidence of postoperative sternal wound infections (SWI) compared with intravenous prophylaxis only. Consequently, the technique with local gentamicin was introduced in clinical routine at the two participating centers. The aim of the present study was to re-evaluate the technique regarding the prophylactic effect against SWI and to detect potential shifts in causative microbiological agents over time. All patients in this prospective two-center study received prophylaxis with application of two collagen-gentamicin sponges between the sternal halves in addition to routine intravenous antibiotics. All patients were followed for 60 days postoperatively. From January 2007 to May 2008, 1359 patients were included. The 60-day incidences of any SWI was 3.7% and of deep SWI 1.5% (1.0% mediastinitis). Both superficial and deep SWI were significantly reduced compared with the previous control group (OR=0.34 for deep SWI, Pless than0.001). There was no increase in the absolute incidence of aminoglycoside resistant agents. The majority of SWI were caused by coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS). The incidence of deep SWI caused by Staphylococcus aureus was 0.07%. The results indicate a maintained effect of the prophylaxis over time without absolute increase in aminoglycoside resistance.

  • 36.
    Friberg, Örjan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahlin, Lars-Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Magnusson, Anders
    Unit of Statistics, Centre for Clinical Research, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Granfeldt, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Källman, Jan
    Department of Infectious Diseases, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Svedjeholm, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cost effectiveness of local collagen-gentamicin as prophylaxis for sternal wound infections in different risk groups2006In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 117-125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. In a randomized trial addition of local collagen-gentamicin in the sternal wound reduced the rate of sternal wound infection (SWI) to about 50% compared to intravenous prophylaxis alone. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the economic rationale for its use in every-day clinical practice. This includes the question whether high-risk groups that may have particular benefit should be identified.

    Design. For each patient with SWI in the trial the costs attributable to the SWI were calculated. Risk factors for SWI were identified and any heterogeneity of the effect of the prophylaxis examined.

    Results. The mean cost of a SWI was about 14500 Euros. A cost effectiveness analysis showed that the prophylaxis was cost saving. The positive net balance was even higher in risk groups. Assignment to the control group, overweight, diabetes, younger age, mammarian artery use, left ventricular ejection fraction < 35% and longer operation time were independent risk factors for infection.

    Conclusion. The addition of local collagen-gentamicin to intravenous antibiotic prophylaxis was dominant, i.e. resulted in both lower costs and fewer wound infections.

  • 37.
    Friberg, Örjan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahlin, Lars-Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Söderquist, B.
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Källman, J.
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Svedjeholm, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Reduced deep sternal wound infection rate in patients with more than six sternal fixation wires and local collagen-gentamicin as prophylaxis2006Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Friberg, Örjan
    et al.
    Universitetssjukhuset, Örebro.
    Engström, Karl-Gunnar
    Umeå universitet .
    Hentschel, Jan
    Norrlands universitetssjukhus, Umeå.
    Freter, Wolfgang
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Åberg, Bent
    Blekingesjukhuset, Karlskrona.
    Dahlin, Lars-Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Sandin, Mathias
    Universitetssjukhuset,, Örebro.
    Näslund, Ulf
    Norrlands universitetssjukhus, Umeå.
    Carath – ett verksamhets­initierat  kvalitetsregister och processtöd. Ger toraxkirurgin bra möjlighet att följa vårdprocessen: [Carath - a quality registry and process support. Good possibility for throacic surgery to follow the care process]2011In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 108, no 26-28, p. 1365-1369Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Carath is the name of a database and outcomes registry for cardiovascular surgery used and developed by four Swedish cardiothoracic centres in cooperation.  This report focuses on our experiences, positive and negative, of designing and implementing a “tailor made” database program for process control in mainly cardiac surgery. The system now provides valuable, and in some ways unique information on medical outcomes as well as administrative data. We have also become very aware of the difficulties involved in maintaining a good quality of data in multicentre medical registries. Several factors, not least the human factor, must be taken into account when building user friendly databases and quality registries. Variables must be well defined. Also, direct linking of data and outcomes directly from digitalised patient records has proved to be complicated - technically and due to the complexity of health care processes.

  • 39.
    Friberg, Örjan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Svedjeholm, Rolf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Letter: Post-sternotomy percutaneous tracheostomy and risky multivariable analyses2008In: European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 1010-7940, E-ISSN 1873-734X, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 930-931Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 40.
    Friberg, Örjan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Svedjeholm, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Källman, J.
    Department of Infectious Diseases, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Söderquist, B.
    Department of Clinical Microbiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Incidence, microbiological findings and clinical presentation of sternal wound infections after cardiac surgery with and without local gentamicin prophylaxis2007In: European Journal of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0934-9723, E-ISSN 1435-4373, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 91-97Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sternal wound infection (SWI) is a serious complication after cardiac surgery. In a previous randomized controlled trial, the addition of local collagen-gentamicin in the sternal wound before wound closure was found to significantly reduce the incidence of postoperative wound infections compared with the routine intravenous prophylaxis of isoxazolyl-penicillin only. The aims of the present study were to analyse the microbiological findings of the SWIs from the previous trial as well as to correlate these findings with the clinical presentation of SWI. Differences in clinical presentation of SWIs, depending on the causative agent, could be identified. Most infections had a late, insidious onset, and the majority of these were caused by staphylococci, predominantly coagulase-negative staphylococci. The clinically most fulminant infections were caused by gram-negative bacteria and presented early after surgery. Local administration of gentamicin reduced the incidence of SWIs caused by all major, clinically important bacterial species. Propionibacterium acnes was identified as a possible cause of SWI and may be linked to instability in the sternal fixation. There was no indication of an increase in the occurrence of gentamicin-resistant bacterial isolates in the treatment group. Furthermore, the addition of local collagen-gentamicin reduced the incidence of SWIs caused by methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci. This technique warrants further evaluation as an alternative to prophylactic vancomycin in settings with a high prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

  • 41.
    Friberg, Örjan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Svedjeholm, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Söderquist, Bo
    Department of Clinical Microbiology, and Infectious Diseases, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Granfeldt, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Vikerfors, Tomas
    Infectious Diseases, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro.
    Källman, Jan
    Department of Infectious Diseases, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Local gentamicin reduces sternal wound infections after cardiac surgery: a randomized controlled trial2005In: The Annals of Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 0003-4975, Vol. 79, no 1, p. 153-161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Sternal wound infections remain a major cause of morbidity after cardiac surgery. Vancomycin is often the only effective antibiotic available for their treatment but its use for routine prophylaxis is inadvisable for ecological reasons. Local application of gentamicin produces high antibiotic concentrations in the wound. We aimed to determine whether this treatment could have an additive effect on the incidence of sternal wound infections when combined with routine prophylaxis.

    METHODS: Two thousand cardiac surgery patients were randomized to routine prophylaxis with intravenous isoxazolyl-penicillin alone (control group) or to this prophylaxis combined with application of collagen-gentamicin (260 mg gentamicin) sponges within the sternotomy before wound closure. Endpoint was any sternal wound infection within 2 months postoperatively. Evaluations were double-blind and made on an intention-to-treat basis.

    RESULTS: Evaluation was possible in 967 and 983 patients in the control and treatment groups, respectively. The incidence of sternal wound infection was 4.3% in the treatment group and 9.0% in the control group (relative risk 0.47; 95% confidence interval 0.33–0.68; p < 0.001). Early reoperation for bleeding was more common in the treatment group (4.0% vs 2.3%, p = 0.03). No difference in postoperative renal function was noted.

    CONCLUSIONS: Local collagen-gentamicin reduced the risk for postoperative sternal wound infections. Further studies are warranted to confirm these results, particularly with regard to deep infections.

  • 42.
    Granfeldt, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    The use of mechanical circulatory support and passive ventricular constraint in patients with acute and chronic heart failure2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Many patients are diagnosed as having chronic heart failure (CHF) and apart from the fact that daily activities are impaired, they are great consumers of health care, and the prognosis is poor. The distinction between acute heart failure (AHF) and CHF may be difficult and is more a question of time rather than severity. The “gold standard” treatment for end‐stage heart failure is heart transplantation. Due to organ shortage this is reserved for selected patients only. Since the introduction of mechanical circulatory support (MCS) more and more patients with progressive CHF have been bridged‐to‐heart‐transplantation. There are MCS systems available for both short‐ and long‐term support. Newer concepts such as ventricular constraint to prevent ventricular remodelling are on the way. We have investigated short‐ (ImpellaTM) and long‐term (HeartMateTM I and II) MCS and ventricular constraint (CorCapTM CSD) as treatment concepts for all forms of heart failure, the aims being: bridge‐to‐decision, bridge‐to‐transplant and extended therapy, called “destination therapy” (DT).

    Methods and results: In Paper I, the use of HM‐ITM pulsatile MCS in bridge‐to‐transplantation patients in Sweden was retrospectively investigated regarding outcome and risk factors for mortality and morbidity. Fifty‐nine patients were treated between 1993 and 2002. The dominating diagnosis was dilated cardiomyopathy in 61%. Median support time was 99.5 days. 18.6% died before transplantation. Four patients needed RV assist due to right ventricular failure. Haemorrhage was an issue. Six patients (10%) suffered a cerebrovascular thromboembolic lesion. 15% developed driveline infection. 45% of the MCS patients were discharged home while on pump treatment. Massive blood transfusion was a predictor for mortality and morbidity, p<0.001.

    In Paper II the second generation long‐term MCS, the continuous axial flow pump HM‐IITM, was prospectively evaluated for mortality and morbidity. Eleven patients, from 2005 until 2008, were consecutively included at our institution. One patient received the pump for DT. The median pump time was 155 days. Survival to transplantation was 81.8%. Ten patients could be discharged home before transplantation after a median time of 65 days.

    Paper III investigated the Swedish experience and outcome of short‐term axial flow MCS, the ImpellaTM, in patients with AHF. Fifty patients were collected between 2003 and 2007 and divided into two groups: 1. Surgical group (n=33) with cardiogenic shock after cardiac surgery; and 2. Non‐surgical group (n=17), patients with AHF due to acute coronary syndromes with cardiogenic shock (53%) and myocarditis (29%). The 1‐year survival was 36% and 70%, respectively. 52% were reoperated because of bleeding. Predictors for survival at 30 days were preoperatively placed IABP (p=0.01), postoperatively cardiac output at 12 hours and Cardiac Power Output at 6 and 12 hours.

    In Paper IV we evaluated the use and long term outcome of ventricular constraint CorCapTM CSD. Since 2003, 26 consecutive patients with chronic progressive heart failure were operated with CSD via sternotomy (n=25) or left mini‐thoracotomy (n=1). Seven patients were operated with CorCapTM only. Nineteen patients had concomitant cardiac surgery. There were three early and three late deaths. The remaining cohort (n=18) was investigated in a cross‐sectional study regarding QoL with SF‐36. There was no difference in QoL measured with SF‐36 after a mean 3‐years follow up period, when compared to an age‐ and sex‐matched control group from the general population. The one‐year survival was 86%, and after three years 76%. Echocardiographic dimensions had improved significantly after three years.

    Conclusion: In our unit, a non‐transplanting medium‐sized cardiothoracic department, short‐ and long‐term MCS (ImpellaTM resp. HMTM) in patients with acute or chronic HF have been used with good results. The use of ventricular constraint early in the course of the disease is a good adjunct to other treatment options in progressive chronic HF patients.

    List of papers
    1. Risk Factor Analysis of Swedish Left Ventricular Assist Device (LVAD) Patients
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Risk Factor Analysis of Swedish Left Ventricular Assist Device (LVAD) Patients
    Show others...
    2003 (English)In: Annals of Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 0003-4975, E-ISSN 1552-6259, Vol. 76, no 6, p. 1993-1998Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background. The use of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) is established as a bridge to heart transplantation. Methods. All Swedish patients on the waiting list for heart transplantation, treated with LVAD since 1993 were retrospectively collected into a database and analyzed in regards to risk factors for mortality and morbidity. Results. Fifty-nine patients (46 men) with a median age of 49 years (range, 14 to 69 years), Higgins score median of 9 (range, 3 to 15), EuroScore median of 10 (range, 5 to 17) were investigated. Dominating diagnoses were dilated cardiomyopathy in 61% (n = 36) and ischemic cardiomyopathy in 18.6% (n = 11). The patients were supported with LVAD for a median time of 99.5 days (range, 1 to 873 days). Forty-five (76%) patients received transplants, and 3 (5.1%) patients were weaned from the device. Eleven patients (18.6%) died during LVAD treatment. Risk factor analysis for mortality before heart transplantation showed significance for a high total amount of autologous blood transfusions (p < 0.001), days on mechanical ventilation postoperatively (p < 0.001), prolonged postoperative intensive care unit stay (p = 0.007), and high central venous pressure 24 hours postoperatively and at the final measurement (p = 0.03 and 0.01, respectively). Mortality with LVAD treatment was 18.6% (n = 11). High C-reactive protein (p = 0.001), low mean arterial pressure (p = 0.03), and high cardiac index (p = 0.03) preoperatively were risk factors for development of right ventricular failure during LVAD treatment. Conclusions. The Swedish experience with LVAD as a bridge to heart transplantation was retrospectively collected into a database. This included data from transplant and nontransplant centers. Figures of mortality and morbidity in the database were comparable to international experience. Specific risk factors were difficult to define retrospectively as a result of different protocols for follow-up among participating centers. © 2003 by The Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2003
    National Category
    Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-46398 (URN)10.1016/S0003-4975(03)01016-6 (DOI)000186986500046 ()
    Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    2. A single center experience with the HeartMate II (TM) Left Ventricular Assist Device (LVAD)
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A single center experience with the HeartMate II (TM) Left Ventricular Assist Device (LVAD)
    Show others...
    2009 (English)In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 43, no 6, p. 360-365Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. Left ventricular assist devices (LVAD), used in the setting bridge-to-transplantation and destination therapy, for patients with deteriorating severe heart failure are continuously developing. The second generation, the axial flow pumps, have been introduced since some years. Design. Eleven consecutive patients, seven male, with severe heart failure due to ischemic cardiomyopathy (n = 5), dilated cardiomyopathy (n = 5) and cytotoxic ethiology (n = 1) were implanted with the HeartMate-II (TM). They were preoperatively treated with inotropic support (n = 9), ventricular assist device (n = 2) and mechanical ventilation (n = 4). Results. Eight patients were bridged to transplant after median 155 days (range, 65 to 316 days). One patient is ongoing for 748 days, intended for destination therapy. Ten of eleven patients were discharged after median 64 days (range, 40 to 105 days). Four patients were reoperated due to bleeding. Two embolic events were recorded. One perioperative death. Conclusion. Eleven HM-II (TM) LVADs have been implanted in our institution with good early results. Eight patients were successfully bridged to heart transplantation. One patient is intended for destination therapy and is ongoing since November 2006. In these severely ill patients, this technique offers a good chance surviving until heart transplantation. In selected cases the technique also offers the possibility of a permanent support and longevity.

    Keyword
    Left ventricular assist; terminal heart failure; bridge to transplantation
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-52868 (URN)10.1080/14017430903019553 (DOI)
    Available from: 2010-01-13 Created: 2010-01-12 Last updated: 2017-12-12
    3. Experience with the Impella® recovery axial-flow system for acute heart failure at three cardiothoracic centers in Sweden
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experience with the Impella® recovery axial-flow system for acute heart failure at three cardiothoracic centers in Sweden
    Show others...
    2009 (English)In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 233-239Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. The Impella (R) recovery axial-flow system is a mechanical assist system for use in acute heart failure. This retrospective study reports the use of the device at three cardiothoracic units in Sweden. Design. Fifty patients (35 men, mean age 55.8 years, range 26 to 84 years) underwent implantation of 26 Impella (R) LP 2.5/5.0 (support-time 0.1 to 14 days), 16 Impella (R) LD (support-time 1 to 7 days) and 8 Impella (R) RD (support-time 0.1 to 8 days) between 2003 and 2007. Implantation was performed because of postcardiotomy heart failure (surgical group, n=33) or for various states of heart failure in cardiological patients (non-surgical group, n=17). The intention for the treatments was mainly to use the pump as a obridge-to-recoveryo. Results. Early mortality in the surgical and non-surgical groups was 45% and 23%, respectively. Complications included infection, 36% and right ventricular failure, 28%. Cardiac output and cardiac power output postoperatively were significantly higher among survivors than non-survivors. Conclusions. The Impella (R) recovery axial-flow system facilitates treatment in acute heart failure. Early intervention in patients with acute heart failure and optimized hemodynamics in the post-implantation period seem to be of importance for long-term survival. Insufficient early response to therapy should urge to consider further treatment options.

    Keyword
    Left ventricular assist device (LVAD), heart failure, temporary circulatory assistance
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-19792 (URN)10.1080/14017430802715954 (DOI)
    Available from: 2009-08-10 Created: 2009-08-10 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    4. Long-term Quality-of-Life (QoL) in patients with progressive chronic heart failure after surgical ventricular restoration with passive ventricular constraint (CorCap-CSDTM): Comparison with a patient-matched reference group from the general population
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long-term Quality-of-Life (QoL) in patients with progressive chronic heart failure after surgical ventricular restoration with passive ventricular constraint (CorCap-CSDTM): Comparison with a patient-matched reference group from the general population
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Chronic heart failure have a poor prognosis with high morbidity and reduced quality of life. Ventricular constraint, the CorCap Cardiac Support Device (CSD) has been introduced with the intention of inducing reverse remodeling. Studies have shown sustained improvement in left ventricular dimensions and function after three years, but quality-of-life (QoL) has been poorly studied.

    Methods and Results: Since 2003, 26 patients with chronic progressive heart failure met the inclusion criteria for CSD. They were prospectively followed each year for five years postoperatively. Nineteen patients were scheduled for concomitant cardiac surgery.

    In a cross-sectional study, 18 patients were investigated regarding QoL using SF-36. A reference group was randomly selected from the Swedish SF-36 general population reference group.

    One-year survival for CSD-patients was 86%, three-year survival was 76%. After a mean follow-up time after surgery of 3.9 years (range; 0.9 to 7 years), no difference in QoL measured with SF-36 was found. Echocardiographic dimensions and QoL improved significantly after three years for isolated CSD patients.

    Conclusions: QoL in patients operated with CSD, measured with SF-36-questionnaire, more than three years after implantation, is comparable to a matched general population reference group. In the CSD group alone, QoL improved significantly after three years.

    Keyword
    Ventricular constraint, Quality of Life, chronic heart failure, SF-36
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-56423 (URN)
    Available from: 2010-05-11 Created: 2010-05-11 Last updated: 2010-05-11
  • 43.
    Granfeldt, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Bansi, Bansi
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wiklund, Lars
    University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Peterzén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Vascular surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Lönn, Urban
    University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Babic, Ankica
    University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ahn, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Vascular surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Risk Factor Analysis of Swedish Left Ventricular Assist Device (LVAD) Patients2003In: Annals of Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 0003-4975, E-ISSN 1552-6259, Vol. 76, no 6, p. 1993-1998Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. The use of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) is established as a bridge to heart transplantation. Methods. All Swedish patients on the waiting list for heart transplantation, treated with LVAD since 1993 were retrospectively collected into a database and analyzed in regards to risk factors for mortality and morbidity. Results. Fifty-nine patients (46 men) with a median age of 49 years (range, 14 to 69 years), Higgins score median of 9 (range, 3 to 15), EuroScore median of 10 (range, 5 to 17) were investigated. Dominating diagnoses were dilated cardiomyopathy in 61% (n = 36) and ischemic cardiomyopathy in 18.6% (n = 11). The patients were supported with LVAD for a median time of 99.5 days (range, 1 to 873 days). Forty-five (76%) patients received transplants, and 3 (5.1%) patients were weaned from the device. Eleven patients (18.6%) died during LVAD treatment. Risk factor analysis for mortality before heart transplantation showed significance for a high total amount of autologous blood transfusions (p < 0.001), days on mechanical ventilation postoperatively (p < 0.001), prolonged postoperative intensive care unit stay (p = 0.007), and high central venous pressure 24 hours postoperatively and at the final measurement (p = 0.03 and 0.01, respectively). Mortality with LVAD treatment was 18.6% (n = 11). High C-reactive protein (p = 0.001), low mean arterial pressure (p = 0.03), and high cardiac index (p = 0.03) preoperatively were risk factors for development of right ventricular failure during LVAD treatment. Conclusions. The Swedish experience with LVAD as a bridge to heart transplantation was retrospectively collected into a database. This included data from transplant and nontransplant centers. Figures of mortality and morbidity in the database were comparable to international experience. Specific risk factors were difficult to define retrospectively as a result of different protocols for follow-up among participating centers. © 2003 by The Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

  • 44.
    Granfeldt, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Hellgren, Laila
    Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Dellgren, Goran
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Myrdal, Gunnar
    Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wassberg, Erik
    Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Kjellman, Ulf
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ahn, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Experience with the Impella® recovery axial-flow system for acute heart failure at three cardiothoracic centers in Sweden2009In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 233-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. The Impella (R) recovery axial-flow system is a mechanical assist system for use in acute heart failure. This retrospective study reports the use of the device at three cardiothoracic units in Sweden. Design. Fifty patients (35 men, mean age 55.8 years, range 26 to 84 years) underwent implantation of 26 Impella (R) LP 2.5/5.0 (support-time 0.1 to 14 days), 16 Impella (R) LD (support-time 1 to 7 days) and 8 Impella (R) RD (support-time 0.1 to 8 days) between 2003 and 2007. Implantation was performed because of postcardiotomy heart failure (surgical group, n=33) or for various states of heart failure in cardiological patients (non-surgical group, n=17). The intention for the treatments was mainly to use the pump as a obridge-to-recoveryo. Results. Early mortality in the surgical and non-surgical groups was 45% and 23%, respectively. Complications included infection, 36% and right ventricular failure, 28%. Cardiac output and cardiac power output postoperatively were significantly higher among survivors than non-survivors. Conclusions. The Impella (R) recovery axial-flow system facilitates treatment in acute heart failure. Early intervention in patients with acute heart failure and optimized hemodynamics in the post-implantation period seem to be of importance for long-term survival. Insufficient early response to therapy should urge to consider further treatment options.

  • 45.
    Granfeldt, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Holmberg, Erica
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Träff, Stefan
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Jansson, Kjell
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Ahn, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Long-term Quality-of-Life (QoL) in patients with progressive chronic heart failure after surgical ventricular restoration with passive ventricular constraint (CorCap-CSDTM): Comparison with a patient-matched reference group from the general populationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Chronic heart failure have a poor prognosis with high morbidity and reduced quality of life. Ventricular constraint, the CorCap Cardiac Support Device (CSD) has been introduced with the intention of inducing reverse remodeling. Studies have shown sustained improvement in left ventricular dimensions and function after three years, but quality-of-life (QoL) has been poorly studied.

    Methods and Results: Since 2003, 26 patients with chronic progressive heart failure met the inclusion criteria for CSD. They were prospectively followed each year for five years postoperatively. Nineteen patients were scheduled for concomitant cardiac surgery.

    In a cross-sectional study, 18 patients were investigated regarding QoL using SF-36. A reference group was randomly selected from the Swedish SF-36 general population reference group.

    One-year survival for CSD-patients was 86%, three-year survival was 76%. After a mean follow-up time after surgery of 3.9 years (range; 0.9 to 7 years), no difference in QoL measured with SF-36 was found. Echocardiographic dimensions and QoL improved significantly after three years for isolated CSD patients.

    Conclusions: QoL in patients operated with CSD, measured with SF-36-questionnaire, more than three years after implantation, is comparable to a matched general population reference group. In the CSD group alone, QoL improved significantly after three years.

  • 46.
    Granfeldt, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Peterzén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Hubbert, Laila
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Jansson, Kjell
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Casimir Ahn, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    A single center experience with the HeartMate II (TM) Left Ventricular Assist Device (LVAD)2009In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 43, no 6, p. 360-365Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. Left ventricular assist devices (LVAD), used in the setting bridge-to-transplantation and destination therapy, for patients with deteriorating severe heart failure are continuously developing. The second generation, the axial flow pumps, have been introduced since some years. Design. Eleven consecutive patients, seven male, with severe heart failure due to ischemic cardiomyopathy (n = 5), dilated cardiomyopathy (n = 5) and cytotoxic ethiology (n = 1) were implanted with the HeartMate-II (TM). They were preoperatively treated with inotropic support (n = 9), ventricular assist device (n = 2) and mechanical ventilation (n = 4). Results. Eight patients were bridged to transplant after median 155 days (range, 65 to 316 days). One patient is ongoing for 748 days, intended for destination therapy. Ten of eleven patients were discharged after median 64 days (range, 40 to 105 days). Four patients were reoperated due to bleeding. Two embolic events were recorded. One perioperative death. Conclusion. Eleven HM-II (TM) LVADs have been implanted in our institution with good early results. Eight patients were successfully bridged to heart transplantation. One patient is intended for destination therapy and is ongoing since November 2006. In these severely ill patients, this technique offers a good chance surviving until heart transplantation. In selected cases the technique also offers the possibility of a permanent support and longevity.

  • 47.
    Hammarskjöld, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Infectious Diseases . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Berg, Sören
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Hanberger, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Infectious Diseases . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases in Östergötland.
    Malmvall, Bo-Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Infectious Diseases . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Low incidence of arterial catheter infections in a Swedish intensive care unit: risk factors for colonisation and infection2010In: Journal of Hospital Infection, ISSN 0195-6701, E-ISSN 1532-2939, Vol. 76, no 2, p. 130-134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is growing concern that arterial catheters (ACs) cause catheter-related infections (CRIs). Limited data are available concerning risk factors for AC-CRI and there are no studies concerning incidence and micro-organisms from northern Europe. The aims of this study were to determine the incidence of, and micro-organisms responsible for, AC colonisation and AC-CRI in a Swedish intensive care unit (ICU), and to determine risk factors contributing to AC colonisation and AC-CRI. We prospectively studied all patients (N=539) receiving ACs (N=691) in a mixed ICU of a county hospital. Six hundred (87%) of all ACs were assessed completely. The total catheterisation time for 482 patients was 2567 days. The incidence of positive tip culture was 7.8 per 1000 catheter-days, with the predominant micro-organism being coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS). The incidence of AC-CRI was 2.0 per 1000 catheter-days (with no cases of bacteraemia). All AC-CRIs were caused by CoNS. Multivariate analysis revealed that immunosuppression, central venous catheter (CVC) colonisation and CVC infection were significant risk factors for AC-CRI. We conclude that AC colonisation and infection with systemic symptoms occur at a low rate in our ICU which supports our practice of basic hygiene routines for the prevention of AC-CRI. Colonisation and infection of a simultaneous CVC seem to be risk factors. The role of contemporaneous colonisation and infection of multiple bloodstream catheters has received little attention previously. Further studies are needed to verify the significance of this finding.

  • 48.
    Hammarskjöld, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Berg, Sören
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Taxbro, K.
    Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden.
    Malmvall, Bo-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sustained low incidence of central venous catheter-related infections in a Swedish county hospital following implementation of a hygiene program: a six year follow-up studyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There are limited data on the long term-effects of implementing a central venous catheter (CVC) program for prevention of CVC infections. The aims of this study were to evaluate the incidence of CVC colonization, catheter-related infections (CRI), catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI), and their risk factors, over a six year period.

    Methods: A continuous prospective study aiming to include all CVCs used at our hospital during the years 2004-2009, evaluating colonization, CRI, CRBSI and possible risk factors.

    Results: 2772 CVCs were used during the study period. Data on culture results and catheterization time were available for 2045 CVCs used in 1674 patients. The incidences of colonization, CRI and CRBSI were 7.0, 2.2 and 0.6 per 1000 CVC-days. Analysis of quarterly incidences revealed one occasion with increasing infection rates. Catheterization time was a risk factor for CRI, but not for CRBSI. Other risk factors for CRI were hemodialysis, CVC use in the internal jugular vein compared to the subclavian vein. Hemodialysis was the only risk factor for CRBSI.

    Conclusion: We found that that a CRI prevention program adhered to by the entire staff at a county hospital is successful in keeping CVC infections at a low rate over a long period of time.

  • 49.
    Hanberger, Håkan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases in Östergötland.
    Berg, SörenLinköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Sepsishähtet: handläggning av sepsis på akuten och IVA2008Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Sepsis på akuten och IVA baseras på SK-kursen med samma namn. Vi har i andra upplagan flera nya kapitel och hoppas att boken skall bidra till att förbättra vården av patienter med sepsis och andra svåra infektioner.

    Linköping april 2013

    Håkan Hanberger och medförfattare

  • 50.
    Hedman, Kristofer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tamas, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Decreased aerobic capacity 4 years after aortic valve replacement in male patients operated upon for chronic aortic regurgitation2012In: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, ISSN 1475-0961, E-ISSN 1475-097X, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 167-171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Exercise testing is underutilized in patients with valve disease. We have previously found a low physical work capacity in patients with aortic regurgitation 6 months after aortic valve replacement (AVR). The aim of this study was to evaluate aerobic capacity in patients 4 years after AVR, to study how their peak oxygen uptake (peakVO2) had changed postoperatively over a longer period of time. Twenty-one patients (all men, 52 +/- 13 years) who had previously undergone cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) pre- and 6 months postoperatively underwent maximal exercise testing 49 +/- 15 months postoperatively using an electrically braked bicycle ergometer. Breathing gases were analysed and the patients physical fitness levels categorized according to angstrom strands and Wassermans classifications. Mean peakVO2 was 22.8 +/- 5.1 ml x kg-1 x min-1 at the 49-month follow-up, which was lower than at the 6-month follow-up (25.6 +/- 5.8 ml x kg-1 x min-1, P = 0.001). All but one patient presented with a physical fitness level below average using angstrom strands classification, while 13 patients had a low physical capacity according to Wassermans classification. A significant decrease in peakVO2 was observed from six to 49 months postoperatively, and the decrease was larger than expected from the increased age of the patients. CPET could be helpful in timing aortic valve surgery and for the evaluation of need of physical activity as part of a rehabilitation programme.

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